28th Dec 1918. Christmastide at Rugby

CHRISTMASTIDE AT RUGBY.

It to many years probably since the message of Christmas, “ Peace on earth,” struck such a real note in men’s hearts as during the Christmas of 1918, which has just passed. For the past four years the Continent of Europe has been deluged in the blood of the flower of the human race, and the annually recurring message of Christmas seemed to many a bitter mockery. Now, however, the armistice has been signed, and once again peace reigns on earth ; and this fact could not fail to react on the celebrations just concluded. Everybody seemed to be in a real festive mood, and the old-time greeting, “ A Merry Christmas,” was given and received with its old-time heartiness. The shops in the town were well stocked with provisions, toys and gifts of all kinds, and for several days prior to the festival the streets swarmed with eager shoppers, the crowds being augmented by an unusually large number of soldiers, many of whom were spending their first Christmas in the family circle since the outbreak at war.

There was an abundant supply of poultry and game on sale ; in fact, the supply was rather greater than the demand, a number of fine turkeys being sold late on Christmas Eve for 1s per lb ; while several fowls failed to secure buyers at 1s 3d per lb.

The principal feature of the festivities at the Rugby Institution was the sumptuous Christmas dinner which consisted of roast beef, pork, mutton, plum puddings with sauce, beer and mineral waters. The dinner was attended, as usual, by members of the Board and other friends, vis, Mr & Mrs W E Robotham and family, Mr C H Rowbottom, Mr C G Steel, Mr & Mrs A G Salter and family, Mr F M Burton, Mr J H Burton, Miss Fenwick, Mrs Stimpson, Messrs J W Pendred, A J Holt, and C W Clayson. Several friends sent gifts, and apples, oranges, sweets, biscuits, tobacco and cigars were distributed amongst the inmates during the afternoon. The Chairman (Rev Canon Mitchison) sent cake for tea and this was much appreciated by the old people. Everything possible for the entertainment of the inmates was done by Mrs Dickens (the matron) and her staff, and a very enjoyable day concluded with an impromptu programme, sustained by the inmates and friends. Selections were played by the Salvation Army Band during the morning.

At the Hospital of St Cross everything possible was done to ensure the happiness of the patients. Early in the morning the nursing staff made a round of the wards (which had been prettily decorated), singing carols. An excellent dinner was provided, the principal viands being turkeys (one of which was sent by the Portland Cement Company) and plum puddings. Dr Simey carved for the men and the children, and Dr Hoskyn for the women. The service in the chapel in the afternoon was conducted by the Rev W F Stokes. In the afternoon the patients were allowed to receive their friends, and in the evening an enjoyable entertainment was given by the nurses.

Special services were held at all the Churches, and these, which were of a bright and hearty character, were invariably well attended. At the Parish Church the services partook of the usual Christmas character. The Rector preached an appropriate sermon in the morning, and at evensong the Te Deum was chanted to a setting by Stanford in B flat. The carols sung were : “ On the Birthday of our Lord,” “See amid the winter snow,” and “ Bethlehem.”

SEASONABLE WEATHER.

The unsettled and showery weather which prevailed last week gave way to more promising conditions, and on Christmas morn a light fall of snow gave a seasonable touch to the countryside, and the air was keen and exhilarating. Boxing Day was bright and frosty.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA HOSPITAL.

On Christmas Day the patients of the Isolation Hospital, Harborough Magna, had a most enjoyable time. The Matron and nurses did everything possible to make it a joyful festival. The wards were very prettily decorated, one of the chief features being the Christmas tree, from which the Matron gave each patient a gift. The early morning was spent singing carols, after which Father Christmas visited each patient. The rest of the day was devoted to playing games, &c.

MONKS KIRBY.

CHRISTMAS PRESENTS have been sent to all soldiers and sailors serving with H.M Forces from this parish, including Street Ashton.

PTE H A WHITE, Worcester Regiment, who has been a prisoner of war since May last, returned home last week, and was heartily welcomed by his numerous friends. He does not give a very good account of Huns treatment of our prisoners. After his capture he was compelled to work behind the firing line, and lastly in a mine, with very little food. Although parcels were sent to him regularly, he never received one.

CO-OP. CHILDREN’S TREAT.—The annual treat to the children of members of the Co-operative Society serving with the Armed Forces was given by the Education Committee of the Society on Saturday last. Nearly 700 children accepted the invitation, and a most enjoyable time was spent. A capital tea was provided, and this was followed by a programme of vocal and instrumental music and a ventriloquial entertainment. A large Christmas tree, prettily illuminated with a multitude of coloured electric lights, was heavily laden with useful presents and toys, and this was stripped by the members of the committee amid a regular babel of joyful sounds. Mr A E Holdom carried out the secretarial arrangements, and assistance was lent by the members of the General Committee and the Co-operative Women’s Guild.

PETTY SESSIONS.—There was only one case at Rugby Petty Sessions on Tuesday (before Dr Clement Dukes), vis, a charge of being an absentee from his unit, which was preferred against Sapper Frank Cooper, R.E, 16 South Street, Rugby. Defendant admitted the offence, but asked to be allowed to re-join his unit voluntarily, and this course was permitted.

TROOPS ON LEAVE.

During the week ended December 21st an enormous number of troops on leave have passed through the L & N-W Railway Station. So great at times have been the crowds that even the spacious platforms at Rugby have been rendered almost impassable. Many special trains have been run from London to the North, and when there has been a sufficient number of passengers to warrant it a special has been run to Birmingham and district so as to avoid a long wait for a regular train.

An extraordinary amount of work has also been thrown on the telegraph offices at the termini and large junctions on the railways, the number of telegrams handed in at Euston alone amounting to between 2,000 and 3,000 on one day. The number passed in at Rugby was also greatly in excess of the normal quantity, and required the constant attendance of one clerk at Rugby Post Office to deal with them.

Another branch of railway work which has shown an enormous development during the War is the supply of cups of tea to the trains from barrows. In the early days of the War small tea barrows were provided, but as the business rapidly increased two of these were joined together by means of planks so as to form counters, and the number of cups of tea supplied from them must number many thousands.

PIVOTAL MEN in the building trade can now be released from the Army, and such employees should make application to the local Labour Exchange.

FOUR YEARS A PRISONER IN GERMANY.
THRILLING EXPERIENCES OF A RUGBY MAN.
HUN BULLIES.

Among the first English soldiers to be taken prisoner was Pte S Beard, son of Mr Beard. 46 Murray Road, Rugby, who returned to his home last week, after having been a prisoner for over four years. Pte Beard joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in 1911, and after spending some time in Malta he was drafted to the “International Army,” which was formed to support the first King of Albania on the throne, and was so serving when the War broke out. He was drafted back to Malta, and thence to England. Three weeks after his arrival in England he was sent out with the famous 7th Division, which landed at Zeebrugge 30,000 strong. On October 22nd when near Ypres volunteers were called for to man trenches, while the main part of the Army consolidated its position. It was stated that it would be a forlorn hope, but Pte Beard was one of 250 volunteers who entered a trench, which they were told to hold at all costs. The fighting was most desperate, the English force being hopelessly outnumbered in both men and guns. Finally, after hours of desperate fighting, when 17 men were left alive out of the 250, they were forced to surrender, and the whole of the rest of the Division were either killed or taken prisoners. But they had succeeded in holding the line until reinforcements arrived.

The Germans stripped all their clothes off them, with the exception of their boots, trousers and shirts, and they were then put into closed cattle wagons, from which they could only obtain a view of the country through the ventilators. Sixty men were packed in each truck, which had not been cleaned since the animals last occupied them, and they were despatched to Gottengen. During the journey, which lasted three days and three nights, neither food nor drink was given to them. When the train stopped at stations the doors were opened so as to exhibit the prisoners to the German people, who spat on them and reviled them. On their arrival at Gottengen they were given some coffee without sugar or milk, but no food. They were also provided with rugs to cover them at night, but as they had nothing but their shirt and trousers, they were glad to use them as cloaks during the daytime until their friends in England could send them a supply of clothing. There were no facilities for bathing in the camps, but they were given a hand bowl and towels. No soap was supplied, there being an absolute dearth of fats in the country. For months they had no change of underclothing, with the result that they became dirty and verminous. They were not allowed to shave, and were also forbidden to smoke.

Pte Beard complains bitterly of the bullying ways of the German. “Son of a pig” was the usual salutation, and he has been beaten in a disgraceful manner with rifles, &c, when he refused to work for them. The camps were very closely guarded, a live wire running round them, but the prisoners used to be sent out in small working parties, and were compelled to labour long hours for very little money. Pte Beard tried to escape on seven different occasions, and managed to reach the Dutch frontier three times. But he never had the luck to get past the triple line sentries by which it was guarded.

Whilst he was at work in one of the factories he became on friendly terms with a young German woman, and he bribed her with gifts of soap and food out of his parcels from England to obtain civilian clothes, maps, compass, &c. He had passed an examination in steering his way by means of maps and a compass, and so he found no difficulty in making his way to the frontier. He lived on what he could carry with him and anything he could pick up in the fields, &c. During one of these journeys he had a very narrow escape of losing his life. Accompanied by an Irish soldier, he came across a large building, in part of which they found some trusses of hay, on which they slept. They were wakened by feeling the hay being mowed, and Pte Beard had the narrowest escape from having a pitchfork driven into his stomach. They jumped up, and found themselves confronted by a lot of lunatics. They had unwittingly found their way into a lunatic asylum! Pte Beard told his companion to bolt, which he did, and the lunatics then performed a dance around him, shouting out in German : “English war prisoners.” Taking advantage of their turning their heads to speak to some attendants who arrived on the scene, he made a dash for safety, and rejoined his comrade outside. Each time that he escaped he was given 14 days’ “strong arrest.” He was put in a small cell about 5ft. square, which was totally devoid of light, and for three days he was fed on bread and water. On the fourth day the cover was taken off the skylight, and light was admitted to the cell for 12 hours. On that day he received two helpings of very poor soup. He also had a rug to cover him at night. This was done every fourth day. The rest of the time he spent in total darkness, and slept on a wooden bed without covering. During the whole period he was never allowed to leave the cell.

Pte Beard consistently refused to work for them for any length of time owing to the long hours and brutal treatment, and was, therefore, continually in trouble with the authorities. The longest period he ever passed at work was on a farm, where he remained four months. The farms are built on the French model, the house and barns being joined together, with the usual muck-heap outside the house. During the time he was there he had his meals with the family, but the fare was very meagre. For breakfast they had coffee without sugar or milk, and an egg or something in that line. For dinner they had bacon or some kind of sausage, the latter being supplied in on extraordinary number of varieties—in fact, he says he could fill a book about the number he has seen. They had potatoes also, but he never saw anything in the shape of a pudding, nor did he see a piece of butcher’s meat during the whole time he was in Germany. For tea they had a sort of “mash up” of what was left from dinner, and they did not have supper. Unsweetened coffee was supplied at every meal, but the only tea he had to drink was that sent to him from England.

Whenever England was spoken of the Germans always said that she was beaten, but he and his companion had every confidence that Mr Lloyd George would pull them through. Although he was comparatively comfortable on the farm, Pte Beard got tired of the farmer’s incessant grumbling, for he said, no matter how much work they did, the Germans were never satisfied, although they worked 12 hours a day for the magnificent wage of 3d per day.

On another occasion he was sent to work in a foundry, and here he also worked 12 hours a day for 2d a day and very poor fare. There were some German women in the factory, for the German Government forced every woman to work, and he met with girls who had never previously done a day’s work in their lives. The foremen in the factory bullied the girls as badly as they did the prisoners; indeed, so far as his experience went, the Germans looked on women as their chattels and slaves, and treated them accordingly. Pte Beard spent three periods in hospitals, but they were totally devoid of all medical comforts, and the wadding and bandages were made of paper. Still, to give the devil his due, the Germans acted on two or three occasions in a totally different manner to what would have been expected. While in the Army Pte Beard had become an expert boxer, and one day he became so enraged at the abuse he was receiving from one of the German guards that he struck him a violent blow in the mouth, knocking two teeth down his throat. One would naturally assume that Pte Beard would have been immediately shot, but instead he was sentenced to two years’ and two months’ imprisonment, He appealed against this, and the sentence was reduced to one year and one month, and on a further appeal he was acquitted altogether. The prosecutor then appealed against this, but the acquittal was upheld, the court holding that he had received sufficient provocation, but he was considered to have been guilty of contempt of court owing to some remarks he had made, and was sentenced to 14 days’ imprisonment.

He calculates that out of his four years’ captivity he has spent 17 months in prison for refusing to work, &c. After he had been in Germany some time he acquired a knowledge of many words, and, thinking he would like to learn the language he applied, through the commandant of the camp, to Berlin for test books, which, strange to say, were supplied, and he became so proficient in the language that he was able to translate the German newspapers for the benefit of his companions. But since things had been going so badly with the Germans, he had not been able to procure any papers. Ha also learned French from a French prisoner, to whom he taught English in return. By bribing the guards, they also managed to get hold of the English “Times” fairly regularly, so that they knew exactly how things were going. He considered the railways far inferior to the English, there being four classes, the last two being totally devoid of cushions. The country is also wonderfully like England, and when he walked through towns like Munster or Minden he could have imagined he was in Birmingham or Leicester had it not been for the language.

Pte Beard earnestly desires to thank the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee for their regular supply of parcels, without which he would certainly have starved. So excellent were the arrangements made that he never missed a single one, and even when he was in prison they were kept for him until he came out. He also wishes to thank many kind friends for things they have sent him. He regularly received a supply of beautiful bread, which was sent from Copenhagen through the International Red Cross Society. When the armistice was signed the prisoners were packed into trains and sent into Holland, where they received every attention, and Pte Beard now appears in the best of health and none the worse for his trying experiences. On his return journey through Germany they were much better treated by the people, who all seemed very pleased to think the War was over, and not at all cast down at their humiliating defeat. Naturally Pte Beard’s feelings towards the Germans are the reverse of friendly, and he complains bitterly of the luxurious way in which the German prisoners are treated in this country.

ANOTHER SAD STORY.

Corpl F T Evans, Rifle Brigade, son of Mr W Evens, James Street, who was captured by the Germans near Cambrai on November 30,1917, has returned home this week, after undergoing most harrowing experiences at the hands of the Germans. He was badly wounded in the left thigh by an explosive bullet during the Battle of Cambrai. and owing to the retirement of the British he had to crawl as best he could to the German dressing station. He arrived there at five o’clock in the afternoon, and his wound was not attended to until seven hours afterwards. In the meantime he suffered considerably at the hands of his captors. Several of the soldiers deliberately kicked him, and others propped him up against a tree and knocked him down until he fell senseless. After his wound had been dressed he was placed with others in a barn and given a slice of dry German bread and a cup of cold coffee. He asked for a blanket to cover over his wounded thigh, but this was refused, and he accordingly had to make shift with some straw. He was subsequently removed to a hospital, where he was operated upon for two hours without an anaesthetic, the doctor and “sisters” informing him that if he cried out they would hurt him the more. After the operation he asked for something to drink and was served with a glass of water. Although he was captured on November 30th, Corpl Evans was not allowed the luxury of a wash until Christmas Day. After referring to the scanty and nauseating rations supplied by the Germans, Corpl Evans remarked to a representative of the Rugby Advertiser : “ You can tell the people of Rugby that had it not been for the food parcels they sent to Germany none of us would ever have returned to Old England.

LADY DOCTOR’S WONDERFUL WAR RECORD.
FRENCH DECORATIONS FOR DR FRANCES IVENS.

Rugby, through the medium of Dr Frances Ivens, finds itself in intimate association with the first hospital in France conducted entirely by women. Dr Ivens is the third daughter of the late Mr Wm Ivens, of Harborough Parva, and at the outbreak of war had a large practice in Liverpool. This she gave up almost immediately after the opening of hostilities. The Scottish branch of the National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies conceived a scheme for supplying and maintaining two complete hospital units of 100 beds each to be officered entirely by medical women. A committee was appointed for the working out of this scheme, the moving spirit of which was Dr Elsie Inglis, of Edinburgh. The first unit parted for France early in December, 1914, and the second sailed for Serbia a little later the same month. Long before 1915 had elapsed the original modest proposition which had represented 200 beds had developed, and included two hospitals stationed, in France and three in Serbia, aggregating over 1,000 beds. After much consideration, the Abbaye de Royaumont was accepted as the centre of the work of the French unit. The personnel consisted of seven women doctors, ten fully trained nurses, eight orderlies, three chauffeuses, all under the direction of a head surgeon, Dr Frances Ivens.

The work and the responsibility of such a position in those early days of the German onward rush, when all hospitals were crowded and their staffs terribly overworked, can well be imagined ; and M Antonio de Navarro (husband of the celebrated actress Mary Anderson), in giving an account of the hospital in a book recently published, thus refers to Dr Iven’s labours on behalf of the suffering Poilu :—“ Here should be recorded the Head Surgeon’s devotion to her—at times superhuman work and her never-failing in times of unexpected complications. One could not but feel that any vacillation, lack of courage, or initiative on her part might have affected at critical moments the security of the institution itself. Happily she issued from them all with invariable composure. It should be [photograph] added that the unsparing co-operation of her assistants—surgeons and doctors alike—has been a notable feature in the unimpeachable success of the medical staff at Royaumont.” During the first two years of the hospital’s existence 2,508 patients were received and 2,872 operations performed.

A letter from one of the staff indicates the strain of the work : “ Day and night our chauffouses were on the road conveying the wounded men from the military evacuating station. Day and night out band of surgeons and nurses worked under the unwearing example of our chief, Dr Frances Ivens. During the first week in July three hours’ consecutive sleep was an inconceivable luxury, yet no one regarded her share in such work at such a time as other than a privilege. Certain it is that only by such assiduous labour were saved the lives and limbs of many of these gas-infected men, Twelve hours of waiting whilst the staff slept would have many a life and limb amongst the hundreds of soldiers entrusted to our care.”

The Scottish women wore uniforms of a soft-grey material with tartan facings, the orderlies were clad in blue cotton caps and frocks, the busy nurses with their flowing white veils flitting and out the sunlit avenues of the gardens, all combined to create of picture of singular charm and animation.

An amusing story is told of an Algerian tirailleur, a sulky young man. His long musical name was shortened to “ Sala.” On one occasion he was found at the head of the cold staircase on a chilly February afternoon, his dressing gown tightly wrapped round his naked legs. From this position of vantage he refused to move. The head surgeon was summoned to cope with the situation. Sala stood against the wall surrounded by six nurses and orderlies gloomily resisting all attempts to take him back to his bed in the ward. To the head surgeon he excitedly explained, half in Arabic, half in French, that the patient in the neighbouring bed had called him a pig, and he would not return to his accustomed place near such a contemptible Frenchman. With sympathetic agreement, Miss Ivens tactfully promised to remove the offender to a remote corner, and with the further inducement of a stick of chocolate, Sala eventually allowed himself to be coaxed back to the warm bed which he had quited half-an-hour before. His devoted Algerian servant followed him to the new position, and from afar they both ignored with oriental dignity the teasing French lad whose jests had occasioned the feud. Later on Sala was removed to a ward on another floor ; but even when out of night of his enemy he had not forgot their quarrel. One night soon after he was caught with a knife, which he confided was to be employed on his former neighbour as soon as he could steal an opportunity to reach his ward. But the opportunity never came. The doctor finally decided that he was “ well enough ” to proceed to his depot.

These incidents selected from many serve to show the splendid work this lady has accomplished since 1914. Little wonder that her services have been fully recognised by the French Government. Early in the war a gold medal was conferred by the French authorities, President Poincaré personally decorated her with the Legion of Honour, in August, 1917, and this year Dr Iven’s services were again noted by the presentation of the Croix de Guerre for performing operations by candlelight when under bombardment at the advanced hospital at Villers-Cotterets.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Pte. THOMAS BATCHELOR of the 5th Royal Berks., who died of wounds in Germany on December 25, 1917.
“ The hardest part is yet to come
When other lads return,
And we miss among the cheering crowd
The face of him we love.”
—Sadly missed by his loving Children, Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

GULLIVER.—In loving memory of our two dear boys—ARTHUR, killed in action Oct 6th, 1917, aged 21 years ; and HARRY, died of wounds in France Dec 25th, 1917, aged 28 years—beloved sons of Mr and Mrs Gulliver, Broadwell. “ Their duty nobly done.”—Father, Mother, Sisters.

SHEASBY.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. H. J. SHEASBY, M.G.C. Co., killed in action on December 30, 1917, aged 19. “ Sleep on, dear one, in a soldier’s grave, out in that foreign land. We often sit and look at your photo in the frame, and often picture your smiling face ; and better tears then flow to think that we have lost you, dear ; it is just a year ago.”—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

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14th Dec 1918. Rugby’s War Trophy

RUGBY’S WAR TROPHY.
ARRIVAL OF THE CAPTURED GERMAN GUN.

We announced last week that in consideration of the excellent war record of Rugby a German field gun, captured by the Royal Warwicks, had been allocated to the Town; and this interesting relic of a shattered military system duly arrived on Wednesday afternoon. The weather was anything but suitable for an outdoor ceremony. A drizzling rain fell most of the morning, but the weather improved early in the afternoon and a large number of people then turned out to witness the arrival of the gun. It was originally arranged that the Chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P. C.C, should formally receive the gun on behalf of the Town at the urban boundary on the Bilton Road. Unfortunately, however, a break-down occurred at Bilton, and a messenger had to be despatched to Warwick for a spare part, and this necessitated an alteration in the arrangements.

The Rugby School O.T.C, under Capt C P Evers, turned out for the occasion, and, headed by the Corps Band, marched to Bilton, where Mr McKinnell, who was accompanied by Messrs W H Linnell, F E Hands, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, A Morson (Clerk), J H Sharp (Surveyor), T S Shenton (Manager of the Electric Light Dept.) received the gun (a 4.5 field cannon) which has evidently seen much service.

The procession restarted from Bilton shortly after three o’clock and when the gun crossed the parish boundary it was received with enthusiastic cheers and a frantic waving of miniature flags by the schoolchildren who had taken up positions on each side of the road.

The gun will be mounted on the grass plot fronting the Public Baths in Regent Street and to celebrate the auspicious occasion streamers of bunting had been hung round the three sides of this plot. On arriving at the Baths the Chairman standing near the gun said “ Ladies and gentlemen, this gun was captured by the gallant boys of the Royal Warwick Regiment, and all I want to do is to ask you to give three ringing cheers for the R.W.R.”

These having been given, an interesting and unique ceremony came to an end.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr Paramore, Bilton Road, Rugby, has been released from the Army and has resumed his practice.

The following B.T.H employes have been reported killed :—Lieut C A Field ; Sergt H M Bradford, R.W.R (Controller factor) ; Pte F J Swingler, Notts and Derby Regt (Collections and Credits Dept) recently died in France from influenza.

Captain R Snewing, eldest son of Mr and Mrs R Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was educated at the Lower School, and later entered the office of the B.T.H, and it still attached to the staff. He joined the Westminster Dragoons in 1916 as a trooper, and by his smartness and efficiency soon gained promotion and secured his commission, quickly following this up this his Captaincy. He was later attached to the Tank Corps, and gained the honour at La Cateau on October 23rd.

Sergt Ernest Gilbert, son of the late Mr Henry Gilbert, of St Andrew’s Street, Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M. The Sergeant joined up with the Surrey Yeomanry, and, after serving in India, took part with the Royal Engineers in the operations in Mesopotamia, where he is still on active service.

Pte Gordon Stretton, sen of Mr & Mrs A Stretton, Stanford Road, Swinford, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany, arrived home on Monday night. Thanks to the food parcels that he has received, he has not fared so badly as some, but is thankful to be in England once more.

Bombardier J Jeffery, R.F.A, son of Mr W Jeffery, 33 Rokeby Street, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field. When his battery was held up by barbed wire he went forward with a sergeant, and under heavy shell fire cleared a path, thereby enabling his battery to come into action.

RUGBY OFFICER’S RETURN.
EXPERIENCES AS A PRISONER.

Captain Gabriel Gray (Lancashire Fusiliers), who was wounded and taken prisoner on March 26th, returned to Rugby on Tuesday evening, having been interned at Pforyheim Camp, Baden, with 180 other officers. Capt Gray has returned home in the best of health and spirits. After a month in hospital at Bielefeld, he proceeded to Karlsruhe, a distributing centre for officers. From there he went to Pforyheim. The food supply, which up to this time had been of a very meagre description, was augmented in June by the arrival of Red Cross parcels, and from that time there was no more talk of starving by inches. The prisoners at Pforyheim entrained on December 3rd, and proceeded to Basle, where they had a very hearty reception from the inhabitants, and again at Pontalier, on crossing the frontier, they were received with enthusiasm. By easy stages they reached Boulogne on the 9th, and crossed to Dover on the 10th.

DUNCHURCH.

PTE HARRY EVANS, whose funeral took place recently at Dunchurch, was at the time of his death (from pneumonia) in the A.S.C. and was formerly a corporal in the 7th Battalion, K.R.R. He joined the regiment on September 2, 1914, and served through the battles of Ypres and the Somme. He was wounded in the last-named battle, and being unfit for further active service was transferred to the A.S.C. Owing to the prevalence of influenza at the depot, it was impossible to arrange for a military funeral, but a bugler was sent over to sound the “ Last Post.”

In a letter to his mother, the C.O states that Pte Evans was one of the best and most reliable men in Transport department and respected by everyone in the Company. His loss was especially felt by members of the football team, of which he was one of the best and sturdiest players. The respect in which he was held was shown by six beautiful wreaths sent by his officers and comrades. His elder brother, Pte W Evans, was killed in June, 1917, and the remaining son, Driver A Evans, M.G.C, is now recovering from an attack of fever.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
On Thursday afternoon last week Pte Bertie Evetts, Gloucester Regiment, arrived home after eight months’ captivity. He has spent his time behind the German lines, and looks very little the worse for his adventures. When he reached home he had to be informed of the recent loss of his mother, who died from influenza on the 8th ult. He enlisted on February 28, 1917, on reaching the prescribed age, and had previously lost his father and elder brother in the War, who both died fighting for their country.

KINETON.
MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Askew, who were notified this week of the death of their son Horace. This is the third son they have lost in the War.

LILBOURNE.
A CONCERT was given in the schoolroom on Wednesday, December 4th, by the R.A.F Concert Party. A large and appreciative audience greatly enjoyed the varied programme, and called for several encores, to which the performers kindly responded. The proceeds will be sent to the soldiers from this parish, and will take the form of postal orders instead of parcels.

DEMOBILISATION QUESTIONS.
AN OFFER TO OUR READERS.

The question of demobilisation is uppermost in everyone’s thoughts at the moment, and it is beset with endless difficulties and misunderstandings. This being so, we shall be pleased to secure an official reply from the Department of Demobilisation and Resettlement in London to any questions our readers may care to put to us, addressed to the Editor at 2 Albert Street, Rugby.

RUGBY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.
FRIDAY. Before Mr E M G Carmichael (chairman), Mr J Findlay (assessor for employers), and Mr E G Evans (assessor for the men).
FITTER’S SUCCESSFUL COMPENSATION CLAIM.

Kenneth H Lythgoe, fitter, 4 Kimberley Read, Rugby, claimed £4 15s compensation from the B.T.H. Company, for dismissal without notice.—Lythgoe stated that he entered the firm’s employment in 1916, and on October 26th was informed by the charge hand that there was no more work for him. He then asked for notice, or failing that a week’s wages. He subsequently saw the foreman, who said he was entitled to a week’s wages and referred him to the office, where he was told that if he had any complaint he must apply at the Tribunal.— In reply to Mr London, representing the B.T.H. Company, complainant stated that owing to the shortage of matches a Bunsen gas burner, which was used for heating materials, was kept burning during working hours, although when it was not in use it was turned low. One day the charge hand approached him with a circular from the head office urging the necessity of economy in the use of gas, and he (the chargehand) asked complainant to turn the gas out when it was not required. Complainant replied that he would turn the gas out if the chargehand would supply him with matches.—The chargehand explained that it was not so much what complainant said as the way in which he said it. On the day following this affair complainant stayed away from work, and when he returned on Saturday he was dismissed on the grounds of general insolence and unreliability as a timekeeper.—Complainant urged that he had never held a job up during his connection with the company.—The Chairman said the firm were quite justified in getting rid of such a workman, but they were not entitled to dismiss him instantly and peremptorily as they had done. Complainant would be awarded a week’s wage as compensation.

THE SALVATION ARMY BAND, in connection , with their Christmas playing, are making a special effort to provide more instruments for their comrade bandsmen, who will soon be returning from active service, when a generous response is hoped for.

ABOUT 45 Army horses were sold at last Monday’s market by Messrs Howkins & Sons at prices ranging from 20 to 76 guineas each. Several bunches of store cattle also met a good trade, the prices realised being £30 to £39 per pair.

SCRAP RUBBER WANTED.—The Ministry of National Service, Rubber Salvage Department, are appealing to the public for scrap rubber, which will be sold to the War Office, and the proceeds devoted to the Red Cross. The Hon Secretary of the Rugby Part-Time Committee, Mr A W Sheasby, of 30 Sheep Street, will be pleased to receive motor-cycle, cycle and other old tyres, rubber boots, air cushions, rubber flooring, hose, belting, waterproof clothing, hot water bottles, air beds, water beds, rubber toys, heels, soles of boots, rubber off electric cables and shock absorbers, or, in fact, any form of rubber, and he will forward it to the department.

DEATHS.

BRAIN.—In ever loving memory of GEORGE WILLIAM BRAIN, of Dunchurch, who was killed in action somewhere in France or Belgium on November 1st, 1918, aged 18.
“ We loved him, yes, no tongue can tell,
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him too, and thought it best
To take him to his Heavenly rest.
Gone from us, but not forgotten.
Never shall thy memory fade ;
Sweetest thoughts shall ever linger
Round the spot where thou art laid.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

INGRAM.—In proud and loving memory of Gunner ERNEST B. INGRAM (BEN), of the R.F.A., killed in action on Dec. 8, 1916. aged 22 years.
“ Somewhere in France in a lonely grave
There sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Loved and sadly missed by his sorrowing Mother, and not forgotten by his sisters and brothers and all who knew him.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of HARRY J. MATTHEWS (the dearly beloved and only son of D. and M. A. Matthews), who died in France Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, and Sisters.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE READ, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, 46 Rokeby Street, Rugby, who was killed in action December 15, 1916, aged 22 years.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried ;
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

9th Nov 1918. An Unfounded Rumour

AN UNFOUNDED RUMOUR
PREMATURE REJOICING.

Feverish excitement was caused in the town on Thursday afternoon by the circulation of a rumour that an armistice had been signed at 2.30 p.m.

In several instances workpeople gave themselves up to jubilation, and work came to a standstill, until it was found later in the day that the statement had not come through an official source and was premature.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt George Alan C Smith, M.C, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who has been killed by a shell in France, was the elder son of the Master of Dulwich College. At Rugby he was head of his house (Mr G F Bradby’s), and played in the School XV for two seasons, captaining the team during his last term.

Lieut G T S Horton, Royal Hussars, son of Mr T Horton, J.P, Ashlawn House, near Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Sergt A J Chadwick, of Kilsby, who has been on active service since December, 1914, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field.

Lance-Corpl W L Gilks, Yorks & Lancs Regt, son of the late Mr Lewis Gilks, farmer, Grandborough, has been killed in action. He enlisted in August, 1914, and had seen considerable foreign service.

The following Rugby men have been posted as missing :—Pte E Cox, Pte F Smyth, Pte C Spokes, and Pte W Boote, all of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment ; Ptes A Webster, Royal West Surrey Regiment ; A J Webster, London Regiment ; G Watkins, R.W.R, and H Cockerill, M.G.C, have been reported killed ; and Pte W H Newman, Royal Berks Regiment, has died of wounds. Lance-Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, has been taken prisoner.

Gunner F J Lines, youngest son of Mrs Lines and the late Mr Lines, 17 Spring Street, died of wounds on October 6th. He was an old Murrayian, 20 years of age, and before joining the army in August, 1916, he was employed by the late Mr C B Jones, hairdresser, Murray Road, who has also been killed in action.

Lance-Corpl H Evans (23), son of Mr W Evans, Thurlaston, formerly of Crick, has died at Norwich Hospital from pneumonia, contracted on active service. He joined the K.R.R on September 2, 1914, and saw a good deal of heavy fighting round Ypres. He was wounded at Hooge in 1915, and again on the Somme in 1916. He was subsequently invalided home, and afterwards was transferred to the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. He contracted a chill while on duty, and after laying up for a few days he reported for duty too soon, caught another chill, and died on Wednesday. In peace time he was well known as a footballer and cricketer. An elder brother was killed in June last, and another brother is in France.

Pte Victor Cowley, son of Walter Cowley, 34 Poplar Grove, 1st Dorset Regt, has been reported missing since September 30. He joined up in September, 1914, had been twice wounded, and went to France for the third time in March last. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before the war was employed in the Winding Department of the B.T.H.

Pte Bernard Woodward, youngest son of Mr and Mrs T Woodward, 39 Stephen Street, has been wounded.

Ptc A Allen, Gloucester Regt, who was employed in the B.T.H Foundry before the war, died from wounds on October 25th.

The Northants Yeomanry, twice mentioned by the Earl of Cavan in his official despatches for distinguished service in Italy last week, is commanded by Sir Charles Lowther, formerly Master of the Pytchley Hounds, and includes amongst its officers Major T E Manning, captain of the Northamptonshire County cricket team.

The death occurred at Stratford-on-Avon, on Tuesday, of ex-Sergt Norman Kinman, of the Warwickshire Royal Horse Artillery, who was well known in athletic circles in the Midlands prior to the War. He was a prominent sprinter and an excellent Rugby footballer, doing fine work for Stratford-on-Avon as wing three-quarter. He gained his Midland cap, and also toured with Leicester. He volunteered at the outbreak of war, and was dis-charged in February of this year after a bad gas attack, having gained his Mons Star and Military Medal. He was 30 years of age.

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR REV. R. W. DUGDALE.

A choral requiem in memory of the Rev R W Dugdale, curate in charge, who was killed in France recently, was celebrated at Holy Trinity Church on Saturday (All Souls’ Day). The celebrant was the Rev G H Roper, assisted by the Rev T H Perry. The 42nd Psalm was chanted at the beginning of the service, and the hymns were : “ Lord, it belongs not to my care,” and “ Let Saints on Earth.” At the conclusion of the service the Nune Dimittis was sung. The congregation included Mrs Hardy and Miss Dugdale (sisters), Canon Simpson, Capt & Mrs C P Evers, Messrs F J Kittermaster, C H Fuller, F Thompson, G E Over, W Brooke, A W Sheasby, W T Coles Hodges, C E L Wright, F W Cooke, W. M. and E R Giding. Senior P.M (representing the Lodge of Rectitude, Freemasons, of which the Rev R W Dugdale was chaplain), A Coaton, Mr & Mrs H Marple, Mrs C N Hoare, Miss Gray, Mike Tomlinson, Miss Dean, Miss Buckley, Miss Stuart, Mrs Stokes, Mrs Stanley, Miss Cope and Mrs Ray (representing Murray School, of which he was chaplain), Misses Hollowell, Miss Sargent, Miss Longstaff, Miss Lines, Mrs Beasley, &c.

DUNCHURCH.

The funeral of Leonard J Hopkins, aged 18 years, son of Mr and Mrs Wm Hopkins of Dunchurch, took place at Dunchurch on Tuesday last. Deceased, who was a private in the Devon Reserves, died after a short illness in Waveney Hospital, Ballymena, Ireland. Before joining the army he was employed as gardener at Thurlaston Grange, and a bunch of mauve chrysanthemums (his favourite flower) was sent by Mr Appleby, bearing the word, “These flowers he tended so carefully during his life are sent as a token of deep sympathy from all at Thurlaston Grange.” The funeral service was conducted by the Vicar, the Rev. E P Rowland, and the coffin was borne by four soldiers staying in the village.
Among the flowers were tributes from Mrs Mallam, Mr and Mrs Appleby, Mr and Mrs Dew, Mrs Borsley, Mr and Mrs Tomlin, and Mrs Busby. The deceased was very popular with the boys of the village, and in addition to the above were wreaths from “His Chums,” Pte R Jennings (serving in France), and the Scholars and Staff of Dunchurch Boys’ School. The people of the village fell the deepest sympathy with Mr and Mrs Hopkins in their bereavement.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr and Mrs Joseph Lane have now received official information that their son, Pte Ernest Lane (R.W.R), formerly porter at the Station here, was wounded and is missing from September 2nd last.—Mr and Mrs Fred Sabin have been advised through a letter from Pte T Sewell (his chum) that their younger son, Pte Edward Sabin (R.W.R), has been killed in action. His friend saw him fall, and was with him till death took place. The news has come as a great shock to Mr and Mrs Sabin, the latter of whom has been seriously ill with influenza.

SERGT RUSSELL WOUNDED.—News is to hand that Sergt F Russell (West Riding Regt) was wounded as he was leading his platoon into action on the 14th ult, a piece of shrapnel penetrating his left fore-arm. He was operated on, and is now at Nottingham. Sergt Russell, who served all through the Boer War, was called up as a Reserve in August, 1914, and has seen a great deal of hard and severe fighting in the present war.

WOLSTON.

DEATH OF CORPL L PAGE.—The news arrived at Wolston recently of the death of Corpl Lewis Page, Warwickshire Yeomanry, from dysentry in Egypt. Corpl Page was the third son of Mrs Page and the late Mr W Page, of Wolston, and was in his 35th year. Before hostilities commenced he was a member of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and was in business as a hay and corn merchant. Much sympathy is felt for his mother and brothers and sister, and for his young widow, who resides at Coventry. Three brothers of the deceased are still fighting.”

SOLDIERS’ CHRISTMAS PARCELS.—The sum of £56 13s 3d has been collected in the parishes of Brandon, Wolston, and Bretford. The committee have sent 74 presents of 12s each to men abroad, and 24 of 5s each to men in England, and £4 4s 5d for parcels to the six prisoners of war. The total expenses were £2 0s 10d.

LIEUT-COL. H. H. PODMORE, D.S.O.

On Saturday afternoon a portrait of Lieut-Col H H Podmore, D.S.O, Northants Regiment, killed in action in December, 1917, was unveiled in the Temple Speech Room by the Headmaster, Dr A A David. The painting was by Mr Charles Miller, and it was presented to the School by the past and present members of Mr B B Dickinson’s house.
Mr R G C Levens, head of the house, formally presented the portrait in “pleasant memory of Col Podmore’s tutorship.”
Dr David accepted the gift on behalf of the School from “ the house which Hubert Podmore served, loved, and inspired.” He added that the memorial was happily conceived, and before unveiling it he wished to thank the past and present members of the house who had joined in the gift, and who desired—and rightly desired—to set it among the pictures of those whom Rugby remembered with gratitude and with honour. They were also grateful to the artist. His was a hard task, but be (Dr David) thought when they saw the picture they would agree that his insight and his skill had been equal to it. He had seen in the photograph, and revealed to them again, what they remembered in the man. Dr David then formally unveiled the portrait, and, having done so. he said :—“ I do not suppose any of us knows a man whose features and expression more faithfully imaged the character within. If the face is ever the window of the soul it was so in him. There was nothing that he had need to hide, therefore the window was not darkened. I wonder if those who follow us here will know from this picture what manner of man he was ? I think they will.”

“ FEED THE GUNS ” CAMPAIGN.

A great effort is being made to extend this campaign in the local villages, and in connection with it representatives of Rugby Rural District (North) and Monks Kirby Rural District Local Committee met at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, Rugby, on Saturday afternoon, last, when the Earl of Denbigh presided, supported by Mr E H Carter, O.B.E (hon county secretary), and Mr R H Myers (hon local secretary).—Mr Myers gave an account of the progress of the organisation, and intimated that final arrangements had been made for a gun to tour the villages during Gun Week (Nov 18-23), when it is hoped that a sum of at least £66,000 will be subscribed in War Bonds and War Savings Certificates.—Lord Denbigh urged those present not to relax their efforts, in view of the satisfactory military position, but to vigorously prosecute the financial campaign til final victory is obtained.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.

There are signs this week that the influenza epidemic, which has claimed so many victims locally, is now on the wane, although unfortunately the death roll is still very high. Since the outbreak of the epidemic the number of deaths from influenza in Rugby and the immediate neighbourhood totals 86, of which 61 have occurred in Rugby and New Bilton. In Rugby alone 27 deaths from these diseases were registered last week, and another 14 occurred in the villages immediately adjacent to the town. Thirteen deaths were registered during the first three days of the present week. . . .

NEEDLESS ALARM.

Some alarm has apparently been caused in Cromwell Road by the proposal that the Mitchison Home is to be used as a hospital for influenza patients. Residents in that neighbourhood may feel assured there is no cause to be uneasy.

RUGBY MAN’S FOOLISH ACT.
UNLAWFULLY WEARING AN OFFICER’S UNIFORM.
A HEAVY FINE.

A remarkable story was told to the Mansfield Magistrates on Thursday last week in a case in which Percy Thos Tallis, a mechanical engineer, now on Government work at Coventry, living in Cross Street, Rugby, and whose father is an innkeeper in the town, was charged with unlawfully wearing the uniform of an officer of the R.A.F at Sutton in Ashfield on October 23rd. After being arrested by Insp Brooks, defendant made a statement, in which he said he received information that his brother, who had been seriously wounded, was lying in a military hospital at Nottingham. He went there to see him, his wife joining him the next day. On the 20th ult he made the acquaintance at a hotel of a man named Millus, who was wearing an officer’s uniform. He suggested that he (defendant) should put on a similar uniform and be photographed in it. He agreed to this, and after putting on the uniform they went into the streets, where Millus persuaded him to accompany him to Mansfield. He did so, and the next day, at Millius’s request, he consented to visit Mansfield again. They took tickets there, but alighted at Sutton, where he was arrested.
Mr W Gamble, who defended, pleaded guilty, but urged extenuating circumstances. When Millus saw defendant at the hotel he said, “Put on this uniform and be photographed in it.” Defendant several times refused to do so, and it was only after Millus said he belonged to the military police, and that no harm would result, that defendant consented. He went out with the intention of being photographed in the uniform, and then coming back and taking it off. but Millus persuaded him to go to Mansfield. It was evidently a case of a strong mind overcoming a weaker mental capacity. Defendant committed this foolish act, but Mr Gamble submitted that no real harm had been done. At Mansfield he found Millus was wanted on a charge, so the latter could afford to be reckless. Defendant bore an excellent character. This had been a lesson to him, and defendant would take care that he would not repeat such foolishness again.
The Chairman told defendant he had been guilty of a most foolish act, and had rendered himself liable to a much heavier penalty than the Bench proposed to inflict. He would have to pay £10, and they hoped this would teach him a lesson.—The money was paid.

NEW RATION BOOKS IN USE.

The new ration books came into use on Monday, and for the next six months they will be the medium by which the available supplies of meat, fats, sugar, and jam will be equitably distributed among the population. Should the War come to an end during the period there is no likelihood that the necessity for rationing will cease. Organised distribution of food, in fact, will have to be continued for many months after fighting stops. No exception is likely to be taken to the maintenance of restrictions. Rationing from the first has worked smoothly in this country, and has been accepted as the fairest—and indeed the only—method of apportioning foods the supply of which is insufficient to meet the normal demand.
Only one change is associated with the use of the new book. Jam, marmalade, and honey are added to the list of rationed articles. It was originally intended that syrup and treacle should also be included; but Lord Bledisloe, the Director of Sugar Distribution, announces that there is no need to surrender coupons when buying these foods. In view of the quantities in which jam is customarily sold, the ministry of Food has arranged that the jam coupons in the ration books may be used in each case in the week marked on the coupon, or in any of the seven succeeding weeks. The red coupon numbered 1 for the week ending November 9th may be used at any time before December 29th. A customer, therefore, may hold his coupons over for seven weeks, and in the eighth week buy a 2-lb jar of jam with the eight coupons saved.

WARWICKSHIRE WAR AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE.

The following reports have been made by the Executive Committee and the Women’s War Agricultural Committee to the County Council :—
The work of the harvest in this county has, generally speaking, been completed, notwithstanding the shortage of labour and bad weather experienced for the last six weeks. The inspection of farms has been continued, and in 34 cases cultivation orders have been issued. In three cases recommendations have been made to the Board of Agriculture to determine tenancies, and in two cases derelict land has been compulsorily taken for improvement. The total acreage ordered to be broken up is at present 35,103 acres.
Orders have been received from the Board of Agriculture for a re-survey of the county for the purpose of more carefully classifying the grassland and for obtaining particulars of all farms not properly cultivated. It is proposed to put this in hand forthwith. The committee continues its efforts to retain skilled men in their employment on the land, releasing for service only those who can best be dispensed with ; 1,402 soldiers from the distribution centre at Budbrooke Barracks are employed on the land. Additional camps have been established at Kingsbury and Mancetter. The total number of prisoners employed is 636, of which 507 are in the camps, 49 are billeted with farmers, and 80 are out with migratory gangs. Including the horses at the prisoner camps, there are 218 under the committee’s control. The number of tractors in the county is 73.
The organisation of threshing has been successfully carried out, district committees were formed, and districts allotted to threshing proprietors. Shortage of drivers has somewhat handicapped the work, but every endeavour is being made to rectify this.
During the past season Mrs Bedhall has given 92 demonstrations in fruit preservation, with an average attendance of 38. One week was devoted to training pupils to work the district canneries established in the county. Thirty visited have been made to such canneries for the purpose of giving further advice and assistance.
The appeal to school children to pick blackberries to be made into jam for the Army and Navy was taken up with keenness, and has been conducted with great success. Already 29 tons 7 cwt have born sent to jam factories.
The Women’s Agricultural Committee reported :—During the past quarter the principal work has been the formation of gangs of woman for threshing. These gangs consist of a number of women, varying from four to six, one of whom is invariably the forewoman. Twenty gangs are already at work, comprising approximately 90 women, and from reports already received they appear to be giving satisfaction. We are prepared to supply any further gangs that may be asked for. We have a total number of 406 girls working in the county at this time, and a welfare officer has been appointed from London to supervise their recreation and general well-being. The total number of L.A women trained in this county since April, 1917, is 261, a very large percentage of whom are still on farm work here, and we are greatly indebted to the farmers who have undertaken to help our committee in this way.

WARWICKSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL.
LAND FOR EX-SERVICE MEN.

At a quarterly meeting of the Warwickshire County Council, held at Warwick on Tuesday, Lord Algernon Percy, presiding, the Small Holdings Committee presented a report on the provision of land for ex-service men, and recommended “that the Small Holdings and Allotments Committee be charged with the matter of dealing with the settlement of ex-service men on the land in the county, all the powers of the Council being delegated to them.”
Alderman Sir H R Fairfax-Lucy moved an amendment : “ That the County Council considers the proposals of the Board of Agriculture for the provision of land for ex-service men a most unsatisfactory one, as it does not enable these men to become the owners of their holdings, and that, further, they consider that the powers of borrowing for purchasing land and adaptation should be restored, and that they should be informed at an early date on what terms loans will be issued for that purpose.” He pointed out that under the policy of the Board of Agriculture County Councils could take up land only through the powers of the board to obtain loans, and this depended on the adoption of the system of a perpetual rent charge. He thought it was their duty to ascertain the demand for land, and this information could be obtained through the Territorial Force Association, which had relations with discharged soldiers. It would be the duty of the County Council to find loans for those who had experience and capital to take up land. It would be necessary for the Small Holdings Committee to continue to press for the re-establishment of their old powers.—The amendment was carried.

SHOP HOURS IN RUGBY.

The following copy of a letter, written by a Rugby housewife to the Secretary of the Housewives’ Committee, was sent to us last week too late for insertion :—
DEAR MADAM,—We understand your committee tried some time ago to get some consideration and convenience for busy workers to do their shopping. They are the majority ; they are the ready cash people ; yet all our wants and purchases have to be crowded into Friday night and Saturday afternoon, waiting in crowded shops, getting served in a take-it-or-leave-it-quick style. If there was a later hour—say, 7.30 on Tuesday—it would ease both server and served at the week-end.
Does it ever occur to traders that the shops are already closed morning, noon, and night to the workers for four whole days?
Can we who have twenty minutes to half-an-hour’s walk home and live the same distance from the town sandwich a tea-dinner and a wash in-between, and yet get in town even by seven o’clock ? No, not for a bit of cotton wool or a pound of oatmeal, or any other necessary for whatever illness or emergency is in the home. If we—the majority—have still to be put to this inconvenience, there is no need for the leisured minority to require four days in which to make their purchases.
Why not even things up a bit ?—Yours very truly,
“ A.E.W.”

DEATHS.

ELLARD.—On October 30th, at 29 Station Hospital, Cremona, Italy, Trooper W. J. ELLARD, 14th Corps, Northants Yeomanry, younger son of Z. J. Ellard, Barby, aged 27 years.

EVANS.—On November 6th, at the Military Hospital, Norwich, Pte. HARRY EVANS, the beloved second son of W. E. & A. M. Evans.—“ Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.”

GILKS.—Killed in action on October 13th, Lance-Corpl. WM. L. GILKS, Yorks. and Lancs. Regt., aged 22.

HOPKINS.—On October 30th, at Ballymena, Ireland, of pneumonia, Pte. L. J. HOPKINS, the dearly beloved son of Elphinstone and Annie Hopkins, Dunchurch, aged 18 years.

LINES.—On October 6th, Gunner F. J. LINES, R.F.A., youngest and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Lines and the late Mr. H. Lines, 17 Spring Street, who died of wounds received in action in France ; aged 20. Never forgotten.

OLDHAM.—Killed in action on October 24th, in France, HARRY, fourth son of the late Stephen and Annie Oldham, 33 Stephen Street, Rugby (late of Long Lawford), aged 25 years.—Deeply mourned by his loving Mother and Brothers and fiancee Lottie.

PEARMAN.—On November 4th, at Warley Military Hospital, after a short illness of pneumonia, HERBERT CARL, elder and beloved son of Thomas and Ada Pearman, of Ryton-on-Dunsmore, in his 23rd year.

STIBBARDS.—On the 31st October, 1918, at the 1st Eastern General Hospital, Cambridge, Seaman HARRY FRANK STIBBARDS, B.Z. 11286, “Attentive III,” passed peacefully away after a short illness, contracting pneumonia. Much suffering patiently borne. Interred in Cambridge Military Cemetery.—Deeply mounted by all who knew him.

WEBSTER.—In memory of ARTHUR JAMES WBSTER, beloved son of Mr. &. Mrs. Webster, of 9 Old Station Square, Rugby, who was killed in action during the evening of September 28, 1918.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother ;
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, and Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

ELKINGTON.—In proud and loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOHN THOMAS ELKINGTON (JACK), who fell in action “ somewhere in France ” on November 10th, 1916.—“ God’s Will be done.”
“ Just when his hopes were brightest,
Just when thoughts were best ;
He was called from this world of sorrow
To that Home of eternal rest.
Never a day but his name is spoken,
Never a day but he’s in our thoughts ;
A link from our family chain is broken ;
He’s gone from our home, but not from our hearts.
His loving smile, his cherry ways,
Are pleasant to recall ;
He had a kindly word for each,
And died beloved by all.”
—Too dearly loved to be forgotten by his Mother, Father, and Sisters, of Long Lawford, Brothers in France and Germany.

 

15th Jun 1918. Selling Ham Without Taking Coupons

FOOD PROSECUTIONS.

SELLING HAM WITHOUT TAKING COUPONS.
Samuel C Duval, grocer, Gipsy Lane, Leicester, was summoned by F Burton for selling uncooked bacon and ham to Evan Evans without detaching the necessary coupons, at Rugby, on May 25th. A second charge was also brought of selling uncooked ham and bacon to the same individual, who was not one of his registered customers.—Evan Evans, 9 Melling Street, Longsight, Manchester, was also summoned by F Burton for unlawfully obtaining for a retailer named Duval a ham, and not producing his meat card to allow the retailer to detach the appropriate coupons on May 25th.—Mr Worthington prosecuted, and Mr Eaden defended ; and, on the suggestion of Mr Eaden, this was taken in conjunction with the charges against Duval.—Defendants pleaded guilty to all three charges.—Mr Worthington said that on the morning in question Mr Purchase saw Evans standing near a stall belonging to Duval in the Market Place. He heard Evans tell Duval that he could not get a supply of bacon where he was registered, and from what he saw he spoke to Duval, who admitted that he had sold some ham to Evans without a coupon.—Mr Worthington said the seriousness of the case lay in an entire stranger coming into the town and taking food away which might be required by someone who was registered in the town.—Mr Eaden said the case was not nearly so serious as his friend tried to make it. There was a distinction between a picnic ham and an ordinary one, the shank end of the former being allowed to be sold without coupons and to an unregistered customer.—Evans was a fireman on the L & N-W Railway, and arrived on a goods train at 9.30 a.m on Saturday. He had nothing with him to eat except bread. He was not due back home until 12.30 Sunday morning, and it was obvious he could not go all that time on bread. He asked Duval to sell him some ham, and Duval cut him the shank end of a picnic ham, which he was perfectly entitled to sell to him. Unfortunately, when Evans saw the amount of bone in it he said he should prefer the other end, and Duval, feeling sorry for Evans, did cut some from that end. With regard to his friend’s statement that food was being taken out of the town, he might state that some three hours later Duval was allowed to sell some 60lbs of bacon without coupons by permission of Mr Burton, so that anyone from Coventry, &c, could have taken it away if they wished.—The Chairman said that Duval knew he was doing wrong, and he would be fined 19s 6d in each case ; and Evans, knowing that he would be away for that length of time, should have brought his coupon with him, and he would also be fined 19s 6d.

THE PRICE OF WHISKY.
William Flint, wine merchant, Church Street, Rugby, was summoned for selling whisky at a price exceeding the maximum price allowed by the Spirits Order, 1918, on May 7th.—Mr Worthington appeared for the Food Control Committee, and Mr Eaden pleaded guilty on behalf of the defendant.—Mr Worthington said on May 7th a man named Richardson, a discharged soldier, went to Mr Flint’s Stores in Church Street, and asked for a bottle of whisky. He was supplied by the assistant, and was told the price was 11s. A few minutes afterwards, in consequence of what he was told or thought he went for a second bottle, and was charged 11s. He asked the assistant if she had not made a mistake. She replied that she could charge the old price, because the Government had not released the whisky in respect of the new prices from bond. He asked for a receipt, and received one for £1 2s. A day or two afterwards Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) saw Mr Flint, who said that the whisky was 35 per cent under proof. The whisky should have been sold at 8s instead of 11s.—Mr Flint told the Enforcement Officer that he went to London, but could not get any information. He could easily have gone to the Food Office at Rugby and received all information required.—Mr Eaden, for the defence, said Mr Flint wished to make perfectly clear that what was done was done in absolute ignorance and without any intention of profiteering or charging above the price. If they considered Glenlivet whisky was a proprietary article, then 9s 6d could have been charged under the new Order. Mr Eaden pointed out that the Order only came into force on May 1st, and though Mr Flint went to an advisory meeting in London, he heard nothing about the new prices.—The Chairman said the Bench felt there was some mitigation in that case, as proceedings were taken so soon after the Order came into force. Those orders were coming so frequently that the public could not very often get hold of them. They would only inflict a fine of £5, including costs.

RABBITS FROM WALES.—Edith J Hardy, 45 Church Street, Rugby, was summoned by F Burton Executive Officer of the Food Control Committee, for unlawfully obtaining two rabbits, and not detaching from her meat card the coupons.—Defendant did not appear.—Mr Worthington, for the prosecution, said that from information received Mr Purchase visited defendant’s house, and she informed him that she was receiving a couple of rabbits per week from an uncle in Wales. He examined her meat card, and found that the coupons which should have been sent for these had not been forwarded. She thus obtained these rabbits and a meat ration with the coupons which should have been used for the former.—The Chairman : She “ received ” them, not “ obtained ” them ?—Mr Worthington : Quite so, and if it had been an isolated case perhaps nothing would have been said, but she had them for three consecutive weeks.—The Chairman : I did not know that if anyone sent me a couple of rabbits that I should have to send two coupons.—Mr Worthington said that probably he should have been the same himself. He believed Mrs Hardy had no idea of committing an offence, and the case was brought simply that the public should know of the Order.—The Chairman said there was no doubt an offence had been committed, but it might be taken as a first case, because the public did not know the law sufficiently, and they would dismiss the summons under the first Offenders’ Act. The public must understand that they could not receive presents of this kind from their friends without giving up the corresponding coupons.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Ration books for the national system of rationing, which comes into operation on July 13th, are now being issued to local Food Control Committees. They contain vouchers for articles of food which are already rationed, with extra pages for commodities which it may be found necessary to ration, either generally or locally, at a later date.

The book is available for 16 weeks, after which a new volume will be distributed. Coupons will require to be surrendered for all rations, four being apportioned as at present to a week’s supply of meat and bacon, and one weekly to other articles. The pages are in distinctive colours for the various rationed foods. The coupons for sugar are yellow, for fats (i.e, butter, margarine and lard) blue, and for meat red. A page of spare coupons is coloured brown, and a page of spare spaces is printed in blue ink on white paper. There is a reference leaf coloured green, while the front and back covers are white. The pages are printed on specially engraved paper. The child’s ration book will be generally similar, except that it will contain two pages of meat coupons instead of four. Thus the meat coupon in the child’s book will be of the same value as is the meat coupon in the ordinary adult’s book.

Full instructions will be found upon the front and back covers of the book.

All applications for the rationing books must be sent to the Food Controller by to-day (June 15th).

SUGAR FOR JAM.
METHODS OF ALLOCATION CRITICISED AT RUGBY.

The methods adopted in allocating the supplies of sugar for jam-making were criticised by Mr W A Stevenson at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week. In many instances, he said, people had anticipated that the quantity asked for would be reduced, and, acting on this assumption, they had asked for more than they required. Others had played fair, and only asked for their bare requirements, but all had been cut down alike. He thought the basis on which they had worked was not a fair one. The sugar should have been allotted according to the number of persons in the household, irrespective of how much was asked for.—The Executive Officer (Mr Burton) pointed out that the allocation was made in accordance with a schedule issued by the Ministry of Food. They did not take into consideration the amount of sugar asked for, but simply the amount of fruit available. If there was any dissatisfaction it was the fault of the Food Ministry, and not of his office, because he only had to carry out the provisions of the schedule.

It was also stated that a large number of persons who had applied for sugar for jam had been refused a supply because they had failed to enclose a stamped addressed envelope for the return of the permit with their application form. The Chairman (Mr Wise) said he believed that in some cases stamped envelopes were enclosed, but owing to the great pressure under which the officials had had to work these had been lost. It would be very difficult to decide which cases were genuine, but he thought that where they were satisfied that the requirements had been complied with they should grant an allowance, if possible. The difficulty was, however, that there was not a large stock to draw from. The existing allowance had been made on the figures sent in on the application forms, and if a lot more people were to be supplied the allowances already made would have to be still further reduced. He had read that the gooseberry crop had failed, and it might be possible to get the permits granted to people for making gooseberry jam returned.—The Executive Officer said, considering the pressure under which the staff worked and the large mob of people invading the offices and the approaches daily waiting for the application forms, the wonder was that they did as well as they had done. With regard to granting fresh permits, he believed that they were helpless in the matter, because the allotment of sugar was made, and if they granted any other allowance some of the people with permits would have to go without sugar. The only way he could see out of the difficulty was to issue a circular asking people whose fruit had not come up to their expectations to return their permits, so that a reduction could be made.—It was decided to do this and also to write to the Ministry of Food asking whether, in any case in which the committee were satisfied that a stamped addressed envelope had been enclosed, they could make an allowance of sugar.

MUNITION WORKERS & THE CUP THAT CHEERS.

At their meeting on Thursday afternoon in last week the Rugby Food Control Committee considered a request from the Lodge Sparking Plug Company for permission to purchase 20lbs of tea weekly for their canteen.—Mr Stevenson reminded the committee that they had refused a request from the Railway Company, and if this was granted the two decisions would clash.—The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) : But this is a munition factory.—Mr Stevenson expressed the opinion that railways were as important as munition establishments, because they were the common carriers of both the raw material and the finished article.—Mrs Shelley said she thought the company were asking for an excessive quantity, because 1lb of tea was supposed to make 160 cups.—Mr Ewart : They are asking for 4lbs a day.—Mr Stevenson : A lot of ladies work there (laughter).—The question was referred to the Ration Committee with power to act, the Executive Officer being asked to get further information as to the actual requirements.

At a meeting on Thursday the committee reported that the company had since written stating that between 400 and 450 cups of would be required daily five days each week, and it was accordingly decided to allow the quantity asked for.

POTATOES IN BREAD.

The Order of the Ministry of Food requiring 10 per cent. of potatoes to be mixed with floor and other ingredients used in making bread came into force last week. Anticipating some such order, the Rugby bakers a few months ago commenced to mix potatoes with the flour, although the proportion was naturally not so great as that now made compulsory by the Order ; and they have thus gained some useful experience. A prominent local baker states that considerable additional work is entailed by the new regulation inasmuch as the potato’s have to be washed, scraped, boiled, mashed, and strained before they are fit to mix with the flour. Great care has to be taken both in the dough-making and the baking, and the difficulties are added to by the poor quality of the yeast now being supplied to the trade. When the bread is properly made, however, a distinct improvement in quality is noticeable, and the loaves are a better colour, much more moist and do not become dry so quickly.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Ingram, 21 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte L Ingram, aged 20, was wounded on May 29th, and died the same day. He was an old Elborow School boy, and has been to the Army three years. Second time wounded.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, East Haddon (late of Rugby), have received news that their son, Pte E Baskott, 101st Labour Battalion, has died from gas poisoning in 1st Australian Hospital, Rouen. He was an old St Matthew’s boy. His brother, Lieut J E Baskott, was killed in action last December.

Dr R H Paramore, of this town, now in the Army, has been promoted to the rank of Major.

Mrs Rixon, Claremont Road, has received official news that her son, Second-Lieut E H Rixom, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded in the right arm and chest.

Mrs Wilde, 5 Earl Street, has been officially notified that her husband, Pte John Wilde, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on April 15th. He has been in the Army two years. Previous to joining up he worked for Mr F Hollowell, builder.

Mr J A Philips, St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, received a telegram from the War Office on Sunday last, informing him that his third son, Kenneth Mc N Phillips, 2nd Lieut, Northumberland Fusiliers, attached Durham Light Infantry, has been missing since May 27th.

Mr C J Elkington, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received notification that his son, Lieut A J Elkington, of the North Staffordshire Regiment, has been slightly wounded in the foot, and is in hospital at Rouen.

Pte H Garner was accidentally drowned on May 22nd whilst bathing in a river in France. He was the first of the company to dive into the river, and was at once seized with cramp. His officer and comrades dived in to save him, but he was carried away by a strong current, and was drowned. Pte Garner was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society as a motor lorry driver till he enlisted at the outbreak of the War.

Lieut Maurice V Eyden. younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, 53 St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, is reported missing on May 27th. He entered the Inns of Court, O.T.C, in autumn, 1915, on leaving Rugby School (where he was “ Head of the Town ”), and received his commission in the 2nd Northants Regiment in September, 1916. Two months later he went to France, where he had been twice wounded. His only brother, Corpl Clarence Eyden, R.E, was killed in action in France on May 19th.

Corpl J Norman Atkinson, M.G.C, who was officially reported wounded and missing, has written home stating that the is a prisoner of war at Altdamn, Pommern, Germany, and that his wound is not serious. He has been very kindly treated, and is quite cheerful. He is the son of Mr J H Atkinson, 37 Windsor Street, Rugby, and the second of four brothers who have joined H.M Forces.

Second-Lieut H H Metters, M.C, Leicestershire Regiment, aged 21, only son of Mr W H Metters, the Manor House, Stoneleigh, near Kenilworth, is reported missing since May 27th.

Lieut-Col H A Gray-Cheape, D.S.O, was commanded the brilliant charge of the Warwickshire and Worcestershire Yeomanry in Palestine on November 8, 1917, is reported missing, believed drowned. He was one of 13 officers and 79 other ranks who lost their lives when H.M transport “ Leasowe Castle ” was torpedoed and sunk on Mar 26th in the Mediterranean. The gallant officer was the well-known polo player. His eldest sister, who was married to Mr Albert Jaffray Cay, son of Mr & Mrs Cay, of Kenilworth, lost her life in the “ Empress of Ireland ” disaster in June, 1914. Her husband’s death has been presumed, as he has been missing ever since the reverse sustained by our arms at Katia on Easter Sunday, 1916.

LIEUT T W WALDING.
Mrs Walding, of The Limes, Rugby, has received information that her son, Lieut T W Walding, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been posted as missing since May 27th. A brother officer has written stating that Lieut Walding was with the guns in the forward area, and was completely surrounded, and the assumption was that he was made prisoner.

MILITARY FUNERAL AT RUGBY.
The death occurred, at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Birmingham (Dudley Road Section), on June 5th, of Pte W Lee, 1st Royal Warwicks, who was wounded on April 15th. Pte Lee, who was 41 years of age, was the son of the late Mr John Lee, of Rugby. He had served 3½ years in the War. The interment took place at Rugby Cemetery on Monday, when a firing party from Budbroke Barracks attended. The mourners included deceased’s two brother, Sergt R Lee and Sergt-Major Harry Lee, both of the Warwicks ; his sisters, Mrs Cements, Mrs Lisamer, Mrs Colledge, and Mrs Abbott ; his brothers-in-law, Sergt Arthur Clements, R.E (who had just arrived in England from Sierra Leone), and Mr Clements and Mr Lisamer (both of whom had served in the Boer War), Mrs R Lee (sister-in-law), Mr Jack Burns (cousin), &c.

AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY & DISTINGUISHED SERVICE.

Major P W Nickalls, Yeomanry, the well-known polo player, has been awarded the D.S.O.

The following have received the Meritorious Service Medal in connection with military operations in Salonika:—Sergt-Major D G Kinden, A.S.C (Rugby), and Staff Sergt-Major G H Sutton, A.S.C (Churchover, near Rugby).

The Military Medal has been awarded for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th to Driver F Calloway, R.F.A, son of Mr W Calloway, Sandown Road, Rugby.

The following men are included in the latest list of awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal :—840139 Sergt H Battson, R.F.A, Rugby, and 22681 Sergt F H Marriott. M.G.C, Rugby.

AMPUTATION DURING RAID.—Miss Marian A Butler, a radiographer of the Scottish Women’s Hospitals, who has just returned from France, telling of experiences at the Hospital at Villers-Cotterets, said that during a German air raid Miss Frances Ivens, the chief medical officer, performed several operations, including amputations, by the light of two candles and with the instruments jumping about through the vibration caused by the explosions. Miss Ivens is a daughter of the late Mr W Ivens. of Harborough Parva.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

ABSENTEES.—Arthur Hill, painter, no fixed abode, was brought up in custody charged with being an absentee from the Army.—He pleaded not guilty.—Sergt Percival stated that he arrested prisoner in West Street, and asked him if he had any exemption from military service or any other documents ? He replied, “It is all right; I have been down to the Drill Hall.” Witness told him that he should take him to the Drill Hall, and on the way he said, “I have sent all my papers to the Minister of Munitions, Hay Lane, Coventry. I had exemption from military service while I was at work at Willans.” Witness telephoned to Coventry, and found that prisoner was an absentee. He also found that he was discharged from Willans & Robinson’s on July 2nd, 1917. Then he would be given 14 days to get other work.—Col Johnstone produced a copy of notice sent to Hill on June 28th, 1917, calling him up on July 12th. The notice was returned marked “ Unknown.” Witness also sent an absentee report.—Defendant claimed that no papers could be sent within eight weeks after his discharge from munitions. He said in June he registered at the Labour Exchange, and they advised him to get a note from the Drill Hall. At the latter place they said they could not help him ; he must paddle his own canoe. So he had paddled his own canoe since. If he was a wilful absentee he should not have remained in the town where he was known at the same address. He had written to the Ministry of Munitions at Coventry, giving his temporary address and all his papers.—Sergt Percival, in reply to the Bench, said no trace could be found of these papers at Coventry.—Col Johnstone said no notification had been received of any change of address.—The case was adjourned for a short time to enable the sergeant to make enquiries at the Labour Exchange.—On their return Sergt Percival said he had ascertained that prisoner last went to the Labour Exchange on June 27th, but his name was crossed off, as it was not renewed within seven days.—Fined £2, and handed over as a deserter.— Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was similarly charged.—Defendant pleaded guilty.—Sergt Hawkes deposed that he saw defendant in Gas Street, and asked him why he was not in the Army ? Defendant said he had dodged it. He had not been registered or medically examined.—Defendant had nothing to say.—Fined £2, and handed over to an escort.—Sergt Hawkes was complimented and awarded 10s.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
WASTE OF WATER.

Notice is hereby given that no consumer is permitted to use WATER BY HOSE PIPE, without the permission of the Council, except when the supply is by meter.

Consumers are urgently requested to co-operate with the Council, in reducing waste of water as much as possible.

Consumer are requested to report all cases of waste at the Surveyor’s Office.

Persons taking and using water in contravention of the Water Regulations of this Council are liable to a penalty not exceeding five pounds for every such offence.

JNO. H. SHARP,
Water Engineer & Surveyor.
Benn Buildings, Hight Street, Rugby.
May 29th, 1918.

DEATHS.

INGRAM.—In ever loving memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. LEONARD INGRAM, 15th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died from wounds in France on May 29th ; son of the late Joseph and Mary Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton ; aged 20 years
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
I loved him, oh, no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him, too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”
“ Though lost from sight, to memory ever dear.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BAUM.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. G. BAUM, 8th Leicesters, of Claybrook-Magna ; killed in action on June 11, 1917 ; aged 22 years.—Not forgotten by his, friends at Churchover.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WILLIAM WOOD, son of the late J. Wood, of 153 Grosvenor Road, Rugby ; killed in action on June 10, 1917, in France.—From Madge and Ernest.

WOOD.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, M.G.C, who was killed in action in France on June 10 1917.—From George and Ellen.

2nd Feb 1918. The Food Shortage

THE FOOD SHORTAGE.

The queue evil reached a climax at Rugby on Friday last when large crowds besieged practically the whole of the provision and butchers’ shops in the centre of the town. An unusually large quantity of margarine, five tons, was received in the town the previous day, and a large portion of this was commandeered by the Executive Officer and distributed amongst about a dozen other shops. Notwithstanding this, however, people were unable to obtain a share, while others by dodging from queue to queue, or sending different members of their families, secured considerably more than their reasonable requirements.

In the afternoon large crowds, estimated at several thousands of persons, including number of locomotive men, assembled in and near the Market Place. These latter were interviewed by Mr T A Wise, chairman of the Food Control Committee, and they also visited the warehouses of several tradesmen to satisfy themselves that there were no large hoards of supplies. The tradespeople did everything possible to satisfy the people, and when the much sought for fats could no longer be obtained a large stock of jam was released. The Police also exercised considerable tact in dealing with the crowd, which several occasions showed signs of exasperation. On the other hand those who were engaged in the difficult task of distributing were impressed with the inconsiderate and unreasonable attitude adopted by many of the people who besieged the shops.

On Saturday, however, the scenes were quite normal again, and in fact there were fewer queues than has been the case for some time.

This state of affairs continued til yesterday (Friday) morning, when large queues had assembled by seven o’clock, and at one establishment the police were sorely pressed to keep a huge crowd from forcing an entrance into the shop.

CULTIVATION OF RAILWAY LAND.—The L N-W announce that they are prepared to allocate plots of vacant land both inside and outside their fences to anyone, whether railway servants or not, who desire to add to the food production at a nominal rent of 1s each lot.

FATAL FALL FROM AEROPLANE.

An inquest was held at the Court House on Friday last week by Mr E F Hadow (coroner), concerning the death of Second-Lieut Harold Griffith Nelson (25), which took place, as reported in our last issue, as the result of an aeroplane accident.

Capt William Hubert Taylor deposed that the deceased officer’s home was in New York. He was a member of the American Air Service, and attached to the R.F.C. He was a learner, but very competent, and had flown altogether 67 hours.

Sergt Eric Jack Robjohns and Corpl William Hunter gave evidence to the effect that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good condition before the flight.

Capt Leslie Randall Wren deposed that he saw decease start off. After he had been up about half-an-hour he pulled the machine into a vertical stall, an evolution by which the machine would be practically “ standing ” on the tail. This evolution was of no practical use. He added that the position would automatically cause the machine to nose dive violently, and it would be out of control for a time. One would want a good deal of depth for such a dive, but 2,000ft. would be quite high enough. While the machine was turning over into the nose dive witness saw the deceased fly out of the machine.—The Coroner: It came round so quickly that it practically “ chucked ” him out ?—A: That is what it comes to ; or, on the other hand, his head might have struck the front of the machine, and during unconsciousness he might have fallen out. The tendency would be for him to fall out if he was not strapped in. Witness added that he immediately went to the machine and examined the belt, but it was not strapped up. It was the pilot’s businesses see that he strapped himself in, and he could not say whether deceased had taken that precaution. There was a possibility, but not a probability, that he might have jerked the belt open by the motion of his arms. Witness had never hoard of such a thing being done.

Second-Lieut G W Curtis gave evidence as to the damage to the machine, which came to earth a-half to three-quarters of a mile away.

Surgeon-Major Collins explained the frightful injuries received by the deceased, who, he said, might have been alive, but would probably have been unconscious by the time he touched the earth. Despite the tremendous impact deceased’s wrist watch, with an open dial, was unbroken, and continued to go without losing a second.

The Coroner referred to the surprisingly few accidents which occurred, in view of the number of flights made daily, and said this appeared to be a clear case of the usual precautions not having been taken.

The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death ” ; but added that there was no evidence to prove whether the belt was fastened or not when deceased began the flight.

After the inquest an officer gave a demonstration with the belt, as a result of which the Coroner and Jury expressed the opinion that it probably was fastened up before the flight.

WOMEN LAND ARMY.

EFFICIENCY CERTIFICATES FOR LOCAL WORKERS.

The presentation of efficiency certificates won by Warwickshire women at the Midland test last autumn was made the occasion of a public demonstration at Birmingham on Tuesday, in which between 20 and 30 workers from the Rugby district took part, along with several hundred women from all parts of the county. The majority were wearing the severely practical uniform in which they are accustomed to work, and the cheerfulness of the girls and their healthy and robust appearance were at once a tribute to the wholesome effect which the work, despite trying conditions, has upon spirits and physique. The certificates were presented by the Lord Mayor (Ald Brookes), who said there were now 180 girls employed on farms in Birmingham and Warwickshire, and, in addition, there were 1,400 women in the villages who had registered themselves as willing to give part of their time to farm work.

Out the 84 Warwickshire girls who entered the tests 70 received certificates. Among them were the following local workers who passed three tests:—Miss Mary Crofts (Long Lawford), Miss Nellie Harrison (Clifton), and Miss Constance Walton (Clifton). Passed two tests: Miss Doris Stent (Pailton), Miss Richards (Clifton), Mrs Lee (Bourton), and Miss Bertha Steath (Clifton). Passed one test: Miss Annie Oven and Miss Kate Foster (Catthorpe), Miss Harriett Dickens (Brownsover), Mrs Edward Eales (Bourton). Others of the Land Army mentioned as doing good work in this district were : Miss Pape (Bretford), Mrs Harry Smith and Miss Robinson (Lawford Heath), Miss Tew (Pailton), Miss Taylor and Miss Smith (Princethorpe), Miss Edwards (Newbold), Miss Allerton (Stretton-under-Fosse), Miss Hunt, Miss Gibbs, and Miss Packer (working near Lutterworth).

There are also many whole-time and part-time workers in the Rugby area who have earned as many as six stripes on their arms for length of service, all going to work on the land. Each stripe represents 1,440 hours’ work.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Four additional prisoners of war have been added to the list of the Rugby Committee. Reported missing since Nov 30, Sergt J R Sacree, 10th Batt. Rifle Brigade, is now known to be wounded with gunshot through the shoulder, and a prisoner of war interned at Soltau. Sergt Sacree, who joined up immediately on the outbreak of war, was an assistant for six years to Mr C T Tew, of Regent Street. He had been previously wounded four times, won the Military Medal and recommended again in September last year.— Rfn W E Boyles, 10th Kings Royal Rifle Corps, whose home is at Bishops Itchington, is a prisoner of war interned at Dulmen. An employee of Messrs Greaves, Bull & Lakin, Ltd. of Harbury, he enlisted in 1914. His firm have generously offered to defray the cost of his food parcels as well as for two other employees of theirs who are prisoners of war in Germany.—Pte A C Neal. Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Napton, is a prisoner of war at Limburg-a-Lahn.—Pte A E Mumford, Machine Gun Corps, attached Cavalry, is a prisoner of war at Minden. For three years he acted as barman for Mr W Jones, of “ The Barrel,” Market Place. He enlisted in August, 1914, in the Lancers, subsequently being transferred to the 17th Lancers—Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of Rugby Committer, has made the necessary arrangements for the despatch of the standard food parcels and bread to each of the above men.

The financial support given to the Committee has been splendid, sufficient to enable them to bear the whole cost of each man’s food parcels, etc. Every month means a grave increase in the number of prisoners of war and a corresponding increase in the expenditure. Constant help is very necessary to prevent any call upon the funds of the Red Cross. The number of prisoners of war now on the list is 83, and to provide for these men £230 6s 6d has to be found every four weeks.

Pte A King, of the Royal Scots, whose home is at Napton, has been repatriated, but no further news has yet come to hand.

D.C.M. WON BY RUGBY SOLDIERS.
BRAVE DEEDS.
The following further awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are officially recorded :—

10764 Pte J H Enticott, Oxford & Bucks L.I.(Rugby).
In spite of heavy machine gun fire, he volunteered to go out and look for wounded, and succeeded in bringing back successfully an officer and N.C.O. He showed complete disregard for danger.

32651 B.S.M H W Evans, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his wagon lines were heavily shelled he promptly organised the clearing of the lines, and removed the wounded to an aid post. All this took place under very heavy shell fire, which killed or wounded six men and 37 horses. By his complete coolness and splendid disregard of personal danger he averted all panic and saved many casualties.

840150 Bty Sergt-Major G Hopewell, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his battery ammunition dump was set on fire by enemy shelling he at once went to the position with his Battery Commander and another officer ; and although under heavy shell fire and in great danger from the exploding ammunition, he collected earth and saved a large quantity of material. Both . officers were wounded whilst performing this gallant act.

A RUGBY MASTER DIES AT SEA.—Second-Lieut Leonard George Colbeck, M.C (R.F.A), reported died at sea on the 3rd January, just after completing his 33rd year, was formerly an assistant master at Rugby School. A fine all-round cricketer at Marlborough when captain of the team in 1903, his batting had not a little do with his side averting defeat from Rugby at Lord’s. Two years later he secured a place in the Cambridge University team. One three occasions he figured in the Inter-Varsity hockey match.

MORE AIR RAIDS.—During an air raid on Monday night over London and the South-Eastern Counties 47 men. women and children were killed and 169 injured—30 of them in the basement of one establishment on which a bomb fell. There was a second raid on Tuesday injured.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.
COUNTY COUNCIL ACCEPTS THE DUKE OF BUCCLEUCH’S OFFER.
OLD TREES TO BE REPLACED BY YOUNG ONE.

The Warwickshire County Council, at their meeting on Wednesday, discussed the question of the future of Dunchurch Avenue, on consideration of a special report by the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and decided, after a long discussion, in favour of the first of two alternative schemes suggested by the Duke of Buccleuch. Ald J S Dugdale, K.C, presided.

The proposals made by the Duke of Buccleuch at an interview with the committee at London on January 4th were set forth in the report of the Avenue Committee. His Grace pointed out that his agent’s letter of June 15th last year had not been read or fully reported to the County Council meeting of October 24th last ; that if that had been done it would have made it clear that he himself would have been glad to preserve the Avenue intact ; but that the preservation of the elm trees was impossible because of the rotten and dangerous state of many of them ; and he made an alternative offer which is summarised in his agent’s letter of January 8th, given below. The committee added : We expressed regret to his Grace that any misapprehension should have arisen from the letter of June 15th not having been fully reported or read, and explained that it had been fully read to the County Roads and Bridges Committee, and that the report was in the ordinary course of the Council’s procedure.

THE DUKE’S OFFERS.

The report of the committee continued : Mr Cyprian Knollys, the Duke’s agent, wrote on January 8th : ” I now write to confirm what passed at an interview between the deputation from your Council and the Duke of Buccleuch on the 4th ult. The Duke has always shared the desire expressed by the deputation that the Avenue (which is now about 180 years old) should be preserved. He has had it under observation for some years, and particularly since the gales of December, 1915, and March, 1916, when 74 of the elm trees were blown down. The opportunity which these windfalls afforded for obtaining accurate information as to the state and condition of the trees has convinced the Duke that they have become dangerous, and that even if left the trees, as an avenue, would in the course of a few years practically cease to exist. His Grace is also of opinion that any lopping or pollarding would never be successful, and would only hasten the process of decay. He feels, therefore, that he cannot take the responsibly of leaving the trees standing. In view, however of the importance of maintaining the Avenue for the public benefit in the future the Duke made the following alternative proposals :—

“ (1) That be should himself dispose of the trees standing on the unenclosed land, and after deducting expenses and charges, handover half the proceeds of the sale to the County Council (or other approved body) to be used for re-planting and keeping up the Avenue : or (2) that he should sell to the County Council (or other approved body) the trees standing on the unenclosed land at 6d per cubic foot, which may be considered half their value, on the condition that an avenue it kept up. In either case his Grace will give all his rights over this unenclosed land on which the trees stand.

“ Scheme No. 1 should provide ample money to replant the Avenue as circumstances will permit.

“ Under Scheme 2 the Avenue would belong to the public, but in connection with it there are one or two observations which the Duke thinks the Council may like him to mention for their consideration :

“ If say half the trees are cut, a sufficient sum should be obtained to pay the cost of the purchase, and young trees could then be planted in the vacant spaces. This would, to a great extent, preserve the present appearance of the Avenue. On the other hand, the shade from the remaining trees might injuriously affect the growth of the young plants, and there would be considerable risk of the young trees being injured by the fall of any of the old trees or their limbs. It should also be borne in mind that when trees are grown close, as in an avenue, every tree that is blown down increases the danger of the remainder being also blown. If it was thought desirable to reduce this risk it might be done by cutting down one-half of the Avenue and re-planting it, and then gradually to re-plant the other half.

THE DUKE’S OPINION,

“ From a practical point of view, the Duke considers Scheme 1 to be the best, as though there would be a temporary loss of the Avenue, all danger to the public would be avoided, and there would certainly be a superior avenue in the future, as experience has shown that making up an old avenue is seldom, if ever, successful. And if, as was suggested the Avenue is to be considered as part of the proposed permanent memorial to the 29th Division, it would if newly planted throughout, be in its prime 100 years after the date of his Majesty’s inspection. In making these observations, however, the Duke desires it to be understood that he leaves it entirely to the Council to decide which (if either) of these proposals they would like to adopt ; and I am to add that if the experience and advice of his Forester would be of any assistance to the Council in their consideration of the subject his Grace will be happy if they will avail themselves of it. It was suggested that you would be able to let me hear from you by March 1st.”

“ VERY GENEROUS OFFER.”

The committee proceeded :—

[LONG DISCUSSION BY W.C.C.]

The question was then put to the vote, and the amendment was carried by 32 votes to 10—Scheme No. 1 being, therefore the one accepted.

It was pointed out that a public subscription would be necessary to provide the 29th Division Memorial.

A vote of thanks was passed to the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and the committee will (it was stated) remain in being.

DEATHS.

HERBERT.—In loving memory of Pte. JAMES HERBERT, 6th Northants Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Herbert, Yelvertoft ; killed in action January 19th, 1918, aged 38 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

SMITH.—In loving memory of GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, who was killed in France on January 29, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN, who died of wounds on January 28, 1916.—From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brothers.

 

 

8th Sep 1917. Everyone Must Provide Their Own Sugar.

EVERYONE MUST PROVIDE THEIR OWN SUGAR.— Hundreds of business premises (as well as Government departments) who have tea clubs have raised the point as to whether they will be allowed any sugar under the card scheme. Their hopes are doomed to disappointment, as it will not be possible for them obtain a single lump of sugar unless each member brings the sugar from his or her domestic allowance. Even the charwoman will have to provide her own sugar when working at a house unless the mistress gives some out of her own store. The form of registration shortly to be issued will make it dear that only people actually sleeping in the house will be counted in the sugar allowance.

THE MEAT ORDER.
DOUBTFUL IF LOCAL PRICES WILL BE REDUCED.

“ Unless we can purchase animals at considerably lower prices than those prevailing at present, I am afraid there is little prospect of the price of beef being reduced locally,” a prominent Rugby butcher informed our representative on Thursday. “ In fact,” he added, “ if we are able to get 2½d per lb profit on cost price allowed by the Food controller, we shall have to advance the price of beef somewhat, although the consumers may expect a little relief in so far as mutton and lamb is concerned.

It is not perhaps generally known that while the price at which stock is to be sold to the government is fixed, up to the present time the butchers are having to buy their cattle in the open market at a figure considerably in advance of that fixed by the Government, and this naturally places the butchers in a very difficult position. Our informant pointed out that the butcher bears practically the whole brunt of the consumer’s displeasure.

“ There is a great deal of talk about profiteering,” he added ; “but anyone who attends Rugby Market and observes the prices we are charged with for the live meat will quickly see who is the real profiteer. It will be quite a new experience for us to make as much as 2½d per lb profit ; that is a figure we have never reached before.”

Several meetings have been held by the Rugby masters butchers during the past week, and the whole of the figures have been most carefully worked out. It was decided that give effect of the Order of the prices for certain cuts of beef would have to be advanced a shade ; but that mutton and lamb must be reduced, in some cases as much as 2d per lb. Great difficulty was experienced in arriving at a decision as regards pork owing to the excessive price of pigs, and it is probable that in this case the price will remain as at present.

At present no price lists have been exhibited in the butchers’ shops in Rugby.

WARWICKSHIRE FARMERS’ PROTESTS.

Strong protests against the prices of meat fixed for the New Year by the Food Controller, especially for beef, were made by representative agriculturists at Warwick on Saturday, and there was general agreement during discussion that if an alteration was not made at once there would be a strong tendency towards a meat famine next spring.

Sir E Montagu Nelson said he knew that the Government were making enquiries about putting English meat into cold storage ; but that, he thought, was a question they did not understand. We had storage to keep meat frozen, but not for freezing it, and he did not think it was possible to get any freezing establishments fitted up before January. Apart from the possibility of larger importations, he could not conceive the object of fixing the figure of 60s per cwt live weight of beef in January.

The meeting passed a resolution urging the Food Controller to raise the price to 70 s.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR, The following is the text of a letter which has been sent to the Chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council by the employees of the B.T.H and which will probably be of interest to your readers.
C H GAY, T FALLA, H YATES, F THACKER, and E A GATEHOUSE, Executive Committee

“Sir,-A meeting representative of all grades of employees of British Thomson-Houston Co. was held this evening and I am directed to acquaint you with the text of the resolutions which were put to the meeting and unanimously passed.

“(1.) That the Rugby Food Control Committee as at present constituted does not command the confidence of the employees of the British Thomson-Houston Co., in view of the fact that its constitution embodies so large a proportion of members whose interests are mainly connected with the sale of food.

“(2.) That consequently it is very strongly urged that the committee should be reconstructed, so no persons directly concerned with the sale of food should remain a member. It is felt that the interests of traders could be fully safeguarded by their incorporation in an advisory sub-committee.

“(3.) That in view of the fact that the employees of the British Thomson-Houston Co, together in their dependants represent at least one-quarter of the total population of Rugby, the B.T.H employees should be asked to nominate not less than three representatives to become members of the committee

“ It is hoped that very careful consideration will be given to these matters at the next meeting on your Council.-Yours faithfully,
E RICHES, Acting Secretary.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Gunner Sydney Ivens, Warwickshire R.H.A, is in hospital at Warrington with gunshot wounds received on the 21st ult.

Major John L Baird, C.M.G., D.S.O, has been awarded the Croix de Chevalier by the Present of the French Republic for distinguished service rendered during the course of the campaign.

Gunner W D Duncombe, Garrison Artillery, has been killed in action, death being instantaneous. Gunner Duncombe was an assistant a the Leamington Free Library for about four years, and left in 1911 to take up a position in the B.T.H Works at Rugby. He enlisted about 18 months ago. He was a nephew of the late Chief Inspector Edwards.

Pte Frank S Stockley, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is in hospital at Portsmouth suffering from a broken leg, caused by a fall inot a shell-hole near St Julien. Before joining the Army, Pte Stockley was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and subsequently in the Co-operative Society’s Bakery.

Mrs Chadburn, of 18 Oxford Street, has received official information that her son William has been seriously wounded, and is now in Hospital in France. He formerly belonged to the Rugby Howitzer Battery, but was subsequently transferred to the Warwicks. He is 19 years of age.

SERGT-MAJOR EVAN’S GETS THE D.C.M.

Sergt-Major Evans, R.F.A, Regular Army, son of Mr Frank Evans, Craven Road, has been awarded the D.C.M for gallant conduct in the field on August 5th. He organised a clearing of killed and wounded men and horses from the wagon lines, which were under very heavy shell fire, thus averting a panic and setting a splendid example. Sergt-Major Evans, who went to France in October, 1914, with the Indian Expeditionary Force, is an Old Murrayian, and also an old member of the 1st Company Boys’ Brigade.

CRICK.

PTE W MORGAN, of Crick, is reported as killed on the Western Front. This is the second son David Morgan has lost in the War. The other son was killed in the Battle of the Marne. Mr Morgan has two other sons serving with the Salonica Force, and a son-in-law a prisoner of war in Germany. A memorial service to Pte W Morgan was held in the Parish Church on Sunday afternoon last.

DISCHARGED SAILORS’ and SOLDIERS’ ASSOCIATION.—A meet of the Rugby Branch was held at the Trades Hall on Sunday, Mr Rose presiding over a good attendance. The branch decided to take action in the case of a local discharged soldier, who, it was stated, came off the funds of his club in order to go to job found him at Coventry. Owing to his lameness he was not accepted, and his club refused to take him back on the funds. A sum was collected for him at the meeting to tide him over his present financial stress. Mr C W Browning gave an address enlightening the members on the position of labour towards the association. Arrangements were also made for a concert and dance in aid of the funds of the branch.

FORTHCOMING FLAG DAYS.—Several official flag days to be held under the auspices of the Urban Council are now being arranged. Saturday, September 22nd, will be observed as Lifeboat Day, and this will be followed by efforts for the French Red Cros, British Red Cross, and the Y.M.C.A Huts. It is hoped that these efforts will meet with a generous response from the general public, and any offers of assistance will be welcomed by the hon organiser, Mr J R Barker.

HORSE CHESTNUTS.—We notice from “ The Spectator ” that it is hoped school teachers will encourage the children to collect horse chestnuts, not for the mysterious games of “ conquerors,” but to help in winning the War. It appears that horse chestnuts can be used by the Ministry of Munitions as a substitute for grain in some important industrial processes. Every ton of chestnuts will save half-a-ton of grain for food, and there are, it is said, 200,000 tons of chestnuts to be picked up. A depot for the receipt of chestnuts will probably be opened in Rugby.

DEATHS.

FLETCHER.—In loving memory of my dear nephew, Pte. G. E. FLETCHER, Napton, who died in France from wounds received in dug-out on August 17, 1917 ; aged 19 years..—“ God’s will be done,”—From his loving Aunt TILL and Cousin WILL.

FLETCHER.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. G. E. FLETCHER, second eldest son of Dennis and Amy Fletcher, of Napton, who was wounded on August 27th. 1917, and died shortly afterwards in France, aged 19 years.—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

BADGER.—On August 27th, 1917, at the General Hospital, Rouen, of wounds received in action, ARTHUR FRANCIS, dearly-beloved third son of Charles and Mary Badger, of Shuckburgh Road, Napton, aged 24 years.
“ Alive in our hearts he will ever be,
For love must survive in eternity;
And its just to wait till He bids us rise,
And see the same light in the same dear eyes.”

GILLINGS.—In fondest memory of Rifleman WALTER (Gunner) GILLINGS, R. B., of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action August 18th, 1917, aged 25 years.
“ If love, and care could death prevent,
Thy life would not so soon spent;
But God knew best, and He did see,
Eternal life is best for thee.”
—From his Father and Mother, Brother & Sisters.

GILLINGS.—In loving memory of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, who died of wounds August 18th, 1917.—From Mr. and Mrs. Fox and Family, Burton Green.

GREEN.—ALBERT (52nd Batt. Canadians), youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Green, of Clifton, killed in action in France, aged 23 years.

SUMMERFIELD.—PRIVATE WALTER ERNEST SUMMERFIELD, 3 Winfield Street, Rugby, killed in action in France Aug. 20th, 1917, aged 25 years.
“ Lost to sight, but to memory ever dear.”

IN MEMORIAM.

GREEN.—In affectionate remembrance of FREDERICK JOHN, the dearly-loved son of Frederick and the late Louisa Greenfield Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, who was killed in action at Le-Neuvelle, France, on September 7th, 1916.—Sadly missed by his Father, Brothers and Sisters.

HENTON.—In ever loving memory of Cecil Henton, 13th Batt. R.W. Regt., eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Henton, Railway Terrace, who died September 9th, 1916, from wounds received in action on the Somme on August 29th, age 20.—For the land he loved and the King he served he gave his life. We who sorrow find consolation in the knowledge that he nobly did his duty and died a hero’s death.

LEE.—In loving memory of Charles Lee, of the 1st Coldstream Guards, who died September 6th, 1916.
“ A year has passed, our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more;
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
—From his loving Wife and Children.

LEE.—In loving memory of Pte. CHARLES LEE, who died Sept. 6th, 1916.—Never forgotten by his Mother, Dad, Brothers, Winnie and May.

LEE.—In loving memory of my dear son, HERBERT, who was killed in France, Sept. 3rd, 1916.—Never forgotten by his loving Mother, Sisters, Brothers, and Brothers-in-law, Charlie and Bob.

MURDEN—In loving memory of dear husband Pte HENRY MURDEN, killed in action Sept. 3rd, 1916, aged 26.
Had I but seen him at the last
And watched his dying bed,
Or heard the last sigh of his heart,
Or held his drooping head.
My heart, I think, would not have felt
Such bitterness and grief.
But God had ordered otherwise
And now he rests in peace.
Never forgotten by his loving wife.

MURDEN.—In loving memory of ROBERT EDWARD HENRY MURDEN (Bob), the beloved grandson of the late James Murden, Brinklow, and Mrs. James Murden, widow, Rugby, who was killed in action in France Sept. 3rd, 1916, aged 26 years.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None aching hearts can know.

WARD.—In loving memory of CHARLES WARD (late of the Rifle Brigade), son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Ward, of Brandon, who was killed in action in France, Sept. 3rd, 1916.—From Father, Mother, Sisters, and Brothers. “ A day of remembrance sad to recall.”

30th Jun 1917. Lord Roberts Memorial Workshops

LORD ROBERTS MEMORIAL WORKSHOPS FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

RUGBY & DISTRICT TRIBUTE DAY Saturday, July 7th.

At the beginning of the present War it was realised, both by Lord Roberts and by the Committee of the Society, that in order to deal with the numbers of soldiers and sailors returning disabled it would be necessary to greatly extend the original Workshops Scheme. Various plans were discussed, but while the matter was still under consideration the great Field-Marshal passed away in the midst of his troops.

A SUITABLE MEMORIAL.

As the question of a suitable Memorial was raised, it was felt that by using the money subscribed to carry out Lord Roberts’ own suggestions and ideas with regard to the Workshops no greater and more lasting Memorial, could be given to him. After consultation, therefore, with the Countess Roberts, who gave the proposal her warmest support, it was decided to start the Lord Roberts’ Memorial Fund for Workshops for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors, and arrangements were at once made to acquire a large Factory in London, with the idea that from this centre a large manufacturing business could be established, which would give employment to all disabled men who wished to profit by the scheme.

TOY-MAKING the STAPLE INDUSTRY.

After due consideration, the Committee decided to start Toy-making as the staple industry, to this way serving two purposes, for there was no time to lose in setting about the capture of this pre-eminently German trade.

Machinery for making wooden toys was duly installed, and the services of suitable instructors obtained.

By the end of 1915 over 80 different varieties of toys had been produced in large quantities, over 100 disabled men were employed, the public interest was aroused and the future of the Workshops as a manufacturing centre was assured.

So far so good ; but the business men in charge of the work saw much farther. They saw the need of not only providing employment for these men, but of providing a market for their goods—of manufacturing in such a way that the articles made could be sold to the trade at a trade price.

In this way—and in this way only—could they hope to make the Workshops pay their own way in the future, for it was obvious that, as the Society proposed to provide permanent employment a self-supporting industry was the only thing to be contemplated.

A STIFF PROBLEM.

The problem was a stiff one. Almost every day batches of disabled men were arriving, each knowing that good work and good pay were assured him the moment he entered the Workshops. Those who had started early were now becoming experts, and the quantity of toys being turned out was enormous.

It became apparent that London alone could not deal with the constant demands for employment, and it was decided to open Provincial Branch Workshops under the control of London, thus enabling the men to work, if they desired it, in their own localities.

ECONOMIC VALUE OF SPECIALIZATION.

That the foundation of these Branches would require an immense amount of capital—a great deal more than had originally been subscribed—was obvious from the outset, as each one must be thoroughly equipped and suitably prepared before even one disabled man could be sent there. But, on the other hand, as specialisation was to be the keynote of the idea, the centre could eventually save money by arranging to manufacture goods which would assist the other Branches and the Main Workshops, and at the same time manufacturing completed articles for sale. In this way the proposed metal working Branch at Birmingham would not only make lead soldiers and other metal toys, but would provide all metal parts, hinges, bolts, dies, &c., which are wanted in the manufacture of wooden toys in London, Bradford, the Printing Branch, would print all the catalogues, posters, stationery, &c., for all the centres, and at the same time could take outside orders in abundance. And so on with every other branch.

The Workshops would thus avoid paying out to other firms what they would necessarily demand as profit, and at the same time be enabled to build up several quite distinct and important industries.

YOUR HELP IS WANTED-NOW.

The disabled men are applying in large numbers for admission, and we want your help to give them what they ask.

The Workshops provide not for the present only, but for the whole future life of these brave men. They take them as they come, lame and halt, from the battlefield, and make of them efficient, capable workmen—not receivers of charity, but valuable units of a huge industrial and economic scheme.

LOCAL SUPPORT.

Rugby’s Tribute Day is fixed for Saturday, July 7th, Mr. J. J. McKinnell, C.C., chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, being President of the effort, and he has entrusted the organisation to Mr. J. Reginald Barker.

Every penny that can be got is wanted now. The smallest amount is not too small, but big sums are wanted too. Do not let the Workshops be held up and the work curtailed for lack of your help. Send every penny you can spare to the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. R. P. MASON, Manager, London City and Midland Bank, Rugby, and do all you can to assist the Fund in helping Rugby’s effort towards success. These Workshops are the most practical, way of finding work for our permanently disabled men in the War.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut O M Samson, of Rugby, has been gazetted temporary lieutenant in the R.G.A.

M House and P D Stokes, who about two years ago were prominent members of Rugby School XV, have recently been killed in action. M House was also a member of the XI.

Capt Charles H Alexander, of the Trench Mortar Section, Australian Imperial Forces, was killed in action in France on June 8th. For some years Capt Alexander was a member of the staff of the B.T.H Company, and subsequently went out to Australia, where he joined the Australian Forces on the outbreak of war. He was a brother of Mrs John Martin, of Clifton, and brother-in-law of Mr Fred Clough, of Hillcrest, Hillmorton.

Sapper G Smith, Royal Engineers Signals, son of Mr & Mrs Smith, 12 Acacia Grove, has been appointed to a temporary commission as second-lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers, and posted to the 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Mr Smith, who was a member of the Old Volunteer Force, was mobilized at the beginning of the War, and proceeded to France with Rugby “ E ” Company. He is a member of the permanent staff of the Post Office and an Old Murrayian.

AN OLD SCHOOL SERVANT KILLED.

Mr W Evans, of Catthorpe, has received official notice that his son, Pte William Evans, Royal Warwicks, was killed in action by a German shell on June 10th. He was for over two years a footman with Dr David at the School House, Rugby, and a member of the School Servants’ Cricket Club. At the time he joined—January, 1915—he was a butler at Eton College. He was seriously wounded by shrapnel on September 3rd on the Somme at the taking of Ginchy. After being in hospital three months, he returned to France in January, and had seen some severe fighting since then with the Warwicks. The Officer of his Company, writing to the parents, states that Pte Evans was killed while taking stores up to the line. As one of the Company runners, he had always shown a splendid spirit—a fine, brave boy throughout. His straight, upright character was respected and admired by all the men, and all felt his loss very keenly. Mr Evans’ second son, who is in the K.R.R, has been wounded twice and discharged as medically unfit, and his third son is serving at the Front in a Machine Gun Corps.

STOCKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr James Green, of Calcutt, Stockton, has received news that his son, Sergt Charles Green, R.F.A, was killed in action on June 9th. He enlisted in September, 1914, went to France the following July, and straight into action with his Battery. He went through every engagement the Battery took part in, and was wounded at the Somme in August, 1916. Since then he has been slightly wounded three times—once in the thigh by a bullet, which he pluckily extracted with his jack-knife ; once in the check, causing a nasty flesh wound ; and then again on the heel by a shell. He has also been gassed, and suffered from frozen knees, and was temporarily buried with others by the bursting of a shell. This was only a week prior to the hit that ended fatally. Letters from the Major and Lieutenant of his Battery speak highly of him as a brave and fearless soldier, and say his last action, doubtless, saved the lives of several of his comrades.

ANOTHER LOCAL PRISONER OF WAR.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the local committee, viz, Lance-Corpl C J Colley, 7th Royal Fusiliers, who is interned at Wahn. He was reported missing on April 21st, and it was not until Sunday last that he was further reported prisoner of war. His parents live at Coton House. Mr J R Barker, hon. secretary, has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him on behalf of the committee.

The many friends of Pte A E Hirons, of Churchover, will be glad to learn that news has at last been received of him. A letter received from another prisoner of war at Soltan says :— “ All the parcels have turned up ; it was owing to the frequent changes of address that they went astray. As soon as a parcel arrives I acknowledge and thank you for it. The chief difficulty is the address. We cannot let you know, of course, when we move and the parcels go adrift. I work in the post office here, and three weeks ago found no less than 23 parcels for Pte Hirons’ which I immediately sent on. Everything is done in order that the parcels reach their owners.”

CONCERT.—The wounded soldiers of the Rugby Infirmary Hospital gave a most enjoyable entertainment in their mess-room on Thursday last week, under the presidency of Mr W Dickens, The Commandant and most of the staff, as well as several friends from the town, attended. The programme, which was a long and varied one, was sustained throughout by the “ boys,” and every item was deservedly encored. Sergt Till (East Lancs Regiment), a fine baritone singe, was in splendid voice, and his rendering of “ Thora ” (by special request) was especially good. Others who contributed largely to the success of the evening and who deserve a word of praise were : Sergt Evans, Corp Beckett and Bostock, Ptes Heath and Holme, and “ Wee Geordie,” who impersonated Charlie Chaplin.

SPOTTED FEVER.—A fatal case of spotted fever has occurred in the Rugby rural district. All precautions have been taken.

A REGULATION has been published prohibiting an occupier of an agricultural holding in Great Britain selling or parting with possession of any horse used or capable of being used for the cultivation of the holding except with the authority of a license granted by the Board of Agriculture.

DEATHS.

EVANS.—On June 10th, WILLIAM EVANS, the beloved eldest son of W. E. & A. M. Evans ; killed in action by a German shell in France.- “ Greater love hath no man than this that he laid down his life for his friends.”
“ Thy will be done.”

GREEN.—Killed in action in France on June 9th, Sergt. CHARLES GREEN, beloved son of James and Flora Green, of Calcutt, Stockton ; aged 28.
“ Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died of wounds received in action on June 29th, 1915.—From his sorrowing MOTHER and SISTERS.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. ARTHUR COOMBES, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life, is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last,
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son ARTHUR, who died February 26th, 1915. From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In ever-loving memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. Chater, R.B., of Dunchurch, who was killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ No lips need speak where the heart mourns sincerely.”—From FATHER and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In affectionate remembrance of Rifleman W. H. Chater, 12th Rifle Brigade ; killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ They miss him most who loved him best.”—From ADA.

COOPER.—In loving memory of 9178 Sergt. JOHN COOPER, 1st Yorks, and Lancs. Regiment ; killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From MOTHER, SISTER, and BROTHER.