11th Apr 1919. The War Workers of the School World – from making socks to growing cabbages

THE WAR WORKERS OF THE SCHOOL WORLD.
WHAT WARWICKSHIRE CHILDREN ACCOMPLISHED.
FROM MAKING SOCKS TO GROWING CABBAGES.

An interesting report on the war work of the schools under the Warwickshire County Council is issued by the Education Committee. It states :

The records of school war work make a tale whose web of varied hues has been spun by busy little hands in play time and school hours. Some of the work is that of tiny people from the infants’ departments ; otherwise the workers of this school-world range from the age of seven to fourteen. Countless socks, mittens, scarves and their like have been sent to “ old boys ” in the trenches, to the Red Cross and kindred societies. Treasure bags, too, have been popular ; the girls of one school alone made 1,150, while the little boys of Standards I. and II., unable to sew themselves, gave material for 163 bags. When sandbags were asked for the girls of many schools worked at these.

Ill-content to make only woollen comforts and treasure bags, the girls of certain schools devised more original work. The cookery class at one school for two successive years made a noble Christmas cake, weighing 12lbs., for the soldiers at the local Red Cross Hospital, and when last Christmas brought a scarcity of spice and plums and the making of cakes became difficult, the girls subscribed the money and bought the cake that the soldiers might not have Christmas without one. Another school specialised in the making of slippers with linoleum soles for the wounded of the local V.A.D. Hospital. At a third school the girls have the fine record of 8,925 collars washed and ironed, and 3,020 garments mended, also for the soldiers at the local hospital.

The boys, too, developed certain lines of their own. Members of the woodwork classes helped to make crutches for the wounded, while one school gained local fame for its poster painting and 14 rolls of honour given to Churches of the neighbourhood. Boys of the school gardening classes have done valiant work. Soldiers’ gardens have been dug and planted ; waste ground has been reclaimed ; old people have received help with their gardens ; potatoes have been sprayed and lifted, and allotments measured out under the direction of head teachers. Many schoolboys gave help in harvesting, potato picking, and general farm work during the holidays. Boys and girls combined to send parcels to “ old boys ” and organise collections of many kinds.

The collection and sale of 7,000 jam jars and bottles by one school realised £14 for charities. Two schools united to collect sufficient waste paper to employ a man regularly in “ baling,” and the result has been £105 for local charities. Many schools collected chestnuts, nut-shells, and bones for Government purposes, while in two years 38 tons of blackberries were gathered for Army jam. The £2 10s. received by the children of a country school for their blackberries was divided between the purchase of a large flag for the school and war funds.

Local Red Cross Hospitals were regularly supplied with vegetables, brought by the school children from home gardens, and Warwickshire vegetables were dispatched in large quantities to naval bases ; one school alone collected 18cwt. for this purpose. A show and sale of vegetables in another school brought £16 to provide Christmas gifts for “ old boys ” at the front. If many sailors have unknowingly enjoyed Warwickshire cabbages, very many wounded soldiers have had Warwickshire eggs. One boys’ school has the splendid record of 11,000 eggs collected ; at another school co-operation with outside helpers has resulted in a total of 24,938 eggs and over £97 in money for the National Egg Fund. In yet another part of the county a girls’ school has contributed £25 to the same cause, while 4,335 eggs have been sent from an infants’ school where the tiny people who had no eggs to bring gave weekly halfpennies to help keep up the supply. The school children have all been very devoted workers for the National Egg Collection, and two schools in districts where it was less easy to find eggs sent money collections.

Self-denial and the sacrifice of many “goodies ” are surely responsible in part for the substantial help given to war funds and charities by money collections in the schools. Eighteen schools have sent among them £30 to the Overseas Club ; a single school sent £56 to the Red Cross and Prisoners of War. A big urban school gave a total of £200 to various war funds ; an infants’ school sent £8 10s. to the Blinded Soldiers’ Children’s Fund ; many schools helped with their subscriptions the Y.M.O.A. huts, St. Dunstan’s, the Sailors’ Rests, and Minesweepers’ Funds ; all had collections for the Red Cross. A school entertainment made a profit of £12 to help an “ old boy ” blinded in war. A Christmas collection devoted for the past four years to the French Red Cross ; collections for hungry Belgian children ; a Christmas gift in money sent to local Belgian refugees ; Empire Day collections for the Overseas Club all reveal the children not indifferent to the magic and responsibility of becoming citizens of the world. Thus the 17 schools which have sent an account of their collections have in all raised the sum of £629 9s. for war charities, in addition to the money given to purchase wool and material for comforts. For this latter purpose children have sacrificed their prize money, organised entertainments, held sales of work, and given up their pocket money.

The children’s help has also been enlisted in the distribution of pamphlets urging National Food Economy, the need for War Savings, National Service, &c. Food economy, too, has been practised by the children, who no longer reject crusts or sniff at unfamiliar vegetarian diet. At one school all except the weekly ones voluntarily gave up mid-morning lunch when the submarine menace was explained to them.

A War Savings Association, attached to the schools, had in May, 1918, 11,078 members, mostly children, and had then collected £50,116.

Each boys’ school in the county has its roll of honour, and the record of gallantry these represent must be a wondrous one. Twenty schools hare sent in lists of the military decorations gained by their “ old boys.” These include: V.C., 2 ; D.S.O., 3 ; M.C. with bar, 1 ; M.C., 10 ; D.C.M., 25 ; D.S.M., 4 ; M.M. with bar, 1 ; M.M., 34 ; M.S.M., 1; Mentioned in Despatches, 23 ; Croix de Guerre, 6 ; Medaille Militaire, 3 ; Croce di Guerra, 2 ; British Empire Medal for bravery during a fire at a munitions factory, 2. If all schools had made returns, the numbers would, no doubt, be very much higher. A large number of former elementary scholars have obtained commissions of various ranks from that of lieutenant-colonel downwards.

IN AND AROUND RUGBY.

NOTICE has been received that Pte. James Peacock, late 2nd Border Regt., has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery under shell fire at a Lewis gun post.

Pte. HAROLD JOHN RUSSELL, son of Mrs W. Burbidge, Alexandra Road, Rugby, who was reported missing in September, 1918, is now presumed to have been killed on that day. He was employed at the B.T.H., and was an old Murrayian.

POSTUMOUS AWARD.—Mr. G. Hall, of 31 Alexandra Road, Rugby, has just received the Meritorious Service Medal, which was awarded to his son, Lance-Corpl. S. G. Hall, 7th R.W.R., in recognition of valuable services rendered in France. It to a year to-day (Friday) since Lance-Corpl. Hall was killed in action.

RUGBY WAR MEMORIAL.—Donations are steadily mounting up for the War Memorial scheme for Rugby, and, as will be seen from our advertising columns, the hon. secretary, Mr A Morson, M.B.E., is able to announce several additional sums since the last list was published. The total is now closely approaching the £2,000 mark, and it is hoped the townspeople will not be slow to add their quota to the fund.

SOLDIERS’ STRIKE AT RUGBY.
RINGLEADER ARRESTED.

We understand that a company of about 30 soldiers travelling from Peterborough to Ireland refused to proceed beyond Rugby on Tuesday night. The men had to wait about an hour at Rugby, and when they were ordered to line up to join the Irish Mail they refused. They were apparently under the impression that they were being taken to Russia, and as they considered they had not had a proper leave, they persisted in their refusal to enter the train. They were accordingly billeted in the Church House for the night, returning to the station early on the following morning. On Wednesday an officer in charge of an armed guard arrived, and after holding an inquiry he decided that the men had no case. The ringleaders were arrested and taken to Warwick, and the rest of the men then proceeded to Ireland by the mail train. The men were very orderly throughout, and no disturbance took place.

OLD COMRADES’ ASSOCIATION.
HAPPY RE-UNION OF RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

The 5th Warwickshire (Howitzer) Battery Old Comrades’ Association held a smoking concert at their Headquarters on Friday evening last, about 40 members being present. The chair was taken by Mr. P. Painter. and a very successful programme was rendered. The pianist was Mr. Littler, and the artistes included the following :— Messrs. Jackson, Seymour, Hopewell. J. J. Smith, Read, Owen, Jago, W. Alsop, and Ainsley, with a violin solo by Master L. Turner.

During the evening the Chairman outlined the objects of the Old Comrades’ Association, which, briefly, are as follows :—

(1.) It was thought, after the active service the Rugby Howitzer Battery had seen abroad during the war, that members would like to keep more in touch with one another than would otherwise be possible without such an association.

(2.) The association is open to any man who has been a member, either past or present, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery.

(3.) A nominal annual subscription of 2s. 6d. is made to defray minor expenses.

(4.) During the year it is proposed to hold several social gatherings, and once each year an annual dinner.

(3.) The association will be known as the 5th Warwickshire (Howitzer) Battery (Old Comrades’ Association, and its headquarters will be at the Battery Drill Hall, Rugby.

Colonel H. H. Mulliner, J.P.. has consented to act as president of the association, and. amongst others, the following have consented to become vice-presidents :—Major C. P. Nickalls, D.S.O., Major W. R. W. Anderson, the Rev. C. T. Bernard McNulty, and Capt. J. Brodribb. The following committee to act for the ensuing 12 months has been elected :—Secretary, Mr. P. Painter, 65 York Street, Rugby ; committee, Messrs. H. Packwood, C. Packwood, J. Davis, A. Neal, G. Hopewell, and S. Wetherington.

It Is hoped that every man eligible for available membership will avail himself of the opportunity of joining.

THE RED CROSS.
RUGBY V.A.D.’S WAR WORK CEASES.

A meeting was held at the Infirmary V.A.D. Auxiliary Hospital on Saturday to wind up the special war work of the Rugby V.A.D.’s, Warwick 40 and Warwick 66. Mrs. Brooke Michell, Vice president, and County Director, Mr. E. K. Little, C.B.E., attended, and the members of the Voluntary Aid Detachments present were :— V.A.D. Warwick 40 : Miss Alderson, Miss H. Alderson,. Miss Ashby, Miss Bluemel, Miss Ella Bluemel, Miss Hilda Bluemel, Miss E. Bromwich, Miss Cumming, Mrs. Haigh, Miss Kittermaster, Mrs. Over, Miss Size, Miss St. Hill, Mrs. Thompson, Mrs. Woodworth, Mrs. Yates, Mrs. Hodgson, Mrs. Loverock, Mrs. Simey (Commandant).

V.A.D. Warrick 66 : Mrs. Wharton (Quartermaster), Mrs. Ash, Miss Clarke, Mrs. Currie, Miss David, Miss G. Everest, Miss L. Fortnam, Mrs. Marshall, Miss Maud, Mrs. Pratt, Miss Scott, Miss H. Size, Miss. Steel, Acting Q.M. Miss Townsend, Acting Commandant Miss M. G. Townsend, Miss Thompson, Miss Walker, Miss O. Walrond, Miss O. Walrond, Mrs Whitlock, Mrs Barber, Mrs. Eustace Hopewell, Miss Ivens, Mrs Barnard, Mrs Burdekin (Commandant).

Lady Denbigh, who was unable to attend, sent the following letter :—

“ Your letter followed me to and from Bournemouth, whither I went to recover from a bad attack of the flu. I am here till after Easter, and am afraid I cannot be in Rugby on the 31st. I wish I could. Will you tell Warwick 40 and Warwick 66 how sorry I am, and say how I congratulate them on the splendid work they have put in both at Te Hira and the Infirmary, and especially on the time they have put in at the Infirmary together, at a period when all were beginning to feel the strain, and when so many others fell out or had their hospitals closed. Having had some small experience of other Auxiliary Hospitals. I also think they are much to be congratulated on their mutual assistance and forbearance, and the splendid sinking of any personal opinions in the cause of the one great work of mercy on which they embarked and which they have so successfully carried to conclusion. It has been a great pride and pleasure to me to have been connected with them.”

Before calling upon the County Director to address the members, Mrs. Brooke Michell said : Our County Director has kindly come here this afternoon to dismiss us at the close of our war work. I hope it will be by no means the close of our Red Cross work, as to which Mr. Little may have something to say to us. I should like to take this opportunity of thanking all those who have given such devoted service to our Red Cross work. Speaking for myself, they have made the office of Vice-president a very easy and pleasant one by their unfailing courtesy and efficiency. I am no speaker, but if anything could make me eloquent it would be the daily example of wonderful and unselfish devotion to duty that I have had before me since the autumn of 1914, when our first Hospital was opened. I say “ wonderful,” because to my way of thinking, it requires an extraordinary degree of grit to carry on such work as yours, in all weathers, through times of discouragement, bodily and mental fatigue, ill-health, and even bereavement. I know that one of you worked till the eve of a serious operation. All this you have done for four years unobtrusively, cheerfully, and without the help of any limelight.

I must thank Miss Maude Townsend, who has so ably seconded Mrs. Burdekin, and shared with her the responsibilities of the Commandant’s work, which she has carried on single handed when the Commandant was seriously ill.

Also Miss Bertha Townsend we must be particularly grateful to for the noble way in which she came to our rescue when the Quartermaster of Warwick 66 was obliged to retire from work. It is no small praise to Miss Townsend to say she has carried on in a manner worthy of her predecessor, Mrs. Wharton.

I must also thank Miss Bromwich, whose work at both Ta Hira and the Infirmary has been invaluable. Miss Bromwich has a genius for discovering the dull, uninteresting jobs and doing them unobtrusively at the top of the house or over hours! Miss David, also, is a devoted worker of the same kind. We also thank those who taught the men to do needlework, cabinet making, knitting, carving, etc.—a work which required much patience and tact. Last, but not least, we owe our cooks grateful thanks for having helped to make our Hospitals popular by their excellent cooking. It is hard enough work to cook in winter, but in the heat of summer it requires more than ordinary courage to face a small kitchen containing several people and two large gas cookers surmounted by steaming saucepans! Our cooks had that courage, and. what is more, the food they turned out was so good that at least one bachelor patient inquired “ whether the cook was married or single !” Out of the Detachments, our most grateful thanks are due to Mr. van den Arend, who has done all our transport work locally, and has even bought an ambulance, in which he has often taken our patients to Birmingham himself, thus giving up whole days of his time. Also we thank the orderlies, without whom we could not have carried on our work. They have cheerfully given up a great deal of their time, and done excellent work. I thank all them and every V.A.D. most sincerely, and hope the experience they have acquired in war time may be made use of in times of peace.

In the course of his address, Mr. Little said now that the curtain was coming down on the first act of Red Cross work, he thought it only right that in congratulating themselves, as they had every right to do, on the success which had attended their work for the sick and wounded, they should remember there was a long rehearsal before the curtain rose. He should always feel that great honour was due to those who pioneered Red Cross work in the year before the war, and laid the foundations of the V.A.D. organisation, which was now a household word in every country. They in Rugby began work among the very first in aiding the troops quartered there, though Te Hira, and then the Infirmary, were not opened until later. In 1918 and 1919 they had 30 hospitals open, and at the date of the armistice 34. Their high water mark of established beds was just over 2,000. Considering that Birmingham was a separate Red Cross one, he thought they could feel that Warwickshire had done well, and held a creditable place among the counties of Great Britain. If they analysed their own county at all, he could truthfully say that no part of it had done better service and shown greater loyalty to the cause than Rugby and its neighbourhood. They must always be grateful to Mr. 7 Mrs. St. Hill for giving up their house so unselfishly and making it possible to provide such an excellent hospital as Te Hira became.

Later on, when, in response to their urgent demand for beds, the help of the Guardians was sought, they not only threw no obstacle in the way, but did, and have continued to do, everything in their power to further the interests of the hospital. The question of future work was now being threshed out by our headquarters. As under the Geneva Convention they were only to work for the sick or wounded in time of war. It was necessary that the scope of the various Red Cross Societies should be enlarged, and an International Conference was to be held 20 days after peace was signed to settle this. All the great nations would be represented. One point he suggested to commandants was that a quarterly lecture of a more advanced kind should be arranged. He expected some of the doctors who had been so good in the past would be equally good in the future, and that they would find suitable subjects to interest those who were ready to learn more of anatomy and other subjects. Then he thought it would be an excellent arrangement that, if possible, their nursing members should put in a fortnight or a month every year in one of the permanent hospitals. All these things wanted working out, but he was sure that the end of the war was only the beginning of a new call on V.A.D. work. He thought everyone agreed that the organisation which had proved so successful during the war should be in every expect maintained in peace. It was only left for him to thank them all, on behalf of the branch, very earnestly and very sincerely for all their excellent work. What they had done was, of course, for the sick and wounded, and they already had their gratitude. But that was no reason why the branch should not also express their appreciation of their loyal support.

IN PRAISE OF THE FRENCH PEOPLE.
A NATION HARDENED BY THE WAR.
DR. FRANCES IVENS ON HER EXPERIENCES.

Miss Ivens, M.S.Lond., the daughter of the late Mr. William Ivens, of Harborough Parva, who for the past four years has been surgeon-in-charge of the Scottish Woman’s Hospitals in France, courteously allowed a representative of the Rugby Advertiser to interview her during a recent visit she paid to the town.

“ The Scottish Women’s Hospitals for Foreign Service were started in Edinburgh by Dr. Elsie Inglis at the beginning of the war,” remarked Miss Ivens after our representative had explained the object of his visit, “ and the first fully-equipped hospital unit was sent to France on November 30, 1914. A suitable building was found a few miles from Chantilly, then the seat of the French General Headquarters. In the ancient and beautiful Abbaye de Royaumout, built by St. Louis at the request of his mother, Blanche de Castille, wards for patients were arranged in the great vaulted halls and cloisters. Starting with 100 beds, the hospital accommodation was increased at the request of the French Army Medical Service until 600 patients could be received. When the line moved forward a second hospital of 300 beds was equipped in huts at Villers Cotterets for the 6th Army, and worked until May 30, 1918, when the fighting in its immediate neighbourhood necessitated evacuation. This was fortunately effected during the bombardment of Villers Cotterets with no loss of life to either patients or staff by the women chauffeurs attached to the hospital, assisted by a few American ambulances.”

“ The personnel retired to its base at Royaumont, and work was continued without a day’s interruption for the Foch Reserve Armies, under the command of General Fayolle, and more especially for the 10th Army, under General Mangin. The work became heavier than it had been even during the Amiens offensive in March, and numerous additions were made to the staff. When the armistice was signed Royaumont was still full of seriously wounded cases, and it was not until February 20, 1919, that the last patients could be evacuated, when the records showed that more than 9,000 patients had been treated, and over 7,000 operations performed. The French Military Authorities showed their appreciation of the work of the hospitals by the bestowal of numerous decorations, including a Cross of the Legion of Honour, a Croix de Guerre with palm, 22 Croix de Guerre with star, and 30 Medailles d’Honneur.”

“ What is your impression of the French soldier and the French people as a nation ? ” our representative then asked.

“ I greatly admire the French soldier,” Miss Ivens replied. “ He is a splendid fighter, and also an exceptionally good patient. He does not grumble, and is eminently philosophical. ‘C’est la guerre’ is his invariable response to any commiserating remark. He appreciates to the full any little attention, and his natural charm and politeness won the hearts of his British nurses. Grateful letters invariably arrived from the old patients, and many travelled hundreds of miles to re-visit their hospital. As for the French people, I sometimes wonder if England fully realises what a great nation we have for an ally. I for one certainly did not appreciate their qualities before the war, and was surprised to find them so brilliantly clever and cultivated. Their tenacity and capacity for endurance have been a surprise to themselves.”

“ France has suffered terribly during the war in every way, and no one who has not seen the devastated regions can picture their unutterable desolation. It will be a disaster if she does not get at the Peace Conference the effective frontier line she is demanding. The women of France, too, have shown great patriotism. As soon as the men were mobilised the women quietly took their places, and it was due to their phenomenally hard work that the food supplies maintained such a high level.”

OFFICIAL NOTICES TO FARMERS.

There are in this country awaiting repatriation a number of South African farmers and farmers’ assistants, who will be here for the next three to six months, and desire to utilise the time in getting instruction on well-managed farms. They are in receipt of their Army pay, and Warwickshire farmers are invited to apply for one or more of these men, and to supply them with free board and lodging in return for their help on the farm. Any farmer willing to do so should communicate direct with Capt. F. J. Sutton. South African Force. No; 7 Camp, Perham Down, Wiltshire.

Motor Lorries.
The Board of Agriculture announce that as more motor lorries become available sales will be arranged in the provinces, at which farmers will have an opportunity of purchasing them. At present the small number of vehicles available are being sold in London.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
PROPOSAL TO UTILISE ARMY HUTS.

SIR,-In reply to “The Sailor’s Plaint,” it is, perhaps, some consolation for him to know that someone else is in the same position. I was discharged from the Army six months ago, and am no nearer obtaining a house now than then, and, so far as I can see, the interest taken by the local authorities in the matter is not likely to assist me in getting one this side of the grave.

Would it not be possible for them to obtain some of the Army huts to tide them over the difficulty ? I would not object to living in one of these. But probably they would be considered an eyesore to Rugby.

You should bear in mind, “ Matlow,” that the war is practically over now, bar a bit of flag-wagging and what the authorities were prepared to do when you were an honoured member of his Majesty’s Forces, and now you are a “ civvy,” are two different matters. One has only to hark back to the South African War for a similar state of things.

I am with you all the way, “ Matlow,” in regard to the reward business. Personally, I cannot convince myself that the persons offering them have served in the Forces. If so, presumably they did not belong to the rank and file.

I second your suggestion to the Rugby property owners with avidity, and if there are any of the gentlemen referred to who would care to fall in with it, and will reply to that effect through the medium of this paper, I will gladly send them my name and address, and thank them heartily for their kindness.—Yours, &c.,
HOUSELESS EX SOLDIER.
Rugby, 8th April, 1919.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATES.—In memory of Corpl. THOMAS BATES, killed in France on March 31, 1918.
“ We little thought when leaving home
That he would ne’er return ;
That he so soon in death would sleep,
And leave us here to mourn.”
—From his Mother, Father, and Sisters.

BLUNDELL.—In loving memory of GERALD JAMES BLUNDELL, who died at Salonika on April 11, 1917.
“ Two years have passed since that sad day,
When one we loved was called away.
God took him home, He thought it best,
But in our hearts he liveth yet.”
—From his Sisters.

BURTON.—In memory of MONTAGUE (MONT), only son of Mrs. & the late E. T. Burton, killed in action in France on April 10, 1917. Interred at Tigris Lane Cemetery, Wancourt.—“ Though lost from sight, in memory ever dear.”—From his loving Mother, Sister, and Albert.

BUSHILL.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. GEORGE BUSHILL, who died from wounds received in action at Abbeville on 11th April, 1918.—The Lodge, Dunchurch.

COLES.—In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BERTRAM, the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Coles (late of Old Lodge, Binley), who was shot by a sniper at Arras on April 10, 1917.
“ Had we but seen him at the lase,
And watched his dying bed,
Or heard the last sigh of his heart,
Or held his drooping head ;
Our hearts, I think, would not have felt
Such bitterness and grief ;
But God ordered otherwise,
And now he rests in peace.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

COLING.—In loving and affectionate memory of our darling PHIL, who died of wounds in France on April 10, 1918, aged 24 years.—“ A devoted son, a loving brother.”—From Dad &t Mam.

COLLEDGE.—In loving memory of WALTER EDWARD COLLEDGE, who was killed at the Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917. Also HERBERT HENRY COLLEDGE, who died on February 20, 1919.—“ At rest with the Lord.”—From their loving Mother and Brother and Sisters.

ELSON.—In loving memory of ALFRED WM. ELSON, who died of wounds in France on April 6, 1918.
“ In health and strength he left his home,
Not thinking death so near.
Death came without a warning given,
And bade him meet his God in heaven.
His King and country called him ;
The call was not in vain.
On Britain’s Roll of Honour
You will find our loved one’s name.”
—Sadly missed by his loving Mother, Wife, Brothers and Sisters.

 

Advertisements

30th Nov 1918. Demobilisation Proceeding

DEMOBILISATION PROCEEDING.

The Ministers chiefly concerned are understood to be most busily engaged in perfecting the plans for demobilisation. It is to be remembered by the impatient that, though the armistice has brought about a cessation of hostilities, the War is not yet at an end. There is a possibility of the preliminary peace treaty (remarks the London correspondent of the “Birmingham Daily Post ”) being signed towards the end of February, but in authoritative quarters the impression is that it would be well not to expect the peace celebration until March. Until peace is absolutely assured it will be necessary to keep up a very large force, while an army of occupation in a portion of Germany may be rendered a necessity by her internal condition. In these circumstances complete demobilisation is bound to be a slow process.

EMPLOYMENT IN THE LOCAL ENGINEERING TRADES.

We are informed that the cessation of hostilities and the suspension of munition work will cause very little (if any) dislocation in local employment, and already the absorption of labour for civil work has removed the possibility of the spectre of unemployment coming out to mar what everyone hopes will be a bright and happy Christmas in Rugby. As a matter of fact, the supply of labour is not equal to the demand, as will be gathered from an advertisement on page 2 of this issue.

Amongst the reconstruction schemes which the Government have under consideration is one covering an extensive programme of large central electricity supply stations for the manufacture of electricity in bulk, so that it can be supplied at low rates to the commuter. The engineering shops of Willans & Robinson and the B.T.H Company are admirably laid out to take care of this class of apparatus required for this scheme, and should secure their share of the contracts resulting from this programme being carried through by the Government.

It is common knowledge that the B.T.H Company are in need of first-class machinists and mechanics of all descriptions, as well as a large number of unskilled labourers. Those Rugby craftsmen who temporarily obtained work away from Rugby should seek employment in Rugby now that there is a slackening of demand for labour in purely munition plants.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte J E Grimsley, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regiment, whose home is at Harborough Magna, was killed in action by a machine gun bullet on November 1st. In a letter to his wife an officer states : “ He was one of my best men ; in fact, had he come out alive, Capt Chamberlain was recommending him for a decoration. In several fights I always admired his conduct and his pluck.”

The “ Gazette ” announces that Second-Lieut G A T Vials, West Riding Regiment, the Northants County cricketer, relinquishes his commission on account of ill-health, and is granted the hon rank of lieutenant.—His father, Mr G Vials, formerly practised as a solicitor in Rugby.

Pte E P Burden, R.M.L.I., late of 24 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, died in hospital in France on November 23rd from influenza. Before joining the Colours he was employed by Messrs Willans & Robinson.

Pte A Badger, 9th Battery, R.F.A (Napton), died at Fargo Military Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on Saturday, from pneumonia. He was 25 years of age.

Bombardier Arthur Russell, R.G.A, husband of Mrs Esther Russell, of 6 Benn Street, Rugby, and son of Mr & Mrs W K Russell, died on Tuesday last at Cattrick Bridge Camp. Bombardier Russell, who was a postman at the Rugby Office, had seen two years’ service in France, had been wounded and gassed, and was just convalescent from a broken ankle, sustained by accident while in the lines.

Temp Major C D Miller, the polo player and organiser, is gazetted Acting Lieut-Colonel while commanding a Base Remount Depot.

DEATH OF ROLAND WILSON BROWNE.—Mr & Mrs Browne, of the Book Shop, Station Road, whose three sons have been doing their part in the great War, have received news of the death of their second son Roland, who was killed in action in France on November 4th. He was an Old Murrayian, and on leaving school was apprenticed in the Drawing Office of the B.T.H, where he remained until the time of his joining the 2nd Manchester. Regiment, He was very popular with and held in the highest esteem by his fellow-draughtsmen, and, apart from being quick and clever at his work, he showed great ability in his love and knowledge of art and art subjects. He was a pupil of John Hassell, B.A, and turned out some clever black and white sketches. In water colour he also displayed talent, but seemed especially to excel in oil colour painting. Touching references were made at the Congregational Church services on Sunday last. He was 23 years of age. and had been in the Army less than five months when he met with his untimely end.

INFLUENZA.—The number of deaths from influenza in Rugby district during the past week was six, a decrease of 10 on the preceding week. Since the 14th October no less than 130 deaths from either influenza or pneumonia have been registered locally.

BRITISH CASUALTIES IN THE WAR.
The figures of British casualties during the war are officially given for each theatre of war, and show a total of 3,049,991. They are made up as follows :—Killed and died, 37,876 officers ; 620,828 other ranks ; wounded, 92,664 officers ; 1,939,478 other ranks ; missing (including prisoners), 12,094 officers ; 347,051 other ranks.

POST-PRESENTATION OF A MILITARY CROSS.
At Birmingham on Friday, last week a number of decorations were presented to men who had won them, or their relatives, by Major-General Sir Hy Schlater. Among the recipients was the mother of Colour-Sergt-Major G H Hayes, R.W.R, who was wounded at Neuve Chapelle on October 4th, 1917, and died a few days afterwards. The act for which the Cross was awarded was officially described thus :—

“ The advance was held up by a strong enemy machine gun position, and all the officers became casualties. He took command and crawled under direct fire to a position from which he killed several of the enemy. He then led his men in an attack on the post, which he captured with ten prisoners and a machine gun. He showed splendid courage and initiative.”

Colour-Sergt-Major Hayes was for some time employed at the Great Central Station as a drayman, and afterwards at the B.T.H as a shunter, where he was working when called up. He had been in the “ E ” Co. (Rugby) Volunteers for 16 years. He was also a well-known local footballer, having played with the Penlee, Star, Old Boys and other clubs, by the members of which and his many friends he was much respected.

FOR WAR SERVICE.

The under-mentioned, have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War by the Chairman of the Joint War Committee of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St John of Jerusalem in England for valuable services rendered in connection with the War :— Miss L Court, Kineton Hospital, Warwick ; Miss B Lewis, Clifton Court Hospital, Rugby ; and Miss A O Tiley, Kineton Hospital Warwick.

DUNCHURCH.
RETURN OF A PRISONER OF WAR.—R Burton. son of Mr & Mrs James Burton, Daventry Road, has arrived home from Germany, where he has been a prisoner of war. He went out to France with polo ponies, and was soon in the fighting and was taken prisoner. It is needless to say he received a hearty welcome, and all his old friends were glad to see him looking fairly well.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PARISH COUNCIL.—At a special meeting on Tuesday evening there were present : Messrs C E W Boughton-Leigh (chairman), J Martin, W Allen, and F Fellows (clerk):—The question of a parish war memorial was raised, and the members were unanimously of opinion that some steps in this direction should be taken as soon as possible.—The Chairman said personally he favoured the erection of a parish hall and reading room, similar to that at Clifton and other villages, provided that they could raise sufficient funds. This would fill a growing need in the parish, and if such a memorial was erected they could have the names of all who had offered their service to the country inscribed on the walls.—On the motion of Mr Martin, who said he agreed with the suggestion of the Chairman, the question was deferred until the next meeting.

CHURCH LAWFORD.
GUN WEEK.—Houses were gaily decorated with flags when the gun visited this village. The quota necessary for Church Lawford and Kings Newnham to obtain a large shell was £1,200, but this sum was exceeded by £250. This result was the more creditable because at the recent estate sale most of the farmers and some of the other residents bought their respective homes and farms.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
DIED IN FRANCE.—A telegram was received by his mother at Broadwell, on Monday afternoon, conveying the sad information that Pte Mark Abbott, of the 7th Dragoon Guards, had died of double pneumonia while with the Forces in France. The deceased had completed his period of service in the Regular Army, having served a good portion of his time in India, from whence he came with the first Indian Forces to France. He was of a genial disposition and popular in the village.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

WALTER HART’S DEATH.—A letter has been received from the Commanding Officer of his Battalion, stating that Corpl Walter Hart was killed by a shell on the 6th ult, near Le Catelet. The writer adds that Corpl Hart had done good work for him since he came to his Company, and that he entertained the highest opinion of him.

SERGT F RUSSELL DECORATED.—Sergt F Russell (Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment), who has been spending a few days at home, has received notification that he has been awarded the Military Medal for his gallant conduct on the 14th ult, when heading his men info action. Sergt Russell is fast recovering from his wound received on that occasion, and returned to Halifax on Monday. Besides his new decoration, he already holds the Queen Victoria and King Edward VII Medals for the South African War, and the Long Service Medal.

WOUNDED.—During the last hours of the war Rifleman E G T STEEL (N.Z Rifle Brigade), only son of Mr & Mrs Geo Steel, of this village, was wounded. His company had just taken their objective, and after witnessing the loss of several of his comrades, Rifleman Steele was hit with a bullet in the right arm. He is progressing well. Pte H Windsor (R.W.R) has also been wounded in the forearm.

RETURN OF A PRISONER OF WAR.—On Friday evening last week Pte Sidney Linnett (A.S.C), who has for over six months been a prisoner of war with the Germans, was welcomed home with great rejoicing. Pte Linnett, who is the adopted son of Mr and the late Mrs W Gaskins, of the Model Village, enlisted in September, 1914, at the age of 18, in the Royal Warwicks, and was eventually transferred to the A.S.C. He had seen much service all through the War, and on April 10th last was reported missing, and afterwards found to be a prisoner of war. He was located with others in the zone of danger behind the German lines, and not only worked under these conditions, but also experienced great cruelty from his captors. On the signing of the armistice he was set at liberty, and he and his comrades had to make their way back to the British lines with no food except turnips obtained from the fields. He arrived at Dover on the 19th, and reached Marton Station on the evening of the 22nd. Being unable to walk the two miles to his home, he was driven up. He states that many of his comrades lost their lives by being made to work within range of the British guns. Pte Linnett has grown much thinner during his captivity, and is still suffering from the shock of his experiences ; but the bare mention of the word “ home ” never fails to bring back his former sunny smile.

BRETFORD.
PTE BONEHAM DISCHARGED.—Pte Francis Wm Boneham, son of Mr T & Mrs Boneham, of Bretford, has now returned home. He joined the 3rd Warwicks in 1916, and saw much service in France. He has received a bad fracture of the right knee-cap, and is permanently disabled. He was also badly gassed, from the effects of which he is now suffering. Before joining up he was a respected employee of Messrs Bluemel’s Ltd.

WOLSTON.

Sapper H Smith. R.E.—News has reached Miss Dorothy Smith that her brother, Sapper Harry Smith, of the Royal Engineers, has died of influenza in Italy. He was one of the earliest Wolston recruits, joining up in August, 1914. Before the War he was in the employ of Mr A J Lord as a carpenter. He went through many battles in France, and was wounded on five different occasions, besides being once gassed. His father—the late Mr G Smith—was for many years employed as a signalman at Brandon and Wolston Station. Another brother, who has been in the Marines for 12 years, fought in the Battle of Jutland, and was on the destroyer, Champion Leader. He had also been previously wrecked.

MILITARY MEDAL.—The medal won by the late Joseph Edmans was presented to his father—Mr J Edmans, of Wolston—by Major-General Slater, of the Midland Command. The brave deed for which the medal was awarded was for picking up a live bomb and hurling it out of danger, and thus saving many lives. He, with one of his brothers, went through the Battle of Mons, and so the Mons Star is also due to the deceased hero. Mr Edmans is proud of the Army record of his family, six sons having fought for their country. Two have paid the extreme penalty, and several of the others have been badly wounded, including Sergt Percy Edmans, who received his discharge.

PRISONER’S RETURN.—Lance-Corpl Reader, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany, returned to his home at the beginning of the week. He met with a very hearty welcome from the inhabitants. Lance-Corpl Reader has not fared so badly as many of the prisoners. Thanks to the parcels he received from the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, he had done fairly well, and is very thankful for them. Mr Reader, who is agent for Mr Udal, is well known and respected, and the inhabitants are delighted to think that he has safely returned to his wife and children.

KINETON
THE FUNERAL OF CORPL HORACE LEE THOMAS, who met with a fatal accident at the Kineton Hospital, took place at Tooting Cemetery on Monday, and was an impressive military ceremony, witnessed by a large concourse of people. The H. A.C provided a firing party, and the coffin was covered with the Union Jack. Over 30 beautiful floral tributes were sent, including several from Kineton. The relatives were deeply grateful for the kindness shown at Kineton.

PEACE.

PEACE, longed-for and fought-for, has at last arrived.

But the plenty of pre-war days will not return yet awhile. Rationing must remain in force for some time.

The International Stores ask their customers, therefore, to accept cheerfully for a little longer those restrictions which the War made necessary.

It will be their earnest endeavour, whatever conditions the future may bring, to maintain the reputation they have built up for High Quality, Low Prices, and Efficient Service.

They are confident that when normal times are restored, their old customers will continue their patronage.

International Stores

THE BIGGEST GROCERS IN THE WORLD

DEATHS.

BADGER.—In ever-loving memory of Bombardier A. BADGER, 235869, A Battery R.F.A., who passed away peacefully from pneumonia, at Fargo Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on November 23rd, aged 25.
“ A light is from our household gone,
The voice we loved is still ;
A place is vacant in our hearts
Which never can be filled.”
—Sadly missed by Mary, Sis, Jim, Fanny, Mr. & Mrs. Cockerill and Family.

BURDEN.—In loving memory of my dear brother, Pte. E. P. BURDEN, R.M.L.I., who died of influenza in hospital in France on November 23, 1918.

BROWNE.—On November 4th, killed in action in France, ROLAND WILSON, second and dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Browne, Railway Terrace, Rugby; aged 23 years.

FLETCHER.—On November 8th, at Boulogne, of pneumonia, Driver G. FLETCHER, R.F.A., aged 19 years and 10 months, the dearly beloved son of George and Lettie Fletcher, who passed peacefully away after great suffering, most patiently home.
“ The evening star shines on his grave :
The one we could not save ;
’Tis sad, but ’tis true, we cannot tell why,
The best are the first that are called on to die.”
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

GRIMSLEY.—Killed in action on November 1st, 1918, in France, JOHN EDWARD, the dearly beloved husband of Edith Ellen Grimsley, of Harborough Magna, near Rugby.
“ A day of remembrance, sad to recall,
The loss of our dear one, loved by us all.
We think of him in silence, and his name we oft recall ;
But there is nothing left but his photo on the wall.
Fondly we loved him, he is as dear to us still.
But in grief we must bend to God’s Holy Will.
If we could have raised his dying head, or heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard for us that loved him well.”
—Too dearly loved to ever be forgotten by his loving Wife, Mother, Father, Sisters and brother Will.

SMITH.—On November 7th, in Italy, of pneumonia following influenza, Sapper HARRY SMITH, Royal Engineers, youngest son of the late George Smith, of Wolston, aged 25 years.—“ Until the day breaks and the shadows flee away.”

WILLIAMS.—On October 30th, killed in action in France, WILLIAM, the dearly beloved husband of Emily Williams, 14 Lawford Road, New Bilton.

WILSON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY WILSON, killed in action in France on November 1, 1918.
“ The midnight stars are shining
On a grave I cannot see,
Amid where storms of battle raged
Lies one most dear to me.”
—From his loving Wife.

WILSON.—Killed in action in France on November 1st, 1918, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY WILSON, aged 24 years ; eldest and beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Wilson, of Bilton.
“There is a link Death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Sister and Brothers.

IN MEMORIAM.

COX.—In proud and loving memory of Rifleman E. J. COX (ERN), K.R.R., Bilton, who was killed at Cambrai on November 30, 1917.—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Father, Sisters, Brothers, and Nellie.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

RICHARDSON.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt LEONARD RICHARDSON, of the K.R.R. Corps, who was killed in France on November 30th, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Sisters, Brother, Grandmother and Nell, The Banks, Dunchurch.

WALL.—In loving memory of Corpl. LOUIS HAROLD WALL, M.M., King’s Royal Rifles, reported missing November 30, 1917.—From his loving Father and Mother, Eva and Jan.

 

Russell, Frederick Arthur. Died 26th Nov 1918

Frederick Arthur RUSSELL was born in Rugby on 28 January 1889 and his birth was registered there with those names in Q1, 1889.  He was the eldest son of William Knibb Russell (b.c.1863 in Rugby) and Charlotte Hannah, née Leeson, Russell (b.c.1862 in Braunston).

The Russell name goes back to Scotland.  William Knibb Russell’s father, Matthew, came south from Darvel, Ayr.  In 1861, Matthew, now aged 27, was a grocer and living at 60 Warwick Street, Rugby with his wife, Elizabeth Jane, née Ensor, and his brother in-law Robert J. Ensor.  The Ensor family were from Newbold on Avon.

In 1891 the Russell family were living at 18 Stephen Street, Rugby.  Frederick was 2 years old and his father, William, was a ‘general labourer’.  His mother, Charlotte’s father, Frederick’s grandfather, was also living with them.

By 1901 they had moved to 25 Rowland Street and Frederick’s father was now a ‘plasterer’.  There was another son, Frederick’s brother, Ernest Henry who was four.  Elsie E Morris, a nine year old ‘niece’ from Long Buckby was in the house, and Charlotte’s father, now 84, was still with them.

In late 1909, Frederick married, as Arthur Frederick, in Rugby with Esther Mary Watkins, who was from Flecknoe – she was three years older than Frederick.  They married at the Baptist Chapel, on 4 December 1909, and by 1911, had moved to live at 11 Dale Street, Rugby.  Frederick was now a ‘postman’ and they had a three month old daughter, Esther Jessie Russell, who had been born on 1 January 1911.

By 1911, the rest of the family had moved to 29 Benn Street, Rugby, and Frederick’s father had become a ‘laundryman’ – indeed he was the owner of a laundry.  His wife was a ‘laundress’, and three of the four girls lodging with them were each described as a ‘laundress’.  Frederick’s brother, Ernest Henry, was a ‘grocer’s apprentice’.  The family would still be living in the same house after the war.

With War declared, and as a married man, Frederick would not have been expected to join up with the first volunteers.  He continued working as a postman until late 1915, and then probably into mid-1916 until he had to report to Plymouth for duty.

Frederick Arthur Russell’s army Service Record survives – it is somewhat complicated with many medical entries, as Frederick seems to have been wounded several times.

He was ‘attested’ at Rugby into the Royal Garrison Artillery on 9 December 1915 for the ‘Duration of the War’, whilst still a postman, aged 26 years and 11 months, 5ft 9ins tall, 168 lbs, of very good physical development and now living at 6 Benn Street, Rugby, nearer the rest of his family.  He was of ‘C of E’ religion.  Whilst ‘attested’ he was not required for a while, but he ‘rejoined the colours’ on 28 August 1916, from which date his service was reckoned and he was posted to ‘3 Depot’ as a ‘Gunner’ No: 116560 and then ‘Approved’ on 30 August 1916 at Plymouth.

His gave his wife’s name, Esther Mary née Watkins, as his next of kin – she was at home at 6 Benn Street, Rugby.  The Baptist Minister signed the various documents for the family.

His service dates and service periods were summarised as follows:

Yrs : Days
Home         9.12.15 to 23.1.17             1 :  46
BEF           24.1.17 to 19.4.17                   86
Home         20.4.17 to 21.6.17                   63
BEF           22.6.17 to 30.8.18              1 : 70
Home         31.8.18 to 26.11.18                 88

Total                             2 : 353

When he arrived at the Citadel, Plymouth, on ‘29.8.16’, he was revaccinated, he then had a TAB inoculation on ‘11.9.16’, and he left the Citadel and was posted again on 18 September.  He passed his ‘Signalling 2nd Class’ on 13 December 1916.  He was posted to ‘2 Depot’ on 17 January 1917 and a week later on 24 January 1917, he was posted to the B.E.F. in France, and was then posted to 146 Heavy Battery from Base on 10 February 1917.

Just over two months after his arrival in France, he was wounded on 11 April 1917, ‘WO Cas List – Wd 11-4-17 [Action] N of Kin … WO Cas List – GSW Lt. Thigh Sev.’ [Gunshot wound left thigh, severe] and he was ‘Adm ? Cas/n? Gen Ho Etaples 13-4-17’ [Admission to Canadian General Hospital, Etaples].

He was ‘invalided to England’ on 17 April 1917, and again posted to ‘2 Depot’ – presumably as an administrative device – and then ‘Wd adm to Eastern Gen Hos Cambs’ [Wounded admission to Eastern General Hospital, Cambridge].  It seems that he recovered fairly quickly as he was posted to the ‘Res Bde’ and ‘4 Res Bgd’, both on 14 May and then promoted Bombardier on 28 May 1917 – however, this seems to have been an error and was corrected to Lance Bombardier on 30 May 1917!  He was sent back to ‘Base’ in France on 22 June 1917 to the ‘4 Res Bty’, and then from ‘Base’ to ‘135 Heavy [Battery] … in the field’ on 30 June 1917.

He became due for leave in UK (via Boulogne) from 1 to 15 March 1918, but a few months after his return to France, he became a casualty again apparently on 10 August 1918 – it seems due to an accident – possibly when dealing with a heavy artillery piece, ‘WO Cas List – NYD – Fract Tibia & Fibular R, Severe adm 1. (Presby USA), Gen H Etretat 22/8/18’ [Fractured Tibia and Fibula right, severe, admitted to No 1 (Presbreterian USA), General Hospital Etretat,[1]  22 August 1918].

There were various administrative notes, but after a few days at Etretat, on 30/31 August 1918, Frederick was evacuated back to UK for treatment on the ‘Ambulance Ship St Patrick’ – and posted away from the battery – ‘WO Cas List – Sick Adm – Lord Derby W Hos Warrington 31-8-18 to 9.11.18 simple fracture – accidental’ [This was for treatment at the Lord Derby War Hospital, Warrington] – it seems the break was the a result of an accident – accidents still happened in war!

He was then posted back to the Depot at Catterick Camp, presumably to recuperate and then to await re-posting, but on about 20 November 1918, whilst at this posting at the ‘RA & Tank Corps, Catterick’, he was admitted to Catterick Military Hospital.

His Medical Case Sheet gives typed up notes on his condition, which give an indication of the severity of the ‘Spanish Flu’, which before the advent of antibiotics, killed many more people, both civilian and military, all around the world, than did the battles of WWI.

‘21 Nov – Admitted, complained of general pains, headache and malaise two days ago.  Cough.  On admission Temp. 102.  Sod. Sal. Gr.x 4 hourly.  Pulse 100.

22 Nov – Headache.  No marked change.

23 Nov – Condition worse.  Temp.102.

24 Nov – Temp. risen. Resp. more rapid.  Abdominal pain and distension.  Inhalation of Benzine.  Cough severe.

25 Nov – Temp. 103.4. Pulse 80.  Condition serious.

26 Nov – Very cyancsel.[2]  Pulse strong until the last.  Resps. Laboured.  Stimulants given.

Died from Broncho Pneumonia.  The result of Influenza contracted during ordinary Military Service.

No P.M.  Nothing of special Medical Interest to investigate.’

Another handwritten note states that ‘The above person died whilst serving’.  He died just six days after being admitted from ‘Influenza and Bronchitis’ at 7.00pm on 26 November 1911.   

An entry also states ‘Hippowell Camp, Catterick – Docs reporting death 26-11-18 – Influenza & Bronchial Pneumonia.  Office – Note of Sympathy to next of kin.’

His body was returned to his family and he was buried in a family plot No: B.298 in the Clifton Road Cemetery, Rugby.  This is a family plot without a CWGC Headstone.  He is interred with ‘Bdr F.A. Russell, RGA’ on one headstone and with his parents alongside, together with William Watkins, his father-in-law, who died on 8 November 1924.

It was said by his family that Frederick died as a result of being gassed at the front, but that is not discernible from available records.  Whether or not this was the case, he should have been entitled to a CWGC gravestone.[3]  He is in any case recorded as a war death by the CWGC – perhaps the family had the option of a gravestone and declined.

Frederick Arthur Russell was awarded the British War and Victory Medals, and his widow acknowledged their receipt on 1 November 1921

He is remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates; on a headstone around the family plot at the Clifton Road Rugby Cemetery, Rugby (right);[4] and at the Baptist Church, where he is remembered as F Arthur Russell – the Memorial Tablet is above the Minister’s vestry in the Church, and inscribed
This tablet and the organ in the Church are erected to the memory of those members of this Church who laid down their lives in the Great War 1914 – 1918, whose names are given herewith also as an act of thanksgiving for the safe return of the many others from this Church who served in the war.’
‘On waters deep in the treacherous mud.
On rock bound heights and burning sand.
They poured the offering of their blood.
They kept the honour of the land.’

Frederick’s ‘Will Form’ dated 19 January 1917, gave his wife’s name and their address.  Final ‘disposal’ was dealt with by the army on 3 February 1921.

It seems his effects were sent to ‘Mrs A Watkins, 6 Benn Street’ – the army initially used his widow’s maiden name in error.  The effects were listed as,
‘Watch, ring, wrist strap, cigarette case & lighter, scissors, purse, pipe, cigarettes, razor (in case), belt, pocket wallet, letters, photos, 3 treasure bags, parcel (unopened), writing pad, field message, wool helmet, mirror, disc.’

On receipt of these, his widow wrote to the War Office,
‘Dear Sir, I am writing to ask why the money order for £1-8-1 ½ d, 1 Franc piece, 1 5 Frank note was not forwarded to me with the other effects of my late husband.  I know they were sent to the Records in D???? from Military Hospital Catterick Camp, Yorks, Dec 5th 1918.  I have a list of all the effects so shall be very much obliged if you will kindly see to this for me, hoping I shall hear soon, Yours truly, E M Russell.’

His widow, Esther Mary Russell, was authorised to receive a pension.  She later re-married with James Albert Tame on 18 September 1923 at the Baptist Church, Rugby.   Esther was then 38, a widow, and had moved to 37 Benn Street, Rugby.

James was 50, a widower and estimating engineer (of 40 York Street, Rugby).  He was born 4 April 1873, son of James Ottoway Tame and Rosetta, née James, Tame.  He had married Kate Cook on 31 July 1897 and they were both living in Kingston on Thames in 1901, but had moved to ‘Strathmore’, Temple Street, Rugby before 1911.

Frederick and Esther’s daughter, Jessie Ester Russell, never married, but served in the WRNS during WW2.

Frederick’s younger brother, Ernest Henry Russell, who was born in 1896, also served in WW1.  He was probably a grocer’s assistant with the Co-Op at the time of his enlistment and later had his own shop, E. H. Russell, the Family Grocer, at 10 Henry Street, Rugby, opposite the Rugby Theatre.  He was a Private, No:266698, and was a signaller (or involved with communications) with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.  He was gassed, but survived, and sent to Somerset for treatment and recuperation.  There he met Dorothy May Hollyman from Clevedon and they were married in 1923.  Their grandson remembers him telling of repairing broken field telephone lines with paperclips.  Ernest died aged 77 in 1974.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Frederick Arthur RUSSELL was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson.  Further information was provided by Martin Taylor,  Frederick Taylor would have been his Great Uncle had he survived the War.  The article is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, October 2018.

 

[1]      It was at this hospital that Arthur GREATREX, from Rugby, was treated, prior to his death on 10 November 1918 – see ‘Rugby Remembers’ for 10 November 1918.

[2]      Implies a blue colour, particularly of the lips, a symptom when insufficient oxygen was reaching the body.

[3]      Qualifications for inclusion.  The Commission only commemorates those who have died during the designated war years, while in Commonwealth military service or of causes attributable to service.  Death in service included not only those killed in combat but other causes such as those that died in training accidents, air raids and due to disease such as the 1918 flu pandemic.  The applicable periods of consideration are 4 August 1914 to 31 August 1921 for the First World War … The end date for the First World War period is the official end of the war, … Ref: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commonwealth_War_Graves_Commission#Qualifications_for_inclusion.

[4]      Photograph provided by Frederick’s great-nephew, Martin Taylor.

9th Nov 1918. An Unfounded Rumour

AN UNFOUNDED RUMOUR
PREMATURE REJOICING.

Feverish excitement was caused in the town on Thursday afternoon by the circulation of a rumour that an armistice had been signed at 2.30 p.m.

In several instances workpeople gave themselves up to jubilation, and work came to a standstill, until it was found later in the day that the statement had not come through an official source and was premature.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt George Alan C Smith, M.C, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who has been killed by a shell in France, was the elder son of the Master of Dulwich College. At Rugby he was head of his house (Mr G F Bradby’s), and played in the School XV for two seasons, captaining the team during his last term.

Lieut G T S Horton, Royal Hussars, son of Mr T Horton, J.P, Ashlawn House, near Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Sergt A J Chadwick, of Kilsby, who has been on active service since December, 1914, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field.

Lance-Corpl W L Gilks, Yorks & Lancs Regt, son of the late Mr Lewis Gilks, farmer, Grandborough, has been killed in action. He enlisted in August, 1914, and had seen considerable foreign service.

The following Rugby men have been posted as missing :—Pte E Cox, Pte F Smyth, Pte C Spokes, and Pte W Boote, all of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment ; Ptes A Webster, Royal West Surrey Regiment ; A J Webster, London Regiment ; G Watkins, R.W.R, and H Cockerill, M.G.C, have been reported killed ; and Pte W H Newman, Royal Berks Regiment, has died of wounds. Lance-Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, has been taken prisoner.

Gunner F J Lines, youngest son of Mrs Lines and the late Mr Lines, 17 Spring Street, died of wounds on October 6th. He was an old Murrayian, 20 years of age, and before joining the army in August, 1916, he was employed by the late Mr C B Jones, hairdresser, Murray Road, who has also been killed in action.

Lance-Corpl H Evans (23), son of Mr W Evans, Thurlaston, formerly of Crick, has died at Norwich Hospital from pneumonia, contracted on active service. He joined the K.R.R on September 2, 1914, and saw a good deal of heavy fighting round Ypres. He was wounded at Hooge in 1915, and again on the Somme in 1916. He was subsequently invalided home, and afterwards was transferred to the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. He contracted a chill while on duty, and after laying up for a few days he reported for duty too soon, caught another chill, and died on Wednesday. In peace time he was well known as a footballer and cricketer. An elder brother was killed in June last, and another brother is in France.

Pte Victor Cowley, son of Walter Cowley, 34 Poplar Grove, 1st Dorset Regt, has been reported missing since September 30. He joined up in September, 1914, had been twice wounded, and went to France for the third time in March last. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before the war was employed in the Winding Department of the B.T.H.

Pte Bernard Woodward, youngest son of Mr and Mrs T Woodward, 39 Stephen Street, has been wounded.

Ptc A Allen, Gloucester Regt, who was employed in the B.T.H Foundry before the war, died from wounds on October 25th.

The Northants Yeomanry, twice mentioned by the Earl of Cavan in his official despatches for distinguished service in Italy last week, is commanded by Sir Charles Lowther, formerly Master of the Pytchley Hounds, and includes amongst its officers Major T E Manning, captain of the Northamptonshire County cricket team.

The death occurred at Stratford-on-Avon, on Tuesday, of ex-Sergt Norman Kinman, of the Warwickshire Royal Horse Artillery, who was well known in athletic circles in the Midlands prior to the War. He was a prominent sprinter and an excellent Rugby footballer, doing fine work for Stratford-on-Avon as wing three-quarter. He gained his Midland cap, and also toured with Leicester. He volunteered at the outbreak of war, and was dis-charged in February of this year after a bad gas attack, having gained his Mons Star and Military Medal. He was 30 years of age.

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR REV. R. W. DUGDALE.

A choral requiem in memory of the Rev R W Dugdale, curate in charge, who was killed in France recently, was celebrated at Holy Trinity Church on Saturday (All Souls’ Day). The celebrant was the Rev G H Roper, assisted by the Rev T H Perry. The 42nd Psalm was chanted at the beginning of the service, and the hymns were : “ Lord, it belongs not to my care,” and “ Let Saints on Earth.” At the conclusion of the service the Nune Dimittis was sung. The congregation included Mrs Hardy and Miss Dugdale (sisters), Canon Simpson, Capt & Mrs C P Evers, Messrs F J Kittermaster, C H Fuller, F Thompson, G E Over, W Brooke, A W Sheasby, W T Coles Hodges, C E L Wright, F W Cooke, W. M. and E R Giding. Senior P.M (representing the Lodge of Rectitude, Freemasons, of which the Rev R W Dugdale was chaplain), A Coaton, Mr & Mrs H Marple, Mrs C N Hoare, Miss Gray, Mike Tomlinson, Miss Dean, Miss Buckley, Miss Stuart, Mrs Stokes, Mrs Stanley, Miss Cope and Mrs Ray (representing Murray School, of which he was chaplain), Misses Hollowell, Miss Sargent, Miss Longstaff, Miss Lines, Mrs Beasley, &c.

DUNCHURCH.

The funeral of Leonard J Hopkins, aged 18 years, son of Mr and Mrs Wm Hopkins of Dunchurch, took place at Dunchurch on Tuesday last. Deceased, who was a private in the Devon Reserves, died after a short illness in Waveney Hospital, Ballymena, Ireland. Before joining the army he was employed as gardener at Thurlaston Grange, and a bunch of mauve chrysanthemums (his favourite flower) was sent by Mr Appleby, bearing the word, “These flowers he tended so carefully during his life are sent as a token of deep sympathy from all at Thurlaston Grange.” The funeral service was conducted by the Vicar, the Rev. E P Rowland, and the coffin was borne by four soldiers staying in the village.
Among the flowers were tributes from Mrs Mallam, Mr and Mrs Appleby, Mr and Mrs Dew, Mrs Borsley, Mr and Mrs Tomlin, and Mrs Busby. The deceased was very popular with the boys of the village, and in addition to the above were wreaths from “His Chums,” Pte R Jennings (serving in France), and the Scholars and Staff of Dunchurch Boys’ School. The people of the village fell the deepest sympathy with Mr and Mrs Hopkins in their bereavement.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr and Mrs Joseph Lane have now received official information that their son, Pte Ernest Lane (R.W.R), formerly porter at the Station here, was wounded and is missing from September 2nd last.—Mr and Mrs Fred Sabin have been advised through a letter from Pte T Sewell (his chum) that their younger son, Pte Edward Sabin (R.W.R), has been killed in action. His friend saw him fall, and was with him till death took place. The news has come as a great shock to Mr and Mrs Sabin, the latter of whom has been seriously ill with influenza.

SERGT RUSSELL WOUNDED.—News is to hand that Sergt F Russell (West Riding Regt) was wounded as he was leading his platoon into action on the 14th ult, a piece of shrapnel penetrating his left fore-arm. He was operated on, and is now at Nottingham. Sergt Russell, who served all through the Boer War, was called up as a Reserve in August, 1914, and has seen a great deal of hard and severe fighting in the present war.

WOLSTON.

DEATH OF CORPL L PAGE.—The news arrived at Wolston recently of the death of Corpl Lewis Page, Warwickshire Yeomanry, from dysentry in Egypt. Corpl Page was the third son of Mrs Page and the late Mr W Page, of Wolston, and was in his 35th year. Before hostilities commenced he was a member of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and was in business as a hay and corn merchant. Much sympathy is felt for his mother and brothers and sister, and for his young widow, who resides at Coventry. Three brothers of the deceased are still fighting.”

SOLDIERS’ CHRISTMAS PARCELS.—The sum of £56 13s 3d has been collected in the parishes of Brandon, Wolston, and Bretford. The committee have sent 74 presents of 12s each to men abroad, and 24 of 5s each to men in England, and £4 4s 5d for parcels to the six prisoners of war. The total expenses were £2 0s 10d.

LIEUT-COL. H. H. PODMORE, D.S.O.

On Saturday afternoon a portrait of Lieut-Col H H Podmore, D.S.O, Northants Regiment, killed in action in December, 1917, was unveiled in the Temple Speech Room by the Headmaster, Dr A A David. The painting was by Mr Charles Miller, and it was presented to the School by the past and present members of Mr B B Dickinson’s house.
Mr R G C Levens, head of the house, formally presented the portrait in “pleasant memory of Col Podmore’s tutorship.”
Dr David accepted the gift on behalf of the School from “ the house which Hubert Podmore served, loved, and inspired.” He added that the memorial was happily conceived, and before unveiling it he wished to thank the past and present members of the house who had joined in the gift, and who desired—and rightly desired—to set it among the pictures of those whom Rugby remembered with gratitude and with honour. They were also grateful to the artist. His was a hard task, but be (Dr David) thought when they saw the picture they would agree that his insight and his skill had been equal to it. He had seen in the photograph, and revealed to them again, what they remembered in the man. Dr David then formally unveiled the portrait, and, having done so. he said :—“ I do not suppose any of us knows a man whose features and expression more faithfully imaged the character within. If the face is ever the window of the soul it was so in him. There was nothing that he had need to hide, therefore the window was not darkened. I wonder if those who follow us here will know from this picture what manner of man he was ? I think they will.”

“ FEED THE GUNS ” CAMPAIGN.

A great effort is being made to extend this campaign in the local villages, and in connection with it representatives of Rugby Rural District (North) and Monks Kirby Rural District Local Committee met at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, Rugby, on Saturday afternoon, last, when the Earl of Denbigh presided, supported by Mr E H Carter, O.B.E (hon county secretary), and Mr R H Myers (hon local secretary).—Mr Myers gave an account of the progress of the organisation, and intimated that final arrangements had been made for a gun to tour the villages during Gun Week (Nov 18-23), when it is hoped that a sum of at least £66,000 will be subscribed in War Bonds and War Savings Certificates.—Lord Denbigh urged those present not to relax their efforts, in view of the satisfactory military position, but to vigorously prosecute the financial campaign til final victory is obtained.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.

There are signs this week that the influenza epidemic, which has claimed so many victims locally, is now on the wane, although unfortunately the death roll is still very high. Since the outbreak of the epidemic the number of deaths from influenza in Rugby and the immediate neighbourhood totals 86, of which 61 have occurred in Rugby and New Bilton. In Rugby alone 27 deaths from these diseases were registered last week, and another 14 occurred in the villages immediately adjacent to the town. Thirteen deaths were registered during the first three days of the present week. . . .

NEEDLESS ALARM.

Some alarm has apparently been caused in Cromwell Road by the proposal that the Mitchison Home is to be used as a hospital for influenza patients. Residents in that neighbourhood may feel assured there is no cause to be uneasy.

RUGBY MAN’S FOOLISH ACT.
UNLAWFULLY WEARING AN OFFICER’S UNIFORM.
A HEAVY FINE.

A remarkable story was told to the Mansfield Magistrates on Thursday last week in a case in which Percy Thos Tallis, a mechanical engineer, now on Government work at Coventry, living in Cross Street, Rugby, and whose father is an innkeeper in the town, was charged with unlawfully wearing the uniform of an officer of the R.A.F at Sutton in Ashfield on October 23rd. After being arrested by Insp Brooks, defendant made a statement, in which he said he received information that his brother, who had been seriously wounded, was lying in a military hospital at Nottingham. He went there to see him, his wife joining him the next day. On the 20th ult he made the acquaintance at a hotel of a man named Millus, who was wearing an officer’s uniform. He suggested that he (defendant) should put on a similar uniform and be photographed in it. He agreed to this, and after putting on the uniform they went into the streets, where Millus persuaded him to accompany him to Mansfield. He did so, and the next day, at Millius’s request, he consented to visit Mansfield again. They took tickets there, but alighted at Sutton, where he was arrested.
Mr W Gamble, who defended, pleaded guilty, but urged extenuating circumstances. When Millus saw defendant at the hotel he said, “Put on this uniform and be photographed in it.” Defendant several times refused to do so, and it was only after Millus said he belonged to the military police, and that no harm would result, that defendant consented. He went out with the intention of being photographed in the uniform, and then coming back and taking it off. but Millus persuaded him to go to Mansfield. It was evidently a case of a strong mind overcoming a weaker mental capacity. Defendant committed this foolish act, but Mr Gamble submitted that no real harm had been done. At Mansfield he found Millus was wanted on a charge, so the latter could afford to be reckless. Defendant bore an excellent character. This had been a lesson to him, and defendant would take care that he would not repeat such foolishness again.
The Chairman told defendant he had been guilty of a most foolish act, and had rendered himself liable to a much heavier penalty than the Bench proposed to inflict. He would have to pay £10, and they hoped this would teach him a lesson.—The money was paid.

NEW RATION BOOKS IN USE.

The new ration books came into use on Monday, and for the next six months they will be the medium by which the available supplies of meat, fats, sugar, and jam will be equitably distributed among the population. Should the War come to an end during the period there is no likelihood that the necessity for rationing will cease. Organised distribution of food, in fact, will have to be continued for many months after fighting stops. No exception is likely to be taken to the maintenance of restrictions. Rationing from the first has worked smoothly in this country, and has been accepted as the fairest—and indeed the only—method of apportioning foods the supply of which is insufficient to meet the normal demand.
Only one change is associated with the use of the new book. Jam, marmalade, and honey are added to the list of rationed articles. It was originally intended that syrup and treacle should also be included; but Lord Bledisloe, the Director of Sugar Distribution, announces that there is no need to surrender coupons when buying these foods. In view of the quantities in which jam is customarily sold, the ministry of Food has arranged that the jam coupons in the ration books may be used in each case in the week marked on the coupon, or in any of the seven succeeding weeks. The red coupon numbered 1 for the week ending November 9th may be used at any time before December 29th. A customer, therefore, may hold his coupons over for seven weeks, and in the eighth week buy a 2-lb jar of jam with the eight coupons saved.

WARWICKSHIRE WAR AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE.

The following reports have been made by the Executive Committee and the Women’s War Agricultural Committee to the County Council :—
The work of the harvest in this county has, generally speaking, been completed, notwithstanding the shortage of labour and bad weather experienced for the last six weeks. The inspection of farms has been continued, and in 34 cases cultivation orders have been issued. In three cases recommendations have been made to the Board of Agriculture to determine tenancies, and in two cases derelict land has been compulsorily taken for improvement. The total acreage ordered to be broken up is at present 35,103 acres.
Orders have been received from the Board of Agriculture for a re-survey of the county for the purpose of more carefully classifying the grassland and for obtaining particulars of all farms not properly cultivated. It is proposed to put this in hand forthwith. The committee continues its efforts to retain skilled men in their employment on the land, releasing for service only those who can best be dispensed with ; 1,402 soldiers from the distribution centre at Budbrooke Barracks are employed on the land. Additional camps have been established at Kingsbury and Mancetter. The total number of prisoners employed is 636, of which 507 are in the camps, 49 are billeted with farmers, and 80 are out with migratory gangs. Including the horses at the prisoner camps, there are 218 under the committee’s control. The number of tractors in the county is 73.
The organisation of threshing has been successfully carried out, district committees were formed, and districts allotted to threshing proprietors. Shortage of drivers has somewhat handicapped the work, but every endeavour is being made to rectify this.
During the past season Mrs Bedhall has given 92 demonstrations in fruit preservation, with an average attendance of 38. One week was devoted to training pupils to work the district canneries established in the county. Thirty visited have been made to such canneries for the purpose of giving further advice and assistance.
The appeal to school children to pick blackberries to be made into jam for the Army and Navy was taken up with keenness, and has been conducted with great success. Already 29 tons 7 cwt have born sent to jam factories.
The Women’s Agricultural Committee reported :—During the past quarter the principal work has been the formation of gangs of woman for threshing. These gangs consist of a number of women, varying from four to six, one of whom is invariably the forewoman. Twenty gangs are already at work, comprising approximately 90 women, and from reports already received they appear to be giving satisfaction. We are prepared to supply any further gangs that may be asked for. We have a total number of 406 girls working in the county at this time, and a welfare officer has been appointed from London to supervise their recreation and general well-being. The total number of L.A women trained in this county since April, 1917, is 261, a very large percentage of whom are still on farm work here, and we are greatly indebted to the farmers who have undertaken to help our committee in this way.

WARWICKSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL.
LAND FOR EX-SERVICE MEN.

At a quarterly meeting of the Warwickshire County Council, held at Warwick on Tuesday, Lord Algernon Percy, presiding, the Small Holdings Committee presented a report on the provision of land for ex-service men, and recommended “that the Small Holdings and Allotments Committee be charged with the matter of dealing with the settlement of ex-service men on the land in the county, all the powers of the Council being delegated to them.”
Alderman Sir H R Fairfax-Lucy moved an amendment : “ That the County Council considers the proposals of the Board of Agriculture for the provision of land for ex-service men a most unsatisfactory one, as it does not enable these men to become the owners of their holdings, and that, further, they consider that the powers of borrowing for purchasing land and adaptation should be restored, and that they should be informed at an early date on what terms loans will be issued for that purpose.” He pointed out that under the policy of the Board of Agriculture County Councils could take up land only through the powers of the board to obtain loans, and this depended on the adoption of the system of a perpetual rent charge. He thought it was their duty to ascertain the demand for land, and this information could be obtained through the Territorial Force Association, which had relations with discharged soldiers. It would be the duty of the County Council to find loans for those who had experience and capital to take up land. It would be necessary for the Small Holdings Committee to continue to press for the re-establishment of their old powers.—The amendment was carried.

SHOP HOURS IN RUGBY.

The following copy of a letter, written by a Rugby housewife to the Secretary of the Housewives’ Committee, was sent to us last week too late for insertion :—
DEAR MADAM,—We understand your committee tried some time ago to get some consideration and convenience for busy workers to do their shopping. They are the majority ; they are the ready cash people ; yet all our wants and purchases have to be crowded into Friday night and Saturday afternoon, waiting in crowded shops, getting served in a take-it-or-leave-it-quick style. If there was a later hour—say, 7.30 on Tuesday—it would ease both server and served at the week-end.
Does it ever occur to traders that the shops are already closed morning, noon, and night to the workers for four whole days?
Can we who have twenty minutes to half-an-hour’s walk home and live the same distance from the town sandwich a tea-dinner and a wash in-between, and yet get in town even by seven o’clock ? No, not for a bit of cotton wool or a pound of oatmeal, or any other necessary for whatever illness or emergency is in the home. If we—the majority—have still to be put to this inconvenience, there is no need for the leisured minority to require four days in which to make their purchases.
Why not even things up a bit ?—Yours very truly,
“ A.E.W.”

DEATHS.

ELLARD.—On October 30th, at 29 Station Hospital, Cremona, Italy, Trooper W. J. ELLARD, 14th Corps, Northants Yeomanry, younger son of Z. J. Ellard, Barby, aged 27 years.

EVANS.—On November 6th, at the Military Hospital, Norwich, Pte. HARRY EVANS, the beloved second son of W. E. & A. M. Evans.—“ Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.”

GILKS.—Killed in action on October 13th, Lance-Corpl. WM. L. GILKS, Yorks. and Lancs. Regt., aged 22.

HOPKINS.—On October 30th, at Ballymena, Ireland, of pneumonia, Pte. L. J. HOPKINS, the dearly beloved son of Elphinstone and Annie Hopkins, Dunchurch, aged 18 years.

LINES.—On October 6th, Gunner F. J. LINES, R.F.A., youngest and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Lines and the late Mr. H. Lines, 17 Spring Street, who died of wounds received in action in France ; aged 20. Never forgotten.

OLDHAM.—Killed in action on October 24th, in France, HARRY, fourth son of the late Stephen and Annie Oldham, 33 Stephen Street, Rugby (late of Long Lawford), aged 25 years.—Deeply mourned by his loving Mother and Brothers and fiancee Lottie.

PEARMAN.—On November 4th, at Warley Military Hospital, after a short illness of pneumonia, HERBERT CARL, elder and beloved son of Thomas and Ada Pearman, of Ryton-on-Dunsmore, in his 23rd year.

STIBBARDS.—On the 31st October, 1918, at the 1st Eastern General Hospital, Cambridge, Seaman HARRY FRANK STIBBARDS, B.Z. 11286, “Attentive III,” passed peacefully away after a short illness, contracting pneumonia. Much suffering patiently borne. Interred in Cambridge Military Cemetery.—Deeply mounted by all who knew him.

WEBSTER.—In memory of ARTHUR JAMES WBSTER, beloved son of Mr. &. Mrs. Webster, of 9 Old Station Square, Rugby, who was killed in action during the evening of September 28, 1918.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother ;
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, and Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

ELKINGTON.—In proud and loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOHN THOMAS ELKINGTON (JACK), who fell in action “ somewhere in France ” on November 10th, 1916.—“ God’s Will be done.”
“ Just when his hopes were brightest,
Just when thoughts were best ;
He was called from this world of sorrow
To that Home of eternal rest.
Never a day but his name is spoken,
Never a day but he’s in our thoughts ;
A link from our family chain is broken ;
He’s gone from our home, but not from our hearts.
His loving smile, his cherry ways,
Are pleasant to recall ;
He had a kindly word for each,
And died beloved by all.”
—Too dearly loved to be forgotten by his Mother, Father, and Sisters, of Long Lawford, Brothers in France and Germany.

 

Russell, Harold John. Died 19th Sep 1918

Harold John Russell was born in 1898 in Rugby, the only son of Walter and Florence (nee Franklin). On their marriage, at Brownsover Church on 7th August 1894, Walter is described as a caretaker, but by 1901 he had taken up his father’s occupation of fishseller and fruiterer. Harold was three years old and his sister Ethel F was four. The family were living at 26 Bridget Street.

By 1911 both Walter and little Ethel had died, but another daughter had arrived. Ivy May was nine and Harold, thirteen, was working as an office boy. The family were now at 61 Abbey Street and widowed Florence was an electric lamp solderer at B.T.H.

Walter Russell had died in late 1901. He was aged 37 and the death registered in Wellingborough RD. Florence re-married in mid 1918 to John Burbidge. By this time Harold John would have already joined the army.

It is not known when he joined up, but it was probably the same time as Lander John Mann. Their service numbers are close and their short military career followed the same course.

Harold enlisted at Rugby into the Royal Warwick Regiment as a private, no: 41740. He served abroad with the Royal Warwicks from 4th to 12th August 1918, then the 2/4th London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers, service number 85166 until 11th September, before moving to the 2/2nd battalion.

By early September 1918 the British advance had reached The Hindenburg Line. After the losses of the previous few months, 180,000 in the last six weeks, Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig was reluctant to order any offensives, but allow the men to rest. When he received news of the British Third Army’s success at the Battle of Havrincourt on 12th Sept, he changed his mind and approved the plan to clear German outpost positions on the high ground before the Hindenburg Line.

In order not to give warning of the attack, there was no preliminary bombardment and the guns would fire concentration shots at zero hour and then provide a creeping barrage to support the infantry. The attack started at 5.20 am on 18th September and comprised all three corps of the fourth army, with V Corps of the Third flank and the French First Army on the right.

The promised French assistance did not arrive, resulting in limited success for IX Corps on that flank. On the left flank, III Corps also found difficulty when attacking the fortifications erected at “the Knoll”, Quennemont and Guillemont farms, which were held determinedly by German troops, the village was however captured by the British 12th Eastern Division [7th Norfolk, 9th Essex and 1st Cambridge]. In the centre, General John Monash’s two Australian divisions achieved complete and dramatic success. The 1st Australian Division and the 4th Australian Division, had a strength of some 6,800 men and in the course of the day captured 4,243 prisoners, 76 guns, 300 machine-guns and thirty trench mortars. They took all their objectives and advanced to a distance of about 3 miles (4.8 km) on a 4 mile (6.4 km) front. The Australian casualties were 1,260 officers and men (265 killed, 1,057 wounded, 2 captured.)

The Battle of Epehy closed as an Allied victory, with 11,750 prisoners and 100 guns captured. Although not a total success, it signalled an unmistakable message that the Germans were weakening and it encouraged the Allies to take further action with haste (with the offensive continuing in the Battle of St. Quentin Canal), before the Germans could consolidate their positions.

It is not clear what part the 2nd battalion of the Royal Fusiliers took in the Battle of Epehy, but Harold John Russell died the following day, the 19th September and was buried in Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery at 1.F.17, a row from Lander John Mann at 1.G.19.

He was awarded The Victory and British War Medals, although there is a note on his medal roll card:
O i/c Recs (Officer in charge of Records) requests auth. to dispose of medals 10/2/22.

Did his mother not want to be reminded of her only son, or did her new husband object? They don’t appear to have had their own children. Someone must have put forward his name to be included on the Rugby Memorial Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

20th Jul 1918. Obtaining Sugar by False Statements

OBTAINING SUGAR BY FALSE STATEMENTS.

Frank Nightingale, clerk, 20 Essex Street, Rugby, was summoned for making a false statement for the purpose of obtaining sugar for preserving fruit.—He pleaded not guilty.—Mr Reddish, for the prosecution, stated that defendant applied for sugar for preserving fruit grown by himself, and signed a declaration to the effect that he estimated that he would have 20lbs of soft fruit and 30lbs of hard fruit, in consequence of which he was allotted 10lbs of sugar for the former and 14lbs for the latter. On July 1st Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) called at defendant’s house and asked to see the fruit trees, in respect of which he had made the application. Defendant replied that he had twelve gooseberry trees and eight or ten currant trees, also some vegetable marrows. He added that the trees were not there, but on his allotment in Newbold Road. The Enforcement Officer asked when he could go to inspect the trees, and defendant replied, “ Not this evening, as I am due at a meeting shortly.” An appointment was made for the following evening, and when Mr Purchase kept the appointment defendant informed him that he had sent a letter on the matter to the office. This letter was to the effect that his application was not strictly in accordance with the regulations ; the trees were his own property, but were not on his own ground. He purchased them last July from Mr Allfrey, and they were still at Radford, near Leamington, unless they had been removed. He was prepared to surrender the permit for 14lbs of sugar which had not been used, and regretted that he had misled the committee, but his claim was perfectly just, as he would have sufficient soft fruit to use up more than the 10lbs of sugar. He had intended to plant the trees—twelve gooseberry and eight or nine currant in his allotment, but owing to delay in obtaining the land it was impossible to plant them in time. He therefore decided to leave them until the autumn, and was paying the person on whose land the trees were a small sum for the convenience. He was willing to surrender the permit for 14lbs, and suggested that he should be allowed to use the remainder. On July 4th Mr Nightingale wrote another letter to the committee, stating that he had a number of raspberry canes and currant trees in his garden which in a normal year would have yielded 20lbs of fruit ; and he therefore, claimed that his application was not a contravention of the order. The yield of the trees was 5lbs, and he asked that his application should be reduced by 75 per cent. In consequence of this letter, Mr Purchase called to see the trees, and found 14 raspberry canes, looking very sick, and which he estimated might yield 2lbs, and one red currant tree, which might yield 1ld. He asked Mr Nightingale about his Radford trees, and defendant then said he had purposely given a wrong name. He still persisted in saying that he owned the trees, but said he would not disclose the name of the person from whom he bought them. Other circumstances had arisen, as a result of which he refused to give any further names, but would take the whole responsibility himself.—Mr Reddish pointed out that the letter of July 4th was not signed, whereupon defendant signed it in Court.

After Messrs Burton and Purchase had given evidence, Defendant deposed that the declaration he made was perfectly true. The trees owned by himself, but which were not actually on the land which he was cultivating, did not enter into the question, as they had nothing to do with the statement he signed on April 3rd, because he included rhubarb and marrows in his estimate.—Mr Burton pointed out that it was not until after the application forms had been sent in that the committee decided to include rhubarb and marrows. Continuing, defendant said he had 10 pairs of raspberry canes and four single canes in his house garden, and he estimated that they would yield 15lbs of fruit, and that the currant tree would yield 5lbs.—Mr Reddish pointed out that the committee did not know which of defendant’s statements to believe.—Defendant : I actually own the trees in the neighbourhood of Leamington, but the name of the man bought them from was not Allfrey.—Mr Reddish : Don’t you see that the effect of that statement was that Mr Purchase could not investigate the facts ?—A : Yes.—The Chairman : Can’t you give the name now ?—A : No—for a particular reason.—The Chairman : It all goes against you ?—A : Unfortunately it does. I am aware of that.—The Chairman : You have been guilty of a very deliberate fraud, and we fine you £10.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Practically everyone in this district has now received his or her ration book, and those which have not yet been delivered belong for the most part, to those persons who omitted to fill in the address on the application form. It was hoped that the work of despatching the books would be completed on Saturday last, and the failure to do this is in no way attributable to Mr J T Clarke and his staff of voluntary helpers, but rather to the carelessness of the general public, no fewer than 2,800 forms having to be sent back for corrections, in addition to upwards of 600 which contained no address. By the middle of the present week about 400 of these persons had been traced, but there were still about 200 cards waiting to be despatched.

Some idea of the magnitude of the task involved in the distribution of the books may be gleaned from the fact that between 45,000 and 46,000 books have been despatched to about 12,000 households, and that the most assiduous worker cannot average more than eleven sets of books per hour. Valuable assistance in the work has been lent by squads of boys from Rugby School and the Lower School and a number of ladies. Some of the elementary school teachers seized the opportunity to assist which was afforded by the closing of the schools through influenza.

Under the new scheme three coupons instead of two can be used for butchers’ meat, but the value of each coupon has been reduced from 8d to 7d. The coupons marked a/a, b/b, and c/c are available for butchers’ meat ; but the fourth, marked d/d, can only be used for bacon, poultry, tinned meat, &c ; 8ozs of bacon with bone or 7ozs without bone can be obtained with each coupon.

The values of the other coupons are :—Sugar, 8ozs per coupon ; butter, 4ozs per coupon ; margarine, 5ozs per coupon ; lard, 2ozs per coupon. Tea will be obtainable without the production of coupons, but only from the dealer with whom the person is registered. Retailers have received instructions not to allow more than 2ozs per head per week.

NO RATIONING OF BREAD.—One of the spare pages in the new ration books was originally intended for the rationing of bread, but it is now considered extremely unlikely that this will come into force. “ One can almost say with certainty,” said an official at the Ministry of Food on Saturday, “ that bread will not be rationed this year.”

RUGBY SCHOOL FARMING SQUADS.

With the approach of the end of the term the accounts of the above have just been closed and show that during the course of the last twelve weeks 183 squads (averaging about eight members to a squad) have gone out to assist the neighbouring farmers. In the month of May the squads planted about 80 acres at potatoes ; later on they spudded or hoed shout 280 acres of corn-land. and lately they have assisted in harvesting about 145 acres of hay, as regards about half of this acreage doing all the work themselves with the exception of rick-building. Payment in the case of only one squad out of the 183 has been cancelled by agreement on the score of careless work, and this record reflects much credit on the squad leaders.

The earnings total up to £167. The expenses come to £27, including purchase and repair of tools £8, and extra rations of tea and cake or bread £14. The balance of about £140 has been voted by the squads to the following objects : Hospital of St Cross £25, Rugby Prisoners of War £25, Mine-sweepers’ Fund £20, St Dunstan’s £20, Y.M.C.A. £15, Blue Cross £5, Serbian Relief £5. £25 is reserved as a guarantee against loss on the Holiday Farming Camp, but if this contingency does not arise the sum is ear-marked for the Home Mission of the School.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut J L Griffin, 2nd Hampshires, has been awarded the Military Cross. Lieut Griffin was in the office of the late Lieut Ivan B Hart-Davies, Rugby.

Lance-Corpl F H Bert Warden, Royal Warwicks, who was posted as missing on August 27th last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was a member of “ E ” Company at the outbreak of war, and went to France in March, 1915. For 18 months previous to his death he was a Lewis gunner, and had been recommended for a commission. He had been wounded four times previously. He was 20 years of age, and the younger son of the late Mr Edward Warden, who was for many years on the staff of the “ Midland Times.”

A FAMILY RECORD.

Pte A J Bennett, R.W.R, son of Mr T Bennett, of 8 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, has been severely wounded in the leg and feet. He is 18 years of age, and had only been in France a month when he received his wounds. Three of his elder brothers are serving. The eldest—Driver C H Bennett, A.S.C—was wounded during the Retreat from Mons, and has recently been invalided home from Salonika. The second—Pte W E Bennett, Welsh Fusiliers—has been wounded twice, and is still in hospital ; while the fourth—Pte A V Bennett, R.W.R—is serving in Mesopotamia, and was recently a patient in hospital suffering from a fractured knee.

BRETFORD.
PTE WM CLARKE MISSING.—Mrs Clarke has been informed that her husband has been missing since March 26th. He had been in France some length of time. He joined the Warwicks under Lord Derby’s scheme more than two years ago, and was later transferred to the Oxford and Bucks L.I. He had two bad attacks of dysentry, and on one occasion was sent home. Before the War he had been employed in the Celluloid Department of Messrs Bluemel’s (Ltd) at Wolston for 14 years. He has four children, and the youngest is only a few weeks old. Much sympathy is felt for his wife and family. At one time he proved an excellent bowler in many matches for the Brandon and Wolston Cricket Club. He has two more brothers on active service.

BOIURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
MILITARY MEDAL.—Major-General C R R McGregor in charge of Administration Southern Command, presented about 90 medals to soldiers at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Edgbaston, on Tuesday, July 9th. Pte F Loach, of this village, was presented with the Military Medal and bar. It was when he won the bar to his medal that he received the wound which caused him to be discharged from the Army.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PRISONER OF WAR.—Pte F J Sinclair, who in last week’s issue was reported missing, has now written home saying he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
WOUNDED.—News is to hand that Pte Percival Russell, R.W.R, who is attached to the British contingent off the Italian front, has been injured in the eyes and face from the effects of a bomb explosion. Pte Russell had located an Austrian outpost, and was witnessing its destruction by our bombers, and being in too close proximity, some of the splinters reached him and inflicted the injury he sustained.

LOCAL VOLUNTEER NOTES.

The King has been graciously pleased to sanction the use of the title, “ Volunteer Battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment,” for the Battalions of this Volunteer Force in Warwickshire, and of which the Rugby Volunteers form “ B ” Company of the 2nd Battalion.

“ B ” Company (Rugby) of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, R.W Regiment, met Rugby School O.T.C in a shooting match on the Clifton range last week, in which the O.T.C scored a total of 427 points against 392 by the Volunteers. Scores :—O.T.C : Second-Lieut Juts, 63 ; Sergt Bourne, 57 ; Corpl Roberts, 53 ; Sergt Kerr, 52 ; Lance-Corpl Berendt, 52 ; Pte Weinberg, 51 ; Sergt Nisbet, 50 ; Corpl Finch, 49. “ B ” Company : Q.M.S Alderson, 55 ; Pte Edwards, 54 ; Lance-Corpl Pywitt, 54 ; Sergt Murray, 49 ; Corpl Seymour, 49 ; Corpl Batchelor, 47 ; Lance-Corpl Burton, 42 ; Pte Mochrie, 42.

THE MASQUERADERS’ COSTUME CONCERT PARTY are giving a performance in the Co-operative Hall on Wednesday, July 24th, in aid of the Royal Artillery Prisoners of War Fund. This party is composed of officers, cadets, N.C.O’s, and members of the Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps of the No. 3 R.F.A Cadet Officers’ School, Weedon, who, in their spare time, are endeavouring to assist various war funds and charities. The Masqueraders have met with considerable success at the various places they have visited, and an enjoyable evening’s entertainment is guaranteed to all who patronise this performance. For full particulars see advt.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,—Local munition factories are hard put to it for timber among other materials, and recently the absence of common packing timber seriously delayed the despatch of important Admiralty munitions which were being telegraphed for. What a contrast to see within a few miles of Rugby thousands of pounds being expended in materials and labour, including much timber, on a house apparently intended for private occupation solely. Are Government permits responsible for such a strange diversion of effort and material ? In any event, the facts are as stated.—Your obedient servant,
July 16th.
“ RUGBY.”

RUGBY URBAN TRIBUNAL.

THE POSITION OF RUSSIAN-JEWS.
An interesting question was raised by the application of a master tailor (38, married).—On behalf of applicant Mr Eaden said his client was a Russian-Jew. Three years ago he applied for naturalisation, but this was not granted. He was born in Ukrania, and under the Military Service Act he was not liable for service ; but under the Military Service Allies Convention Act, 1917, mutual arrangements were come to between the Allied States, by which such men became liable for service if they remained in the country. Since the passing of this Act, owing to the disruption in Russia, the various States in that Empire, including Ukrania, had broken away and had formed self governing countries. The contention now was that this man did not come under either of the Acts cited, and that he was a free person to go his own way. This point had been fought out before Tribunals and the Police Court, and 47 Russian-Jews in Birmingham, Coventry, and Rugby were involved. When these men were taken to the Police Court as absentees it was the practice to adjourn the cases sine die until after a decision was given in the High Court in the test case of Wolf Cohen, of Coventry. For this reason he asked for exemption until the question was definitely settled.—Mr Hoper said the official instructions were that Russians were to be recruited.—Mr Eaden said if this was done his client would stand in with the others mentioned as the subject of an independent State.—Mr Hoper : The British Government do not recognise these different divisions. There is only one Government as far as we know officially.—Mr Wise said, in view of the fact that a case pending in the High Court, it would be practically impossible for a Bench to convict a man as an absentee until the decision was given.—The case was adjourned for 28 days.

DEATHS.

KENDRICK.—At Duston War Hospital, Northampton, on the 16th inst, from pneumonia, Private HAROLD KENDRICK, A.S.C., aged 33. eldest son of Harry and Elizabeth Kendrick, of 14 Warwick Street, Rugby.

NEALE.—On July 11th, 1918, in Hospital at Dover, after a very short illness, Pte. E. J. NEALE, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Neale, of Burton Dassett, age 25 years.
God took our loved one from our home,
But never from our hearts.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.
No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost their loved and dearest
Without saying “ Farewell.”
—Sadly missed by a loving wife, mother, father, brother, and sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVENPORT.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Gunner W. E. DAVENPORT, killed in action July 18, 1916.
“ Somewhere in France our dear son sleeps :
A hero laid to rest.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Father, and Sisters (Harborough Magna).

DICKEN.— In ever loving memory of Lce-Corpl S. H. DICKEN, who died of wounds in France, July 20th, 1916.
If God should call us to resign,
What most we prized it ne’er was mine ;
We only yield Thee what is Thine,
Thy will be done.
—Fondly remembered by brother and sister, Will and Amy.

HIPWELL.— In ever-loving memory of our dear son, Pte. JOHN HIPWELL, Lilbourne, who died of wounds received in action in France on July 23, 1916. Interred in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt, south-west of Albert.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He served his King and country :
God knows he did his best ;
But now he sleeps in Jesus, a soldier laid to rest.
He sleeps beside his comrades
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.”
—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers.

LENTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. W. LENTON, who died from wounds in France, July 19th, 1916. Ever remembered by Erne and Ethel, 64 Wood Street, Rugby.

LENTON.— In proud and loving memory of WILL, dearly loved son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Lenton, who died in France July 19th, 1916.—Ever in the thoughts of Tom, Ma, and Family.

SMITH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. S W. E. SMITH, Royal Fusiliers, killed in action at Beaumont Hamel on July 21, 1916.

WAREING.— In loving memory of Pte. STANLEY WAREING, 10th Warwickshire Regt., aged 18 years. Only dearly-beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. James Wareing, Lilboune Farm, killed somewhere in France, July 23rd. 1916.
Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you,
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.
From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, & Uncle.

 

22nd Jul 1916. Helping the Prisoners of War

HELPING THE PRISONERS OF WAR.

A meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held on Wednesday evening. Mr Wm Flint, C.C, Chairman of the Committee, presiding. Also present : Mrs Lees, Rev Father Jarvis, and Messrs A E Donkin, W H Clay, C J Newman, G W Walton, J Mellor, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J R Barker. Apologies for absence were received from Mrs Blagden, Mr F R Davenport, and Mr S H Weobley.

The Chairman, in reviewing the past work of the Committee, said that, starting with a list of 13 prisoners of war, the work had grown to such an extent that the Committee were now looking after the welfare of 55 men from Rugby and the villages. The expenditure had increased so very considerably that the Executive thought the Committee should meet to consider what steps should be taken to maintain the weekly parcels to the prisoners of war.

The Hon Secretary presented a statement of accounts to date. Subscriptions and donations amounted to £526 16s 6d, and the cost of food parcels and other expenditure was £417 8s 2d, which left a balance in hand of £109 8s 4d. He was glad to be able to report that during the past week there had been a slight improvement in the subscriptions, and although the money in hand would only provide for a few weeks parcels, he was glad to be able to report that several local efforts were being made to raise funds. It was, however, very necessary that, without delay, the Committee made arrangements to secure sufficient money to carry on the work for several months ahead, especially in view of the possibilities of further names being added to the list.

Various schemes were suggested and agreed upon, the first effort to be a Flag Day, Mr Newman and Mr Barker agreeing to carry out the arrangements as early as possible.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

The following local cases were heard before Mr Carmichael at the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Friday in last week.

Alick J Tabor, Woolscott, near Rugby, applied for a leaving certificate from the B.T.H.—The case was adjourned from a previous Court. Another adjournment for four weeks was granted ; and the Court instructed the lad to return to work.

G North, 113 Railway Terrace, Rugby, was fined 10s for absenting himself from work at the B.T.H without leave for the whole of the week ending July 8th, the fine to be paid in four weekly instalments.

A King, 385 Clifton Road, Rugby, was charged by the B.T.H Company with being absent from work without leave on Saturday, July 8th, for 8¾ hours on Monday, and the whole of Tuesday, July 11th. The man’s previous time-keeping had been bad, and he was fined 15s and ordered to pay in weekly instalments of 2s 6d.

F H Shorthose, 19 Market Street, Rugby, was summoned for refusing to work overtime at the B.T.H on Saturday afternoon, July 8th, thereby delaying skilled men.—He was fined 10s (2s 6d per week), and was warned by the Chairman regarding his defiant attitude before the Court.

J Asquith, Shawell, Rugby, employed at the B.T.H, was charged with failing to work diligently on the morning of July 8th, and the case was dismissed owing to the conflicting evidence. Asquith asked for expenses ; but, in reply, the Chairman informed him that he was lucky to get off.

POST LETTERS EARLY.—The Postmaster-General calls attention to the fact that in view of the restricted number of postal collections and deliveries now afforded throughout the kingdom, it is particularly desirable that letters should be posted as early in the day as possible. In many rural districts there is only one delivery, and letters for such districts, unless posted in time for early evening mails, will not be delivered until the second day after posting. Early posting also facilitates the work of the Post Office sorters, and on account of the great depletion of staff for military purposes this assistance will be much appreciated.

PUBLIC BATHS.

The Baths Committee reported the receipt of an application from the Officer Commanding a Squadron, Royal Flying Corps for facilities for his men to attend the Baths at a reduced rate. They had informed him that free use of the swimming bath was granted to all soldiers or sailors in uniform on condition that they provided their own towels and drawers, or paid the regulation price for same. The numbers attending the baths and the amounts received for the month of June as compared with the same month in 1915, were as follows :—Baths, &c : Swimming bath, 1916, 5,511 ; 1915, 6,008. Slipper baths, 1916, 1,455; l915, 1,074[?]. Receipts, 1916, £54 10s 2d ; 1915, £56 10s 7d.-Approved on the motion of Mr Walker.

RESERVOIR GROUNDS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

The Water Committee had decided that the grounds at Brownsover Mill be opened during the summer from noon to 8.30 p.m (Sundays included) so long as no damage was done.—Adopted.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt the Earl of Clonmell, of the Warwickshire R.H.A, is transferred to the Territorial Force Reserve.

The Rev C T Bernard McNulty, M.A, vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, has recently been promoted from 4th to 3rd Class Chaplain, with the rank of Major, and has been appointed Senior Chaplain of his Division.

We are pleased to note that Capt G T Hilton, of North Street and Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has been mentioned in despatches for distinguished conduct in the field.

George E Middleditch, 1st Lieutenant, Oxon and Bucks L.I, was wounded at Ypres, France, some four weeks ago. Before the War Lieut Middleditch was an apprentice (premium) in the L & N-W Rly Erecting Shop. At the outbreak of the War he joined up at once as a private. He soon got promotion—first a lance-corporal, then a corporal, next a sergeant, then a commission as 2nd lieutenant, now 1st lieutenant ; and, we understand, has been recommended for a captaincy. He was wounded in the leg and back at Ypres, and is now well again. He visited the shop on Tuesday, and received a splendid ovation from his fellow-workmen and a very hearty send-off.

CASUALTIES TO RUGBY MEN IN THE GREAT ADVANCE.

Pte J F Holmes, East Surrey Regiment, son of Mr J Holmes, of Union Street, has been seriously wounded during the recent fighting.

Capt S Morris Bickersteth (O.R), a brother of the Rev Julyan K F Bickersteth, formerly of Rugby, was killed during the attack on Serre on July 1st. He was 23 years of age.

Mrs Greenwood, Kirstall, Lower Hillmorton Road, has received news that her son, Lieut J Greenwood, Northants Regiment, the well-known Rugby and Newbold footballer, has been wounded.

Other Rugby casualties reported recently are : Diver W Elkington (11137) killed ; and F H Warden (2168), F Burberry (275), and Sapper H Barrows, R.E. ; Ptes J Varney (Rugby), A Welsby (New Bilton), and T Lee (Swinford), wounded.

LANCE-CORPL W J COOPER OF HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

Lance-Corpl W J Cooper, R.W.R, son of Mr Jack Cooper, of Harborough Magna, was killed in action on June 26th. Lance-Corpl Cooper was a native of Newbold, but had spent most of his life at Harborough Magna. He was 30 years of age, and was called up as a reservist in August, 1914, and had been in France from the beginning of the war. Prior to the outbreak of hostilities, he was employed in the Cement Works at Newbold.

NEWBOLD SOLDIER REPORTED MISSING.

Mr Tom Smith, of Newbold, has received official intimation that his son, Rifleman Tom Smith, of the Rifle Brigade, was wounded on June 1st, and has been missing since that date. Rifleman Smith, who was about 23 years of age, was employed at the Cement Works before he enlisted at the commencement of the War.

Pte Wm Curtis, Leicester Regiment, another employee of the Cement Works, and son of Mr A Curtis, has written informing his parents that he has been wounded, and is now in hospital.

BRAUNSTON.

LOCAL CASUALTY.—Mrs J Manning received news last week that her son, Pte Thomas Manning, was wounded and in a base hospital in France ; and on Tuesday notification came that he had died. Mrs Manning has three other sons serving in the Army, two in France, and one at Salonica. Much sympathy is felt with the family in their bereavement.

HILLMORTON.

MRS CASHMORE of Lower Street, has received information that her youngest son, Pte F Cashmore, of the 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, died of wounds received in the great push on the 6th inst. Previous to this Pte Cashmore had taken part in much fighting both at the Dardanelles and Egypt.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

CORPORAL CONSTABLE WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Ernest Constable have received an intimation from Corporal Harry Constable, stating that he is lying wounded in Firdale Hospital, Sheffield. The wounds are in both legs, right arm, and head, but he writes cheerfully, and it is hoped that he may effect a good recovery. It is barely six weeks since he was sent to the front.

DEATH OF PRIVATE SUTTON RUSSELL.-The sad news was received on Tuesday of the death of Private Joseph Sutton Russell in hospital of malarial fever on the 14th last. Private Russell enlisted in the Army Ordnance Corps in December, 1914, and was with the contingent in Mesopotamia. It was known that he had been in hospital, and only on Tuesday morning a post card was received from him, dated 6th June, on which he stated that he was out of hospital, and that his health was improving. So the shook caused by the news of his death was very great to all his relatives and friends, and, indeed, to the whole village. Before he joined the army, Private Russell had been for some years a clerk in the office at Messrs Kaye & Co’s Cement Works. He was also the Clerk to the Parish Council, assistant overseer, tax and rate collector, and Secretary to the Co-operative Society. He was of a genial temperament, and always ready to make himself useful. As a member of the Parish Church choir, and in many other capacities, he will be greatly missed. Private Russell was the life and soul at the Cricket Club in the pre-war days, and it was always a pleasure to witness his performance either as a bats man or a bowler. The deepest sympathy is felt for his widowed mother, brother and sisters, and for his fiancée, Miss Hilda Jeacock. His brother, Lance-Corpl Arthur Russell, is now in training in the Royal Warwicks.

FRANKTON.

KILLED IN ACTION.-News was received on Tuesday of the death of another of our brave village lads. Corporal Frank Doyle, a bright young fellow, was attached to the Berkshire Regiment. He enlisted early in the war. He was shot down at his post, with three more of his comrades. The sad news was conveyed to his widowed mother by the Rev R S Mitchison, of Barby, who motored to tell her. Much sympathy is felt throughout the village with Mrs Doyle in her sad loss. Mr Mitchison’s son-in-law is an officer in the same soldiers Company, and has been severely wounded.

WOLSTON.

Mr and Mrs John Orton have received news that their son, Pte H Orton, of the 1st Worcesters, has been wounded in the left hand. He is now in hospital in England, and progressing favourably. He has seen many months of fighting in France.

RIFLEMAN R B BUTLIN KILLED.—Mr J Butlin has received news of the death of his son, who was shot through the heart. He was one of Kitchener’s Army, who joined the King’s Royal Rifles. His death occurred on the 10th inst., and he was laid to rest at Potijze Military Cemetery, near Ypres. The inscription on the tomb was : “ He tried to do his duty.” Much sympathy is felt for Mr Butlin, who has lost his wife, a grandchild, and son in the space of a few months, and is himself an invalid. He has also received a sympathetic and comforting letter from the chaplain.

 

BISHOPS ITCHINGTON.

FROM THE FRONT.—Pte Thomas Thacker, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was slightly wounded in the latest attack on the West. Pte Thacker, who had previously been wounded, received some shrapnel in the ankle. He has been at his home since July 13th, and has made such good progress that he will return to his depot in the course of a few days.

DUNCHURCH.

SERGT W E CONSTABLE, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable (formerly of Dunchurch), who joined the Royal Engineers early last year, has been mentioned in despatches by General Sir Douglas Haig, dated April 30th. He is to be warmly congratulated upon his distinction.

DEATHS.

CASHMORE.—Died of wounds in France,. Private F. Cashmore, 1st R.I.F., aged 24 years.

CHATER.—In loving Memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. Chater, Machine. Gun Section, 12th R.B. Killed in action in France, June 30th, 1916, aged 31 years.
“ Sleep on, beloved, and take thy rest,
We loved you well, but God loved you best.”

COOK.—Died of wounds on July 8th, Cyril Edward, Second-Lieutenant, Royal Sussex Regiment, elder son of Sam Cook, Wargrave, Berks, and grandson of the late Mrs. Cook, of Hillmorton House, aged 23.

DOYLE.—In ever-loving memory of Corporal Frank Doyle, the dearly loved son of Betsy and the late Joseph Doyle, of Frankton. Killed in action at No Man’s Land, July 13, 1916.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving MOTHER, BROTHERS, and only SISTER (LIZ).