12th Oct 1918. Lord Denbigh Suspects Cunning Scheme

LORD DENBIGH SUSPECTS CUNNING SCHEME.

Lord Denbigh, delivering a war lecture at Coventry on Sunday, said if the German  proposal was simply a cunning scheme for evacuation of Belgium and Northern France, with Germany insisting on retaining what they held in the East, then the Allies would, in consenting to peace on such terms, be putting their head into a noose which would give long and endless trouble in the future. It must be remembered that Germany had made enormous profit out of the War, and boasted that in the destruction they had made of machinery they had put French and Belgian industrial competition out for 10 or 20 years. Germany must, he said, pay for her robberies. If once a war like this were stopped it could not be got going again. What was needed was to make the Germans lose their faith in the military party and in the policy of blood and iron. There could be no real unity until the power of Germany was finished.

IRISH MAIL BOAT TORPEDOED.

THE OUTGOING Irish Mail boat, Leinster, was torpedoed on Thursday morning.
The passengers numbered 650, and there was a crew of 70. Of these it is believed 500 have been killed or drowned.

A Japanese liner has been sunk by submarine off the Irish Coast, and nearly 300 lives lost. It was the usual story of German brutality.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte A R Fothergill, Royal Berks Regiment, son of Mrs Fothergill, 111 Lawford Road, New Bilton, has been wounded.

The following Rugby men have been reported prisoners of war :—Corpl F C Clements, R.W.R, Pte F Wright, M.G.C, and Pte A C Williams, R.W.R.

Capt Walter Bonn, Welsh Guards, has just been awarded the D.S.O. It will be remembered that he gained the M.C in March.

Pte H C Williams, 1st Royal West Kent Regiment—formerly an apprentice in the B.T.H Drawing Office—who was reported missing on October 26th last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date.

Mr H Hyam, 8 Drury Lane, Rugby, has received official information that his son, Pte Clifford Hyam, R.W.R, was wounded with shrapnel in the leg and arm in the fighting around Cambrai on September 27th. This is the second lad Mr Hyam has had wounded.

Mr H Minchin, 10 Market Street, has received news that his son, George Victor, a private in the R.W.R, was killed in action on September 3rd. Pte Minchin, who was nearly 19 years of age, joined the Army in January last, previous to which he was employed as a waiter at a Harrogate Hotel.

Mr A H Tilley, 46 Railway Terrace, has received news that his son, Horace, a gunner in the Royal Artillery, was killed while gun laying on September 27th He was 20 years of age, and before enlisting in March, 1917, was employed in the Controller Department at the B.T.H. In a letter to the parents his sergeant says :—“ I lost in your son a very useful lad, an intelligent gunner, conscientious and thoroughly reliable taking, as he did, a great interest in his work.

Lieut Albert Francis, 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, eldest surviving son of the late William G. Francis and Mrs H Dale, 28 Bridge Street, Rugby, was killed in action on September 29. He was formerly an employee at the B.T.H, went to Canada in 1913, joined up in November, 1915, quickly gaining promotion, and obtaining his commission in June. Mrs Dale has another son, Walter, serving with the Canadians, who won the M.M. Early in this year for bravery on the field.

MENTIONED FOR DISTINGUISHED SERVICES.
The names of General Sir E H H Allenby, Commander-in-Chief Egyptian Expeditionary Force, Rear-Admiral T Jackson, Lieut the Hon F E Feilding, and other navel and military officers have been brought to the notice the Secretory of State for War in connection with the operations at Hedjaz.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
ERNEST WM SMITH AGAIN WOUNDED.—We are informed that Pte Ernest Wm Smith, Grenadier Guards, second son of Mr & Mrs Tom Smith, is again wounded and in hospital. A year ago he received an injury to his thigh, and is now suffering from a big gun wound in the same limb. His younger brother Tom, also in the Grenadiers,was killed in action on September 25th, 1916. Both brothers volunteered early in the War. They were well known in the cricket and football fields, and highly respected by all.

DUNCHURCH.
BLACKBERRIES.—The school children of Dunchurch have responded well to the request of the authorities for their assistance in picking blackberries for making jam for the Forces. Up-to-date the Girls’ School have picked 688 lbs, and the Boys’ School 640 lbs—in all 1,328 lbs or 11cwt 3qrs 12lbs—a record probably unsurpassed by any school of the same size in the county. The largest quantity picked by one individual was 38½lbs by Irene Ellis. Quite a large quantity of crabs have also been forwarded to the jam factory.

MARTON.
CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS.—A meeting of the Parcels Fund Committee and Old Comrades’ Committee was held on Tuesday, when it was decided to join forces in the efforts to provide comforts for our boys on active service.

TO HELP THE GUNS TO BEAT THE HUNS
And make money for yourself as well, just by saving your WASTE MATERIALS.
Simple, isn’t it ?
BONES in lbs. or cwts.
RAGS, Woollen or cotton.
BRASS, in lbs, or cwts.
LEAD in any quantity.
IRON of any kind.
We pay the TOP PRICES. Send what you have.
We will send it in the proper direction.
W. BROOK,
2 & 4. PLOWMAN STREET, RUGBY.
Telephone 240.

THE SUPPLY OF MARGARINE.
At the Food Control Committee meeting on Thursday attention was called to the shortage of margarine in the town. It reported that the shortage was due to the railway strike, but supplies had that day come along and normal conditions would prevail in the future.

SEVEN COAL SAVING POINTS.

If the following seven coal-saving points, prepared after exhaustive experiments by the Coal Controller’s Department, are observed, a saving of from 30 per cent. To 40 per cent. of coal may be effected :—

OPEN FIRES.
(1.) The back and sided of every fire should be provided with firebricks or fire-tile not less than 6 inches high.
(2.) The fire-brick at the back of the fire should not be set vertically, but should lean slightly towards the front.
(3) An open fire should measure from front to back not more than 4½ inches
(4.) The ashpit or open space under the fire should be closed with a loose metal plate resting on the hearth.
(5.) The outlet flue opening or “ throat ” above the fire should not measure more than 4 inches in width.

CLOSED STOVES AND COOKING RANGES.
(6.) Closed fires and ranges should be provided with a “ false bottom,” resting upon and covering the grate. The simplest and cheapest device for this purpose, is sheet metal plate, having holes of ½-inch diameter punched in the plate at a distance of 2½ inches apart.
(7.) When cooking is finished all dampers should be immediately closed as tightly as possible.

By adopting these and similar methods every coal user can help the nation through the coming coal crisis and bring victory nearer.

DEATHS.

MINCHIN.—GEORGE VICTOR, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Minchin, 10 Market Street, Rugby. Killed in action September 3, 1918, somewhere in France ; aged 18 years and 9 months.

TILLEY.—Killed in action in France on September 27th, 1918, Gunner HORACE A. TILLEY, R.F.A., aged 20, elder son of Mr. & Mrs. A. H. Tilley, 46 Railway Terrace, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

AMOS.—Killed in action on October 9, 1917, Pte. HARRY AMOS, Gloucester Regiment, at Poelcappelle, the dearly beloved husband of Clara Amos, 41 Lodge Road.
“ Sweet is the memory he left behind
Of a life that was manly, clean and kind ;
His fight is fought, he has gained his rest ;
We remember you, dear, as one of the best.”
—His loving Wife and Children.

BOOTE.—In ever loving memory of Pte. S. BOOTE (SYD), 4th Worcestershire Regt, who died of wounds in Belgium October 11, 1917. —From his loving brother and sister Jack and Jeannie and his little nephew Aubrey.

COLLIER.—In loving memory of my dear sons, WILLIAM C. COLLIER, 16th R.W.R., killed in France on October 9, 1917 ; and FRANCIS GEORGE COLLIER, who died from pneumonia on July 17, 1918, at Kirkstall, near Leeds.—From their loving Father.

CURTIS.—In ever-loving memory of our dear one, Pte CHARLES WILLIAM CURTIS (Old Bilton), 16th Warwicks, previously missing, October 7, 1917, now reported killed ; aged 36 years.
“ One year has passed, how we miss him,
Never shall his memory fade ;
God has claimed him, angels guard
The sacred place where he is laid.
Somewhere in France his life he gave,
A husband true, a soldier brave :
Dear Lord, protect my brother’s grave,
A British hero’s grave.”
—His loving sister Bell (Torquay).
—Deeply missed by his loving Mother and Father, sisters Fan and Bell, brother Fred (a prisoner of war in Germany).

GRANT.—In loving memory of Pte. W. GRANT, Cock-robin Cottages, Dunchurch, and of the M.G.C., who was killed in action in France on October 12, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you ;
Just a year ago.
Too far, dear Will, thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—From loving Mother, Father, Brothers & Sisters.

HAYES.—In loving memory of C.S.M. GEORGE HINDE HAYES, M.C., 1/7 R.W.R., wounded October 4, died October 10, 1917. Interred at Wirmertoux, aged 34 years.
Also of Pte. FRANK HINDE HAYES, 1/7 R.W.R., killed in action July 19, 1916, at Festubert, aged 19½ years.
“ Their forms are from our household gone,
Their voices hushed and still.
Their places vacant in our hearts,
No earthly power can fill.”
—Deeply mourned by Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

HIRONS.—In loving memory of Pte. HARRY HIRONS, Machine Gun Corps, killed in action on October 10th, 1917 ; aged 22.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—From his Father, Sisters and Brothers.

LANE.—In ever-loving memory of our dear friend, BERT, who died 13th October, 1917, from wounds received in France.—Nell and Ernie.

SALMON.—In loving memory of Rifleman J. R. SALMON, killed in action on the Somme Front on October 7, 1916.

SEATON.—In proud and loving memory of my dear husband (WILL), Corpl. SEATON, Welsh Guards, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917.
“ Oh, surely, my beloved,
Though sign and token all be swept away,
‘Tis not in that land of desolation,
But in our hearts that thou live alway.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

SEATON.—In proud and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Corpl. W. R. SEATON, 1st Batt. Welsh Guards, who was killed in action on October 12, 1917.
“ We looked for his safe returning.
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed that meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—Sadly missed by Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

WILKINS.—In loving memory of my dearly beloved son, Pte. REGINALD GERALD WILKINS, R.W.R., killed in France on October 12, 1916 ; aged 21 years.

 

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14th Sep 1918. Rugby Volunteers Complimented

RUGBY VOLUNTEERS COMPLIMENTED.

The Rugby (“ D ”) Company. 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment still continue to make rapid progress, and was warmly complimented by the new District Army Inspecting Officer, Lieut-Col Adrian Wayte. King’s Own Regiment, after an inspection on Sunday. Col Wayte, who was accompanied by the Battalion Commanding Officer, Lieut-Col F F Johnstone, inspected the Company in platoon in the various branches of training, and said he was very pleased with what he had seen. He added that he had never seen a Volunteer unit turned out so well as the Rugby Company, and it would be a great pleasure for him to send in a favourable report with regard to their progress.

Lieut-Col Johnstone distributed three of the silver spoons offered for the six highest individual scorers at the recent Battalion shooting competition at Wedgnock for the Lincoln-Chandler Cup. The recipients were : Sergt Murray, Corpl Seymour (who made a “ possible ” at the 200 yards range), and Pte Edwards. Col Johnstone congratulated the Company on having three such good shots in their ranks, and he expressed the hope that they would win the cup next year.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl George John Plant, M.M, Coldstream Guards, formerly of Pailton, died of wounds on Aug 27.

Sergt F T Gambrell, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, of 174 Cambridge Street, who was taken prisoner during the German offensive in March last, has been repatriated, and is now in hospital in London, where his wounds are being treated. A bullet went in the right side of his hip, and his thigh was broken. Before joining the Army he worked in the Winding Department at the B.T.H.

A commission in the Regular Forces (3rd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) has been obtained by Mr T Eaton-Shore, who has been on active service since June, 1915, and will join his regiment at Dover. He is a son of the late Mr James Eaton-Shore, formerly works manager at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Engineering Works.

Mr H Fretter, of Kilsby Station, has secured a commission in the Regular Forces (King’s Royal Rifles). For two years and three months he was with the Rifle Brigade in France, and was in the Battles of Ypres (1915), Somme (1916), and Cambrai (1917). It was after the last engagement that he was recommended for a commission.

Rifleman Horace Wilson, London Regiment, late of the K.R.R, son of Mrs Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, has been seriously wounded in France. He has lost his right leg and his left arm has been badly fractured. He joined the Army in September, 1914, and has served three years in France. He was formerly employed by the B.T.H.

Pte H E Haddon, Coldstream Guards (39), was killed in action on August 28th. He was a native of New Bilton, where he worked for a time as a bricklayer. His wife and four children reside at Yardley, Birmingham.

Pte Thomas Goodyer, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, a native of Barby, was killed in action on August 31st. He was 19 years of age, and joined the Army twelve months ago, previous to which he was employed as a window cleaner in Rugby. He had been in France five months.

Sapper T H Overton, Welsh Field Company, brother of Mrs R Bubb, Cambridge St., is down with dysentery in Egypt.

Mrs Bax, of 21 Oliver Street, Rugby, has received news that her youngest son, Stanley Bax (29371), 1st Battalion Somerset Light Infantry, has been wounded in the left hand, and is now in hospital at Sheffield.

The names of Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, D.L, J.P. of the Warwickshire Territorial Force Association, and Mr J Hartwell, Remount Depot, Rugby, have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valuable services rendered in connection with the War.

Pte A Backler, R.W.R, and Pte S A Orland, Machine Gun Corps, both of Rugby, have been taken prisoners by the Germans.

Lance-Corpl G Biddels, Yeomanry, Rugby, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for distinguished and gallant services rendered on the occasion of the destruction or damage by enemy action of hospital ships, transports, and storeships.

Several months ago we recorded the fact that Sergt J Webb, 1st Warwicks, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, had been awarded the D.C.M. The official account of the action for which this distinction was awarded has now been published as under :—For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in handling his platoon. While trying to establish posts in a wood, he was twice surrounded, and it was only by his courage and skill that enabled the platoon to fight their way back. Later, during an attack, he again displayed the greatest courage and ability, penetrating far into the enemy’s position, and when forced to withdraw bringing back prisoners.

An intimation has been received by Mr & Mrs Williams, of 1 Market Street, Rugby, from the War Office, stating that their son, Harry Cecil Williams, of the 1st Royal West Kent Regiment, who was reported missing on October 26th last, is now believed to have been killed in action on that date.

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

There were only three Rugby cases before this Tribunal on Wednesday, when there were present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P G Lovett , S J Dicksee. and W Johnson, jun. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

George Francis Harris (41, C3), licensed victualler, Newbold-on-Avon, applied for exemption.—Mr Meredith explained that this case was adjourned at Easter for the man to get work of national importance, but nothing further had been heard of the this.—Applicant stated that he was now working as a semi-skilled mechanic at Willans & Robinson a and a national utility order to cover this work was made for six months.

Arthur John Tapley (28, Grade 3), watchman, 35 King Edward Road, Rugby, appealed against the decision of the Rugby Rural Tribunal to exempt him till October 15th on condition that he engaged in agriculture. He said he was now a watchman at the B.T.H, and when he took up this work he released an ex-soldier for productive work.—The Chairman : Are you a skilled gardener ? Tapley : I am an expert.—The Chairman : Obviously a skilled gardener in this phase of the country’s history cannot be allowed to look after a gate, which in all probability could very well look after itself.—Tapley then save his reasons for objecting to the decision of the Lower Tribunal, and criticised a newspaper report of the proceedings before that body.—The Chairman : Now, do not make any allegations, against the Press. They are very long-suffering people and my experience of the press representatives is that they are uniformly fair. They do not report things which people do not say, neither do they, as some people allege, put inferences into people’s mouths which they do not intend.—A national utility order was made, Tapley’s services to be used for food production in his own trade.

The National Service representative appealed against the Urban Tribunal’s decision in the case of Philip Singer (38), tailor, 199 Railway Terrace.—Mr Meredith said the appeal was against the adjournment of this case on a technical legal point, which, he contended, was not arguable before that Court. Mr Eaden might argue that because his client was born in Ukrania or Lithuania he was not amenable to the Military Service Acts. Ukrania might not be a part of Russia. but that was a point which must be argued before a Court of Summary Jurisdiction. Under the convention made with the Allied States in July, 1917, Russian subjects were given the option of returning to their own country, or coming under the operation of the Military Service Act. Therefore, leaving all legal arguments out, he did not care whether the man came from Lithuania, Ukrania, or the moon ; if he had elected to reside in this country and to accept all the advantages of the country in times at peace, this carried an obligation to defend the country against its enemies in times of war.—Mr Eaden submitted that the duties of that Tribunal laid within limited bounds, and were restricted to the Military Service Acts, and in this case the Allied Countries Convention Act, under which it was contended his client was liable. As a matter of fact, the whole point as to whether this man, in company with 45 or 47 other men, similarly situated, came within this Act, was sub judice, and the test case on which they all depended had been adjourned till after the long vacation. He contended that at present the Ttibunal had no jurisdiction in this matter, but immediately the test case was settled in the High Court they would know how to deal with this case on its merits.—The Tribunal unanimously upheld the contention of Mr Meredith, and refused to sanction an appeal to the Central Tribunal.—Singer was given two months’ calling-up notice to enable him to complete the orders he has on hand.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
CASUALTY.—Mrs J Seymour has received news that her husband, Corpl J Seymour, of the 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, is wounded and lying seriously ill with enteric fever at No. 9 Clearing Station, Italy.

NAPTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs George Alsop received the sad news this week that their only son, Wilfred Alsop, Berks Regt., was killed in France on August 21st. He was only 19, and had just returned to France after being previously wounded. Much sympathy is felt with Mr & Mrs Alsop.—Gunner J Makepeace and Pte W Griffin have both been gassed, and are now in hospital.—Pte Leonard Sheasby is wounded.

STOCKTON.
Wilfred Warner, who is in Italy, has had the unpleasant experience of being buried by a shell, which exploded in the trench. He was dug out after being a few minutes under ground, and was fortunate to escape with no worse injury than a sprained back.—William Bicknell has been awarded the Military Medal for good work in a raid, when about 400 Austrians were captured and a number of mules and horses.—Cyril Sheasby, who has been missing since March 21st, has been posted as killed on that date. He was a well-developed lad of 18 years.

MINISTRY OF FOOD.

NEXT ISSUE OF RATION BOOKS.

The attention of the Public is particularly drawn to the necessity of filling in the Green Reference Leaf at the end of the present Ration Book. Particular attention should be paid to the following five points :—

(1.) That the name and address of the holder and the holder’s signature is duly filled in.

(2.) If the holder is in possession of a Supplementary Ration Book the number must be inserted.

(3.) The serial number given on the front cover of the present Ration Book MUST BE FILLED IN.

(4.) If the holder has changed his or her address since the present book was issued, the space in the bottom left-hand corner of the reference leaf must be filled in and duly signed.

(5.) In the case of children under 18 years of age the date of birth and occupation or school must be inserted.

When the above directions have been complied with the reference leaf may be handed over the counter at the nearest POST OFFICE. If returned by post direct to your Local Food Office, the envelope must hear a 1½d. stamp. ON NO ACCOUNT MUST A REFERENCE LEAF BE PLACED IN A PILLAR BOX OR POST OFFICE LETTER BOX. Unless your local Food Office receive this reference leaf ON OR REFORE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st, there is a grave possibility of your not receiving a New Ration Book, which would mean you would be unable to purchase rationed foods when the present Ration Book expires. In the case of households all reference leaves should be pinned together before handing them in. If in doubt what to do, enquire at your Local Food Office at once.

DIVISIONAL FOOD COMMISSIONER
(North Midland Division),
Westminster Buildings,
Parliament Street, Nottingham.

The Rugby Town V.A.D. Hospital, “ Te-Hira.”
This hospital re-opened on Monday, September 9th, with its full complement of 44 patients. We shall be very grateful for gifts of any kind, and we especially want a gramophone.  The following friends have already sent us welcome presents, for which we thank them :—Mrs Higginbotham, Mrs C Bluemel, Bourton parish, and Leamington Hastings parish.
CAMILE PRIOR (Quartermaster).

DEATHS.

ALSOP.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. WIFRED ALSOP, Royal Berks. Regt. killed in action on August 21, 1918 ; aged 20.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best toward his mother ;
He nobly answered his country’s call,
He gave his young life for one and all.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, and Sisters.

ALSOP.—In loving memory of our dear nephew, Pte. W. E. ALSOP, Napton, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on August 21, 1918 ; aged 20.
“ No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost a loved one
Without saying ‘ Farewell.’
We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand,
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Aunt and Uncle and dear Cousin Will in Italy.

GOODYER.—In ever-loving memory of my dearest and eldest son.,Pte. THOMAS H. GOODYER, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in action “somewhere in France ” on August 31, 1918 ; aged 19 years.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but our aching hearts can tell.”
“ Peace, perfect peace.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

HADDON.—Killed in action on August 28th, Pte. H. E. HADDON, Coldstream Guards, aged 39, the dearly beloved husband of Florence Haddon, Church Road, Yardley.
“ Only those who have lost a loved one
Know the bitterness of ‘ Gone’ ”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and dear Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399 1/24th Queen’s London Regiment, who fell in action in France on September 11, 1916.
“ Not dead to us who love him still,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory still,
And will for evermore.”
—From his loving Wife, Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

COLING.—In loving memory of Gunner JOHN THOMAS COLING, R.F.A., the beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. John Coling, Grandborough, who died of wounds at Rouen on September 10, 1916.
“ Anchored by love, death cannot sever ;
Sadly we miss thee, and will for ever.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”

PEARCE.—In loving memory of Gunner H. C. PEARCE, the beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, Dunchurch, who was killed in action on September 11, 1917.
“ We do not forget him, nor do we intend ;
We think of him daily, and will to the end.
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—Not forgotten by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

VEARS.—Killed in action in France on September 11, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest grandson of Mrs. F. Draper, Long Buckby ; aged 21 years.
“ Not dead to us, we love him still ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory still,
And will for evermore.”
—From Grandma, Aunts and Uncles.

Williams, Harry Cecil. Died 26th Oct 1917

Whilst an ‘H C Williams’ is on the Rugby Memorial Gates and it must be presumed that the H C Williams on the BTH Memorial is the same man – there was initially insufficient ‘checkable’ information as to exactly whom he might be.

However, among the many soldiers named H or H C Williams on the Commonwealth War Graves data-base is a Harry Cecil Williams who was born in about 1897 and was the son of Harry and Florence Williams of 1, Market Street, Rugby.   This provided a man with a connection to the town.

Census data seemed to have no obvious records of either of these two Harry Williams in Rugby, and there was no place of birth to make searching easier. However, searching the various pre- and post-war Rugby Directories suggested that a Henry Williams, an ‘Engraver’ came to Rugby in about 1908, and in the 1909 Directory was living at 9 Lawford Road, Rugby.   Before 1911 he had moved to 66 Pennington Street, Rugby, and by 1913 onwards he was listed at 1 Market Street, Rugby, the address that was given on the CWGC site.

However, with no obvious birthplace to search, neither he nor his son appeared to be listed by the 1911 census! Fortunately searching for Harry’s mother, Florence, produced better results!

In 1901, the family had been at 8 Houston Road, Whiston, Lancashire.   Harry senior was a ‘watch engraver’ which also provided a ‘match’ to his occupation in Rugby. The children, Florence E and Harry C were five and four respectively and were both born in Prescott, Lancashire. Harry senior was born in Coventry [b.c.1871] so there was a connection with the area and his wife was from Norwich [b.c.1877]. Harry junior was born on 29 April 1897 and his birth was registered in Q2 1897. He was baptised as Harry Cecil on 7 July 1897 in Prescot, Lancashire, and his father was then also a ‘Watch Engraver’.

A 1911 census entry could now be found. The family had indeed moved to Rugby and were now in a four room house at 66 Pennington Street, Rugby, which fits with one of the earlier Directory entries. Harry senior was now working as an ‘Electric Meter Repairer, Engineer Works’, although the Directories still listed him as an engraver throughout the war – there may not have been staff to check – but he was still living in Market Street until at least 1920. In 1911, Harry Cecil was 13 and still at school, and his elder sister, Florence Eva was 15 and worked in the ‘Electric Insulating Dept., Engineer Works’.

It seems that Harry Junior would go on to work at BTH – and that was probably the ‘engineer works’ where his father and sister were working in 1911.

There are no extant military Service Records for Harry Cecil Williams, except for Medal Cards – but once again there is some confusion.

The Harry Williams with parents in Rugby is listed by the Commonwealth War Graves data-base as being in the 1st Battalion, the Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) with a Number G/23882.

However, from the Medal Cards, the Harry Cecil Williams who was born in about 1897 with the number G/23882 would appear to be in the Duke of Cambridge’s Own (Middlesex) Regiment, however there is no indication of his Battalion which makes tracing his movements during the war virtually impossible.

There is also a Harry Williams who was indeed in the 1st Battalion, the Queen’s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment) in the CWGC database.   However, he had the number S/173, went to France on 27 December 1914 and died on 12 March 1915 and is buried in Enclosure No.2. IV. A. 46., in the Bedford House Cemetery having been concentrated [moved] from the Asylum Cemetery – both in the Ypres area.

Regimental numbers were not unique, indeed the CWGC database includes five soldiers who had the number 23882, from five different Regiments, as well as a Harry Williams. Soldiers could be renumbered when they were posted to a different Regiment as happened when losses in action had reduced a Battalion to insufficient fighting strength.

In tracing ‘our’ Rugby ‘Harry Williams’, one has to make a decision as to likelihoods. The Army was in contact with his parents, so his date of death was likely to have been correct, and probably also his Regiment. He may have had more than one number – and perhaps that is the least important fact, and is less crucial to finding his story, in the absence of any Service Records. So what is the story of the 1st Bn, the Queen’s Own (Royal West Kents)?

The 1st Battalion was in Dublin in August 1914 as part of the 13th Brigade in the 5th Division and on

15 August 1914 they landed at Le Havre. During 1914 they took part in the Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat; the Battle of Le Cateau; the Battle of the Marne; the Battle of the Aisne; the Battles of La Bassee and Messines 1914 and the First Battle of Ypres. During 1915 they were engaged in the Second Battle of Ypres; and the Capture of Hill 60.

When Harry joined up is unknown, it was probably not until he was 18 in 1915.   When he went to France and joined his battalion is also unknown, but there is no record of him receiving the 1915 Star, so it was probably not until sometime in 1916, by which time he would have received some training in UK, and he would have reached the age of 18 or 19.   In 1916 the Battalion participated in the Attacks on High Wood; the Battle of Guillemont; the Battle of Flers-Courcelette; the Battle of Morval and the Battle of Le Transloy.

During 1917 the Battalion was in the Battle of Vimy; the Attack on La Coulotte; and the Third Battle of the Scarpe, which was part of the Battle of Arras.   They were then involved in several actions of the 3rd Battle of Ypres: the Battle of Polygon Wood; the Battle of Broodseinde; the Battle of Poelcapelle and the Second Battle of Passchendaele.

The 1st Bn. Royal West Kents were involved in an assault on 26 October 1917, on the first day of the Second Battle of Passchendale in the Gheluvelt area. In this southern area, X Corps supported the operation by attacking Gheluvelt which was almost due east of southern Ypres, to secure Tower Hamlets ridge, east of the Bassevillebeek as a diversion.

The Battalion War Diary[1] describes the attack on that first day: After withdrawing slightly to allow battery fire on the enemy positions, the enemy retaliated and shelled the areas behind the previous British positions causing heavy casualties. That day the War Diary noted that 2 officers were killed, 10 wounded and one was missing; and that 14 men were killed; 111 wounded and that 211 were missing. The writer of the reports stated: ‘The large number shown as “missing” are accounted for by the following facts: 1. Heavy shelling which must have buried many men. 2. Condition of ground which made it impossible to search ground properly for dead and wounded. 3. Complete lack of information from two assaulting Coys after zero hour.’ The report was on notebook pages, and written by the Lt. Col., whose papers and diaries had been sent back with a lance-corporal who was now missing presumed killed.

The CWGC records some 117 men of the Royal West Kents who died on that day, 26 October 1917. Some were buried in small burial grounds and later moved [concentrated] to the Hooge Crater Cemetery, but the majority have no known grave and are commemorated at Tyne Cot.

It is assumed that sometime during that costly assault on 26 October 1917, Harry C Williams was deemed to have been ‘Killed in Action’.

He was probably one of the many reported ‘missing’ and his body was either never found or not identified. He is remembered on one of the Panels 106 to 108 of the Tyne Cot Memorial. The Tyne Cot Memorial is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Whereas those who died before 16 August 1917 are remembered on the Menin Gate, the United Kingdom servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot.

Harry Cecil Williams is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby; on the BTH List of ‘Employees Who Served’; and on the BTH War Memorial.[2]

Harry was awarded the British War and Victory Medals.

His father’s death at 71 was registered in Rugby in Q1 1943.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Harry Cecil WILLIAMS was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, July 2017.

[1]       The National Archives, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, 5th Division, Piece 1555/1-2: 1 Battalion, Queen´s Own (Royal West Kent Regiment, July 1917 – April 1919.

[2]       The List is that published in the Rugby Advertiser, 4 November 1921.

9th Dec 1916. An Urban Council Employee’s Wages

AN URBAN COUNCIL EMPLOYEE’S WAGES.

Leave to appeal for a further extension was asked for Mr M J H Sharp, surveyor under the Rugby Urban District Council, in respect of Arthur Williams (35, married), chargehand at the refuse destructor, living at 58 Bennett Street.—In a letter Mr Sharp said he had advertised the post six times, and had not received a single application. The Military Authorities had supplied substitutes, who had refused to take on the work after visiting the destructor and seeing what was required of them. If the man joined up before a suitable substitute was obtained, the Council would be left in an awkward position, and no doubt the destructor would have to be closed down, as neither of the three men left was fit to take charge. Seeing the man was passed for garrison duty only, the Surveyor considered he would be doing good service by remaining in his present employment.

The Chairman : What wages are you offering ?-Mr Sharp : Thirty shillings.—The Chairman : I think you ought to be ashamed of yourself to offer a wage like that. Do you know what the ordinary labourer gets at the Coventry destructor works ?—Mr Sharp : Ninepence an hour.—The Chairman : He gets £2 3s per week.-Mr Sharp : How many hours do they work ?—The Chairman : Fifty-four.—Mr Sharp said the average of the men at the Rugby destructor was less than that.

The Chairman asked if it was true that the Military sent a man who would have gone for £2 a week, and they would not have him ?—Mr Sharp : Not that I am aware of.-Mr Wratislaw : It is true.

Mr Sharp enquired who the man referred to was ?—The Chairman read a statement by the Military to the effect that Mr Sharp asked them to send the man up, and on his return he informed them he would have taken the place, only 30s a week was offered, and he would not agree to take it under £2.—The Chairman (to Mr Sharp : Did you offer him £2 a week ?—Mr Sharp : I said, “ Come down to the destructor and see what work you have got to do.” He went down, and he would not take the job.

The Chairman : The chargehands at our destructor are earning £3 10s a week. Leave to appeal refused. It is a disgraceful thing. You say the man is absolutely indispensible to Rugby. You say if he goes you will have to shut down, and the health of Rugby will be jeopardised, and yet you offer 30s a week. Leave to appeal is not allowed in this case. I do not think the Urban District Council of Rugby can really understand it.

Mr Sharp : I am placed in an awkward position. One of the men is away from work, and if Williams has to go I shall have to close down to-night.—The Chairman : Well, you will have to close down. You thoroughly deserve it. You have asked for it.—Mr Sharp : Thank you, Sir.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The entertainments at the Co-operative Hall on Thursday and Friday last week were of a highly enjoyable character, and must have entailed a large amount of time and trouble on the part of the organisers. The colour scheme adopted for the costumes and stage (black and scarlet) was striking and pleasing to the eye. The members of the party are local ladies and gentlemen, who, however, prefer to remain anonymous.

“ Jacques ” with his patter was a source of mirth, and “ Coquette ” for her song “ Come and cuddle me,” was quite successful. The rich baritone voice of “ Pierre ” was heard to advantage in “ Sailor’s Paradise.” “ Babette ” was at her best in “ Whoops 1 lets do it again,” and Paulette” captivated the audience with her songs, “ Plumstones ” and “ God send you back to me,” which were rendered with ability. The concarted pieces were pleasingly rendered. “ Jeau ” was quite at home with “ Every morn you’ll hear him say Good-night,” and made a good hit. “ Little Reggie,” the pet of the party, caused roars of laughter on Friday, evening in a Charlie Chaplin make-up, and also did useful work as a programme seller.

The financial result was satisfactory ; it is expected, to clear about £30.

A collection was made each evening to provide, tea for the wounded soldiers, who were entertained at a special matinee on Saturday. The whole of the sum realised—vis, £3 7s 9d—will be given to the Rugby Infirmary V.A.D Hospital Fund.

The secretarial work was successfully carried out by Mr G O Watson, the hon secretary of the Corps.

The thanks of the Corps to the members of the party were expressed by Mr C H Fuller, Commandant, in a short speech at the performance on Thursday. Mr Fuller also urged on the public the usefulness of the Corps, as evidenced by Lord French’s interest and support. More men are urgently needed to bring the Corps up to Company strength. At present the Corps has Atherstone attached to it to form the “ B ” Company of the 2nd (County) Battalion.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has come to hand that Second-Lieut E F Lawlor, of the Monmouthshire, grandson of Mr John Lawlor, of 7 Charlotte Street (a member of the Rugby Board of Guardians), has been killed in action. He was with other soldiers killed by a shell on the parapet of a trench. Lieut Lawlor was well known in Marton and the vicinity.

Pte George H Dunstone, of the R.A.M.C, who at the time he enlisted was a clerk in the Traffic Department at Rugby under Mr Bolton, has won the Military Medal for his bravery in rescuing wounded soldiers when under fire. He has recently had ten days’ leave, and on visiting his friends at Rugby was heartily congratulated by them on the honour conferred upon him.

Captain E W E Kempson, commander of the unit of the Army Troops Corps, R.E, which was raised in Rugby, and originally known as the “ Rugby Fortress Company,” has been mentioned in despatches.

The parcels sent this week on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to the Rugby and District men in prison camps in Germany, contained the following :— ½lb biscuits, 1 tin herrings, 1 tin Oxo cubes, ¼ tin cocoa, ½lb cooked ham in tin, 2oz tobacco. ½lb sugar, ½lb milk, pepper, salt, and mustard, 1 tin sausages, ½lb dripping in tin.

ANOTHER LONG LAWFORD SOLDIER KILLED.

Official information has been received by Mr and Mrs Elkington, of Long Lawford, that their son, Rifleman J Elkington, of the Rifle Brigade, was killed in action November 10th. Previous to the war, Rifleman Elkington was employed at the Carpenter’s Shop at the B.T.H, and had been in France for the past eighteen months.

PRESENTATION OF D.C.M.

At Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital on Thursday, Colonel Johnstone presented to Gunner Roberts, R.G.A, the Distinguished Conduct Medal, won in Gallipoli in January, 1915, for carrying a wounded comrade to safety under very heavy fire. Col Johnstone, who was accompanied by Major Neilson, made a very appropriate speech, and pinned on the medal in the presence of the Commandant, the Quartermaster, the in-patients, and Staff.

LANCE-CORPL BOB MAYS AWARDED THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Mr J Mays, of 17 South Street, Rugby, has received a letter from his son, Lance-Corpl Bob Mays, of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, describing how he won the Military Medal. He says : “ We endeavoured three times, Corpl Hester, Pte Sullivan, and myself, to obtain a sample of the German barbed wire. It was during the third attempt that Corpl Hester was shot through both thighs, and his cry of pain brought very heavy rifle and machine-gun fire from the enemy’s line. After dressing Corpl Hester’s wounds, I left Pte Sullivan with him, whilst I tried to find my way back to our trenches—a very difficult task in the black darkness. Three times I found myself in the German line, and eventually I managed to find our line, and returned to Corpl Hester and Pte Sullivan, and we managed to drag him along on his back whilst we crawled on our stomachs, for to kneel or stand meant certain death. Corpl Hester being 6ft in height, and Pte Sullivan and myself only 5ft 4in, he was a good load to carry ; but at last we managed to get him in, after being in “ No Man’s Land ” for over five hours. Pte Sullivan and myself were recommended for the Military Medal, and have both received our reward. Lance-Corpl Mays was formerly a Staff-Sergeant in the Boy’s Life Brigade and had previously been wounded.

BRINKLOW.

SOLDIER’S DEATH AND MILITARY FUNERAL.—The death of Lance-Corpl William Robert Everton, aged 27, of the Military Foot Police, occurred at Brinklow on November 27th. The deceased, who was a native of Tottenham, came from France on special leave on November 11th to stay at the home of Mr S Heath, to whose daughter he was engaged. He caught a cold, which developed into pneumonia. He was originally in the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, and had served five years in India. His regiment took part in the disastrous Gallipoli campaign, where he was wounded. He was afterwards drafted into the Military Police. The deceased was accorded a military funeral, which took place at the cemetery on November 30th. A special firing party came from Rugby for the purpose. The Rev G A Dawson was the officiating clergyman. In addition to the family mourners, a large number of the villagers and the school children gathered round the graveside, when the “ Last Post ” was sounded, many floral tributes were afterwards placed upon his grave.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SOLDIERS’ GRAVES IN FRANCE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—In my conversations with friends whilst on a few days’ leave from France I find out how very few people know of the Graves Registration Units of the British Army.

I am often asked the question : “ How are our soldiers buried and graves attended to ? ” I think the following information will put any uneasy mind at rest if you will be kind enough to insert it in your paper :—

The work of the Graves Registration Units is carried on by officers, N.C.O’s, and men who are otherwise unfit for fighting. Land is bought at various spots along our line, is surveyed and marked out for cemeteries. Hedges, trees, shrubs, &c, are being planted, so that the cemeteries are permanent resting-places for our dead soldiers. The bodies are laid in separate graves, or side by side, one foot apart. The graves are carefully tended, and flowers planted, &c. The grave is registered, and the records filed for enquiries. A cross is erected over every grave with the man s number, name, regiment, &c, inscribed upon it. Photographs are taken of any grave when applied for, providing the grave can be reached without undue exposure to the enemy.

Any enquiries or applications should be addressed to : THE DIRECTOR, G.R Units, G.H.Q, B.E.F,

I am, sir, yours truly,
A E AINSWORTH,
Attached G.R Units, France.
84 Manor Road, Rugby.

DEATHS.

ELKINGTON.—In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of our dear son, John Thomas Elkington, who was killed in action on November 10, 1916 ; aged 27 years.—“ God’s will be done.”—From his sorrowing MOTHER and FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

21st Oct 1916. Conscientious Objectors in Warwick Prison

WARWICKSHIRE STANDING JOINT COMMITTEE.
CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS IN WARWICK PRISON.

The conditions under which conscientious objectors are accommodated at Warwick Prison were described in a report presented to the Warwickshire Standing Joint Committee at their meeting at Warwick on Monday. The report stated that the men “ will live in the prison, and for the most part work on the premises, though some of them may at a later date be sent to such work as may be arranged outside. They will not be subject in any way to penal discipline ; they will be allowed to leave the prison premises when their work is done, and at other times, with the permission of the agent in charge. If a man absconds, he will not be liable to arrest, but will be reported, with a view to his being recalled to the Army, or, if his prison sentence is unexpired, to be sent back to prison.”

RUGBY BOARD OF GUARDIANS.
MORE ACCOMMODATION NEEDED FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

The Chairman informed the Board that he had that day received a telephone message from Mr Michell, stating that the War Office had applied for further accommodation for wounded soldiers to be made in Rugby ; and Mr Steel, in conjunction with Mr Michell, wondered if provision could be made for any accommodation in the Workhouse Infirmary. A small committee had been appointed, consisting of the Chairman of the Board, the Vice-Chairman, Mrs Dewar, Miss McClure, Messrs Steel, C H Rowbottom, F M Burton, Garratt, and Salter ; and they had decided to get on with the work of the Board as quickly as possible, and meet that afternoon with the Guardians approval. The Local Government Board Inspector (Mr Nesbit) would have to be consulted before any arrangement could be made, and the question was whether the committee should have power to act. Personally, he thought, to the point of self-sacrifice, they ought to do everything they could ; and if it was possible, without undue strain upon the officers, he thought they should place the whole of the infirmary at the disposal of the Military Authorities (hear, hear).

It was decided to adopt the committee’s suggestion, and to give them power to act.

Mr Hicken asked if they had one of the Children’s Homes to spare ?- The Chairman said that was a most important suggestion, and it would be considered by the committee.—Mr T Mitchell mentioned that the Small-pox Hospital at Lawford Heath was vacant ; but the Chairman said that was not under the control of the Guardians.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

DEBADGING OF MARRIED MEN AT THE B.T.H WORKS.

Letters from Mr H N Sporborg, of the B.T.H Co, were read by Mr Wratislaw in answer to the statements made at a previous sitting of the Tribunal that married men were debadged while single employees were retained, and that the debadging was done by the foreman. Mr Sporborg said there was no truth whatever in the statement made by Walter Alderman, a joiner, of 85 Wood Street (whose case had been adjourned), that he was being taken in preference to single men in the building department whose work he could do. In proof of that a list of the single men retained and their occupations was given. That the question of debadging was left to the foreman of the shop was incorrect as regarded Alderman’s case, because he was debadged by the Inspector of the Ministry of Munitions.—Mr Wale : Don’t say any more. The Inspector might have been a tailor.—The Chairman pointed out to Alderman that the letters did not bear out his statement that a lot of single men were kept back. Evidently they were not.—The Military appeal against an exemption was upheld.

WAGES OF CHARGE HAND AT THE REFUSE DESTRUCTOR.

Mr John H Sharp, Surveyor to the Rugby Urban Council, appeared in support of an appeal for a further exemption for Arthur Williams, 15 Bennett Street, in charge at the Refuse Destructor. He said he had advertised, but had not been able to replace the man. Mr Wratislaw’s statement that a substitute sent by the Military was told he would be offered 30s a week was declared by Mr Sharp to be absolutely wrong.—Mr Wratislaw produced a postcard as evidence.—Mr Sharp said he saw the man, and made an appointment to meet him at the Destructor, but the man never went near the place.—The Chairman said if a man was so vital they ought to offer more than 30s.

Mr Wale thought such a man should be worth 9d an hour, which was a lot more than 30s a week. It was not a question of wages, but a question of getting a man.—Mr Wratislaw said if a man could get better wages he was not going to work for 30s.—Mr Sharp replied that if a man was satisfied with his wages, that had nothing to do with the case.—Mr Wale was quite certain there were attested men, unfit for military service, who could do this work, and Mr Wratislaw said the Military could send a suitable man.—The Surveyor : Suited to this work ?—Mr Wale : I have to take what the Military send me. I take the goods the gods provide, and don’t grumble.—Final exemption till November 30th was granted.

WORK OR WAGES ?

John Shanks farmer, Cawston, again appealed for his son George (33, single), who had been exempted till August 31st.-Mr Eaden asked for the case to be adjourned sine die, but the Tribunal refused nor would they grant an exemption till January 1st.-Mr Wratislaw : You should have taken the man we sent last August.-Mr Eadon : You sent two or three, but they didn’t like the work.-Mr Wale : Perhaps they didn’t like the wages.—Mr Eaden : The wages were all right.—Mr Eaden informed appellant that under the new Army Order his son would get till 1st of January.—The Chairman : We don’t make it the 1st of January.

Mr Channing associated himself with the appeal of Mrs Colledge, baker and corn dealer, Brandon, on behalf of her son, Sydney George Colledge, 27, single.—The Chairman : We have put him back once.—Mr Channing : If you do to again, I think that will meet the case.—Appeal dismissed, but allowed 28 days.——Francis Buckingham, carter, Combe Fields, asked for further exemption on domestic grounds, and offered to undertake farm work.—Appeal dismissed, but given 14 days.

MILITARY APPEALS.

The Military appealed against the exemption to January 1st granted to Thos Scrawley, fitter, 15 James Street, Rugby, employed by Messrs Foster & Dicksee, for whom Mr Herbert Watson, secretary to the firm, appeared. It was stated that this was the only fitter left.—Mr Wratislaw said Mr J Darby, sen, did nearly all the repairs to the Rugby Fire Brigade appliances, and a blacksmith was also employed by the firm.-Appellant said he did three parts of the Fire Brigade work, but if the Tribunal would give him the chance he would go into munition works.—The Chairman : You have spoilt your own case ; that settles it.—Final exemption till December 31st.

An appeal by the Military against temporary exemption to December 31st granted to Richard Edward Williams (37, married), proprietor of a laundry business in Stephen Street, was dismissed.-Ernest Manners, general dealer, 4 Windmill Lane, agreed to accept December 31st as final, and an order for this date was made.——Thos Arthur Stephenson (29), woollen and rag merchant, Newbold Road, placed in Class C (3), claimed that his work was of national importance, but the Tribunal considered he should do something different, and adjourned the case for 14 days to see what could be arranged.-Exception was taken by the Military to the temporary exemption till January 1st granted to Thos Hubbard Deacon (18), plumber’s apprentice, Newbold-on-Avon, but the Tribunal dismissed the Military appeal.-The appeal of the Military was upheld in the case of George Mascord White (22, single), shoeing and general smith, Dunchurch, to whom temporary exemption was granted till January 1st.-Walter Wm Heap (37, married), builder, Dunchurch, was also given to January 1st, .whilst Chas Wells, School Street, Wolston, a haulier in the employ of Kirby Bros, was allowed till December 1st, with leave to appeal again.—Alfred Webster, farm labourer, Woolscott, was given till January 1st.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lady members of Albert Street Bible Class and a few friends gave a tea and concert to 44 wounded soldiers at “ Te Hira ” on the 11th inst. It was greatly enjoyed.

Lieut Stanley Hidden, previously of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been gazetted Adjutant of the Army Service Corps of the 1st Mounted Division at the Headquarters of the Division.

As a result of the horticultural exhibition held at the Conservative Club recently, the sum of £30 was raised after paying all expenses, and this was equally divided between the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund and Rugby Soldiers Comforts Fund.

Drummer W Newman, of the Rugby Territorials, younger son of Mr C J Newman, Benn Street, has just been invalided to England from France, suffering from a severe attack of rheumatism. He is now in hospital at University College, London.

The parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men in German prison camps this week contained : ¼-lb tea, 1lb sugar, tin Nestles milk, half-cheese, tin sardines, tin rabbit and onions, a blackberry and apple pudding, and 2lbs biscuits. In addition, a warm woollen undervest and pants have been sent to each man.

ANOTHER MILITARY MEDAL.

The Military Medal has been awarded to Rifleman H E Lister, of the Rifle Brigade. The Major-General commanding the Division notifies that he has received a report of the gallant conduct of Rifleman H E Lister on September 4 and 5, 1916, for continuously carrying messages under heavy rifle and shell fire near Guillemont, and he wishes to congratulate him on his fine behaviour. Rifleman Lister is a grandson of Mr H Lister, 105 Clifton Road, Rugby. He was formerly an apprentice in the pattern shop at the B.T.H. He joined up in September, 1914, and was wounded once in the following year.

CAWSTON HOUSE HOSPITAL RE-OPENED.

After being closed for about eight months, Cawston House has been re-opened by Mr C E and Mrs Blyth for the reception of wounded soldiers. An urgent request was received from the authorities on Thursday week, and by Monday everything in the way of equipment and staff was ready, and ten wounded soldiers were brought in during the day.

A GOODS GUARD KILLED.

Mr and Mrs Edwards, of 42 Windsor Street, have received news that their oldest son, Lance-Corpl Edwards, of the London Regiment, was killed in the great fight on September 15th. The first intimation came from a sergeant of another regiment, who, when making a short cut to new lines of trench, came across the body of a young man, who, in company with some others, had been caught by machine gun fire. In the man’s pockets were two photographs of a wife and two children, which had apparently been pierced by a bullet ; also a wallet, &c, all of which the sergeant was able to send to the address written on the photos—that of the deceased’s wife at Rowington, near Warwick, together with a letter full of comfort and sympathy. Lance-Corpl Edwards, who enlisted at the outbreak was a goods guard on the L & N-W Railway, and was 26 years of age. He was discharged on account of physical defects soon afterwards, but was recalled in 1915, and transferred from the K.R.R to a London regiment. He usually carried the photographic in the left pocket of his tunic.

LONG LAWFORD.

MR & MRS ELKINGTON have received news that their youngest son, Ronald, has been promoted to be sergt in the King’s Royal Rifles. He has also been a recipient of congratulations from Major-General Douglas Smith for gallant conduct and fine behaviour on the night of August 23rd and 24th during the attack on Guillemont. Sergt Elkington, is only 20 years of age, and he has three brothers and two brothers-in-law on active service.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

MISSING.—Pte F Linnett, Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Stretton, is reported as having been missing since September 3rd. He is 26 years of age, unmarried, and has served nine years with the colours. He has not been home on leave for seven years.

BRETFORD.

Pte Arthur Wilson, of the Royal Inniskillings, has received his discharge, owing to ill-health. He was at the Dardanelles and in Serbia, where last winter he was severely frost bitten. From this he has suffered severely, and it is feared that it will be years before his strength returns.

AN ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court, on Thursday (before T Hunter, Esq), Pte Arthur Collins, of the R.W.R, 45 New Street, New Bilton, pleaded guilty to being an absentee from his Battalion since October 14th, and was remanded to await an escort.

MURRAY SCHOOL BOYS’ INGENIOUS DEVICE.—Two boys attending the Murray School—Frank James Clarke (13) and Thomas George Mann (12)—have been working on a design for an aircraft shell, and have submitted the drawings to the Coventry Ordnance Company. The officials of the Company have expressed themselves as very interested in the idea, and are considering the details.

DEATHS.

EDWARDS.—On September 15th, in France, Albert Victor, the dearly loved eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Edwards, of 42 Windsor Street, Rugby.

EDWARDS.—Killed in action in France on September 15, 1916, Lance-Corpl. A. V. EDWARDS, London Regiment, the dearly loved husband of Bessie R. Edwards.

THORNE.—Officially reported missing since October 13, 1915, now concluded killed, Lance-Corpl. CHARLES THORNE, Leicester Regiment, elder son of George and Kate Thorne, of Lutterworth ; aged 22.

27th May 1916. Considered Indispensable at the Refuse Destructor.

CONSIDERED INDISPENSABLE AT THE REFUSE DESTRUCTOR.

The Military Authorities appealed against the three months’ exemption granted to Arthur Williams, 58 Pennington Street, Rugby, charge hand at the refuse destructor. It was pointed out that in the interests of the health of Rugby it was most important that this man’s work should be done efficiently.—Mr John H Sharp, town surveyor, mentioned that Williams had charge of a small Cornish boiler, and had to get into it to clean it out when necessary. He had been in the Council’s employ for ten year’s, and was thoroughly used to the work, and it would be very difficult to replace him.—Mr Wratislaw said if the decision of the Local Tribunal was absolute, the appeal would not be pressed.—The Chairman said they could not alter what exemption had been given, but it might not go through so easily next time.

GROCERY MANAGER’S SACRIFICE.

Mr Harold Eaden represented James H Ivey, branch manager for the Rugby Co-operative Society at Hillmorton, whose case had been adjourned to enable the applicant to get into work of national importance. The Metropolitan Asylums Board had promised him work as a storekeeper, and duty was found for him at a Hospital in Surrey, but subsequently a letter was received, stating that the Board were unable to offer him employment at the present moment. Acting on his advice, his client was now working on a farm. His salary as manager for the Rugby Co-operative Society was £1 13s a week, in addition to house, coal, and gas, making a total of £2 5s, and he understood his present wages would be 15s, so that he had made a sacrifice.-Exempted as long as engaged in agricultural work.

MR LEO BONN’S HOSPITAL ATTENDANT.

Another adjourned case was that of Frank Lobb, attendant at Mr Leo Bonn’s hospital for disabled soldiers at Newbold Revel.—Mr Eaden pointed out that the position was now altered altogether. Quite recently the Government had built a hospital at Brighton for soldiers, and within the next month the men at Newbold Revel would be sufficiently cured to go back home and await their artificial limbs. Mr Leo Bonn’s hospital had been beautifully fitted up, and application had been made for a dozen ordinary wounded soldiers to be sent along. He asked for a month’s postponement, as if those soldiers came the man’s services might be regarded as indispensable, but if not Mr Bonn would let him go.—Temporary exemption till June 23rd, the Chairman remarking that he thought the man would have to go then.

PAILTON FARMER AND HIS SON.

John Smiths Cockerill, farmer, Pailton, appealed for his son, aged 19, a shepherd and stockman on a farm of 147 acres, 37 being arable. Mr Harold Eaden supported the request, which Mr Cox said seemed reasonable, and on his advice exemption was given till September 30th.

OTHER CASES.

Wm Witter, farmer and dairyman, Tithe Farm, Pailton, aged 79 and a cripple, appealed for his cowman, Joseph Hill, to whom a conditional exemption was granted.— Robt Bucknill, traction engine proprietor, Marton, asked that his son, Colin R Bucknill, aged 19, assisting in the business, should be exempted. Applicant said he had three engines and only three men, whereas he really required six. His son was the driver of a thrashing machine.—Appeal dismissed.—Frank John Cockerill (28), farmer and butcher, in partnership with his brother at Birdingbury, on being told that his appeal for exemption would be dismissed, said he would have to sell his stock and let the land lie idle.—Wm Leslie Morgan, dentist, Osborn House, Rugby, was represented by Mr Eaden, who merely asked for sufficient time to carry out existing contracts.—Papers not to be be served before August 3rd.

NOT OF NATIONAL IMPORTANCE.

Mr Edwards, manager of the Hippodrome, appealed for Oswald Thos Measures, the stage manager, living at 12 Pinfold Street, New Bilton.—The Local Tribunal considered the business was not of national importance.—Appeal dismissed.

A BUSINESS RECENTLY PURCHASED.

Having been three times before the Local Tribunal, Leslie Bramall, grocer, 27 Rokeby Street, Rugby, who was said by the Military representative to have purchased his business in September, 1915, appealed for postponement on the ground of hardship.—The Chairman : You purchased the business when you knew you would be called upon.—Appeal dismissed.

MORE MILITARY APPEALS.

Military appeals were lodged in the following cases :-

Frank Walding, boot and shoe retailer, living at 52 Caldecott Street, who was represented by Mr Worthington, and given a temporary exemption till September 1st.—Francis Dudley Hogg, licensed victualler, Central Hotel, Rugby, was allowed till August 15th.—Maurice Hethersay, confectioner and toy dealer, 32 Sheep Street (represented by Mr Worthington), was allowed till August 1st.—Alfred Wm Elsley, manager of the Home & Colonial Stores, was granted conditional exemption till October 31st ; and Albert Partridge Stephens, hairdresser, 4 Little Church Street, was given till September 1st.

OTHER CASES.

Not satisfied with the recommendation for exemption to June 15th, John Gardner Hall, dental mechanic, 20A High Street, Rugby, appealed, and was allowed till July 31st.

An appeal made by J Liddington on behalf of P B Woodward, confectioner, 70 James Street, was supported by Mr Worthington, who said his client chiefly baked “ smalls,” but also bread, and had entire control of the bakehouse and stores in Regent Street.—Appeal dismissed.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS SUMMONED.—At the Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before T Hunter,Esq, two conscientious objectors, Alfred John Routley, North Street, Rugby, and George Henry Smith, Pennington Street, Rugby, were charged with being absentees under the Military Service Act.—Defendants were remanded till Tuesday, bail being allowed.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.—At the Rugby Police Court on Wednesday, before T Hunter, Esq (in the chair), and A E Donkin, Esq, James Glasgow, of the 1st K.O.S.B’s, who went through the fighting in Gallipoli, was fined 1s 6d for being drunk at Rugby the previous evening.—P.S Percival stated that defendant was helplessly drunk and lying on the footpath.—William Fred Hewitt, carter, 69 Victoria Avenue, was remanded until Tuesday for being an absentee under the National Service Act. Defendant said he did not feel well enough to go, and a military witness pointed out that the man had been refused an exemption.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Jack Beech, 9th R.W.R, son of Mr G Beech, 19 Avenue Road, New Bilton, who has been wounded and frost-bitten, and has been in hospital five months, arrived in England on May 18th, and is now at Elizabeth Hospital, London.

Pte W Scarlett, R.W.R, son of Mr and Mrs Hy Scarlett, Long Lawford, has been wounded. He is only 19 years of age, and enlisted on the outbreak of the war.

Last week we reported that Bomb W K Freeman, R.F.A, of Rugby, had been awarded the Military Cross and recommended for the D.C.M. The decoration that Bomb Freeman has received, however, is a French one, and not the Military Cross, which is only awarded to officers of warrant or commissioned rank.

Alfred Shepherd, O.L, younger son of Mr William Shepherd, of Grosvenor Road, late of the Clifton Inn, Clifton Road, has been granted a commission as Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve, and has left Kinshasa, Stanley Pool, Belgian Congo, to cross Africa for service in the East.

WELL-KNOWN FOOTBALLER WOUNDED

Lieut S G Wolfe, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, the well-known Rugby, Coventry, and Midland Counties footballer, has been wounded at the front. Lieut Wolfe gained a commission after eighteen months’ service in the trenches, and he had only been with his new unit a week when he was caught by a German machine gun while he was helping to repair barbed wire entanglements in front of the firing line. The nature of his injuries are not known locally except. that he received two wounds in the neck and one in the face. Lieut Wolfe was successively a pupil, student teacher, and assistant master at Elborow School, and was selected to play for the Midland Counties against the South Africans.

LIEUT BUCKNILL KILLED.

It is officially announced, that in the Persian Gulf operations on January 21st last Lieut Bucknill, of the Hampshire Regt, formerly reported missing, was killed in action. Lieut Bucknill was the son of Lieut.-Colonel John T Bucknill, R.E, of Hillmorton Manor, and Thornfield, Bitterne. After taking his degree at Cambridge, the deceased officer became an architect. At the outbreak of war he obtained a commission, and left with his battalion for India in October, 1914, going to the Persian Gulf in March, 1915. His regiment was in the hard fighting at Nasrich, and for his services Lieut Bucknill was mentioned in despatches and received the Military Cross. His only brother, Major L M Bucknill, R.F.A, died in May last year in France from wounds received in the battle of Festubert, and was twice mentioned in despatches. His uncle was the late Sir Chas Bucknill, the High Court Judge. Lieut Bucknill was a very keen lawn tennis player, as also was his wife.

FOOD PRICES IN WAR TIME.—The marked increase in the cost of food since the war began is a matter of common knowledge, but the British advance, great as it has been, compares favourably with the state of affairs in Germany and Austria. In Vienna the cost of food has risen 110 per cent, in Berlin 100 percent, whilst in the United Kingdom the increase is 55 per cent. Meat has become in some households an almost prohibited luxury. Before the war prime rump steak could be obtained in Rugby at 1s per lb, now the price is 1s 8d. Loin of beef was formerly 10d, now it costs 1s 4d. Legs of mutton have advanced in price from 9d to 1s 4d per lb, and chops and cutlets from 1s to 1s 6d ; whilst pork chops, which could formerly be obtained for 9d, are now 1s 4d per lb. Sugar has become both scarce and dear. The Royal Commission on sugar cannot guarantee 75 per cent of last year’s supply, and many grocers are unable to obtain 50 per cent. For granulated sugar, which could formerly be bought at 2d per lb, the grocers are now charging 5¼d, and then only a limited quantity is supplied to each customer, who is also expected to purchase other commodities at the same time. In May, 1895, the retail price of best butter at one large establishment in Rugby was 10d per lb ; last week the price was 1s 8d.

THE SUMMER TIME ACT IN OPERATION.

In Rugby and neighbourhood the adoption of the Summer Time Act was readily observed, and as far as we have been able to gather, without causing inconvenience, except to a very few who preferred to ignore the change, or where through inadvertence or otherwise clocks were not adjusted to the new time. On Sunday everything seemed to come as a matter of routine. People attended Divine worship at the ordinary times—by the clock—and it was only in the evening that the difference was impressed upon one by the longer time that elapsed between the last observances of the day and the time when darkness set in—the extra hour of daylight, in fact, the measure is designed to give.

On Monday work and business went on as if nothing had occurred, and again in the evening the extra hour in which workers could be out of doors in lovely May weather was much appreciated.

The farmers’ objections were voiced at Northampton on Saturday by the largest meeting of farmers held in the town for many years past, and a resolution was unanimously adopted to adhere as far as possible to real time as shown by the sun in the arrangement of work on the farms, and to take as little notice as we can of the sham time that will be shown by public clocks.”

DEFENCE OF THE REALM ACT

ADVERTISEMENTS in the Situations Vacant columns from Firms whose business consists wholly or mainly in engineering, shipbuilding, or the production of arms, ammunition, or explosives, or of substances required for the production thereof, are, in order to comply with Regulation 8 (b) of the above Act, subject to the following conditions:—“ No person resident more than 10 miles away or already engaged on Government work will be engaged.”

IN MEMORIAM.

DOYLE.—In ever loving memory of Frederick Doyle, who passed away May 26th, 1912, at Dunchurch. Never forgotten by his loving Wife and Children, Father, Mother, Sisters, and Brothers.

HILL.—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother, Lewis Henry Hill, Newbold-on-Avon. Killed in action, May 28th, 1915.
“ One year has passed, our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more.
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face
Never on earth can we replace.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died,
To think he could not say ‘ Good-bye ’
Before he closed his eyes.”
—Deeply mourned by his mother, father sisters and brothers.

HUNT.—To the Glory of God, and in loving Memory of my dear husband, Albert John Hunt, Warrant Officer of the 15th Brigade R.H.A., of the immortal 29th Division. Killed in action in Gallipoli on the 27th May, 1915.
Thou hast made me known to friends whom knew not. Thou hast given me seats in homes not my own. Thou hast brought the distant near, and made a Brother of the Stranger. Blessed art Thou, oh Merciful and Holy Father, for ever and ever.

HUNT.—In ever loving Memory of Warrant Officer Regt.-Sergt.-Major A. J. Hunt, R.H.A. Killed in action in the Dardanelles, May 28,1915.
“ In him we gave our best.
With him Duty was always best.
Proud of his life and death as ever,
We shall meet again beyond the River.”
—Father and mother.

SMITH.—In loving memory of Trooper W Smith, of the Leicester Yeomanry, son of James and Elizabeth Smith, of Lutterworth (late of Eathorpe), who was reported missing, May 13th, 1915, and now reported killed. Born May 27th, 1897.

 

12th Feb 1916. Another Interesting Letter from the Front

ANOTHER INTERESTING LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

The Rev CT Bernard McNulty, Vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, contributes to his Parish Magazine for this month another interesting letter written from the Headquarters, Divisional Artillery, British Expeditionary Force, where he is attached as a chaplain.

“ I write again,” he says, “ from this little village in France, a village in which every little farmhouse, and every tumble-down barn, is crowded with British soldiers—troops to whom the inhabitants as a rule show much kindness and consideration, and yet think what such a state of affairs means to the people here ! The best rooms in their houses are given us, the very straw is turned out of their barns in order to make room for our men ; consider how very small is the payment which the French people receive from their Government for all this, when compared to the prices paid in England for the billeting of troops. In England the house-holder receives 3s a night for every officer who sleeps in his house, and in many cases there are several officers in the one house, and for every private soldier payment of 6d a night is made ; but here in this country the rate of payment is one franc (8d) a night per officer, and 1/2 d a night for each soldier ! When troops are stationed in any district in England, it means an enormously increased prosperity in that particular locality, or town, but here the inhabitants gain very little pecuniary benefit by our presence, for with the exception of eggs and vegetables bought from the small farms, any extras which the soldiers purchase are bought at our army canteens, a number of which are provided in every division. Yet the people, with but few exceptions, are as a rule kind and obliging, at any rate, such has been my experience, and why ? Because they fully realise that we are here to protect and safeguard their homes from a foe who is close to their very doors, and they know full well that the safety and welfare of their country is at stake, and on every French person’s lips to-day there is but one motto. It is this: ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’

“ A few days ago I passed through several French villages, and in each village, here and there, I noticed houses brightly decorated with evergreens and holly, whilst over the door in large letters the motto was printed. I asked the reason for this, and I was told that the recruits of the 1916 class were being called out, and soon I saw companies of lads marching away from their villages, as years ago their fathers marched, for there are practically no men to-day in France who do not know what it is to fight in the wars. How it thrilled my heart to see these lads ! Strong, healthy-looking youths, tramping along with their rifles on their shoulders, with heads held high, and a smile on their lips, leaving their homes, yet bravely hiding the aching hearts proud that at last the looked-for day had come for them, when they could don the uniform of their army. ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’ Such were the words over each home from which a son had gone forth, and the parents’ hands had put up those evergreens, had written the glorious motto. They, too, had hidden the aching heart. Is it not a matter of rejoicing, say they, for has not our boy gone forth to the war ? And in the silence of the night, as they whisper his name in their prayers, it will be as if they heard the voice of God answering ‘ Honneur et Patrie ‘ !

“ Ah, yes, this is the dominating thought throughout the length and breadth of France, the one thought influencing the actions of all its people. It is honour and country which makes one man eager to go forth to the battery or the trench. It is the self-same motto which makes his brother work earnestly and cheerfully in factory or workshops. In the workshops the same golden motive is inspiring labour. They know that they toil for something higher and nobler than wages. The other day I was speaking to a French interpreter, a member of one of France’s noblest families, like many another French nobleman serving to-day as a private in the army of France. He told me that his brother had large munition works near Paris, and that the workmen had petitioned that they might be allowed to work on Sundays. They stated, as their reason, that they felt they could not rest that day, whilst their brothers were fighting in the trenches ! Dare I say that the sanctity of the Sabbath is violated by labour undertaken from such a motive ?

“ Soon there is to be in Great Britain a very modified form of compulsory service. Whatever may have been our opinions on that subject in the past, to-day such a course is right because it is necessary. It is necessary for honour and country. Let that sublime thought silence the voice of opposition, and let those who are called upon to send forth their sons, remember the decorated homes of France !

“ ‘ Honneur et Patrie.’ May that, indeed, be the proud motto for all in our country during this year of 1916. I can wish no grander thing. May it be the sole motive underlying the sayings and actions of every politician who sits within the walls at Westminster. May that same motive lighten the labours of thorn who toil in our workshops, making both employers and men earnest and faithful. May it make the women of our country eager and proud to send forth their manhood, and may that same thought make our soldiers brave in the face of danger. May it also bring consolation to those who mourn ! ”

LETTERS FROM OLD MURRAYIAN8.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of the Murray School, has received several letters from Old Boys with the Colours.

Ptes C E Williams and E A Welch, C Section, Machine Gun Company, 143rd Infantry Brigade, write:—

“ We chaps of the Machine Gun are now no longer attached to our old Battalion, for we have been formed into a Machine Gun Company; find so we are away from the rest of they old “ E ” Company. However, we are still able to see them occasionally, and we are pleased to say that they all seem to keep in fairly good health. Would you kindly thank the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee from the Rugby boys of the Machine Gun Company for all the gifts they so kindly sent us, which were handed on to us by Q.M.Sergt Tomlinson. They were much appreciated by all. At present, there are only two Old Murrayians in our section. The trenches are a little better now than they have been for a month or two. We still have our share of mud, but it is drying up a treat.

“ Fritz is as amiable as ever, only just lately he has begun to talk too much with his artillery. He always get paid back with interest, though, by our artillery, which includes the Rugby Howitzer Battery. We are out of the trenches now, but go in again shortly. While out, we have to man a gun for anti-aircraft purposes, and we are anxiously waiting for a Taube to come over, so that we can warm our gun up a little.”

W Holmes, a sailor boy on one of H.M. warships, has also written to Mr Hodges, stating that he is having a good time and is now at sea.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In response to the appeal of the Rugby Womens’ Volunteer Reserve for fresh fruit and vegetables for the sailors—who have to depend upon gifts from friends for such luxuries—a gift ? held at the Murray School on Friday in last week, when neatly 7cwt. of produce, consisting of artichokes, parsnips, oranges, apples, beet, cabbage, onions, carrots, turnips, etc, were received. The gifts were afterwards packed up under the supervision of Captain , Moss and Quartermaster Dickinson, of the W.V.R.

NEW BILTON SOLDIER WOUNDED.

Mr C Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, received an official intimation that his son, Pte George Pegg, of the Leicestershire Regiment, was wounded on January 6th. Particulars of nature of the wounds have not yet come to hand.

 

PTE FREDK BAXTER DIES OF WOUNDS.

Pte Fredk Baxter, youngest son of Mrs Baxter, New Street, New Bilton, who, as we recently reported, was seriously wounded in the knee in France on January 7th, died as the result of his injuries in Colchester Hospital on Saturday. Pte Baxter, who belonged to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was out with a scouting party when a bullet passed through his knee, killing the officer in charge who was behind him. Pte Baxter was brought to England about three weeks ago, and it was ascertained that his injury was so serious that it was found necessary to amputate the limb. At first he made good progress, and it was hoped that he would ultimately recover, but towards the end of last week he became worse, and his mother was summoned on Saturday, but he died before she reached the hospital. He was 26 years of age, and joined the army after the outbreak of war. The body was brought to Rugby, and the funeral took place in the Cemetery yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

[Private Baxter is remembered on the Croop Hill War Memorial]

SCHOOLBOYS WITH ARMLETS.

We understand that every master of military age at Rugby School has attested or been rejected, and a number of the senior boys of the school may be seen wearing armlets, showing they, too, have done their duty in this connection.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There have been very few enlistments under the Group System during the past week, but the majority of those who have presented themselves were single men. We would remind single men who have not yet attested that the Group System so far as they are concerned comes to an end this month, after which time they will be automatically absorbed into the Army.

POST OFFICE NOTICE.

REDUCTION OF DELIVERIES IN RUGBY.

On and from Monday, the 21st inst, there will only be two deliveries on weekdays in Rugby, at 7 a.m and 12.30 p.m. Sunday deliveries will remain for the present.

In the rural districts the deliveries are being limited to one daily, and these changes are being carried out as circumstances permit.

PROTECTIVE MEASURES AGAINST ZEPPELINS.

CONFERENCE IN BIRMINGHAM.

A DEMAND FOR EARLY WARNING.

The conference of representatives of Midland authorities, convened by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham (Alderman Neville Chamberlain), to consider the question of the better protection of the Midlands in the event of further aircraft raids, was-held on Wednesday afternoon at the Council House Birmingham. The Lord Mayor presided, and there was a large and representative attendance of nearly 100 public gentlemen from all parts of the counties of Warwick, Worcester, and Stafford.

A resolution was passed calling on the military authorities to organise a system for giving an early warning of the approach of hostile aircraft and information as to subsequent movements inland. A committee was appointed to lay before the authorities the methods which the meeting considered would best the situation.

The meeting then proceeded to discuss the various methods to be adopted in giving warning to the public, and while so engaged a telegram was received by the Lord Mayor from the Under-Secretary of State for the Home Department, stating that “ the matter of organisation for conveying to police, factories, etc, information of movements of hostile aircraft being actively pressed forward by Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief Home Forces in co-operation with Post Office.”

TEST MOBILISATION OF BOY SCOUTS.

On Wednesday, February 2nd, a surprise mobilisation, was held of the town, troops of the Boy Scouts, the idea being to ascertain how soon the boys could turn out in the event of their being required in case of an air raid, to assist the public organisations such as the St John’s Ambulance Brigade, Red Cross Nurses, Fire Brigades, etc.

Although the Scouts were quite unaware when the mobilisation would take place, 50 responded to the call, and assembled on the B.T.H. Athlete Field. A number of the boys, of course, were prevented by overtime, and by evening classes, from taking part. After the mobilisation had taken place, the boys were practised in outpost and sentry duty under the following scheme :— Important military stores were supposed to be located in the field, the Scouts being deputed to defend same from hostile attack while some kind friends had previously undertaken to set as “ enemies ” and. endeavour to obtain access to these stores. Some of these spies were duly caught by the Scouts…

DEARTH OF PETROL

The supply of petrol available for the use of owners of private motor cars will in future be considerably restricted.

Nearly a month ago restrictions upon the supplies of petrol were foreshadowed by the British Petroleum. Company in a circular which they sent out. Now, by some companies at any rate a limit has been placed upon the number of gallons to be supplied to various districts. Hitherto the public have paid little attention to the warnings they have received that, in the national interests, private users should exercise the utmost economy. The restrictions upon the supply which have now been put into force do not affect the owners of vehicles used for commercial purposes.

THE MILK SUPPLY.

COTTAGERS & GOAT-KEEPING.

A very interesting circular has been issued by the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries, pointing out how in certain districts goat-keeping might be extended with advantage. It is well known (says the “ Lancet”) that many cottagers and others living outside the area of retail delivery find it difficult to obtain milk for their families. The large dairy farms are, as a rule, under contract to supply milk to distributing agencies in towns, or else they, turn their milk into cheese and butter. As the Board rightly says, all the objections which apply to the keeping of a cow by a cottager would be met in the case of a goat. The first; expenditure for its purchase is within his means, the housing accommodation is reduced to a minimum, the food costs little, and there is no great expense to be borne for the maintenance of the animal.

Even in the event of a cow’s milk supply being available, goats may profitably be kept to supply milk for domestic use. It is, as a rule, a most wholesome milk, and its flavour, if the food of the animal is regulated, is not any real drawback to its employment. Moreover, goat’s milk is easily digested by children, and especially infants, and, as is well known, it is fair lets likely than cow’s milk to contain tubercle bacilli of animal origin. The average goat will give at its flush three pints of milk a day, and, on the whole, calculations based on extreme cost of keep, outlay, and so forth, show that while a good supply of milk could be maintained, a very fair profit could be made. The suggestion is a valuable one, and the information contained in this circular as to how to start goat-keeping, as to the choice of breeds, as to breeding itself, housing, feeding, tethering, milking, and the care of the milk, and so forth, should be spread up and down the land.

The composition of cow’s milk and goat’s milk is much the same, although goat’s milk is superior as regards fat, which is an advantage. Human milk differs chiefly from goat’s and cow’s milk in that it contains a much smaller proportion of mineral salts and casein.

 

TO RELATIVES OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS.

AN OFFER FROM CHICHESTER.

Mr Robert Bottrill, of Rugby House. Chichester, wishes to be informed when Rugby soldiers are patients in the Graylingwell War Hospital. If relatives will communicate with him, he says he. will be very pleased to visit such soldiers and to take them motor rides ; also, if any friends of the wounded would like to visit them at Chichester, Mr Bottrill offers to provide them with a bed, etc. He adds : “ I believe we have had several Rugby boys here, and I have missed them.”

Mr. Bottrill is a native of Rugby, which explains his desire to show kindness to wounded soldiers from homes in the town who may be staying in the Graylingwell Hospital.