Driver, Charles John. Died 31st Dec 1917

Charles John DRIVER, as in the military records – or John Charles DRIVER in civilian life – was born in late 1897, with his birth registered at Rugby in Q1, 1898. He was baptised as John Charles Driver, on 13 February 1898, at St. Andrew’s church, Rugby. He was the first and only child of Reuben Edward Driver [jnr.], b.c.1869 in Market Harborough, a plate layer of 811 Old Station, and Elizabeth Ann née Beers, Driver who had married on 19 April 1897 at St Andrew’s church, Rugby.

It seems that his mother must have died, when she was aged 27, in childbirth, towards the end of December 1897, as her death was registered in Q4 1897.   Indeed, because of the time allowed for registration, her death would have had to be registered within five days, but the birth did not have to be registered for 42 days – hence the birth being registered in Q1, 1898 – the following year.

It seems that John Charles’s paternal grandmother took on the task of rearing her grandson. His father Reuben Edward Driver [jnr] remarried with Georgina née Hinks, in about 1900, and in 1901 they were living elsewhere although near his parents and enumerated at 855 Old Station, together with Georgina’s widowed mother. By 1911, they had been married 11 years, and had moved to live at 811 Newbold Road, Rugby, but had had no children. He had remained a plate layer over this time, latterly at least for the L&NW Railway.

In 1901, the 3 year old John Charles Driver was enumerated with his grandparents, Reuben E. Driver [sen.] and Caroline Driver at 1002 Old Station, Rugby.   Reuben sen. was a ‘Loco Railway Labourer’. In 1911, John Charles was again at that address, with his widowed 71 year old grandmother and a younger cousin, his grandfather having died in early 1909.

John Charles followed in the family ‘tradition’ and went to work for the railway, and when war broke out, he enlisted in September 1914 and was included on … ‘The following … list of men from the Locomotive Department of the L & N-W Railway at Rugby …, J C Driver, …’.[1]

There are no Service Records to indicate where John Charles may have served, but his final posting was in the Royal Flying Corps, where he became No.92241, and promoted to be a 2nd Class Air Mechanic in the 56th Kite Balloon Section.

At the end of 1917, John Charles, and other members of his Kite Balloon Section were posted to the Middle East, and due to arrive at Alexandria.

In March 1915, the base of the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force was transferred to Alexandria from Mudros and the city became a camp and hospital centre for Commonwealth and French troops. Among the medical units established there were the 17th, 19th, 21st, 78th and 87th General Hospitals and No 5 Indian Hospital. After the Gallipoli campaign of 1915, Alexandria remained an important hospital centre during later operations in Egypt and Palestine and the port was much used by hospital ships and troop transports bringing reinforcements and carrying the sick and wounded out of the theatres of war.

John Charles was travelling on the Mercantile Fleet Auxiliary HT Osmanieh when it was struck by a mine on 31 December 1917, when entering the port of Alexandria. 76 officers and men of the Commonwealth forces were lost.

The ship’s loss was not reported until February 1918,
‘… The Mercantile fleet auxiliary Osmanieh, whose loss, with a large number of lives, in the Eastern Mediterranean on 31 December was officially announced the Admiralty on Wednesday, was the vessel commanded by Lieut-com. D. R. Mason, of Tenby, who lost his life on that occasion.’ [2]

John Charles Driver’s death was also reported in a Coventry newspaper; although it is not yet established what his Coventry connection may have been.
‘Roll of Honour, Coventry and District Casualties, … Missing believed Drowned, … Driver, 92241, 2nd Class Air Mechanic J. C., Coventry, R.F.C. …’ [3]

He is remembered with fellow members of his Kite Balloon Section on the Chatby Memorial, which notes that they were ‘… Drowned at Sea [from H T Osmanieh] …’.

Chatby is a district on the eastern side of the city of Alexandria, Egypt.   The Chatby Memorial stands at the eastern end of the Alexandria (Chatby) War Memorial Cemetery and commemorates almost 1,000 Commonwealth servicemen who died during the First World War and have no other grave but the sea. Many of them were lost when hospital ships or transports were sunk in the Mediterranean, sailing to or from Alexandria. Others died of wounds or sickness while aboard such vessels and were buried at sea. More than 700 of those commemorated on the memorial died when the vessels were torpedoed or mined.

John Charles DRIVER was awarded the British War and Victory Medals, and is commemorated – as ‘C J Driver’ – on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM 

– – – – – –

 

This article on Charles John DRIVER was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, October 2017.

[1]       Rugby Advertiser, 5 September 1914.

[2]       Western Mail, Friday, 1 February 1918.

[3]       Coventry Evening Telegraph, Tuesday, 12 February 1918.

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29th Dec 1917. Suggested Rationing Scheme for Rugby

SUGGESTED RATIONING SCHEME FOR RUGBY.

At a meeting of the Rugby Urban Food Control Committee on Thursday evening a sub-committee was appointed to formulate a rationing scheme for butter, margarine, lard, bacon, and cheese for the Urban and Rural Districts.

MARGARINE COMMANDEERED.

The Rugby Food Control Committee did not wait long before putting their new powers, enabling them to commandeer supplies of margarine, into force. The margarine queues on Friday and Saturday last were longer than ever, and there was every indication that similar scenes would experienced on Christmas Eve. Mr F M Burton, the Executive officer, however, ascertained that one of the multiple shops was expecting a consignment of four tons of margarine, and he immediately commandeered one and a-half tons, and distributed it among other grocers in the town. A notice to this effect was displayed in the window of the shop affected, and the police promptly broke up all attempts to form a queue. The action of the committee and the executive officer was greatly appreciated by many people, who were thus enabled to do their shopping with a degree of comfort which has been lacking for the past two months.

THE COLLECTION OF WASTE PAPER.

A meeting of the Rugby Waste Paper Committee was held on Thursday last week, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P, C.C, presiding. A grant of £10 was made to the Rugby Town Red Cross effort, and it was decided that at the next meeting the claims of the Prisoners of War Fund should have first consideration.—The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that there had lately been an encouraging increase in the amount of waste paper collected by the boys of Elborow School and Murray School.—Mr McKinnell said that the Local Government Board had again urged the local authorities to collect all waste paper. Mr Barker had arranged to have every description of waste paper sorted and graded and sent to the paper mills for re-pulping, obtaining for the committee the maximum amount under the Government schedule of prices. They had, therefore, been able to devote considerable sums to local charities, and, in addition to the grant made at that meeting, had rendered substantial assistance to the Hospital of St Cross, St John’s Ambulance Brigade, the Hamilton Home, and the District Nursing Society. There were, however, other deserving objects which were in need of funds, and he trusted all who had waste paper of any kind would drop a postcard to Mr W T Simmonds, of Elborow School, or Mr W T Coles Hodges, of Murray School.

RAILWAY BOOKINGS.

During the days immediately preceding Christmas there was the usual exodus of workers from the town, and the number of travellers was well in excess of last year, when the Government’s exhortation to the people to avoid unnecessary travelling was loyally observed. At the L & N-W Railway Station bookings were very heavy to all parts of the United Kingdom ; and the Great Central Authorities also experienced exceptionally busy times. The majority of people travelling were munition workers and their families, and of the number of visitors to the town a large portion were soldiers home on leave.

CHRISTMAS ARRANGEMENTS AT THE POST OFFICE.

Owing to the scarcity of foodstuffs, the number of parcels despatched to the troops this year from the Rugby Post Office was not so large as usual ; but, nevertheless, during the busiest nights preceding December 14th—the last date for sending such parcels—as many as 80 odd mail sacks were sent off one night. There was, however, an enormous increase in the number of registered letters and small parcels of comforts. The labour question proved a great difficulty this year; but with the assistance of 28 extra postwomen and sorters and about a dozen spare-time workers, the rush was successfully dealt with. To relieve the counter pressure the Army allowances, amounting to over £1,000, were paid out for two weeks during the week preceding Christmas. On Saturday, Sunday, and Monday the counter staff was kept abnormally busy, and on Christmas Eve the number of parcels delivered in the town was unusually large, vis. 1,500 ; while the number on Christmas Day was 700. There was a falling-off this year in the number mainly confined to the residential quarters. In the working-class districts of the town the numbers were as large as ever.

Another unusual feature was the small quantity of poultry passing through the post, the customary ducks and geese giving places to more homely, but nowadays none the less welcome; piece of bacon.

For four days preceding Christmas the country mail motor vans were forced to make double journeys ; and although these ran rather late on several of the heaviest mornings, the times compared well with previous years.

SUNDAY POSTAL DELIVERY IN RUGBY.

To the Editor of the Advertiser

SIR,—Would it not be possible for Rugby to forego its delivery of letters on the Lord’s Day ? When we see so many women on the rounds we all know what it must mean in those homes, and they surely need their Sabbath rest as much as we do. In asking this I do not mean to ask that their pay shall be stopped for that day’s work, but that they should receive the same wage as now, and that we should forego our letters on that day.

London and many other large cities do without Sunday delivery, and so I think we should do the same. I believe it can only done by a resolution passed by the District Council. Will not some member propose such a resolution ? I believe he would find the whole Council ready to support him, and I am quite sure he would have the great majority of the townsmen with him. It is too much for a man to work seven days a week. What must it mean to these women ?—Believe me, sir, yours faithfully,

CYRIL T ASTON,
Vicar St Matthew’s Church.
St Matthew’s Vicarage, Rugby, Dec 24, 1917.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dennis Over, youngest son of Mr Samuel Over, has passed out fifth in his company from the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and has been gazetted to a commission in the Regular Army in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Mr & Mrs C F Everett, 42 Claremont Road, have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl Fredk Stanley Everett, of the Motor Transport, died from disease in the base hospital at Basra, Mesopotamia, on Sunday, December 16th. He was 21 years of age, and an Old Murrayian. Prior to joining the Army in January, 1916, he was employed as a goods clerk by the L & N-W Railway Company at Berkswell and Hampton. He was at one time a teacher in the Murray Sunday School and secretary of St Andrew’s Guild Cricket Club. He was also a member of St Peter’s Church Choir, and after the service on Sunday evening the “ Dead March ” in Saul was played to honour his memory.

MENTIONED DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches of November 7th appears the name of Sergt A W Hughes, Royal Engineers. Sergt Hughes was formerly employed at the B.T.H, and has been on the Western Front 2½ years. In July last he was the recipient of a “ card of recognition ” from the General commanding the Division for distinguished conduct.

ANOTHER ADDITION TO THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR LIST.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, viz, Lance-Corpl W H Roberts, 2nd Machine Gun Company, who is interned at Lechfeld, Bavaria. This man was formerly employed at Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd, Wolston. Mr Barker has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him as from “ his former fellow employees,” as they have generously undertaken his adoption.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

MILITARY MEDAL.—This week Mrs F Cooke has received news that her brother, Corpl A Haynes, of the 28th Canadians, has been awarded the Military Medal.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening last a memorial service was held the Parish Church for Sergt S Batchelor, when a good number of the parishioners attended. The service was impressively conducted by the Rector (Rev H Smith), and one or two of Sergt Batchelor’s favourite hymns were sung. In his sermon at the evening service the Rector made allusion to the loss the parents and family, the parish, and the church had sustained by the death of Sergt Batchelor, and said it was such men that our country can ill-afford to lose. Amongst the many letters of sympathy which Mr & Mrs Batchelor have received several have come from the front, from the chaplain, the nurse, and from his lieutenant. The latter wrote:—“ Everybody who knew him recognised in him a good N.C.O and a good soldier every way.”

DUNCHURCH.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Pearce, Coventry Road Dunchurch, have received intimation that their son. Pte W Pearce, K.R.R, is missing. This is the fourth son Mr & Mrs Pearce have lost in the War.

WOLSTON.

PTE W BARKER KILLED.—Mr & Mrs N Barker received news on Sunday that their son, Pte W Barker, had died from wounds in France. Deceased volunteered early in the War for the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, but was rejected owing chest measurement. Later on he joined the Royal Warwicks, and has been in the thick of the fighting. He was well known and respected in the district. His father has for many years been a member of the Wolston Parish Council, and occupied other public offices in the parish. Much sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Barker and family.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

CORPL C DIPPLE WOUNDED.—Mr V Dipple has received news that his brother was wounded in the charge at Cambrai. Corpl Dipple was one of the Mons and Marne fighters, being attached to the 18th Hussars. His other brothers—Sergt F Dipple, R.F.A, is now stationed in Italy (he also was amongst the 1914 battles); while a third brother, Bombardier H Dipple, is also in Italy and a sister is a nursing sister in the Army.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

On Boxing Day the wounded soldiers at the Infirmary and “ Te Hira ” Red Cross Hospitals numbering about 120, were entertained by the Rugby V.T.C at the Howitzer Battery Drill Hall. Tea was provided by the Red Cross Society in the small rooms, which were nicely decorated and presented a warm and cosy appearance, and this was followed by an entertainment in the Large Drill Hall. Under the supervision of Sergt S H Weobley, the members of Corps had tastefully decorated the hall with flags and garlands. The stage was arranged in a series of arches, illuminated with coloured electric bulbs, and a large Christmas tree, upon which useful and suitable presents were hung, was also illuminated by movable electric lights, arranged by Sergt O H Watson. Quartermaster Alderson as Father Christmas presented each guest with a present from the tree. An excellent programme, consisting of instrumental and vocal items, was given ; and, in addition to members of the V.T.C and wounded soldiers, were songs by Quartermaster C Prior and Miss Phyllis Vann.

BILTON HALL RED CROSS HOSPITAL.

The wounded soldiers at this hospital has a very pleasant round of entertainment. On Thursday last week Corpl Hawkins and friends from Rugby gave a concert, and on Saturday Mr Giggs and party went over from Rugby for a similar purpose. Dinner on Christmas Day consisted of turkey, plum pudding, &c, given by friends ; and in the afternoon the soldiers and staff were entertained by a professional conjuror from London. On Boxing Day the Southam Amateur Dramatic Company attended, and gave a concert and theatricals. The Bilton Brass Band played carols at The Hall on Sunday, and again during dinner and tea on Christmas Day. The men enjoyed and appreciated everything immensely.

SEASONABLE WEATHER.

The weather during Christmas was, on the whole, bright and seasonable. In the previous week frost and snow gave promise of ideal conditions, but on Monday there was a considerable rise of temperature, with drizzling rain, which quickly converted the road surfaces into sticky mud, and the outlook was not at all promising. On Christmas Day, however, a keen wind from the North with spells of bright sunshine put the roads in good order again, and outdoor exercise was quite enjoyable, and the same may be said of Boxing Day.

DEATHS.

EVERETT.—On December 16th, at Basrah (Persian Gulf,) Lance-Corpl FREDERICK STANLEY EVERETT, of the Motor Transport, A.S.C., eldest and dearly loved son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett, aged 21. (Nature of illness not stated).—Rest in peace. Not lost, but gone before.
Father, in Thy gracious keeping,
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of PTE HARRY J. MATTHEWS, the only and beloved son of D. and M. A. MATTHEWS, of Napton, who died in hospital in France on Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.

 

22nd Dec 1917. The Rector of Rugby and the Capture of Jerusalem

THE RECTOR OF RUGBY AND THE CAPTURE OF JERUSALEM.

Preaching at the Parish Church on Sunday morning the Rector (Rev C M Blagden) referred to the capture of Jerusalem. He said they rejoiced in the fact that Jerusalem was now in Christian hands after 739 years, and that British Armies had recovered it without damaging a single stone. The strategic effect of this would be considerable, and the moral effect of this tremendous ; but they must beware of assuming that too great political results could come from the return of the Jews in any number to Jerusalem. They had to think of the Moslem population, who had the Sacred Mosque of Omar standing on the site of the Altar of Burnt Offering, and they also had to think of the Christian connection with Jerusalem. Everything in the Holy City had been re-hallowed by our Lord. Jerusalem was the first centre of the Christian Church ; it claimed the first Bishop and the first council. From Jerusalem began the first preaching of the Gospel. The return of the Jews would produce new difficulties. They were no longer a nation but only a race. They had wonderfully kept their Faith, but the heart of their Faith had disappeared with the disappearance of the sacrifice. The real point was that there was no new covenant between God and man. The Jewish religion doomed, and Christ was the end of the law. The Jews had contributed much to the religion the world, but their religion had no future in front of it. It had had its day and ceased to be, and there was no future for Jerusalem at the centre of that religion. The only future to which they could look forward was that Jerusalem should be once more the centre of the Christian Church, and the only hope for the Jews lay in their becoming Christians and being once more the missionaries of the East. The Mohammedans might listen to them when they would not listen to the Christians. Then there might be in solid fact a new Jerusalem, “ Zion the City of our solemnities, the City of God Himself.”

A TOMMY’S LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

SIR,—You can imagine our feelings in reading the papers of the strikes in Coventry over such trifles, when the men are earning wages which were only earned by very few in pre-war time, and under the most favourable conditions, with a home and home comforts to go to after working-hours. Can they realise what a Tommy is going through out here to protect them and theirs from being treated the same as Belgium, Serbia, Montenegro, and parts of France ?

Here are a few conditions which they might compare with those under which they work at home. I speak as an artilleryman ; the infantry are in a position to claim more sympathy. Firstly, the wages are less per day than the average munitions worker earns per hour. Then, the hours are not eight a day, but all God sends ; still they smile. We are not in a factory warmed or cooled according to the weather, and run under the eyes of health inspectors. It is open air—hail, rain, snow, or shine, and if up to the knees in mud and water, or numbed with cold, one cannot hear anything but cheers and jokes from the men who are proving themselves men in a cause on which stands the future destiny of dear old England. Then the comforts. No, the lads have not a daintily prepared meal, their slippers warmed, a nice fire, a nice bed, and all that a home provides. They have either a ruined building, hut, tent, bivouac, or dug-out, which they make as comfortable as circumstances allow. And do they realise at home that whilst they are in bed, from which they never get disturbed, unless the baby cries or something similar, the men out here are straining every nerve either on the look out, at the guns, or feeding them with ammunition. Some journeys to and from the guns, for instance, occupy four, six, even eight hours, which means another nights’ sleep lost. They can thank God it has been their lot stay at home, but it makes one think who has had two or three years out here that the heads are encouraging such thoughtlessness, and makes one wish that they are made to come here and relieve some of the thousands who have either done their bit or who are unfit to undergo such conditions and strain. Still, those who we hold dear to us can rest assured that the British Tommy, never minding the conditions, is going to do all in his power to protect the flag and the country which gave him birth. All he asks in return is that the men who are left at home to provide the necessities of war will stand by them and uphold Lord Nelson’s motto, “ England expects every man to do his duty,” and so abolish strikes and petty grievances, which are prolonging the war and assisting the enemy.

Kindly excuse writing this epistle, but it tends to discourage those are doing their bit out here.
Yours truly.
ONE WHO WENT OUT WITH THE RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

LORD DENBIGH’S CHRISTMAS MOTTO.

The Earl of Denbigh, lecturing to a large audience of soldiers and civilians at Bury St Edmunds, said it was no time to talk of peace, because we could stick it and had to. In reply to a questioner, who asked him to give a motto for Christmas, Lord Denbigh said : “ Stick it, England, or go under for ever.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In Sir D. Haig’s list of names, published on Tuesday last, of those deserving special mention is that of Lt.-Col. W. Elliott Batt, R.F.A.

Corpl F Evans, son of Mr Evans, 13 James Street, Rugby, was wounded on November 30th, and is probably a prisoner of war. It is quite believed he is in hospital behind the German lines.

Mrs Lamb, 17 St Marie’s Terrace, Rugby, has received notification from the War Office that her eldest son, Gunner W Lamb, of the R.F.A, has been severely wounded in the left leg. He was pupil at St Marie’s School.

The list of successful candidates for admission to the R.M.A, Woolwich, was published on Thursday, and contained the name of F R Kittermaster, captain of the Rugby School Football XV.

Major H H Neeves, D.S.O., M.C., was mentioned in Sir D Haig’s despatch, published in the “ London Gazette ” on December 14th, for gallant service on the Western’ Front.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C W Horley, 2nd Sherwood Foresters, recently died from wounds. Before enlisting Corpl Horley was employed in the Winding Department.

Mrs Neville had received a telegram from the King and Queen regretting the loss she has sustained by the death of her son (Capt Frank Neville) in the service of his country and sympathising with her in her sorrow.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, of East Haddon (formerly of Rugby), have been notified that their eldest son, Second-Lieut James E Baskott, died of wounds in France on December 11th. Second-Lieut Baskott who was 27, years of age, was educated at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, Rugby, and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery as a private early in the War, being gazetted to a commission in the same regiment about six months ago. He had been in most of the recent heavy fighting, and had built up a reputation for coolness and bravery, being regarded as a general favourite and an officer of considerable promise.

Pte Hugh Lissimore, Coldstream Guards, son of Mrs Lissimore, 23 Lodge Road, was killed in action on November 28th in the Battle for Bourlon Wood. Pte Lissimore was 19 years of and an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School. In announcing his death his officer writes to Mrs Lissimore :—“ Your son was very popular with the men in his platoon always cheerful and bright, and was a very brave soldier and a good man. He was keen on his work, knowing his Lewis gun thoroughly. I shall miss him very much.”

NEWS OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Mr & Mrs Alfred Webb have returned home after visiting their son, Rifleman Wm Webb, who was lying badly wounded in hospital at Etaples. He was the victim of a terrific blow at close quarters from the butt-end of a German rifle, and was afterwards hit in the back by shrapnel. The visit of his parents (who are loud in praise of the hospitality and kindness they experienced in France and en route) cheered the gallant soldier greatly, and he has since been removed to a London hospital.—Mrs Frank Lane has now received a communication from her son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane, K.R.R. He is still in hospital at Rouen. He has lost a leg, and is very seriously ill. There is great hope that these two brave men will pull through.

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT.

An inquest was held on Thursday by Mr E F Hadow, touching the death of Second-Lieut Charles Robert Rawbone (20), R.F.C, son of Mr C T Rawbone, Civil servant, of 4 Templar Street, Myerts Park, London, which took place at the Brookfield Nursing Home as the result of an accident on December 7th.

Evidence was given to the effect that deceased had been in the R.F.C for nine or ten months. On December 7th he went up in an aeroplane, the rigging, control, and engine of which had been previously tested and found to be in good order. He was practising with a machine gun, and while doing so engine trouble developed; and he turned, evidently with the intention of going to have it seen to. As he turned the engine “ picked up,” and this brought the nose of the machine down, and caused it to dive to the ground. An eye-witness, Second-Lieut Claude E Mayors expressed the opinion that turning while so close to the ground—the machine was about 100 ft up—showed a lack of judgment. Lieut Rawbone was immediately attended to by Dr Chester Collins, and was subsequently removed to the Brookfield Nursing Home and treated by Drs Collins and Hoskyn; but, despite every care and skilful nursing, he died ten days after the accident, meningitis having set in.

The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said the cause of the accident was not very clear, although Lieut Mayors had shown them that Lieut Rawbone chose to take a very grave risk when banking by relying on the impetus gained from the dive rather than on the engine, and had it come off all right it would probably have been applauded. The Jury would join with him in sympathising with the parents, and would feel that they had lost one of their young flying men who, after all, were the bravest of the brave.

The Jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death.”

The witnesses were Mr C T Rawbone, Second-Lieut C E Mayors, Dr Chester Collins, 2nd A/M Thos Staines, A/M Geo Nicholls, and Corpl G E Southcott.

BROADWELL.
WOUNDED.—Mr T Gulliver has received news that his son, Harry Gulliver, of the Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the back. Mr Gulliver’s younger son was killed in action in France about two months ago.

WOLSTON.
CHRISTMAS GIFTS.—All soldiers who left Messrs Bluemel’s Works to fight for their country will be again well remembered this Yuletide. Messrs F Stevenson, L Jeacock, S Everton, T Boneham, H Chater. and J Satchwell have acted as a committee, under the able guidance of Mr W R Glare, the genial works manager. A collection was made amongst the employees and staff, which realised £22 11s. Forty soldiers each received a tuck box, 27 stationed in England received a 5s P.O each, and two prisoners of war in Germany each received an 8s parcel of food through the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee. Each employee who is now, or has been, with the Colours received a fine Christmas card, which had been specially designed by Mr W R Glare. The directors have independently sent each soldier a postal order for £1.

FLECKNOE.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Only last week the sad news was received in Flecknoe that another of its young inhabitants had given his life for his country. Pte Charles Frank Rose was the son of Mr Charles Rose, who has long held the position of postmaster and assistant overseer in the parish, and was most popular among young and old. He was one, too, who could ill be spared from the life of the village. Frank, whose age was only 25, was attached to the Machine Gun Section of the King’s Own Yorkshire Regiment, and was killed in action on the Western Front on November 24th. The general respect felt for his memory and the sympathy for his sorrowing parents, brothers and sisters, was well shown by the number who attended the memorial service held in the Village Church of St Mark’s on Sunday last.

TERRITORIALS’ FAMILIES AND WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

The third annual tea and entertainment to the wives, sisters, mothers, and families of members of the 7th R.W.R, Howitzer Battery and Yeomanry was given by the Territorial Committee on Wednesday last. As on the last occasion, about 300 wounded soldiers and nurses from the local Red Cross Hospitals, “ Te Hira,” Infirmary, St John’s, Bilton Hall, Cawston House, Pailton House, and the officers from Clifton Court Hospital were invited, and everything possible was done to make the occasion a really enjoyable one.

The proceedings began with an entertainment at the Empire, kindle provided by Mr B Morris, who procured a special film for the occasion. The variety artistes also gave their services, and the excellent programme was thoroughly enjoyed. After the entertainment the guests repaired to the Co-operative Hall, where, by special permission of the Food Controller, an excellent tea was served. About 600 sat down, and among the visitors were the Rev C M & Mrs Blagden, Rev Bernard McNulty (Leamington) “ padre,” to the Division, of which the 7th Royal Warwicks and the Howitzer Battery form a part ; Major C P Nickalls and Lieut Matheson (Rugby Howitzer Battery), Col F F Johnstone, Col G M Seabroke, Mr Pridmore (Coventry), Mr J J McKinnell, Capt C H Fuller, Lieuts Wharton and Yates (Rugby V.T.C), Mr A E & Miss Donkin, Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs P Nickalls, Mrs Marsham, &c. During tea, crackers were distributed, and as these were exploded the beaming faces of the children bore eloquent testimony to their enjoyment, and gave ample recompense to all who had worked so hard in the organisation of the entertainment. After tea a variety programme was given by the Clifton Court Hospital Party and the members the V.A.D there, under the direction of Mr Yardley ; and, needless to sy, this was much appreciated.

The committee responsible for the arrangements consisted of Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs West, Mrs Claude Seabroke, Mr A W Adnitt, Mr F E Hands, assisted by Major Nickalls. The staff of the Co-operative Society and friends of the committee rendered useful service by waiting at the tables.

BAPTIST CHURCH.—A “ Dickens’ Evening ” was held in the Large Hall on Wednesday, and was largely attended. The Rev J H Lees presided. Three sketches were given in an excellent manner from Dickens’ Christmas carol, viz, “ Scrooge in His Office,” “ Visit of Marley’s Ghost,” and “ Cratchit’s Christmas Dinner.” Miss W Davidson two solos, and during intervals there were refreshments and games.

MILK DELIVERY IN RUGBY.—In the New Year there will be only one delivery of milk per day in Rugby.

WINTER.—Severe frost set in on Wednesday night, 14 degrees being registered. During Thursday night the thermometer recorded 9 degrees.

CHRISTMAS POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS.—To ensure delivery for Christmas parcels should be posted not later than Saturday evening, and letters and cards by Sunday night or early Monday morning. [Christmas Day was Tuesday]

HIGH PRICES FOR POULTRY.—In Messrs Tait, Sons & Pallant’s Smithfield on Monday a fine lot of 500 birds came under the hammer, and prices were the highest known. Turkeys made up to 52s each, geese 24s, ducks 8s, cockerels 8s 6d, hens 6s.

DEATHS.

LISSIMORE.—In loving memory of Pte. HUGH LISSIMORE, the beloved son of Mrs. and the late Wm. Thos. Lissimore, 23 Lodge Road, Rugby, who was killed in Bourlon Wood, France, on November 28, 1917.—“ Thy will be done.”

ROSE.—Killed in action on November 24, 1917, in France, CHARLES FRANK ROSE, M.G.S., King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, aged 25, second and dearly beloved son of Charles and Catherine Rose, of Flecknoe.
“ Father, in Thy gracious Keeping, Leave we now our dear on sleeping.”—CHAS. ROSE, Post Office, Flecknoe.

 

Everett, Frederick Stanley. Died 16th Dec 1917

Frederick Stanley EVERETT was born in 1897 in Daventry, the son of Charles Frederick (born 1869, Marsh Gibbon, Buckinghamshire) and his wife, Edith Annie, née Wall, Everett who were married on 18 July 1895 in Daventry, Northamptonshire. They moved to Narborough in Leicestershire in about 1899 for two or so years, before moving to Rugby at some date before 1901.

In 1901, the family were living at 118 Abbey Street, Rugby, and in 1911 the family were at 42 Claremont Road Rugby, a six room house. Frederick now had six younger siblings and was working as a ‘junior railway clerk’. His father was also a ‘railway clerk’.

Frederick attended the Murray School and in 1909 was highly commended in a competition to make a model dog kennel,[1] and in 1910 when in Form ‘St. VII’ received an Attendance Prize.[2] ‘He was at one time a teacher in the Murray Sunday School and secretary of St Andrew’s Guild Cricket Club. He was also a member of St Peter’s Church Choir, …’[3]

Frederick had been employed as a Goods Clerk by the L & N-W Railway Company at Berkswell and Hampton.[4]

He joined up when he was aged 18 in January 1916,[5] into the Army Service Corps as No.DN2/155017. When he went abroad is unknown, but it was probably after training, later in 1916. He went to Mesopotania and was part of the 971st MT [Motor Transport] Company.   At some date he was promoted to Lance Corporal.

In 1914, Baghdad had been the headquarters of the Turkish Army in Mesopotamia. It was the ultimate objective of the Indian Expeditionary Force ‘D’ and the goal of the force besieged and captured at Kut in 1916. On 11 March 1917, the British entered Baghdad … The British Indian Army played a significant role … but the position was not fully consolidated until the end of April.

Amidst the confusion of the retreat a large part of the Ottoman army (some 15,000 soldiers) was captured.[6] Given the continually depressing news in France and elsewhere, this was a significant and newsworthy achievement. British forces (and Russians, advancing from the north and east) closed in on the Turks throughout the autumn of 1917.[7]  Baghdad became the Expeditionary Force’s advanced base, with two stationary hospitals and three casualty clearing stations.

By 18 November 1917, the distribution of the Mesopotamia Expeditionary Corps,[8] suggested that the No.971 Mechanical Transport Company was equipped with Ford vans and was on the Tigris Front and they were in the Basra or Baghdad Garrison as Army Troops in the 18th Division which had just begun to be formed, although the bulk of the units (most of which were to come from India) had not yet arrived in Mesopotamia on that date.

The supply lines had become overlong and General Maude had died of cholera on 18 November 1917. He was replaced by General William Marshall who halted operations for the winter.

‘… conditions in Mesopotamia defy description.   Extremes of temperature (120 degrees F was common); arid desert and regular flooding; flies, mosquitoes and other vermin: all led to appalling levels of sickness and death through disease.   Under these incredible conditions, units fell short of officers and men, and all too often the reinforcements were half-trained and ill-equipped. Medical arrangements were quite shocking, with wounded men spending up to two weeks on boats before reaching any kind of hospital. These factors, plus of course the unexpectedly determined Turkish resistance, contributed to high casualty rates. …’[9]

11012 killed,
3985 died of wounds,
12678 died of sickness,
13492 missing and prisoners (9000 at Kut),
51836 wounded.’[10]

Frederick Everett died on 16 December 1917, aged 21. He was one of the very many who ‘Died of Sickness’ in the base hospital at Basra. He was buried in the Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery in Plot III. G. 11. His gravestone bears the wording, ‘Father in Thy Gracious Keeping, Leave we now our Dear One Sleeping’. 

Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery is today located in a very sensitive area in the Waziriah Area of the Al-Russafa district of Baghdad. … The North Gate Cemetery was begun in April 1917 and has been greatly enlarged since the end of the First World War by graves brought in from other burial grounds in Baghdad and northern Iraq, and from battlefields and cemeteries in Anatolia where Commonwealth prisoners of war were buried by the Turks.[11]

When news of his death reached Rugby in December 1917, after the service at St Peter’s church on Sunday evening ‘… the ‘Dead March’ in Saul was played to honour his memory.’[12]

Frederick Stanley EVERETT was awarded the British War and Victory Medals, and is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Frederick Stanley Everett was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, October

[1]       Rugby Advertiser, 6 November 1909.

[2]       Rugby Advertiser, 5 November 1910.

[3]       Rugby Advertiser, 29 December 1917.

[4]       Rugby Advertiser, 29 December 1917; also info. given in Birmingham Daily Post, Friday, 28 December 1917.

[5]       Rugby Advertiser, 29 December 1917; also info. given in Birmingham Daily Post, Friday, 28 December 1917.

[6]         https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mesopotamian_campaign.

[7]         http://www.1914-1918.net/mespot.htm.

[8]         http://www.314th.org/Nafziger-Collection-of-Orders-of-Battle/917BKMA.pdf.

[9]         http://www.1914-1918.net/mespot.htm.

[10]     Data from ‘Statistics of the Military Effort of the British Empire’, London: HMSO, 1920.

[11]         https://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/57303/baghdad-(north-gate)-war-cemetery/.

[12]     Rugby Advertiser, 29 December 1917.

15th Dec 1917. On Christmas Day

ON CHRISTMAS DAY every household in Rugby and district is asked to make a collection at their Dinner Table to help to maintain a continuance of the very necessary food parcels for our unfortunate men who are

PRISONERS OF WAR.

The increase in the cost of the food parcels has caused a serious strain upon the funds of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, and it is felt that everyone will be glad of this opportunity of showing in a practical manner their sympathy with these poor fellows who are languishing in prison camps in Germany.

Please place your collection in the special envelopes which will be left your house and hand same to the authorised collector, who will call soon after Christmas.

If you going away this Christmas will you forward a donation towards this Special Effort to the Hon. Secretary : Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Recent Street, Rugby.

EVERY PENNY COUNTS.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, who was wounded at Cambrai on November 29th, is making satisfactory progress.

General Sir H S Horne, K.C.B, returned to the Front from East Haddon on Wednesday.

Lance-Corpl H F Hancox, who has been a prisoner of war and on the Rugby list of Prisoners of War Fund for 2½ years, has been transferred to Switzerland

Pte W Thomson, son-in-law of Mr & Mrs Mayes, Abbey Street has been wounded with shrapnel in the eye. They lost a son from wounds twelve months ago. Mrs Mayes has four brothers serving—three of them in France—and her husband has had two nephews killed in the War.

Mr T Horton, J.P, of Ashlawn, a late captain of the Northants County Cricket Club, is acting as a volunteer tram driver.

During the past ten weeks a total of £52,845 has been subscribed to the War Loans in Rugby, of which £7,680 was invested during the week ended December 8th.

Capt C N B Hurt, East Lancs Regiment, who has been appointed Assistant Controller of Statistics under the regional scheme of National Service at Headquarters, Leamington, has been presented with a silver cigarette-case by fellow-members of the Recruiting Staff at Rugby, where he has been stationed for the past two years. He was at Oxford when the War broke out, and, joining up immediately went, with his regiment to Gallipoli, where he contracted dysentery and enteric. He has played in the Derbyshire County Cricket XI.—Pte Bateman, a clerk on the staff, has also been the recipient of a present on leaving the town.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lance-Corpl H P Arnold, of the Royal Engineers, was killed in action on November 28th. Prior to joining the Army he was employed in the turbine works.

News has been received of the death in action of Capt Leystens Llewellyn Greener, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (T.F), son of Mr Charles Greener, of Four Oaks, Captain Greener, who was 24 years of age, was educated at Rugby, where he was captain of the football fifteen and a member of the shooting eight. He joined the Territorials about eighteen months before the outbreak of the War, received his commission in the 6th Warwicks in February, 1913.

NAVAL HONOUR FOR ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY.

Warrant-Officer E W Penney, an old scholar of St Matthew’s Boys’ School, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for gallantry in the Battle of Jutland. He was on Admiral Beatty’s flagship Lion during the engagement, and the great skill and fearlessness effected essential repairs to the wireless installation while under heavy.

LIEUT-COL VISCOUNT FEILDING, D.S.O, AGAIN MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s list of mentions this week we again find the name of Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O (Coldstream Guards), son of the Earl of Denbigh. This is the third time during the War Viscount Feilding has gained distinction.

MILITARY MEDAL.

In a list of awards of the Military Medal issued on Thursday the following names appear :—Pte W Green, Worcester Regiment (Ryton-on-Dunsmore), and Gunner (Acting Bdr) W R Clarke, R.F.A (Rugby).

PRINCETHORPE.

NEWS has been received that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of Princethorpe.

MONKS KIRBY.

Farrier-Sergt-Major Bishop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has received news of the death from wounds on November 15th of his brother, Sergt Percy Bishop, Berks Yeomanry, serving with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. He was the son of the late Jonathan Bishop of this village.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another of the brave lads from this village has made the great sacrifice. Sergt S Batchelor, of the Royal Warwickshire regiment, only son of Mr & Mrs J Batchelor, died on December 1st of wounds received in action in France. He joined up on January 13th, 1915, and was drafted out to the front in April of the same year. Although not born at Church Lawford, Sergt Batchelor is regarded as a native, as his parents came to reside in the village when he was about two years old. He was educated at the village school, and when he was old enough to start work he went to Mr J Brierley’s at The Hall, Kings Newnham, to assist in the garden, &c. From there he took the situation of gardener and coachman to the Misses Townsend, of Kings Newham, where he was at the time of enlistment. Sergt Batchelor was 28 years of age, and was a fine strapping fellows, standing 6ft, and broad in proportion. He was as good-hearted as he was big, was ever ready to give a helping hand where it was wanted, and always had a cheery word and smile for everyone. He belonged to the local Cricket and Social Clubs and the choir at the Parish Church, where he was a most regular attendant. He was a very steady, thrifty young fellow, a total abstainer and non-smoker, and a jolly, all-round, good fellow. More especially, perhaps, because of these traits of character, very great sympathy is felt with his parents in the loss of their son in his prime, and whose life had taken as a whole, might well be regarded as an example by many country lads.

DEATHS.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Sergt. S. Batchelor of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment (only son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Batchelor, of Church Lawford), who died from wounds received in action in France on December 1st, 1917 ; aged 28 years.
Bravely he answered his country’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.
Father in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

IN MEMORIAM.

GLENN.—In affectionate remembrance of my dear husband, JOHN GLENN, who died in France on December 8, 1916.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on December 15, 1916 ; aged 22 years.—“ God takes our loved ones from our homes, but never from our hearts.”
—From his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

 

8th Dec 1917. Using Potatoes to Save Bread

USING POTATOES TO SAVE BREAD.

Sir Arthur Yapp, the Director of Food Economy, is anxious that the present very large surplus stock of potatoes and vegetables should be utilised in all private houses, and also in hotels, restaurants, and other public eating places, in such a way as to save bread.

It has been brought to his notice that in many public eating places the charge for a portion of potatoes and other vegetables is so relatively high as to encourage people to order bread instead. This is very much against the national interest at present, and Sir Arthur Yapp desires it to be clearly understood that he expects the management of all public eating places to alter their arrangements accordingly.

It is stated that it is still quite common for meat, eggs, etc, to be served on toast or bread. This practice should be immediately discontinued, and the use of bread should be discouraged in every way possible, so long as potatoes and other vegetables are abundant.

In particular, it is most if desirable that in all public eating places as little bread as possible should be served at lunch and dinner when potatoes and other vegetables are available in abundance, as at present.

Sir Arthur Yapp urges the public to give their full support to these recommendations, as this is of great importance in utilising the national food supply to the utmost advantage.

NOW TO OBTAIN SUGAR.
A NEW PROCEDURE.

It is important to remember that after December 31st you can only obtain sugar by one of the following systems ; that you can only use the system which applies to your particular case :—

A.—THE HOUSEHOLD SYSTEM.—If you have already deposited with your grocer a household sugar card, and if you are still a member of the same household, you must go to your grocer after December 8th and ask for Declaration Forms. When you have filled these up your grocer will give you a Retailers Sugar Ticket for each member of the household, which must be shown when buying sugar after December 31st.

B.—THE COUPON SYSTEM.—If you have not registered with your grocer on a Household Sugar Card, or if you have left the household from which you were registered, you must go to a Post Office before December 15th, ask for an application form, fill it up, and post it as directed. You will later receive a Ration Paper, which will entitle you to get Sugar Coupons from a Post Office.

AN ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Monday —before Mr J E Cox—Corporal Charles Hammett, of Long Lawford, was charged with being an absentee from the Agricultural Company.—P.C Hunt gave evidence of arrest and defendant was remanded to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr A Marsh, 15 Little Elborow Street, Rugby, has received intimation that his son, Pte A Marsh (24) of Leicesters, was killed in action on November 2nd ; and that another son, Pte G W Marsh, of the Warwicks, was posted as missing on October 26th. The former was, before joining up, employed as a labourer by the late Mr W C Musgrave, and the latter worked for J Young, builder. Both were Murray school boy.

Mrs Bennett, 1 Hillmorton Road, has kindly forwarded to the funds of the Rugby War Hospital Supply Depot the sum of £3, the proceeds of her chrysanthemum show on November 21-24.

A SON OF THE VICAR OF GRANDBOROUGH KILLED.

The Rev John Martin, vicar of Grandborough, has just received the sad news of the death in France of his second son, Second-Lieut F H Martin, R.E, 84th Field Company. The Commanding Officer writes : “ He was shot by a German sniper whilst setting out a new piece of engineering work behind our front line. It is a consolation that he did not suffer, as he was killed instantly. He was interred by the Rev P H Hargreaves, C.F, in a military cemetery near Gonzeancourt. He had only been a very short time with the 84th Field Company. I can assure you that all the officers and men realise what a really excellent fellow he was, and we all feel we have lost a good comrade and an extremely valuable officer.” Second-Lieut F H Martin is brother of Capt C G Martin, V.C, D.S.O, R.E, and had only a few months since come home from Egypt, where he was engaged in engineering work for the Egyptian Government, to offer himself to the War Office for military service. After a few months at Newark, he left for the front in September last. He had given a few months to military work near the Suez Canal, where he was employed in laying down pipes to carry fresh water from the Canal into the desert for 21 miles. He has another brother in the R.A.M.C, who is now in India. Second-Lieut F H Martin was born in China in 1888. He was educated in Bath and Clifton College (while at Clifton he was captain of the Cricket XI). and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He had passed the examination for the I.C.E.

THE LATE CAPT FRANK NEVILLE.

Mrs T Neville of Rugby, whose son, Capt Frank Neville, was killed in action, as recorded in our last issue, has received a sympathetic letter from the Colonel commanding the battalion. He writes : “ I much regret that I should have been home on leave when this great loss happened to my battalion. It is difficult for me to express what your son was to the battalion ; he was a very exceptional soldier—in fact, during over two years of service in France I have not met his equal as a company commander ; and had he lived I should certainly have recommended him for rapid advancement. As a man he was loved by every man in the regiment. I, as battalion commander, was immensely proud of him, for he was a grand figure of a man and the most cheery of comrades. He overcame all difficulties with a laugh. You may be a proud mother to have had such a son. May you do as he would have wished, and bear bravely your great loss.”

DUNCHURCH.

NEWS was received on Tuesday that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of this village.

MR & MRS GAMBLE DAVIS, Mill Street, have received news that their son, Percy, has gone through a second operation, and is getting on well. He is a prisoner in Germany.

MR & MRS J BULL, Mill Street, have received news that their son has been wound in Palestine. This is the second time.

BRANDON.

PTE G BOSTOCK MISSING.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock, of Brandon, have been notified that their eldest son, Pte G Bostock, is missing. He had been in France for a long time. His parents have resided in the district all their lives.

FRANKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mrs Doyle has received the sad news that her youngest son, Pte W Doyle, Q.O.O.H, was killed in France. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved mother, this being the second son she has lost in the War. One brother is now at home wounded, and the fourth son is in Egypt. A memorial service was held on Sunday afternoon, when the Rector (Rev C Lunn) gave a sympathetic address. The Rev H F B Shuckburgh read the lessons. There was a large congregation.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT OWEN W W W MEREDITH MISSING.—Mrs Meredith, late of Wolston Vicarage, has received news that her son is missing. He had been in France for some short time, and was attached to the Royal Flying Corps. While residing in Wolston his cheerful disposition and amiable manner made him very popular. He is the only son of Mrs Meredith, who now resides at Leamington and the late Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, for upwards of seven years Vicar of Wolston.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory WILFRED JOSEPH (BILL), who was killed in France, November 11th, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave,
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MAYES.—In fond and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, who died of wounds received in action in France at the General Hospital, Bristol, December 6th, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ A devoted son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered Duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
“ Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which that smile hides all the while.
“ Gone but not forgotten—
Oh no ! not one so dear.
He is gone to his home in heaven,
And with a smile we will meet him there.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

 

1st Dec 1917. Presentation to a Howitzer Man

PRESENTATION TO A HOWITZER MAN.

On the occasion of the presentation of medals at Chatham on the 25th inst, Bombardier F A Bosworth R.F.A, was the recipient of medals. The presentation was made by Colonel H R Adair, Commander Royal Artillery, Thames and Medway Garrison, who said : “ The Royal Artillery has no colours. Our colours are the proud traditions of our Regiment, to which we cling, and around which we rally, just as other Corps have rallied round their Banners. It is men like Bombardier Bosworth who not only preserve these traditions, but, who, by their deeds, actually add to and enoble them. I am proud to stand here to-day representing His Majesty the King, who, you will remember is our Colonel-in-Chief, to present to Bombardier Bosworth, on his behalf, two medals, which he has gained by his own brave hands. They are the Military Medal of England and the Military Medal of France.”

“ The records of the deeds for which he has won these read as follows:- Military Medal of England: “Repairing telephone lines and bringing in wounded under heavy shellfire.” Bar to Military Medal of England and Military Medal of France: “Maintaining communications under heavy shell fire.”

“ These medals are a proud possession for himself and splendid heirlooms for his kindred to possess. On behalf of our Country, our Ally of France, our Regiment and its Colonel-In-Chief our King. I shake hands with Bombardier Bosworth and wish him health and happiness and long life the to wear his noble distinctions.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt E Wood, Manchester Regiment, son of Mr T T Wood, The Laurels, Park Road, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Pte W Wilks, Cameron Highlanders, an old Murrayian, has been wounded by shrapnel a second time, near Ypres, and has undergone three operations. He is now in a Military Hospital near Norwich.

The many friends of Mr A Clarke, Spencer House, Crick, will be glad to hear that his eldest son, who was serving in France with the 1st Gordon Highlanders, has been promoted to Captain.

Lord Leigh is gazetted Colonel of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Lieut R W Friend, son of Mr R Friend, of Rugby, who has been serving in Salonika for about two years in the A.S.C, has been promoted to Captain and Adjutant. He was educated at Rugby School, and passed through Sandhurst. After leaving school he was a prominent player of both the Rugby Cricket and Football Clubs.

Gunner Harold Richard Hazlewood, R.F.A, second son of Mr & Mrs Hazlewood, Weedon, has been killed in action. In a sympathetic letter the Chaplain said :—“ He died a soldier’s death at the gun.” The deceased who was 21 years of age, was educated at Weedon Boys’ School, and afterwards at the Town and County School, Northampton. On leaving school he was articled to Mr W J Pearce, auctioneer, Northampton, and joined up in January, 1915, proceeding to France in January, 1916. He was in the Somme push, the Battles of the Vimy Ridge, Beaumont Hamel, &c ; was wounded in March, 1917, and had been recently recommended for his commission on account of meritorious service.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Monday evening at the Benn Buildings, the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, reported that during the past month there had been further charges on the funds of the Committee. An additional prisoner of war had been added to the list—Pte T Bachelor, 5th Royal Berkshire Regt, of Napton, who is interned at Mulheim A/Ruhr. A lady had offered to pay for this man’s food parcels, and the Committee would only have to be responsible for the 26lbs of bread per month. Pte J Pescow, 1st Northants Regt, of Clifton, interned at Konigsmoor bei Tolstedt, who had been on the Rugby list for over two years, but who had been fully “ adopted,” had again become a charge to the Committee, as the guarantee on his behalf were only now 22/6 per month, the Committee, therefore having to provide a difference of 33/- per month. Mr Barker further reported that the subscriptions and donations received during November would cover the cost of the month’s standard parcels and bread.

The Chairman, Mr William Flint, C.C, said that this was indeed satisfactory, especially in view of the many other efforts, and showed there was no lack of support for the prisoners of war. He trusted that this excellent result would continue.

With regard to Christmas dinner table collection for the fund, Mr Barker said he had nearly completed the arrangements.

The scheme involved an immense amount of work, but many ladies had offered their services as helpers, and if a few more would assist every house in the town would have its appointed collector.

The response from the villages was excellent, and there only remained a few districts to fix up. He estimated that between 9,000 and 10,000 houses would be canvassed in the town and villages.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR

The Postmaster-General announces that the German authorities have decided not to admit parcels for prisoners of war in Germany between the 12th and 22nd of December next. Parcels intended for delivery to prisoners of war in Germany for Austo-Hungary by Christmas Day should, therefore, be posted without delay. In accordance with the arrangements made last year parcels reaching the camps in Germany before Christmas will be delivered not earlier than 24th December if they are prominently marked “ Weihnachtspaket.”

AID FOR ALIEN ENEMIES,

The fifth report of the Emergency Committee for the assistance of Germans, Austrians, and Hungarians in Distress has just been issued. The committee was convened in the early days of the war by the Religious Society of Friends, “ to aid innocent ‘ alien enemies ‘ in Great Britain rendered destitute by the war.”

The list of subscriptions from July 1, 1916 to June 30, 1917, totals £13,226 7s 6d. There are 74 amounts, ranging from £60 to one shilling under the heading of “ Anon,” and other subscribers include Messrs Cadbury Bros, £200 ; Mr J B Crosfield £100 ; eight members of the Fry family, and three Rowntrees.

Viscount Haldane sends £25, and the two largest subscribers are F Merttens and Edith M Ellis, and who send £500 each. The report states that in London alone more than 5,000 cases of need have been dealt with.

DR TANGYE’S MILITARY SERVICE.—At the meeting of the Mid-Warwickshire Joints Sanitary Committee on Thursday last week, presided over by Mr P E Shepheard, it was resolved, on the motion of Mr H Hulme, seconded by Mr Lloyd Evans, that the release of Dr C E Tangye for military service extended be extended for the period of the War on the same conditions that were agreed when he was released for a year’s service. Dr Tangye is in Aldershot Command, and is responsible for the sanitation of three large military camps, but may be called upon for foreign service at any time.

POLICE COURT.—At Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before Mr A E Donkin, Pte Fredk Curtis, of the Canadian Forestry Corps, was charged with being an absentee.—P.S Tromans deposed that on the previous evening he saw defendant in the Railway Hotel. He suspected him of being an absentee, and he called him outside and asked to see his pass. Defendant would not produce this, and admitted that he was an absentee. Remanded to await an escort.

ACORNS FOR STOCK.

The Food Production Department again drawn the attention of stockowners to the necessity of making full use of this year’s crop of acorns. In places where these are still lying on the ground collecting parties of children and others should be organized without delay. Landowners are urged to put no unreasonable obstacles in the way.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. H. BARNWELL, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regiment (of Bilton), who died from wounds received in action in France on November 19, 1917 ; aged 27 years.—From his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

ROUND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. W. A. Round, who died of wounds in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ When we last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
He did his best for one and all
And those who loved him well.”
—From his loving Father and Mother.

ROUND.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. W. A. ROUND, who died of wounds in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ In health and strength he left his home,
Not thinking death so near ;
It pleased the Lord to bid him come,
And in His sights appear.”
—From his loving Sisters and brother Fred.

IN MEMORIAM.

DODD..—In memory of Coy.-Sergt-Major DODD, R.W. Regiment, killed in France on December 2, 1915.—Sadly missed, Bill.

EDMANS.—In loving memory of our dear son, FRANK, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.—“ Three years have passed, how much we miss him.”—From Father & Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

EVERSDEN.—On November 12, WILLIAM, youngest son of Joseph Eversden, of Withybrook, who died of wounds in France ; aged 33 years.
“ For days and nights he bore great pain.
We hoped for cure, but hoped in vain.
God saw it, too, and thought it best
To take him to His Home of Rest.”
—From his loving Father, Sister and Brothers.