15th Dec 1917. On Christmas Day

ON CHRISTMAS DAY every household in Rugby and district is asked to make a collection at their Dinner Table to help to maintain a continuance of the very necessary food parcels for our unfortunate men who are

PRISONERS OF WAR.

The increase in the cost of the food parcels has caused a serious strain upon the funds of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, and it is felt that everyone will be glad of this opportunity of showing in a practical manner their sympathy with these poor fellows who are languishing in prison camps in Germany.

Please place your collection in the special envelopes which will be left your house and hand same to the authorised collector, who will call soon after Christmas.

If you going away this Christmas will you forward a donation towards this Special Effort to the Hon. Secretary : Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Recent Street, Rugby.

EVERY PENNY COUNTS.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, who was wounded at Cambrai on November 29th, is making satisfactory progress.

General Sir H S Horne, K.C.B, returned to the Front from East Haddon on Wednesday.

Lance-Corpl H F Hancox, who has been a prisoner of war and on the Rugby list of Prisoners of War Fund for 2½ years, has been transferred to Switzerland

Pte W Thomson, son-in-law of Mr & Mrs Mayes, Abbey Street has been wounded with shrapnel in the eye. They lost a son from wounds twelve months ago. Mrs Mayes has four brothers serving—three of them in France—and her husband has had two nephews killed in the War.

Mr T Horton, J.P, of Ashlawn, a late captain of the Northants County Cricket Club, is acting as a volunteer tram driver.

During the past ten weeks a total of £52,845 has been subscribed to the War Loans in Rugby, of which £7,680 was invested during the week ended December 8th.

Capt C N B Hurt, East Lancs Regiment, who has been appointed Assistant Controller of Statistics under the regional scheme of National Service at Headquarters, Leamington, has been presented with a silver cigarette-case by fellow-members of the Recruiting Staff at Rugby, where he has been stationed for the past two years. He was at Oxford when the War broke out, and, joining up immediately went, with his regiment to Gallipoli, where he contracted dysentery and enteric. He has played in the Derbyshire County Cricket XI.—Pte Bateman, a clerk on the staff, has also been the recipient of a present on leaving the town.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lance-Corpl H P Arnold, of the Royal Engineers, was killed in action on November 28th. Prior to joining the Army he was employed in the turbine works.

News has been received of the death in action of Capt Leystens Llewellyn Greener, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (T.F), son of Mr Charles Greener, of Four Oaks, Captain Greener, who was 24 years of age, was educated at Rugby, where he was captain of the football fifteen and a member of the shooting eight. He joined the Territorials about eighteen months before the outbreak of the War, received his commission in the 6th Warwicks in February, 1913.

NAVAL HONOUR FOR ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY.

Warrant-Officer E W Penney, an old scholar of St Matthew’s Boys’ School, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for gallantry in the Battle of Jutland. He was on Admiral Beatty’s flagship Lion during the engagement, and the great skill and fearlessness effected essential repairs to the wireless installation while under heavy.

LIEUT-COL VISCOUNT FEILDING, D.S.O, AGAIN MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s list of mentions this week we again find the name of Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O (Coldstream Guards), son of the Earl of Denbigh. This is the third time during the War Viscount Feilding has gained distinction.

MILITARY MEDAL.

In a list of awards of the Military Medal issued on Thursday the following names appear :—Pte W Green, Worcester Regiment (Ryton-on-Dunsmore), and Gunner (Acting Bdr) W R Clarke, R.F.A (Rugby).

PRINCETHORPE.

NEWS has been received that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of Princethorpe.

MONKS KIRBY.

Farrier-Sergt-Major Bishop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has received news of the death from wounds on November 15th of his brother, Sergt Percy Bishop, Berks Yeomanry, serving with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. He was the son of the late Jonathan Bishop of this village.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another of the brave lads from this village has made the great sacrifice. Sergt S Batchelor, of the Royal Warwickshire regiment, only son of Mr & Mrs J Batchelor, died on December 1st of wounds received in action in France. He joined up on January 13th, 1915, and was drafted out to the front in April of the same year. Although not born at Church Lawford, Sergt Batchelor is regarded as a native, as his parents came to reside in the village when he was about two years old. He was educated at the village school, and when he was old enough to start work he went to Mr J Brierley’s at The Hall, Kings Newnham, to assist in the garden, &c. From there he took the situation of gardener and coachman to the Misses Townsend, of Kings Newham, where he was at the time of enlistment. Sergt Batchelor was 28 years of age, and was a fine strapping fellows, standing 6ft, and broad in proportion. He was as good-hearted as he was big, was ever ready to give a helping hand where it was wanted, and always had a cheery word and smile for everyone. He belonged to the local Cricket and Social Clubs and the choir at the Parish Church, where he was a most regular attendant. He was a very steady, thrifty young fellow, a total abstainer and non-smoker, and a jolly, all-round, good fellow. More especially, perhaps, because of these traits of character, very great sympathy is felt with his parents in the loss of their son in his prime, and whose life had taken as a whole, might well be regarded as an example by many country lads.

DEATHS.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Sergt. S. Batchelor of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment (only son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Batchelor, of Church Lawford), who died from wounds received in action in France on December 1st, 1917 ; aged 28 years.
Bravely he answered his country’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.
Father in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

IN MEMORIAM.

GLENN.—In affectionate remembrance of my dear husband, JOHN GLENN, who died in France on December 8, 1916.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on December 15, 1916 ; aged 22 years.—“ God takes our loved ones from our homes, but never from our hearts.”
—From his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

 

8th Dec 1917. Using Potatoes to Save Bread

USING POTATOES TO SAVE BREAD.

Sir Arthur Yapp, the Director of Food Economy, is anxious that the present very large surplus stock of potatoes and vegetables should be utilised in all private houses, and also in hotels, restaurants, and other public eating places, in such a way as to save bread.

It has been brought to his notice that in many public eating places the charge for a portion of potatoes and other vegetables is so relatively high as to encourage people to order bread instead. This is very much against the national interest at present, and Sir Arthur Yapp desires it to be clearly understood that he expects the management of all public eating places to alter their arrangements accordingly.

It is stated that it is still quite common for meat, eggs, etc, to be served on toast or bread. This practice should be immediately discontinued, and the use of bread should be discouraged in every way possible, so long as potatoes and other vegetables are abundant.

In particular, it is most if desirable that in all public eating places as little bread as possible should be served at lunch and dinner when potatoes and other vegetables are available in abundance, as at present.

Sir Arthur Yapp urges the public to give their full support to these recommendations, as this is of great importance in utilising the national food supply to the utmost advantage.

NOW TO OBTAIN SUGAR.
A NEW PROCEDURE.

It is important to remember that after December 31st you can only obtain sugar by one of the following systems ; that you can only use the system which applies to your particular case :—

A.—THE HOUSEHOLD SYSTEM.—If you have already deposited with your grocer a household sugar card, and if you are still a member of the same household, you must go to your grocer after December 8th and ask for Declaration Forms. When you have filled these up your grocer will give you a Retailers Sugar Ticket for each member of the household, which must be shown when buying sugar after December 31st.

B.—THE COUPON SYSTEM.—If you have not registered with your grocer on a Household Sugar Card, or if you have left the household from which you were registered, you must go to a Post Office before December 15th, ask for an application form, fill it up, and post it as directed. You will later receive a Ration Paper, which will entitle you to get Sugar Coupons from a Post Office.

AN ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Monday —before Mr J E Cox—Corporal Charles Hammett, of Long Lawford, was charged with being an absentee from the Agricultural Company.—P.C Hunt gave evidence of arrest and defendant was remanded to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr A Marsh, 15 Little Elborow Street, Rugby, has received intimation that his son, Pte A Marsh (24) of Leicesters, was killed in action on November 2nd ; and that another son, Pte G W Marsh, of the Warwicks, was posted as missing on October 26th. The former was, before joining up, employed as a labourer by the late Mr W C Musgrave, and the latter worked for J Young, builder. Both were Murray school boy.

Mrs Bennett, 1 Hillmorton Road, has kindly forwarded to the funds of the Rugby War Hospital Supply Depot the sum of £3, the proceeds of her chrysanthemum show on November 21-24.

A SON OF THE VICAR OF GRANDBOROUGH KILLED.

The Rev John Martin, vicar of Grandborough, has just received the sad news of the death in France of his second son, Second-Lieut F H Martin, R.E, 84th Field Company. The Commanding Officer writes : “ He was shot by a German sniper whilst setting out a new piece of engineering work behind our front line. It is a consolation that he did not suffer, as he was killed instantly. He was interred by the Rev P H Hargreaves, C.F, in a military cemetery near Gonzeancourt. He had only been a very short time with the 84th Field Company. I can assure you that all the officers and men realise what a really excellent fellow he was, and we all feel we have lost a good comrade and an extremely valuable officer.” Second-Lieut F H Martin is brother of Capt C G Martin, V.C, D.S.O, R.E, and had only a few months since come home from Egypt, where he was engaged in engineering work for the Egyptian Government, to offer himself to the War Office for military service. After a few months at Newark, he left for the front in September last. He had given a few months to military work near the Suez Canal, where he was employed in laying down pipes to carry fresh water from the Canal into the desert for 21 miles. He has another brother in the R.A.M.C, who is now in India. Second-Lieut F H Martin was born in China in 1888. He was educated in Bath and Clifton College (while at Clifton he was captain of the Cricket XI). and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He had passed the examination for the I.C.E.

THE LATE CAPT FRANK NEVILLE.

Mrs T Neville of Rugby, whose son, Capt Frank Neville, was killed in action, as recorded in our last issue, has received a sympathetic letter from the Colonel commanding the battalion. He writes : “ I much regret that I should have been home on leave when this great loss happened to my battalion. It is difficult for me to express what your son was to the battalion ; he was a very exceptional soldier—in fact, during over two years of service in France I have not met his equal as a company commander ; and had he lived I should certainly have recommended him for rapid advancement. As a man he was loved by every man in the regiment. I, as battalion commander, was immensely proud of him, for he was a grand figure of a man and the most cheery of comrades. He overcame all difficulties with a laugh. You may be a proud mother to have had such a son. May you do as he would have wished, and bear bravely your great loss.”

DUNCHURCH.

NEWS was received on Tuesday that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of this village.

MR & MRS GAMBLE DAVIS, Mill Street, have received news that their son, Percy, has gone through a second operation, and is getting on well. He is a prisoner in Germany.

MR & MRS J BULL, Mill Street, have received news that their son has been wound in Palestine. This is the second time.

BRANDON.

PTE G BOSTOCK MISSING.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock, of Brandon, have been notified that their eldest son, Pte G Bostock, is missing. He had been in France for a long time. His parents have resided in the district all their lives.

FRANKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mrs Doyle has received the sad news that her youngest son, Pte W Doyle, Q.O.O.H, was killed in France. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved mother, this being the second son she has lost in the War. One brother is now at home wounded, and the fourth son is in Egypt. A memorial service was held on Sunday afternoon, when the Rector (Rev C Lunn) gave a sympathetic address. The Rev H F B Shuckburgh read the lessons. There was a large congregation.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT OWEN W W W MEREDITH MISSING.—Mrs Meredith, late of Wolston Vicarage, has received news that her son is missing. He had been in France for some short time, and was attached to the Royal Flying Corps. While residing in Wolston his cheerful disposition and amiable manner made him very popular. He is the only son of Mrs Meredith, who now resides at Leamington and the late Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, for upwards of seven years Vicar of Wolston.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory WILFRED JOSEPH (BILL), who was killed in France, November 11th, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave,
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MAYES.—In fond and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, who died of wounds received in action in France at the General Hospital, Bristol, December 6th, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ A devoted son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered Duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
“ Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which that smile hides all the while.
“ Gone but not forgotten—
Oh no ! not one so dear.
He is gone to his home in heaven,
And with a smile we will meet him there.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

 

25th Sep 1915. Local War Notes

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Sydney Hall and Mr J Hoare, servers at St Andrew’s Mission Church and members of the Brotherhood of St Ardan, have enlisted in the R.W.R.

Capt A D Coates, of the 9th Warwickshire Regiment, which has figured prominently in the Dardanelles fighting, has recovered from his illness, and is now at Cairo in charge of the Turkish officer prisoners.

Sergt Donnithorne, of the 1st Border Regiment, who was billeted with Mr and Mrs Lane, 79 Manor Road, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, for ‘ a bit of work I have done out here ’ (the Dardanelles), as he puts it in a letter to his friends in Rugby.

On Monday afternoon the wounded soldiers from Ashlawn Hospital were entertained at the picture matinee at the Empire through the kindness of Mr B Morris, the proprietor. Cigarettes, &c, were handed round to the visitors, who spent a highly enjoyable time.

Mrs Stokes, wife of Farrier Q.M Sergt Stokes, informs us that the rumour which has been circulated regarding her husband’s supposed death is quite untrue. He is in hospital suffering from a general breakdown, which has affected his eyesight. A letter received from him on Wednesday, however, contained favourable news.

Pte James Plumb, of the 10th Royal Warwicks, and an old scholar of St Matthew’s Schools, has written to his mother, who resides at 21 Union Street, Rugby, to state that he has been wounded, but not seriously. He was out sniping on September 13th, when he was struck in the calf of his leg by a bullet, which passed out at the knee. He is now in a base hospital at Boulogne, where he is very comfortable and going on well. When Pte Plumb enlisted he was working at the Rugby Gas Works. He joined in September, 1914, and went over to France about three months ago. His father is also serving in 2/7th Royal Warwickshire.

NEWS OF A RUGBY YEOMAN.

Included in a number of wounded soldiers from the Dardanelles who arrived at “ Ashlawn ” Red Cross Hospital on Monday, was Trooper Ambrose Cole, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who brought cheering word to Mr Albert White, chief clerk at the L & N.-W Erecting Shop, respecting his son, Trooper Cyril White, whom he left quite well and in the best of health.

LETTER FROM AN OLD MURRAYIAN.

Sapper Tuckey, of the 78th Field Co, R.E, an Old Murrayian, has sent a number of interesting views showing Ypres before and after the bombardment to his old schoolmaster. We give a few extracts from his letter :—“ It is a terrible sight to see glorious architecture, such as the Cathedral of St Martin, the Cloth Hall, and other such places lying in heaps of ruins ; but still, one takes little notice of such things, for human nature gets surprisingly hard-hearted out here. . . . . No one will ever be able to say that the Old Murrayians were found wanting. I receive the local paper every week, so naturally I am well acquainted with the news, and watch with great interest everything concerning Old Murrayians. I met some of the old-timers a few days ago while behind the lines, and I do not think any of us look the worse for our Continental tour. There is rather a strange thing in a desolate village ‘somewhere in Belgium ’—a small church in ruins, but the crucifix is standing untouched and the inscription on the remains of the tower, ‘Suceedo Combustis,’ which is rather appealing to the passing troops, don’t you think ? ”

RUGBY SAWYER CONGRATULATED BY THE KING.

Mr Frederick Branston, a sawyer, in the employ of Messrs Travis & Arnold, of Rugby, and living in Chester Street, has this week received the following letter from the Privy Purse Office at Buckingham Palace, dated September 20th, 1915 :-

“ SIR,—I have the honour to inform you that the King has heard with much interest that you have at the present moment four sons and two sons-in-law serving in the Army and Navy.

“ I am commanded to express to you the King’s congratulations, and to assure you that his Majesty much appreciates the spirit of patriotism which prompted this example in one family of loyalty and devotion to their Sovereign and Empire.—I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant,

“ F M PONSONBY,

“ Keeper of the Privy Purse.”

We may explain that Mr. Branston has five sons serving with the colours (not four, as mentioned in the letter), and that he is himself employed on Government contracts.

OLD MURRAYIAN GASSED WHILE AT RESCUE WORK.

Driver S G Smith, 41, 3/4th Warwickshire Battery, an Old Murrayian, has written to his old schoolmaster, informing him that he has been gassed, and adding the following particulars :— “ I thought I would like to see a little more life than I did with the Battery, so I went to do a bit of mining and sapping under the German first line trenches, and found what I went for. For about a week all went well, but we could hear the Germans working over the top of us ; therefore it was a case of who should get there first. We could hear them talking when everything was quiet. One Sunday evening at about five o’clock I was in the dug-out, when all of a sudden the whole place was shaken ; and, knowing something was the matter, we jumped up. We were ordered to fall-in and hurried to the firing trench. Then we found that the Germans had blown our sap in. We could not go down for a time because there was so much gas ; but after we had worked and had got some air in, they asked for men to try to get our comrades out. I was one who volunteered, and we went down, but could not stand it long. -We found five dead at the bottom of the shaft. We worked hard for about four hours, and then there was a big rush of gas, and I don’t remember any more until I came round in the dressing station.” Driver Smith adds that he has been in several hospitals, and is now nearly well again.

A LAWFORD MAN KILLED.

Mr Henry Hopkins, of the Sheaf and Sickle Inn, Long Lawford, has received intimation that his son, Pte Frank Hopkins, of the 6th Dorsets, has been killed.

Capt Courtenay Dutton, writing to convey the intelligence, says :” I regret to have to inform you that your son was killed early this morning by a shell bursting on the parapet. His death was practically instantaneous, and he suffered no pain. Curiously enough his own officer was killed by a bullet about two hours previously in the same place. Your son was a good soldier, and in expressing my sincerest sympathy, I would add that you may be to a certain extent comforted in your grief by the knowledge that your son died the most honourable death a man can die.”

Sergt J Jeacock, of the same Company, has also written to inform the parents, and adds :” He was at his post when he was hit. We had a hot time of it for about a quarter of an hour. I am very sorry to lose my old chum like that. We used to work together and we joined together. He was one of the best we had out here.”

Pte Hopkins was employed at Bluemels when he enlisted about twelve months ago. He was an active member of the Lawford Football, Cricket, and Rifle Clubs, and was much liked and respected in the village.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS’ OUTING TO STANFORD PARK.

Recently, when Lord and Lady Braye entertained wounded soldiers from Leicestershire hospitals at Stanford Hall, the men at the Ashlawn Hospital, Rugby, although invited, were unable to be present because, his Lordship was informed, vehicles were not available to convey them to the rendezvous.

Lord Braye kindly repeated his invitation, and Mr F van den Arend undertook to arrange the motor transport. The Leicestershire men have had several successful tours, and one of the features that has contributed largely to the success of the outings has been the enthusiasm which has been shown to the gallant men when passing through the different places. The villagers decorated their houses, and showered cigarettes, chocolates, and fruit upon the wounded in the cars.

The Ashlawn men are going to Stanford Hall to-day (Saturday), September 25th, and we are asked to mention that they will start from the hospital at 2.0 o’clock, pass through Dunchurch, down the London Road to Stretton-on-Dunsmore, then turn off through Wolston and Church Lawford to New Bilton.

The cars will line up opposite the Rugby Portland Cement Works. Here they will be met by the B.T.H Military Band about 2.35 p.m, and will pass in procession through New Bilton, Warwick Street, High Street, Market Place, Church Street, Clifton Road, Clifton, by St Thomas’ Cross (Newton), Catthorpe and Swinford to Stanford Park.

On the homeward journey they will start at 5.30 p.m, and travel via Yelvertoft, Crick, and Hillmorton.

We have so doubt people on the routes indicated will be glad of the opportunity of showing enthusiastic appreciation to these gallant defenders of the Empire.

HOW THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY FOUGHT AT THE DARDANELLES.

LOCAL MEN WOUNDED, BUT NOT SERI0USLY.

“ I am writing this from my little ‘ hole ‘ in the hill,” says Sergt-Major Tait, of C Squadron of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, now at the Dardanelles. ” We left our base on August 17th, and arrived here ‘somewhere at the front’ on the 20th or thereabouts. I have lost count of time since we have been in the real thing. We had our baptism of fire as soon as we landed, being shelled by the Turks for about five minutes. Fortunately no one was hit, and we reached our bivouac without mishap. We had a few casualties while in bivouac, as we had to go to the shore for water, and the Turks or Germans, knowing or being able to see when the men went to draw water, sent some shrapnel over them, and succeeded in bagging one or two. They used to send us one or two ‘haters ’ at meal times just to pass the time of day—sometimes they burst and sometimes not. They seat 14 at us one morning, but did no damage. We are on the side of a hill about — miles from the coast, and when our ships shell the enemy the shells come right over us, and make a terrific noise. It was funny at first to see the men ‘ duck ‘ when one came over ; but it was only natural, and I suppose I was one of the ‘ duckers.’ They are getting used to it now.

“ Our shells have been making terrible work in the enemy’s camp trenches, according to reports of men who have been in the first lines. They say they found Tucks or Germans mixed up together in heaps of 10 or 15. They asked for an armistice to bury their dead, but this was refused, because the last time they had one they did not bury the dead, but moved their big guns to the rear and set them up in other positions ; so our fellows had the job of burying their dead when they had taken their trenches. Since we landed they have been pushed back about —— miles. Perhaps you will have heard of our doings by the time you get this, but you may not have got details.

“ We left our base at 4.20 p.m. on Friday, the 20th. with orders to join the Division by 7.30 p.m. All went well until we got about two miles on our journey. We had cross a large extent of perfectly flat country to our objective and covered with patches of gorse. We must have made a good mark for the enemy’s guns, for as soon as we got to the edge of the gorse they opened fire on us with shrapnel, high explosives, and incendiary shells. They had got the range, and officers and men began to drop. For three-quarters of an hour they rained shrapnel upon us, and it is marvellous how any of us came through the storm alive.

“ My squadron lost 27 killed and wounded. We were the luckiest of the lot, and lost the least men being on the right of the column. Men were going down in one’s and twos every time a shell burst, and, to make matters worse, the devils set fire to the gorse.

“ After being under fire for about a quarter of an hour we had the order to double, but we could only go about 100 yards, and had to walk the rest. This was the time the casualties were heaviest.

“ We eventually reached the foot of the hill to the accompaniment of the cheers of those who had watched us from the hillside. When the roll had been called we found we had lost about 70 in the regiment, but several walked in afterwards only slightly wounded.

“ When we reached our objective we thought we had finished, but after half-an-hour’s rest we were told, to advance to the reserve trenches one and a-half miles to the front. Fortunately by this time it was getting dark. We were taken over the top of the hill and down the other side, where we again came under fire—this time from machine guns and snipers. We had a few more casualties, but only wounded, no one being killed and finally we got to the trench where we threw of our packs, said a fervent prayer, and tried to go to sleep. But the excitement of the past events made this impossible.

“ We have since heard of fellows having marvellous escapes. One officer had the back of his helmet shot away, and also the collar of his coat, but did not get wounded. Several men can show holes in their clothes and helmets. I was hit with a bullet on one of the pouches, and it knocked three clips of cartridges out, but did not hurt me. I came through without any other mishap, so I offered up a prayer of thankfulness to the Almighty for bringing us through what can be literally called ‘ hell on earth.’

This is the only time any troop have been brought across the open since operations commenced in this part of the seat of war, and everyone who saw our advance says that the Yeomanry have earned a name for themselves.

“ The only thing that is a bit of a trouble is the water. It is only issued twice a day. and as bully beef and biscuits make one thirsty, it is trying—put the water is good when we get it. The men in the firing line are looked after first, which is as it should be—the men in the reserve trenches forming fatigues for getting food and water to the first line, and they do it cheerfully day and night. It is really wonderful how the fellows have adapted themselves to circumstances.

“I am feeling quite fit and well, with the exception of a slight cold. It is very hot in the day, and gets cold towards early morning. We expect the rainy season to commence shortly.

“ When you see Mr J E Cox tell him his two sons are in the next dug-out to me. They are both all right, and came through without a scratch. Bert White’s son was left at — camp to look after the horses—if he only knew what a lucky fellow he was.

“ We do not get a very good service post here, and have had no letters since we left the base. We are now pretty ‘cosy,’ not over-worked, and plenty of bully and tea.

“ I hope you will be able to read this, as it is written in rather an uncomfortable position, lying on my back in the dug-out whilst the shells are coming over.

“ We are rather troubled with snipers, but the Australian bushmen are dealing with them. One chap lives close to me, and he says he has shot 17 since he has been on the job. They got three yesterday—one dressed in a K.O.S.B uniform. They say the snipers are principally Kurds.”

“ A LIVING SHEET OF FIRE & BULLETS.”

Corpl Horace Neeves, of the Signal Troop of the 1st South Midland Mounted Brigade, has written to his parents, Mr and Mrs S Neeves, of Murray Road, Rugby, giving an interesting account of his experiences in the fighting on Hill 70, following the landing at Suvla Bay at the Dardanelles. He was working on the staff at Rugby Post Office, when at the outbreak of war the Rugby Troop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, of which he had been a member for six or seven years, was mobilised. Having been for, some months at Alexandria, he went with the South Midland Mounted Brigade (with which his troop is incorporated) to the Dardanelles, and experienced some heavy fighting in the advance from Suvla Bay, the last stage of which, he says, was “like going through a living sheet of fire and bullets.” He felt one or two bits of stuff, probably dirt, thrown up by shrapnel, hit him in the face ; but he remarks that otherwise he came through quite safely. However, on returning to hospital, suffering from a severe attack of dysentry, it was found that Corpl Neeves had had a narrow escape. A shrapnel bullet had entered his haversack, had passed through four folds of the housewife it contained, and had become embedded in a thimble which was crumpled up and possibly saved his life. We understand that Corpl Neeves has been invalided home, and is now on a transport ship on his way to England.

 

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been attested at the Rugby Drill Hall this week :—E Imeson and S O’Donnell, Gloucester Bantams ; K W Smallwood R.E, Telegraph ; W Courtman, R.G.A ; W E Hughes, T W Hughes, and H Panter, R.F.A ; T Cleaver and J E Newman, 220th Fortress Co, R.E.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

MORE PROCEEDINGS.

A sitting of the Coventry And District Munitions Tribunal was held at the Labour Exchange offices, at which Mr F Tillyard, of Birmingham, presided. There were also present : Mr T Clarke (employers), Mr J G Chater (employees), together with the Clerk (Mr P E Wilks) and Mr D G Bolland {assistant clerk).

SLEEPY WORKER.

The allegation against James Cullen, turner, of 93 Winfield Street, Rugby, an employee of the British Thomson-Houston Co, Ltd, was that he had been found asleep on two separate occasions whilst engaged on important Government work.

Prior to the hearing of the case Cullen asked for an adjournment on the ground that his trade union secretary, and a witness were not present, but the Court decided to proceed with the case.

Mr J Bale, foreman, stated that at 4.25 a.m on the 8th inst. he found Cullen asleep by the side of his machine. After taking his name and number he walked down the shop, and when about half-way down he heard Cullen’s machine running again. Cullen’s explanation was that owing to the nature of his work the breakfast half-hour had been re-arranged, and that the time when the foreman came up was his breakfast time, 4 a.m to 4.30, half-an-hour later than usual.

Launcelot Wakelin, in charge of the shop, said that on the 9th inst. he saw Cullen lying full length across the floor near the machine, fast asleep. When asked for his name and number Cullen was abusive, and refused to give them. He had watched Cullen for fully ten minutes to make sure he was asleep.

Cullen admitted lying down, but emphatically denied being asleep, and stated that it was customary for men to lie down and watch the material running through.

After consideration, the Chairman announced that the Court had come to the conclusion that Cullen was not “diligently attending to his work,” which was an infringement of the Munitions Act. The first case had been withdrawn, and a fine of £1 was inflicted for the offence on the 9th inst.—Cullen : If I did wrong once I did wrong twice.—The Chairman : You are being fined on your own admission that you were lying down at your work.—Cullen : I refuse to pay a halfpenny until see my solicitor.—The Chairman : There is no appeal to this decision.

GOVERNMENT CARRIER PIGEONS.

A WARNING.

The Press Bureau issues the following announcement :—

“ Notice is hereby given that carrier or homing pigeons are being used for certain purposes in connection with his Majesty’s Service, and attention is called to the fact that anyone who shoots or kills a carrier or homing pigeon whilst on passage renders himself liable to prosecution.”