13th Apr 1918. The New Man Power Proposals

THE NEW MAN POWER PROPOSALS.

By the New Man Power Bill, introduced in the House of Commons on Tuesday by the Prime Minister, it is proposed to raise the age for military service to 50 ; and in certain cases, such as medical men, to 55. Men of 45 to 50 to be taken for home defence, and ministers of religion for non-combatant service.

All exemptions on occupational grounds to be cancelled, and restriction of right of appeal to the medical grounds only.

Substantial combing out from Civil Service, munition works, mines, and a number of occupations. Tribunals to be re-organised.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl T E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks L.I, who has been missing since August 16, 1917, is now reported a having been killed on that date. Prior to joining the Forces he was employed in the B.T.H Controller Factory.

Corpl A Ashmore, youngest son of Mr & Mrs Ashmore, 7 Oliver Street, Rugby, and formerly of Marton, 29th Machine Gun Corps, has been awarded the D.C.M for gallant conduct at Cambrai.

Gunner G H Mann, R.G.A, of 102 Oxford Street, has died in France of gunshot wounds in the right leg. Before he joined up two years ago, he was a painter in the employ of Mr J Young. He was 38 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children.

The news will be received with general regret in this neighbourhood that Capt T A Townsend, M.C, R.A.M.C, is reported as wounded and missing on March 21st. Capt Townsend returned to the Cambrai Sector on March 18th, after a fortnight’s leave. There is, of course, the possibility that he is a prisoner, but no further information is at present obtainable.

HILLMORTON BADLY HIT.

Wednesday was a sad day for Hillmorton, news being received that three soldiers belonging to the village had been killed in action, and another was posted as missing. Those killed are : Lieut Rathbone, Staffordshire Regiment, son of the late Mr W T Rathbone ; Sergt S Chambers and Pte Charles Chambers, sons of Mr W Chambers, farm bailiff. Lieut Rathbone was formerly employed in the London City and Midland Bank, and Sergt S Chambers was in the Rugby Co-operative Society’s Boot Department. Pte J Hart, son of Mr J Hart, Lower Street, is reported missing, and Pte T Griffiths son of Mr T Griffiths, Upper Street, has been gassed.

A SOUTH AFRICAN VETERAN KILLED.

Mrs Chant, 43 Union Street, Rugby, has received news that her husband, Driver George Chant, R.F.A, has been killed by a shell which fell among a group of officers, men, and horses standing near the Brigade Headquarters. In a kind letter conveying information, the Brigadier-General writes :—“ I feel deeply for you and your young family in your great loss. It is a great loss to me also, Chant had been with me since the early days of the War, and I had the greatest confidence in him. He looked after the horses splendidly, and when I was busy with other things I felt I never need worry about them, and that Chant would do everything that was required.” Driver Chant, who was 38 years of age, was employed at the B.T.H when the war broke out. He was the first to volunteer from those Works, and went out at once on August 15, 1914, so that he had been all through the fighting. He previously served in the South African War, and gained two medals.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.

WOUNDED.—On Wednesday morning a letter was received from France, stating that Sergt W Cleaver, of the Hussars, was wounded in both arms during the recent fighting. Sergt Cleaver has seen eight years’ service, and this is the second time he had been wounded.

WOLSTON.

THE LATE LIEUT O W W H MEREDITH, R.F.A.—When the news reached Wolston that this young officer had lost his life, very sincere regret was expressed on all sides. During the seven years that his father, the Venerable Archdeacon T Meredith, was Vicar of Wolston, Lieut Meredith made scores of friends. His bright and cheerful disposition was shown alike, not only to those in his own social position, but also to the poorest of the inhabitants, and none more than these regret that so fine a young life should have been cut short. The sympathy of the inhabitants is freely expressed for his poor widowed mother, especially as it follows closely upon the death of her husband. Lieut Meredith was educated at Harrow School and Cambridge University. He distinguished himself in all Mechanical Examinations in London and at the Aerodromes of Castle Bromwich and Dartford. He received his wings July, 1917, and went to France in October last. On November 20 he was taking part in the attack on Cambrai. He left the ground at 7 a.m. with others of his Flight to support the advance of the Infantry and Tanks. The work they were engaged on was of the utmost importance, and they succeeded in doing it. Lieut Meredith was last seen shooting at German infantry from low down some five miles the other side of the lines. Owing to the fog and low cloud, nearly all the machines—there were 15 others from the same Squadron alone—got separated. The Commanding Officer of the R.F.C writes : “ It was to a great extent owing to the co-operation of our low-flying aeroplanes that we scored a marked success on the initial day. Lieut Meredith, fully realising the risk, gave his life in helping what was very nearly the biggest victory of the war. He was a gallant officer, an excellent and fearless pilot, very popular, and died a death which cannot but be a source of pride to all who were connected with him.”

RUGBY AND DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE

SUGAR FOR DOMESTIC FRUIT PRESERVING.

OWING to delays in printing of forms application for sugar for home-made jam preserving, the last day for receiving these forms from the public has been extended to Saturday, April 13th. No forms of application can be accepted after that date.

MEAT RATIONING ORDER.

No person may keep any food or meat card which does not belong to him or to some other person for whom he is authorised to buy food. For instance, he must not keep a card belonging to a person who has left the country, or joined H.M. Forces, or died, or gone into hospital or other institution. Anyone who has in his possession a card belonging to person who is no longer entitled to use it as a member of the same household, must return it to the Local Food Office at once, or if the holder of the card is in any institution, must send it to the head of the institution. It is an offence to keep such a card ; it is obviously an offence to try to use it to get an extra ration.

A person may not lend his card to anyone else or sell or give the ration he has bought on it to anyone else. This does not affect the sharing of food by members of the same household or guests or by persons taking common meals.

Rationing covers every kind of meat, including bacon and ham, poultry, game, venison, edible offal, sausages, bones, and all cooked, canned, and preserved meat, etc.

It is an offence to break any of these rules. The buyer as well as the seller is liable to prosecution.

Coupons for the purchase of meat rations must in all cases only be detached by the seller. Coupons detached by the holder of the card are worthless. Butcher’s meat can only be bought from the butcher with whom you are registered.

SUPPLEMENTARY RATIONS for HEAVY WORKERS.

The work of classifying and grading is now proceeding, and due notice will be given of time and place where applicants may receive their cards.

SUPPLEMENTARY RATIONS for ADOLESCENT BOYS.

As from May 5th a supplementary meat ration will be allowed to boys who on March 1st, 1918, were not less than 13 nor more than 18 years of age—i.e., to boys born after February 28th, 1900, but before, March 1st, 1905—except they are already receiving supplementary meat rations as heavy workers. Forms of application may be obtained at the Local Food Office after April 14th.

LICENSING OF DEALERS IN FISH.

A person shall not deal in fish by wholesale either on his own account or on the account of any other person after the 10th of April, 1918, unless he has applied for a license as a wholesale dealer in fish ; or after the 1st of May, 1918, unless he is the holder of a license for the time being in force, granted by the Food Controller authorising him to deal in fish by wholesale. Every application for a license shall be made to the Secretary (Fish Supplies Branch) Ministry of Food, 14, Upper Grosvenor Street, W,1.

A person shall not after the 1st May, 1918, deal in fish by retail except in, about, or in connection with premises in respect of which he is the holder of a certificate of registration as a retail dealer in fish for the time being in force, granted by the Food Committee for the area in which the premises are situate, but this shall not prevent a dealer duly registered from selling from his cart in the ordinary course of business in the area in which such premises are situate.

Forms of application for registration may be obtained from the Local Food Office.

ENQUIRIES may be made at the Local Food Office between the hours of 9.30—12.30 p.m. and 2.15—4.30 p.m. Saturdays—9.30 to 12.30.p.m. Only.
F. M. BURTON, Executive Officer.

GENERAL RATIONING.

From the commencement of this week the country generally has been rationed, and no one will be able to buy meat or a meat meal without producing a card and depositing a coupon. It is desired by the Ministry of Food that people should be reminded that after May 5 bacon may only be bought at a shop where the buyer has previously registered his or her name, and that holders of meat cards who wish to use any coupon for the purpose of buying bacon after that date should immediately register their names at the shop of the retailer with whom they propose to deal. To-day (Sat.) is the last day for such action.

After May 5 only two coupons each person, instead of three per week, will be available for the purchase of butcher’s meat.

Any or all of the coupons will be available for the purchase of bacon or other meats. Increased supplies of bacon will be provided to meet the third coupon, which will no longer be available for butcher’s meat.

This arrangement is being made in order to utilise the additional supplies of bacon now being received from America, and at the same time diminish the call upon home-grown cattle during the months when their weight can be materially increased by fattening on grass.

Although it is too early yet to express an opinion as to the measure of success attending the Rationing Scheme which came into effect this week, the indications are that it is working smoothly. The butchers’ shops have presented almost a normal appearance, the blinds being raised so that the supplies of meat could be seen, and many householders are reaping the benefits of a more equitable distribution.

THE QUANTITY OF TEA ALLOWED PER COUPON.

In the summary of regulations under the new Rationing Scheme published in our last issue the weight of tea allowed for each person weekly was by a typographical error put at 1¼oz. It should have been 1½oz.

THE POTATO PUSH.
URGENT NEED FOR GREATER ACTIVITY.

British farmers as a body have responded admirably to the call of the Government for increased production, and the outlook for our corn crop is extremely encouraging. Unfortunately, the potato prospect is by no means so satisfactory. Up to the present it is doubtful whether as much land has been prepared for potatoes this season as last ; and it is hardly to be expected that the 1918 yield will be as large as that of the 1917 crop, which was well above the average.

The Prime Minister a few weeks ago appealed to farmers to grow more potatoes this year than last year, when, in response to his earlier appeal, the farmer beat all records of potato planting England and Wales. A certain number of large growers have been moved by the Premier’s recent message to arrange for the growing of more potatoes ; but this movement does not seem to be general.

As the Food Production Department points out, the situation is most serious. We need a million acres of potatoes in Great Britain this year to make the food situation safe, and only the farmers can give us this million acres. We want another million and a half tons of potatoes grown this year, apart from the allotment holder and gardeners’ crops and only the farmers can grow them. As things now look, there is reason to fear that we may be as much as 400,000 acres short of our probable requirements in potatoes during 1918. This must be prevented at any cost.

Many farmers have protested against the proposal that they should increase their 1918 acreage under potatoes because they have been unable to sell satisfactorily a large part their 1917 crop. The Ministry of Food has met them in this difficulty. On May 18, 1918, the Food Controller will purchase all sound ware potatoes in the United Kingdom for which the grower cannot otherwise find a market. The Food Controller will pay not less than £7 per ton for 4-ton lots free on rail.

These concessions in relation to the remainder of the 1917 crop should induce many hesitating farmers to increase their 1918 acreage of potatoes. The Ministry of Food has always guaranteed to buy at minimum prices of from £6 to £7 per ton all the crop grown on new land this year, and to pay a generous price for the remainder of the 1918 potato crop—prices for the latter being fixed by a Joint Commission of the Board of Agriculture and the Ministry of Food after visiting each area and taking evidence from the growers as to yields, cost of production, etc.

PERMITS TO PRESERVE EGGS.

In view of the possibility that the preserving of eggs not produced by householders’ own birds might be considered an offence under the Hoarding Order, the Food Controller has issued a general license authorising any person to acquire eggs for the purpose of preserving them for use in his own household, provided that notice of the number eggs to be acquired and preserved is sent to the Food Control Committee for the district in which the person usually resides, and that the number of eggs so acquired does not exceed the number of eggs stated in such notice, or, if objection is taken by the committee to the number stated, the number permitted by the committee. A Food Control Committee has power to reduce the number proposed if they think it necessary, after taking into consideration the size of the household and the quantity of supplies available in their district. Subject this reasonable limitation. Lord Rhondda wishes to encourage the preserving of eggs for use in the household during the winter months.

RESCUED FROM DROWNING.—On Wednesday in last week two Rugby boys—John Bull, son of John Overton, 7 New Street, and Alfred Pickering, of the same address—were playing near the river at Newton, when Bull fell into the water. A soldier belonging to the R.F.C was attracted to the spot by the shouts of Pickering, and he at once jumped into the river and brought Bull to the bank in an unconscious condition. Artificial respiration was successfully applied, and the boy was conveyed to his home in a float lent by Mr S Nicholas, of St Thomas’ Cross.

DEATHS.

BICKNELL.—LANCE-CORPL. A. BICKNELL, killed in action about April 2nd, son of Mr and Mrs Arthur Bicknell, of 123 Oxford, Rugby, aged 30 years.

CLEAVER.—April 9, 1918, CHARLES RICHARD CLEAVER, the beloved husband of Bertha Amy Cleave, of 27 Victoria Street, Bilton, Rugby.

ELSON.—Pte. ALFRED WILLIAM ELSON, 1st Hants. Regiment, died of wounds on April 6th in France, son of Mrs. Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, Bilton.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath a foreign sky,
Far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.
Some day we hope to meet him ;
We know not when.
We shall clasp his hands in the Better Land,
Never to part again.” R.I.P.
—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Wife, Brothers and Sisters.

HAY.—PRIVATE DOUGLAS HAY, of the 1/4th Yorks & Lancs. Regt. son of Mrs Hay, of Murray Rd., Rugby. Killed in action March 18th, 1918.

LINNELL.—On April 8th, 1918, at No. 9 General Hospital, Rouen, of tetanus from wounds received in action, WILLIAM HENRY LINNELL.

IN MEMORIAM.

BURTON.—In loving memory of MONTAGUE (MONT) BURTON, who killed in action on April 10, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Mother and Sister.

In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of Lance- Corpl G. B. COLEMAN, the dearly-beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Coles, Old Lodge Farm, Binley, who was shot by a sniper at France on April 11th, 1917, aged 23 years.
A loving son and faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother,
He bravely answered duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.
Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile,
But they little know the sorrow
Which is hid behind that smile.
He is gone, but not forgotten,
Oh, dear no, not one so dear ;
He is gone safe home to heaven,
And we hope to meet him there.
—From his ever-loving Mother and Father, Brothers and Sisters.

DALE.—In memory of Pte. HARLEY DALE, of the 11th Royal Warwickshire Regt., who was killed in action somewhere in France, April 11th, 1917.
God knows how we all miss him,
And He counts the tears we shed,
And whispers, “ Hush, he only sleeps.
Thy brother is not dead.”
—From his loving Mother and Sister and Brothers at Long Lawford.

HINCKS.—In proud and loving memory of Lance-Corpl. EDWARD WARNER HINKS, Middlesex Regiment, younger son of Mr. & Mrs. Marlow Hincks, The Holts, Southam, killed in action near Arras on April 12, 1917 ; aged 20.—From Father, Mother, Brother & Sisters.

MANSFIELD.—In memory of Lieut. H. Mansfield, 1st Cheshires, who died in France on April 12, 1916.—Not forgotten, “ M. W.”

PRESTIDGE.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOSEPH PRESTIDGE, Barby, aged 21 years ; killed in action in France, April 11, 1915.

PYWELL.—In loving memory of Sergt. F. W. PYWELL, who was killed in action on April 9, 1917.
“ He sleeps, not his native land,
But under foreign skies,
Far from his friends who loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father, Brother and Sisters.

23rd Mar 1918. Daylight Saving, Arrival of “Summer Time”

DAYLIGHT SAVING.
ARRIVAL OF “ SUMMER TIME.”

We remind our readers that after midnight on Saturday, March 23rd, [?] on Sunday, March 24th, they must but their clocks FORWARD one hour.

It may for convenience be done when going to bed on Saturday night.

The period of saving has been extended this year five weeks, and will terminate on Sept. 29.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Cadet C Wright, son of Mr E Wright, of Long Lawford, who was sent home in July last (while on active service in France) for a commission, has been gazetted Second-Lieutenant in the 4th Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regt.

FOOD PARCELS OR MONEY FOR SOLDIERS AT THE FRONT.
SYMPATHY FOR DEAR FRIENDS AT HOME.

A letter which has a bearing on this subject comes from a Rugbeian in an Artillery Regiment on the Western Front. He writes :—

“ How good of you to send us a P.O. I happened to be ‘ stoney broke,’ and we had a feed that night. We can get things at our canteen very cheap. Can get a brand of tobacco for 5d per ounce which costs at home 8½d. I see you are all on the ration system in England. We live extremely well, and begin to feel sorry for all our dear friends at home having to go so short.”

It will, therefore, be seen that, as far as the Western Front is concerned, plenty of food can be procured, provided the men have the money. But in Egypt, and Mesopotamia it is probable that parcels of suitable food which will not suffer from climatic conditions will be more useful.

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT.

Thursday, March 14th. Present : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), L Loverock, T A Wise, W H Linnell, and W A Stevenson. Mr H P Highton was the National Service representative.

The case of a jersey manufacturer (31) was again considered.—The case had been adjourned for the man to be examined by the Volunteer Corps doctor. He had not received notice to submit to this examination, however ; and even if he was passed fit, he would not now be able to attend the drills, because since the case was last heard his wife had died, and he had one to look after his house. He was making Cardigan jackets for the War Office, and he had not done any civilian work since May. He had not tried to get a protection he thought it fairer to leave for the Tribunal to decide.—The case was further adjourned, and Mr Morson was directed to communicate with Capt C H Fuller. The man was also advised to approach the War Office with a view to obtaining protection.

Other results were :—Clerk, 23, single, B3, June 15th, and advised either to get work in a munitions factory as a clerk or on the land. Fruiterer, 41, married, June 1st, on condition that he took up work of national importance for three days a week. July 15th plumber, married, and wholesale grocer, 40 married. July 1st, blacksmith’s doorman, 33, married, and accountant clerk, 41, single. June 1st, church caretaker, 42, married, and printer’s machinist.

THE NEW SYSTEM OF ALLOCATING MEAT SUPPLIES.
A GILBERTIAN SITUATION.

At a Meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday afternoon a resolution was passed protesting against the new system of allocating stock to butchers by which the stock in a market is divided out amongst the whole of the towns in the scheduled area which are represented at the market. As a result of this system the Rugby butchers must attend every market in Warwickshire, Worcestershire, Staffordshire, Herefordshire, and Shropshire before applying to the deputy meat agent for a further supply to make up their quota—a proceeding denounced by several members as wasteful and ridiculous.

(A report of the discussion will appear next week.)

THE PRIME MINISTER AND POTATOES.
APPEAL FOR A MILLION MORE ACRES.

A letter has been issued from 10 Downing Street for publication in the Press. It says :—“ I desire to impress upon all farmers and small growers the vital importance of increasing, to the utmost extent possible, the supply of potatoes this year. There is no crop under existing war conditions which can compare with it in importance as a food for either man or beast, and it would be quite impossible to plant too many potatoes this spring. . . . If we can get a million acres under potatoes in Great Britain this year the food situation will be safe, and farmers will have rendered an immense service to their country. The grower is in the front line of the fight against the submarine. He can defeat it if he chooses, but victory depends on his action and exertions during the next few weeks.—D LLOYD GEORGE.

THE DUNCHURCH ESTATE AGAIN ON THE MARKET.

Messrs May & Rowden, of London, in conjunction with Messrs James Styles & Whitlock, of Rugby, announce that they will sell by auction in June various portions of this property, extending to about 4,550 acres, including the whole of the parishes of Church Lawford and Kings Newnham and a portion of Dunchurch parish.

DEATHS.

MEREDITH.—November 20th, 1917, killed in action near Cambrai, OWEN WATKIN WYNN HARDINGE MEREDITH, 2nd Lieut. R.F.C., aged 24, the only and beloved child of the late Ven. Thomas Meredith, M.A., Vicar of Wolston and Archdeacon of Singapore, and of Mrs. Meredith, Park Road, Leamington.

IN MEMORIAM.

CHEDGEY.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. PERCY JAMES CHEDGEY, Bitteswell, Lutterworth, who gave his life for his country in France on March 22, 1917.
“ To live in the hearts those we love is not to die.”

DODSON.—In loving of our dear son, Rifleman WILLIAM DODSON, who died of wounds, March 24th, 1915.
“ We loved him—oh ! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him, and how well.
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he lies in a hero’s grave.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, Brothers, & Sister.

FOX.—In memory of our dearly loved son, NORMAN H. FOX, killed in action, March 21st, 1915.
—From Father and Mother, who loved him better than life.

HADDON.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. C. F. HADDON, of the Winnipeg Rifles, who was killed at Vimy Ridge on March 29, 1917.—Not forgotten by loved ones at home.

LEESON.—In loving memory of our two dear lads, ALBERT (Bert), killed in action, March 20, 1917, and FRED ( Bob), missing since September 25, 1915.
“ Two of the best that God could send — Loving sons and faithful friends.”
—From Father, Mother, Brothers, Sister, & Hilda.

LANGHAM.—In loving memory of HAROLD F LANGHAM, who died of wounds in France on March 23, 1917.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from his friends who loved him best,
in a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father, Brother and Sister.

MONTGOMERY.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, HERBERT MONTGOMERY, of 6 Oak Terrace, who was killed in Egypt on March 27, 1917.
“ A light from our household is gone.
A voice that we loved is stilled ;
A place is vacant in our home
Which never can be filled.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and Children.

SALISBURY.—In ever loving memory of WILFRID, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Salisbury, 17 Clifton Road, who was killed while mine sweeping on March 25th, 1917.
“ A light has from our pathway gone,
A voice we loved is stilled ;
A place is vacant in our hearts
Which can never be filled.”
—From Father, Mother, Brothers, & Sister.

 

8th Dec 1917. Using Potatoes to Save Bread

USING POTATOES TO SAVE BREAD.

Sir Arthur Yapp, the Director of Food Economy, is anxious that the present very large surplus stock of potatoes and vegetables should be utilised in all private houses, and also in hotels, restaurants, and other public eating places, in such a way as to save bread.

It has been brought to his notice that in many public eating places the charge for a portion of potatoes and other vegetables is so relatively high as to encourage people to order bread instead. This is very much against the national interest at present, and Sir Arthur Yapp desires it to be clearly understood that he expects the management of all public eating places to alter their arrangements accordingly.

It is stated that it is still quite common for meat, eggs, etc, to be served on toast or bread. This practice should be immediately discontinued, and the use of bread should be discouraged in every way possible, so long as potatoes and other vegetables are abundant.

In particular, it is most if desirable that in all public eating places as little bread as possible should be served at lunch and dinner when potatoes and other vegetables are available in abundance, as at present.

Sir Arthur Yapp urges the public to give their full support to these recommendations, as this is of great importance in utilising the national food supply to the utmost advantage.

NOW TO OBTAIN SUGAR.
A NEW PROCEDURE.

It is important to remember that after December 31st you can only obtain sugar by one of the following systems ; that you can only use the system which applies to your particular case :—

A.—THE HOUSEHOLD SYSTEM.—If you have already deposited with your grocer a household sugar card, and if you are still a member of the same household, you must go to your grocer after December 8th and ask for Declaration Forms. When you have filled these up your grocer will give you a Retailers Sugar Ticket for each member of the household, which must be shown when buying sugar after December 31st.

B.—THE COUPON SYSTEM.—If you have not registered with your grocer on a Household Sugar Card, or if you have left the household from which you were registered, you must go to a Post Office before December 15th, ask for an application form, fill it up, and post it as directed. You will later receive a Ration Paper, which will entitle you to get Sugar Coupons from a Post Office.

AN ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Monday —before Mr J E Cox—Corporal Charles Hammett, of Long Lawford, was charged with being an absentee from the Agricultural Company.—P.C Hunt gave evidence of arrest and defendant was remanded to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr A Marsh, 15 Little Elborow Street, Rugby, has received intimation that his son, Pte A Marsh (24) of Leicesters, was killed in action on November 2nd ; and that another son, Pte G W Marsh, of the Warwicks, was posted as missing on October 26th. The former was, before joining up, employed as a labourer by the late Mr W C Musgrave, and the latter worked for J Young, builder. Both were Murray school boy.

Mrs Bennett, 1 Hillmorton Road, has kindly forwarded to the funds of the Rugby War Hospital Supply Depot the sum of £3, the proceeds of her chrysanthemum show on November 21-24.

A SON OF THE VICAR OF GRANDBOROUGH KILLED.

The Rev John Martin, vicar of Grandborough, has just received the sad news of the death in France of his second son, Second-Lieut F H Martin, R.E, 84th Field Company. The Commanding Officer writes : “ He was shot by a German sniper whilst setting out a new piece of engineering work behind our front line. It is a consolation that he did not suffer, as he was killed instantly. He was interred by the Rev P H Hargreaves, C.F, in a military cemetery near Gonzeancourt. He had only been a very short time with the 84th Field Company. I can assure you that all the officers and men realise what a really excellent fellow he was, and we all feel we have lost a good comrade and an extremely valuable officer.” Second-Lieut F H Martin is brother of Capt C G Martin, V.C, D.S.O, R.E, and had only a few months since come home from Egypt, where he was engaged in engineering work for the Egyptian Government, to offer himself to the War Office for military service. After a few months at Newark, he left for the front in September last. He had given a few months to military work near the Suez Canal, where he was employed in laying down pipes to carry fresh water from the Canal into the desert for 21 miles. He has another brother in the R.A.M.C, who is now in India. Second-Lieut F H Martin was born in China in 1888. He was educated in Bath and Clifton College (while at Clifton he was captain of the Cricket XI). and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He had passed the examination for the I.C.E.

THE LATE CAPT FRANK NEVILLE.

Mrs T Neville of Rugby, whose son, Capt Frank Neville, was killed in action, as recorded in our last issue, has received a sympathetic letter from the Colonel commanding the battalion. He writes : “ I much regret that I should have been home on leave when this great loss happened to my battalion. It is difficult for me to express what your son was to the battalion ; he was a very exceptional soldier—in fact, during over two years of service in France I have not met his equal as a company commander ; and had he lived I should certainly have recommended him for rapid advancement. As a man he was loved by every man in the regiment. I, as battalion commander, was immensely proud of him, for he was a grand figure of a man and the most cheery of comrades. He overcame all difficulties with a laugh. You may be a proud mother to have had such a son. May you do as he would have wished, and bear bravely your great loss.”

DUNCHURCH.

NEWS was received on Tuesday that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of this village.

MR & MRS GAMBLE DAVIS, Mill Street, have received news that their son, Percy, has gone through a second operation, and is getting on well. He is a prisoner in Germany.

MR & MRS J BULL, Mill Street, have received news that their son has been wound in Palestine. This is the second time.

BRANDON.

PTE G BOSTOCK MISSING.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock, of Brandon, have been notified that their eldest son, Pte G Bostock, is missing. He had been in France for a long time. His parents have resided in the district all their lives.

FRANKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mrs Doyle has received the sad news that her youngest son, Pte W Doyle, Q.O.O.H, was killed in France. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved mother, this being the second son she has lost in the War. One brother is now at home wounded, and the fourth son is in Egypt. A memorial service was held on Sunday afternoon, when the Rector (Rev C Lunn) gave a sympathetic address. The Rev H F B Shuckburgh read the lessons. There was a large congregation.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT OWEN W W W MEREDITH MISSING.—Mrs Meredith, late of Wolston Vicarage, has received news that her son is missing. He had been in France for some short time, and was attached to the Royal Flying Corps. While residing in Wolston his cheerful disposition and amiable manner made him very popular. He is the only son of Mrs Meredith, who now resides at Leamington and the late Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, for upwards of seven years Vicar of Wolston.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory WILFRED JOSEPH (BILL), who was killed in France, November 11th, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave,
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MAYES.—In fond and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, who died of wounds received in action in France at the General Hospital, Bristol, December 6th, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ A devoted son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered Duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
“ Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which that smile hides all the while.
“ Gone but not forgotten—
Oh no ! not one so dear.
He is gone to his home in heaven,
And with a smile we will meet him there.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.