27th Jul 1918. Rugby and District Food Control Committee

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

A meeting of this committee was held on Thursday afternoon last week, when there were present : Messrs T A Wise (chairman), H Tarbox (vice-chairman), Mrs Dewar, Mrs Shelley, Mrs Townsend, Messrs G Cooke, C Gay, J Cripps, A Humphrey, R Griffin, T Ewart, and J H Mellor.

The Chairman referred to the suggestion made by the Rugby Magistrates that the committee should provide price lists, and charge retailers a small sum for them and the Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) was directed to write to the Commissioner for advise on the question,

Mr T E Smart, the representative of the Crick Rural Council, wrote stating that, as he had taken up land work under Sir Auckland Geddes’ scheme for men over 45, he wished to resign his position on the committee.—The Chairman expressed regret at this announcement and a cordial vote of thanks was. accorded Mr Smart for his past services.

At a recent meeting the Executive Officer was instructed to offer three cheeses which had been surrendered to the committee to the local hospitals, but only one hospital required one, and he asked for instructions regarding the other two.—It was decided to let the Institution have half a cheese, and the remainder is to be distributed by the Rugby Housewives Committee.

The Executive Officer reported that he had written to the Commissioner with reference to the frozen meat recently condemned by the local Medical Officer of Health. The Assistant Commissioner had replied that an effort was made to ensure that all frozen meat was inspected before being despatched from Birmingham. Since July 3rd the inspection had been made more thorough, and such an occurrence was less likely to happen in the future.

Mr Ewart reported that the potatoes purchased by a Yelvertoft baker for bread-making were absolutely unfit for use, and he suggested that permission should be obtained to dispose of them for pig food at the earliest opportunity. Several of the potatoes were produced, some of the samples having more than a dozen sprouts 3 or 4 inches long.—It was stated that application had been made for the purchaser to be compensated and this action was endorsed.

The Chairman stated that about a month ago the Executive Officer and his staff were accused of showing partiality in the distribution of sugar for jam. He (the Chairman) expressed his belief at the time that the charges were unfounded ; but the matter was referred to the Rationing Committee, and the person who made the accusations was asked to attend their meeting and to give the names of persons who he alleged had been improperly supplied with sugar. He declined to give any names, but he mentioned several specific instances where sugar was improperly allotted. These cases were investigated, and the committee was absolutely satisfied that there was no ground for the accusation, but that the allotment had been made in strict conformity with the scale and the details on the application forms. He accordingly wrote to the man asking him to withdraw the statements he had made, but so far no reply had been received.

The Foleshill Committee wrote asking the Council for support for a resolution protesting against the issuing of jam to enemy prisoners of war in view of the seriously restricted supplies.—The Chairman said Earl Stanhope recently stated in the House of Lords that only 1oz of jam per week was issued to each prisoner, and it seemed absurd to protest against such a small quantity.—No action was taken.

An application from the Chester Street canteen for 1cwt of sugar for making jam was granted.

Several applications for leave to change retailers were considered, as exceptional hardship was involved, and were granted.—The Executive Officer stated that about 20 people applied for such forms daily, but he refused to issue them because the applications were now too late.—Mr Gay enquired whether the resolution passed by the committee, in which they stated their determination not to consider any application received after July 6th, prohibited them from considering such claims in the future.—The Chairman : We have already broken that rule to-day.—Mr Mellor contended that that resolution referred to the block transfers, and had nothing to do with the individual applications, which should be dealt with in the usual way. He knew a young couple, who were registered at different shops, who were getting married, and he asked if a transfer would be allowed in such cases ?—The Chairman : It would be only common sense to grant such an application.—Mr Mellor : Common sense may enter into other applications also.—Mr Gay suggested that the Executive Officer should be instructed to issue forms to anyone who had a sufficiently strong case.—It was pointed out that it was only a week since a number of changes were sanctioned ; and Mr Humphrey expressed the hope that no more changes would be sanctioned until the present registrations had been completed.—It was decided that no further application should be considered, except on very strong grounds, for two months.

It was decided to grant permission to the Prioress of Princethorpe to receive a side of baron and a ham from America on condition that the rationing regulations were adhered to.

The committee expressed satisfaction with the way in which the Enforcement Officer did his work, and decided to support his application for exemption from military service.

FOOD FOR UTILITY POULTRY.

The Minister of Food is releasing a quantity of poultry food which is to be rationed by means of committees throughout the country for the use of poultry of approved utility breeds. Those who desire to participate in the supply should note that their applications must be sent in by to-day, Saturday, July 27th.

Forms of application can be obtained from Mr P J McMicken, of 24 Acacia Grove, Rugby, who has been appointed poultry officer for No. 1 Area of Warwickshire and will be pleased to give all information.

WHITER BREAD.—Flour which will be put on the market shortly will provide lighter bread consequent on a further reduction in the percentage of extraction from the grain. The Wheat Commission is releasing more imported flour, which may be mixed with the G.R article to the extent of 20 per cent.

HAM & BACON TO BE COUPON FREE.

On and after to-morrow (Sunday, July 28), ham and bacon is to be sold without coupon, but it must be obtained from the retailer with whom the consumer is registered.

Each person will be entitled to not less than 8ozs. of bacon and 12ozs. of ham per week if demanded.

Supplementary ration books will cease to be available, and further instructions will be issued as to their future disposal.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte A S Horswill, son of Mr C H Horswill, of 48 Craven Road, who was reported missing twelve months ago, is now presumed to have been killed. He was an old Elborow boy, and for a time was a teacher on the Murray School staff, but at the time of his enlistment he was engaged at a school in Coventry. Besides being a talented teacher, he was a musician of considerable ability.

Pte C H Thatcher, R.W.R, who before joining the Army was employed in the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds, has written from Italy to his mother, who resides at 20 Dale Street, as under :—“ You will have seen by the papers that we have been in again. It was a terrible time for the Austrians and for us. We defeated them after hard fighting, and they lost thousands of men. Our battalion captured about 500 prisoners. They (the Austrians) thought it was going to be a ‘ cake walk,’ but we were there waiting for them. They are rotters for fighting. We have won a very good name in Italy, and they were about five to one against us. The fight was in a big wood on the mountains ; but, thank God, we beat them off. We are the talk of Italy. It was hand-to-hand fighting, and as soon as the Austrians saw who they were fighting they lost all spirit. The Frenchmen fought well, and the Italians also are doing well. Don’t worry—we are winning.”

ANOTHER FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT.

At about 11 o’clock on Thursday morning another fatal aeroplane accident occurred in the Midland area. Col Sparkes, of the Royal Air Force, had just commenced a flight, and when about 500 feet high his machine fell to earth and burst into flames. The heat of the burning machine was so intense that it was some time before helpers could extricate the unfortunate officer, and when they did so he was dead, the lower portion of his body having been terribly burned.

THE BRITISH THOMSON-HOUSTON CO, LTD.
ROLL OF HONOUR.

Mr H C Levis presided at the annual meeting held on Wednesday, July 17th. He said that the past year had imposed exacting demands upon the employees, and he could not speak too highly of their loyal and efficient co-operation. Of the employees who joined the Forces 180 had been killed in action or had died in service; 21 were missing and were believed to have been killed. In addition, 163 had been wounded. 13 were prisoners of war, and one was interned in Holland, making the total list of casualties 378. Of the 121 holding commissions 87 had been promoted from the ranks, 39 had been awarded special honours, 16 were mentioned in despatches, and 11 had been specially commended for services in the field. As stated in the last report, the company proposed to erect a suitable memorial to those who had died in serving their country. Sir C A Coffin, one of the directors and chairman of the Board of the General Electric Company of New York, had been awarded by the French Government the Order of Officer of the Legion of Honour in recognition of his energetic and fruitful work in connection with the French Red Cross and other kindred organisations ; and the Serbian Government, for the same reason, had likewise conferred upon him a similar Order for work in connection with Serbia. Another of the directors, Mr Owen Hugh Smith, for the past three years had given practically his entire time to work for the Ministry of Munitions, and also as one of the emissaries from Great Britain to America in connection with food problems. They welcomed as a valuable addition to the Board Lord Carmichael. They had on hand at the end of the year Exchequer and National War Bonds to the amount of £175,000. It would be interesting if they could make a statement relative to the character of the work they were carrying out. When, after the War, they could speak freely of those matters, he was sure the shareholders would be very well satisfied with what had been accomplished.

RUGBY BOARD Of GUARDIANS.
CAPT T A TOWNSEND.

The Chairman mentioned that Capt T A Townsend, R.A.M.C, son of Mr T S Townsend, had been awarded a bar to his Military Cross for gallantly attending to the wounded of his own and neighbouring units under a heavy concentration at high explosives. The official account of Captain Townsend’s gallantry read.—“ Although twice wounded he refused to have his wounds attended to, and continued to dress the wounded under a continuous and heavy concentration of high-explosive and gas shells. Not only did he attend the wounded and gassed at his own unit, but rendered aid, under conditions at great difficulty, to wounded of neighbouring battalions, whose medical officers had become casualties. His complete disregard at personal danger and splendid devotion were a magnificent example to all.” The Chairman added that they all regretted that Mr Townsend had so far received no further news of his son. The action for which he had received this additional honour added to their knowledge of what a very gallant English gentleman Capt Townsend was. They all prayed that he had been spared, and that before long they would receive the good news that they might see him again, and they would then welcome him with the greatest gratitude for what he had done for his country. To Mr Townsend he would like to say how pleased the Guardians were to read of his son’s honour, and how they hoped that they might hear from Capt Townsend before long, and have the honour of shaking hands with him, for it would be a very real honour to shake hands with a lad who had done so gallantly, so bravely, and so nobly for his country.—Mr Townsend : Thank you, very, very much.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
HERBERT WRIGHT DISCHARGED.—After 20 months’ service, Pte H T Wright, R.W.R. has now received his discharge through ill-health. He served first in Mesopotamia, then in India, from whence he was transferred to hospital in Bloemfontein. While in South Africa he located the grave of Sergt George French, who fell in the Boer War, and has brought home a photograph showing the memorial erected over it. He and his brother, John French, both fought in South Africa, and the latter was killed while on service in France in October last. They are the gallant sons of Mr & Mrs James French, of this village.

WARWICKSHIRE WAR AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE.
RUGBY DISTRICT EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.
Labour Available for Farm Work.

WOMEN OF THE LAND ARMY, with 6 weeks’ training ; 38 Milkers, 38 Carters, and 114 Field Workers, also 171 unskilled Field Workers (14 days’ training). Others will be available as they leave the training centres. Applications should be made to the County Women’s Agricultural Committee (Miss Margesson, Room 43, 3 New Street, Birmingham), or to the local Hon. Secretaries, Lady Patterson, Bilton ; Miss Townsend, Kings Newnham ; or Mrs. Lister-Kaye, Stretton-on-Dunsmore.

WAR AGRICULTURAL VOLUNTEERS, many with agricultural experience, can be obtained on application to the Employment Exchanges.

INTERNED ALIENS. A number of able bodied men can be licensed for work on the land, including men who claim to have experience of agricultural work, or knowledge of motor implements, steam ploughing tackle, &c. Apply to the Labour Officer, 12, Northgate Street, Warwick.

CONCERT BY “THE MASQUERADERS.”

A delightful entertainment was derived from the performance of “The Masqueraders ” Costume Concert Party at the Co-operative Hall on Wednesday evening, when about 800 people were present to support No. 3 R.F.A Cadet Officers from Weedon in their endeavour to raise funds for the Royal Artillery Prisoners of War Fund. During an interval Capt Doherty, who directed the performance, explained that they did not like to come for support to a town which so nobly helped a local Prisoners of War Fund, but their regiment was practically drawn from all over the world; and they, therefore, could not go solely to one district ; £2,200 was required per month to help their unfortunate brethren. The performance was bright and breezy, and the programme well varied. A capable company of ten artistes included Corpl Pollard, who, as Barrie Seddon, has won considerable distinction behind the footlights. As a mirth-provoker he made good in all items, and received able support from the others. Sentimental items formed a prominent part, and none of them was more popular than the duet, “The Battle Eve,” sung by Cadets Burns and Wallis. It was, as the title of the opening and closing choruses suggested. “ some ” show, and was admittedly the best of its kind given in Rugby for a long period. The patrons were very generous in their applause throughout the performance, which lasted upwards at 2½ hours.

HOSPITAL INFLUENZA CURE.—The deaths from influenza that have occurred have been almost invariably cases in which the patents were in a weak condition beforehand, or when the golden rule of at once lying up in bed has been disregarded. All sorts of remedies are popularly recommended. The hospital cure consists of bed, calomel, open windows, and a milk diet.

DEATHS.

KENDRICK.—At Duston War Hospital, Northamptonshire, on the 16th inst. after a short illness (influenza-pneumonia), Private HAROLD KENDRICK, A.O.C, aged 33, beloved husband of Elsie Kendrick, 12 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton.

IN MEMORIAM.

ALLSO.—In loving memory of our dearly-loved son and brother, LANCE-CORPL PERCY ALLSO, who was killed in action in France July 27, 1916, aged 23.
Two years have passed, our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more.
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
—From his loving father, mother, and family.

CRAWFORD.—In loving memory of CLEMENT ERIC CRAWFORD, of the 18th Canadians (late of Clifton-on-Dunsmore), who died of wounds in London July 23rd, 1917.
No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost their dear ones
Without one last farewell.
Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears of silence often flow
When we think of the loss of our dear one
Just a year ago.
—From Mother, Dad, Brothers, and Sisters.

DICKEN.—In ever-loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, who died of wounds in France on July 20, 1916 ; aged 23 years.—“ We loved him in life, let us never forget him in death.”—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters, Brothers, and Elsie.

DUNKLEY.—In ever-loving memory of our dear sons, PERCY and HARRY, killed “ somewhere in France ” on July 25, 1916, and July 30, 1916.
“ No one knows the silent heartaches,
Only those can tell
Who have lost their loved and dearest
Without saying ‘ Farewell.’”
—From their loving Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

HART-DAVIES.—Killed in an aeroplane accident on July 27, 1917, IVAN B. HART-DAVIES, Lieut. R.F.C. Always remembered by his old office staff, 3 Albert St.

HART-DAVIES.—In memory at LIEUT IVAN BEUCLERK HART-DAVIES, killed in aeroplane mishap at Northolt July 27th, 1917.—From old boys of 1st Rugby Troop, B.P. Boy Scouts, at home and abroad.

LEA.—In loving memory of Pte. EDWARD CROFTS LEA, 16th Warwicks, eldest son of the late James E. Lea, Denbigh Arm, Monks Kirby, killed in action in France on July 30, 1917.

PARNELL.—In loving memory of Corpl. JAMES PARNELL, 11th R.W.R., who was killed in action in France on July 23, 1917.
“ We do not forget him, nor do we intend ;
We think of him daily, and will to the end.
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—From his loving Mother, Sisters and Brother, and Alice.

SPENCER.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Signaller J B SPENCER (JIM), 11th R.W.R., killed in action July 22nd, 1917. “ In the midst of life we are in death.”—Always in the thoughts of his loving Mother, Father, and Brothers.

WAKELIN.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. C. H. WAKELIN, who was killed in action in France on July 26, 1917 ; aged 26 years.
“ His King and country called him,
The call was not in vain ;
On Britain’s roll of honour
You will find our loved one’s name.
We think of him in silence,
No eyes may see us weep ;
But ever deep within our hearts
His memory we’ll ever keep.”
—From his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brother.

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20th Jul 1918. Obtaining Sugar by False Statements

OBTAINING SUGAR BY FALSE STATEMENTS.

Frank Nightingale, clerk, 20 Essex Street, Rugby, was summoned for making a false statement for the purpose of obtaining sugar for preserving fruit.—He pleaded not guilty.—Mr Reddish, for the prosecution, stated that defendant applied for sugar for preserving fruit grown by himself, and signed a declaration to the effect that he estimated that he would have 20lbs of soft fruit and 30lbs of hard fruit, in consequence of which he was allotted 10lbs of sugar for the former and 14lbs for the latter. On July 1st Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) called at defendant’s house and asked to see the fruit trees, in respect of which he had made the application. Defendant replied that he had twelve gooseberry trees and eight or ten currant trees, also some vegetable marrows. He added that the trees were not there, but on his allotment in Newbold Road. The Enforcement Officer asked when he could go to inspect the trees, and defendant replied, “ Not this evening, as I am due at a meeting shortly.” An appointment was made for the following evening, and when Mr Purchase kept the appointment defendant informed him that he had sent a letter on the matter to the office. This letter was to the effect that his application was not strictly in accordance with the regulations ; the trees were his own property, but were not on his own ground. He purchased them last July from Mr Allfrey, and they were still at Radford, near Leamington, unless they had been removed. He was prepared to surrender the permit for 14lbs of sugar which had not been used, and regretted that he had misled the committee, but his claim was perfectly just, as he would have sufficient soft fruit to use up more than the 10lbs of sugar. He had intended to plant the trees—twelve gooseberry and eight or nine currant in his allotment, but owing to delay in obtaining the land it was impossible to plant them in time. He therefore decided to leave them until the autumn, and was paying the person on whose land the trees were a small sum for the convenience. He was willing to surrender the permit for 14lbs, and suggested that he should be allowed to use the remainder. On July 4th Mr Nightingale wrote another letter to the committee, stating that he had a number of raspberry canes and currant trees in his garden which in a normal year would have yielded 20lbs of fruit ; and he therefore, claimed that his application was not a contravention of the order. The yield of the trees was 5lbs, and he asked that his application should be reduced by 75 per cent. In consequence of this letter, Mr Purchase called to see the trees, and found 14 raspberry canes, looking very sick, and which he estimated might yield 2lbs, and one red currant tree, which might yield 1ld. He asked Mr Nightingale about his Radford trees, and defendant then said he had purposely given a wrong name. He still persisted in saying that he owned the trees, but said he would not disclose the name of the person from whom he bought them. Other circumstances had arisen, as a result of which he refused to give any further names, but would take the whole responsibility himself.—Mr Reddish pointed out that the letter of July 4th was not signed, whereupon defendant signed it in Court.

After Messrs Burton and Purchase had given evidence, Defendant deposed that the declaration he made was perfectly true. The trees owned by himself, but which were not actually on the land which he was cultivating, did not enter into the question, as they had nothing to do with the statement he signed on April 3rd, because he included rhubarb and marrows in his estimate.—Mr Burton pointed out that it was not until after the application forms had been sent in that the committee decided to include rhubarb and marrows. Continuing, defendant said he had 10 pairs of raspberry canes and four single canes in his house garden, and he estimated that they would yield 15lbs of fruit, and that the currant tree would yield 5lbs.—Mr Reddish pointed out that the committee did not know which of defendant’s statements to believe.—Defendant : I actually own the trees in the neighbourhood of Leamington, but the name of the man bought them from was not Allfrey.—Mr Reddish : Don’t you see that the effect of that statement was that Mr Purchase could not investigate the facts ?—A : Yes.—The Chairman : Can’t you give the name now ?—A : No—for a particular reason.—The Chairman : It all goes against you ?—A : Unfortunately it does. I am aware of that.—The Chairman : You have been guilty of a very deliberate fraud, and we fine you £10.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Practically everyone in this district has now received his or her ration book, and those which have not yet been delivered belong for the most part, to those persons who omitted to fill in the address on the application form. It was hoped that the work of despatching the books would be completed on Saturday last, and the failure to do this is in no way attributable to Mr J T Clarke and his staff of voluntary helpers, but rather to the carelessness of the general public, no fewer than 2,800 forms having to be sent back for corrections, in addition to upwards of 600 which contained no address. By the middle of the present week about 400 of these persons had been traced, but there were still about 200 cards waiting to be despatched.

Some idea of the magnitude of the task involved in the distribution of the books may be gleaned from the fact that between 45,000 and 46,000 books have been despatched to about 12,000 households, and that the most assiduous worker cannot average more than eleven sets of books per hour. Valuable assistance in the work has been lent by squads of boys from Rugby School and the Lower School and a number of ladies. Some of the elementary school teachers seized the opportunity to assist which was afforded by the closing of the schools through influenza.

Under the new scheme three coupons instead of two can be used for butchers’ meat, but the value of each coupon has been reduced from 8d to 7d. The coupons marked a/a, b/b, and c/c are available for butchers’ meat ; but the fourth, marked d/d, can only be used for bacon, poultry, tinned meat, &c ; 8ozs of bacon with bone or 7ozs without bone can be obtained with each coupon.

The values of the other coupons are :—Sugar, 8ozs per coupon ; butter, 4ozs per coupon ; margarine, 5ozs per coupon ; lard, 2ozs per coupon. Tea will be obtainable without the production of coupons, but only from the dealer with whom the person is registered. Retailers have received instructions not to allow more than 2ozs per head per week.

NO RATIONING OF BREAD.—One of the spare pages in the new ration books was originally intended for the rationing of bread, but it is now considered extremely unlikely that this will come into force. “ One can almost say with certainty,” said an official at the Ministry of Food on Saturday, “ that bread will not be rationed this year.”

RUGBY SCHOOL FARMING SQUADS.

With the approach of the end of the term the accounts of the above have just been closed and show that during the course of the last twelve weeks 183 squads (averaging about eight members to a squad) have gone out to assist the neighbouring farmers. In the month of May the squads planted about 80 acres at potatoes ; later on they spudded or hoed shout 280 acres of corn-land. and lately they have assisted in harvesting about 145 acres of hay, as regards about half of this acreage doing all the work themselves with the exception of rick-building. Payment in the case of only one squad out of the 183 has been cancelled by agreement on the score of careless work, and this record reflects much credit on the squad leaders.

The earnings total up to £167. The expenses come to £27, including purchase and repair of tools £8, and extra rations of tea and cake or bread £14. The balance of about £140 has been voted by the squads to the following objects : Hospital of St Cross £25, Rugby Prisoners of War £25, Mine-sweepers’ Fund £20, St Dunstan’s £20, Y.M.C.A. £15, Blue Cross £5, Serbian Relief £5. £25 is reserved as a guarantee against loss on the Holiday Farming Camp, but if this contingency does not arise the sum is ear-marked for the Home Mission of the School.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut J L Griffin, 2nd Hampshires, has been awarded the Military Cross. Lieut Griffin was in the office of the late Lieut Ivan B Hart-Davies, Rugby.

Lance-Corpl F H Bert Warden, Royal Warwicks, who was posted as missing on August 27th last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was a member of “ E ” Company at the outbreak of war, and went to France in March, 1915. For 18 months previous to his death he was a Lewis gunner, and had been recommended for a commission. He had been wounded four times previously. He was 20 years of age, and the younger son of the late Mr Edward Warden, who was for many years on the staff of the “ Midland Times.”

A FAMILY RECORD.

Pte A J Bennett, R.W.R, son of Mr T Bennett, of 8 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, has been severely wounded in the leg and feet. He is 18 years of age, and had only been in France a month when he received his wounds. Three of his elder brothers are serving. The eldest—Driver C H Bennett, A.S.C—was wounded during the Retreat from Mons, and has recently been invalided home from Salonika. The second—Pte W E Bennett, Welsh Fusiliers—has been wounded twice, and is still in hospital ; while the fourth—Pte A V Bennett, R.W.R—is serving in Mesopotamia, and was recently a patient in hospital suffering from a fractured knee.

BRETFORD.
PTE WM CLARKE MISSING.—Mrs Clarke has been informed that her husband has been missing since March 26th. He had been in France some length of time. He joined the Warwicks under Lord Derby’s scheme more than two years ago, and was later transferred to the Oxford and Bucks L.I. He had two bad attacks of dysentry, and on one occasion was sent home. Before the War he had been employed in the Celluloid Department of Messrs Bluemel’s (Ltd) at Wolston for 14 years. He has four children, and the youngest is only a few weeks old. Much sympathy is felt for his wife and family. At one time he proved an excellent bowler in many matches for the Brandon and Wolston Cricket Club. He has two more brothers on active service.

BOIURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
MILITARY MEDAL.—Major-General C R R McGregor in charge of Administration Southern Command, presented about 90 medals to soldiers at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Edgbaston, on Tuesday, July 9th. Pte F Loach, of this village, was presented with the Military Medal and bar. It was when he won the bar to his medal that he received the wound which caused him to be discharged from the Army.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PRISONER OF WAR.—Pte F J Sinclair, who in last week’s issue was reported missing, has now written home saying he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
WOUNDED.—News is to hand that Pte Percival Russell, R.W.R, who is attached to the British contingent off the Italian front, has been injured in the eyes and face from the effects of a bomb explosion. Pte Russell had located an Austrian outpost, and was witnessing its destruction by our bombers, and being in too close proximity, some of the splinters reached him and inflicted the injury he sustained.

LOCAL VOLUNTEER NOTES.

The King has been graciously pleased to sanction the use of the title, “ Volunteer Battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment,” for the Battalions of this Volunteer Force in Warwickshire, and of which the Rugby Volunteers form “ B ” Company of the 2nd Battalion.

“ B ” Company (Rugby) of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, R.W Regiment, met Rugby School O.T.C in a shooting match on the Clifton range last week, in which the O.T.C scored a total of 427 points against 392 by the Volunteers. Scores :—O.T.C : Second-Lieut Juts, 63 ; Sergt Bourne, 57 ; Corpl Roberts, 53 ; Sergt Kerr, 52 ; Lance-Corpl Berendt, 52 ; Pte Weinberg, 51 ; Sergt Nisbet, 50 ; Corpl Finch, 49. “ B ” Company : Q.M.S Alderson, 55 ; Pte Edwards, 54 ; Lance-Corpl Pywitt, 54 ; Sergt Murray, 49 ; Corpl Seymour, 49 ; Corpl Batchelor, 47 ; Lance-Corpl Burton, 42 ; Pte Mochrie, 42.

THE MASQUERADERS’ COSTUME CONCERT PARTY are giving a performance in the Co-operative Hall on Wednesday, July 24th, in aid of the Royal Artillery Prisoners of War Fund. This party is composed of officers, cadets, N.C.O’s, and members of the Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps of the No. 3 R.F.A Cadet Officers’ School, Weedon, who, in their spare time, are endeavouring to assist various war funds and charities. The Masqueraders have met with considerable success at the various places they have visited, and an enjoyable evening’s entertainment is guaranteed to all who patronise this performance. For full particulars see advt.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,—Local munition factories are hard put to it for timber among other materials, and recently the absence of common packing timber seriously delayed the despatch of important Admiralty munitions which were being telegraphed for. What a contrast to see within a few miles of Rugby thousands of pounds being expended in materials and labour, including much timber, on a house apparently intended for private occupation solely. Are Government permits responsible for such a strange diversion of effort and material ? In any event, the facts are as stated.—Your obedient servant,
July 16th.
“ RUGBY.”

RUGBY URBAN TRIBUNAL.

THE POSITION OF RUSSIAN-JEWS.
An interesting question was raised by the application of a master tailor (38, married).—On behalf of applicant Mr Eaden said his client was a Russian-Jew. Three years ago he applied for naturalisation, but this was not granted. He was born in Ukrania, and under the Military Service Act he was not liable for service ; but under the Military Service Allies Convention Act, 1917, mutual arrangements were come to between the Allied States, by which such men became liable for service if they remained in the country. Since the passing of this Act, owing to the disruption in Russia, the various States in that Empire, including Ukrania, had broken away and had formed self governing countries. The contention now was that this man did not come under either of the Acts cited, and that he was a free person to go his own way. This point had been fought out before Tribunals and the Police Court, and 47 Russian-Jews in Birmingham, Coventry, and Rugby were involved. When these men were taken to the Police Court as absentees it was the practice to adjourn the cases sine die until after a decision was given in the High Court in the test case of Wolf Cohen, of Coventry. For this reason he asked for exemption until the question was definitely settled.—Mr Hoper said the official instructions were that Russians were to be recruited.—Mr Eaden said if this was done his client would stand in with the others mentioned as the subject of an independent State.—Mr Hoper : The British Government do not recognise these different divisions. There is only one Government as far as we know officially.—Mr Wise said, in view of the fact that a case pending in the High Court, it would be practically impossible for a Bench to convict a man as an absentee until the decision was given.—The case was adjourned for 28 days.

DEATHS.

KENDRICK.—At Duston War Hospital, Northampton, on the 16th inst, from pneumonia, Private HAROLD KENDRICK, A.S.C., aged 33. eldest son of Harry and Elizabeth Kendrick, of 14 Warwick Street, Rugby.

NEALE.—On July 11th, 1918, in Hospital at Dover, after a very short illness, Pte. E. J. NEALE, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Neale, of Burton Dassett, age 25 years.
God took our loved one from our home,
But never from our hearts.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.
No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost their loved and dearest
Without saying “ Farewell.”
—Sadly missed by a loving wife, mother, father, brother, and sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVENPORT.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Gunner W. E. DAVENPORT, killed in action July 18, 1916.
“ Somewhere in France our dear son sleeps :
A hero laid to rest.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Father, and Sisters (Harborough Magna).

DICKEN.— In ever loving memory of Lce-Corpl S. H. DICKEN, who died of wounds in France, July 20th, 1916.
If God should call us to resign,
What most we prized it ne’er was mine ;
We only yield Thee what is Thine,
Thy will be done.
—Fondly remembered by brother and sister, Will and Amy.

HIPWELL.— In ever-loving memory of our dear son, Pte. JOHN HIPWELL, Lilbourne, who died of wounds received in action in France on July 23, 1916. Interred in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt, south-west of Albert.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He served his King and country :
God knows he did his best ;
But now he sleeps in Jesus, a soldier laid to rest.
He sleeps beside his comrades
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.”
—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers.

LENTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. W. LENTON, who died from wounds in France, July 19th, 1916. Ever remembered by Erne and Ethel, 64 Wood Street, Rugby.

LENTON.— In proud and loving memory of WILL, dearly loved son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Lenton, who died in France July 19th, 1916.—Ever in the thoughts of Tom, Ma, and Family.

SMITH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. S W. E. SMITH, Royal Fusiliers, killed in action at Beaumont Hamel on July 21, 1916.

WAREING.— In loving memory of Pte. STANLEY WAREING, 10th Warwickshire Regt., aged 18 years. Only dearly-beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. James Wareing, Lilboune Farm, killed somewhere in France, July 23rd. 1916.
Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you,
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.
From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, & Uncle.

 

13th Jul 1918. Rugby Soldier Honoured.

RUGBY SOLDIER HONOURED.

Sergt A Neal, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery has been awarded the Croce di Guerra for gallantry under shell fire with the Italian Army, and was decorated by the King of Italy on June 7th. On March 19 & 20, when the Battery was subjected to heavy shell fire, he set a fine example to all ranks by his calm behaviour and total disregard of danger. On May 20th he was N C.O in charge of a party making a dump in No Man’s Land. The party worked under continuous shell fire, and under most adverse conditions Sergt Neal again set a splendid example. He is a native of Hillmorton, and was employed as a fitter at the B.T. H. His wife lives at 12 King Edward Road.

RUGBY MILITARY MEDALIST MARRIED.—Much interest was taken in the wedding which took place at the Baptist Church, Rugby, on Wednesday, of Corpl J R Mayes, Royal Berks, son of Mr & Mrs J Mayes, of South Street, and Miss Ethel Davison, daughter of Mr & Mrs T Davison, of Acacia Grove. The bridegroom was formerly a staff-sergeant in the Boys’ Life Brigade, the members of which formed a guard of honour at the ceremony. His ambulance training with the brigade helped the bridegroom to win the coveted medal, for he gained it by going out under heavy fire, dressing the wounds of his comrades, and bringing them to safety. He has been since wounded twice, and also gassed. There was a large congregation at the ceremony, which was performed by the Pastor, the Rev J H Lees. Two hymns were sung, and Mr Harris (the organist) played the “ Wedding March.” The bride was given away by her father, and Misses Winnie and Jessie Davison (sisters) and Miss Katherine Mayes (sister of the bridegroom) attended as bridesmaids. Mr Mitchell, of Kilsby, was best man. Amongst the presents was a silver egg cruet, given by the Boys’ Life Brigade.

THE amount realised by the sale of War Bonds in Rugby for the week ended July 6th was £71,750, making a total for 40 weeks £293,305.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl R Robinson (Rugby), of the Queens Royal West Surrey Regiment, has been reported missing.

Mr A D Stocks, formerly of Misterton, near Lutterworth, and in recent years articled to Messrs Seabroke & Son, solicitors, of Rugby, has received a commission in the Coldstream Guards, and is now stationed at Windsor. Mr Stocks is widely known in the Midlands as a hockey player of international fame, and also in cricket circles.

Capt A D Stoop (O.B), the Queen’s, the famous English Rugby international football player, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Capt J C Palmer, 22nd Rifle Brigade, Balkans, formerly Second-Lieutenant, Accrington Pals Battalion, and Corporal, 9th Hast Surrey Regiment, has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished services in the field. He is the eldest son of Supt J T Palmer, Church, Lancashire, and grandson of the late ex-Supt Palmer, Rugby, and has served in Egypt, France, and the Balkans.

The death is announced, as the result of a flying accident, of Lieut Raymond Coape-Arnold, sixth and youngest son of Mr & Mrs H J F Coape-Arnold, formerly of Wolvey Hall. His machine came to grief through a side-slip. The deceased, who was an officer of considerable promise, was 26 years of age, and after completing his education he visited various parts of the world, including Canada and South Africa. On the outbreak of war he joined the South Staffordshire Regiment, and became a commissioned officer in November, 1915. He joined the Air Force last year.

Captain Eric Lattey, of the Worcestershire Regiment, has been again wounded in France, this being the third time his name has appeared in the list of casualties. Captain Lattey is the elder surviving son of Captain W C Lattey, RAM.C, of Southam, and was educated at Greyfriars School, Leamington (of which he was the captain), and at Bradfield, where he won an Entrance Scholarship. His brother was one of the earliest victims of the War, having been a midshipman on H.M.S Hawke, which was sunk in October, 1914, off the coast of Scotland.

We understand that Col F F Johnstone has resigned his position as Recruiting Officer at Rugby, and that the Drill Hall, Park Road, will be closed for recruiting after July 17th. During his term of office Col Johnstone has carried out his duties with considerable tact and consideration, and has taken a great interest in everything appertaining to the comfort and well-being of both soldiers and their dependents. Major Neilson will still have an office at the Drill Hall as National Service representative.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
MISSING.—Mrs R Collins has received official notification that her husband, Rifleman R Collins, Rifle Brigade, has been missing since the night of May 27-28. He is the second son of Mr & Mrs T Collins, of Stephen Street, Rugby. and joined up soon after the outbreak of war.—Mrs Sinclair has also received notice that her husband, Pte F J Sinclair, of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, has been missing since May 28th. Pte Sinclair has been previously wounded three times.

KILSBY
MISSING.—Mr & Mrs D Conopo received news on  Monday that their son, Corpl L Conopo (Middlesex Regiment) is missing. They have already lost one son, who was drowned when serving on H.M.S Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland.

STOCKTON
OUR MEN.—Perry Hodges has been dangerously wounded.

DECORATION.—Q.M.S. Sam Griffin, R.E, son of Mr W Griffin, Coventry Street, Southam. has been awarded the D.C.M. Last year he gained the M.C.M, and he also holds the Mons Star.

WAR WEAPONS WEEK.
£83,000 RAISED.

The result of the special effort in Rugby last week was very gratifying to those taking part is the campaign. Not only the town itself, but all the adjoining villages responded splendidly to this special call ; and although the figures have not yet been fully analysed, it is believed that the average per head of population in some of the villages is higher than that for the town The total amount invested during the six days’ campaign was £83,239 8s.

This was 66 per cent. in excess of the amount asked for by the National War Savings Committee ; and the controller, Mr Theodore Chambers, has sent the following telegram to the hon secretary for the local Campaign Committee :—

“ Very hearty congratulations upon splendid result of Rugby War Weapons Week, which is proof of to patriotism and fine spirit of its people.”

About £78,000 was subscribed through the banks, and remaining £6,000 was divided between the Selling Depot at the Lover School and the Post Office. At former about £5,000 worth of bonds and certificates were sold, Saturday being an especially busy day. The arrangements were made by the Executive Committee of the Rugby War Savings Association, of which Mr H Lupton Reddish is chairman and Mr G W Lawson secretary.

Certainly the local committee has every reason to be satisfied with this result, coming as it does so soon after their previous effort in connection with Business Men’s Week.

As a result of this the town will have the honour of giving its name to an aeroplane.

THE COAL AND FUEL ORDER.
APPOINTMENT OF LOCAL OVERSEERS.

A special meeting of the Rugby Urban District Council to appoint a local fuel overseer, as required by the Household Fuel and Lighting Order, was held on Tuesday evening. Mr W Flint (vice-chairman) presided, and there were also present : Messrs S B Bobbins, R W Barnsdale, F E Hands, W H Linnell, L Loverock, T Ringrose, R Walker, and H Yates.

The Clerk (Mr A Morson) explained that it was necessary to appoint a local overseer to carry out the Fuel and Lighting Order, which came into force on July 1st. Such appointment must be made within 14 days of the order coming into force, became after July 8th the protection of men engaged in the coal trade would depend upon the certificates granted by these officials. Although the order came into force on July 1st, the local authorities did not receive it until July 4th. The Local Government Board suggested that borough surveyors should be appointed overseers where possible.—Mr Loverock : What are the duties ?—The Clerk : The regulations occupy 94 pages. The duties will be important : coal merchants will have to be registered, and consumers will only be able to obtain their coal through the merchant with whom they are registered. The local fuel overseer will be responsible for issuing permits for merchants to obtain the coal they require and for seeing that it does not exceed the allotted portion.—The Chairman suggested that Mr Sharpe, the surveyor, would make an admirable overseer, and the Clerk said if the Council agreed to this, arrangements could be made whereby Mr Sharp could give plenty of time to the work.—Mr Loverock : If he has to carry out these duties he will have something to do.—Mr Robbins : He will have to have to have a clerk.—Mr Linnell said now that there was very little building going on Mr Tew would be able to assist the Surveyor.—The Clerk said unfortunately Mr Sharp had had to go to Yorkshire to attend his father’s funeral ; but he had informed him (the Clerk) that he was quite willing to take the post. The Clerk added that he was anxious that whoever was appointed should take up the work from the beginning—Mr Loverock : What is the remuneration ?—The Clerk replied that it was based on the number of inhabited houses in the district, but it would probably be revised.—Mr Yates said he did not always agree that they should accept the recommendations which came from the Local Government Board. If that body could not manage better than to send out an order four days after it came into operation they could not give much weight to their suggestion as to who should be appointed overseer, especially when they suggested that an official, who was supposed to be fully occupied with work, should be appointed to take over very onerous duties. Although this scheme was not of the same magnitude as the food rationing, it would entail a tremendous amount of detail work, and in the measure in which this was done effectively the comfort of their fellow-citizens would depend. If they had large queues of people whose requirements had not been attended to owing to the lark of facilities for dealing with them, the Council would be the responsible party. They should, therefore, appoint someone who would be able to devote his whole time to the work. The work would have to be put in hand straight away, and an office and staff would have to be provided. At present people who were in the habit of getting their coal in by small quantities were letting things slide, but they would come in with a rush latter. Although he had the greatest respect for Mr Sharpe’s abilities in other directions, he did not think he would have the necessary time to take on this work.

The Chairman said he had thought over the question thoroughly, and Mr Sharpe was perfectly willing to take the position and to get the scheme into working order. He proposed that Mr Sharpe should be appointed.—Mr Loverock seconded.—Mr Yates protested, and said the matter ought to be considered in all its bearings. The Clerk had suggested that in order to ensure efficient working someone should be in charge form the beginning, but to suggest that Mr Sharpe should get the scheme in order, and then hand it over to other people, was not the proper way to do it. There were men disabled from other work who might take the position, and devote the whole of their time to it. The work was not only for the coming winter, but would last for a number of winters, and to saddle an official who was already in charge of very important work with these duties was to make a hash and a fiasco of it.—The Chairman said he thought if Mr Sharpe found he could grapple with the work there was no reason why he should not keep the appointment permanently. There was little work to do for the Plans Committee now, and Mr Sharpe had rather more spare time on his hands than usual.—The Clerk pointed out that the Council could appoint Messrs Sharpe and Tew jointly if they wished, and the proposition was amended to this effect and carried. Mr H Yates voting against it.—It was decided that the offices should be situated at the Benn Buildings for the present.—The matter of appointing a committee to carry out the scheme was left to the monthly meeting of the Council.

SPRAYING POTATOES.

Continued experiments have shown that on an average of a series of years spraying has increased the yield of sound potatoes by approximately two tons per statute acre ; while in a bad season the neglect of this operation often means the loss of a large proportion of the crop.

Although there is no authentic record of an outbreak of the disease in Warwickshire up to the present time (June 24th), yet several suspicious cases have been reported ; these on investigation were found to be connected with “ leaf curl ”—caused by planting seed from worn-out stock—or were the result of a check to growth through drought. The time will, however, soon arrive when the real and dreaded disease “ blight,” which has so often ruined our crops, may be expected to again attack them. Fortunately spraying with Burgundy mixture provides a means by which serious damage may be prevented ; therefore, in view of the food shortage, it is the patriotic duty of all to spray mid-season and late potatoes as a method of insurance against loss.

It is not so necessary to spray First Earlies, because they are usually lifted before the disease affects the tubers, and it is always a good plan to lift and store them as soon as ready, and thus prevent risk from disease. Where, however, First Earlies have been planted late they should be sprayed, because the disease may develop on their tops and spread to Second Earlies or Main Crop potatoes growing near. The first sign of disease visible to the naked eye is the appearance on the leaves of blackish spots of irregular size and shape on the under surface of which a delicate white mould may be seen, especially round the edges of the diseased parts. Frequently the disease is first seen on the leaves near the tops of the haulms, but where the growth is dense (through close planting) disease may first occur on the leaves near the ground.

From the 8th to 15th of July is usually the most suitable time to give the first spraying in Warwickshire, but in some instances it may with advantage be done a week earlier. The second spraying should be done two or three weeks after the first.

Leaflets giving full particulars regarding the potato disease and spraying may be obtained on application to the Horticultural Organiser, 12 Northgate Street, Warwick.

BILTON.
WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Wednesday Mr B Morris, of Bilton Manor, celebrated his daughter’s birthday by entertaining about 200 wounded soldiers from the local Red Cross Hospitals. Owing to the unfavourable weather, the first part of the proceedings took place in the house, where enjoyable entertainments were given by the artistes appearing at the Empire and two entertainers from Leicester. Tea was provided in the garden, where a number of ladies and gentlemen assisted in waiting upon the guests. A gaily decorated stage had been erected on the lawn, and after tea a “ free and easy ” concert, in which several of the guests participated, was given. Several valuable presents were presented lo Miss Morris by the soldiers from the various hospitals.

NEW REGISTER ON OCTOBER 1ST.—The Local Government Board have issued an Order in Council which fixes June 29th as the date for the publication of the first list of electors and October 1st as the date when the new Register under the Franchise Act is to come into force. Naval and military voters can claim to be placed on the Absent Voters list up to July 31st. Registered civilians may be included in this list if they satisfy the Registration Officer that owing to the nature of their occupation they might not be able to vote in the ordinary way at a Parliamentary election.

THE INFLUENZA.—Owing to the widespread epidemic of influenza, all the schools in the town and New Bilton have been closed. In some cases nearly 50 per cent. of the scholars were affected. Hundreds of adults have also fallen victims, and a number of deaths from pneumonia following the influenza have been recorded.

DEATHS.

HANCOX.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, who died of wounds in France on June 5, 1918.—Deeply mourned by all who knew him.

HALE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. A. G. HALE, of Yelvertoft, who was killed in action, May 28th, 1918.
God took my loved one from my home,
But never from my heart.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.
—From his loving wife, Bernard, and all his friends.

RICHARDSON.—In loving memory of Sergt, L. RICHARDSON, of the 11th K.K.R., who was reported missing since Nov. 30th, and has now been reported killed on that date.
He marched away so bravely,
His young head bravely held ;
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed ;
But his unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever will know.
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing mother, sisters, brother, grandmother, and Nell, of “ The Banks,” Dunchurch.

IN MEMORIAM.

BENNETT.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. G. BENNETT, M.G.C, of Union Street, killed in action on July 14, 1917. Inserted by his loving brother and sister, Mr. & Mrs. T. Bennett, of Dublin.

CLARKE.—In loving memory of Gunner T. CLARKE, killed in action in France on July 11, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you :
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”

DEXTER.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son, GUNNER P J DEXTER, who died in France July 10, 1917.
We cannot forget him, we loved him too dearly
For his memory to fade away like a dream.
Our lips need not speak, though our hearts mourn him sincerely,
For grief often dwells where it seldom is seen.
—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

HIPWELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. ARTHUR HIPWELL, killed in action in France on July 14, 1916.
“ No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lent their loved and dearest,
Without saying farewell.”
—From his loving Father & Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

KENNEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. ROLAND ISAAC (1/7 R.W.R. Territorials), dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Kenney, Stretton-under-Fosse, who was killed in action on the Somme in France on July 14th, 1916 : and 23 years.
“ He fought for his country,
He answered Duty’s call ;
His home, his friends, his comforts,
He sacrificed them all ;
But he won admiration in Britain’s glorious name.”
—“ Peace, perfect peace.”—Never forgotten by his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

PAYNE.—In loving and affectionate remembrance of my dear son, LANCE-CORPL. E. PAYNE, killed in action at Verdun, July 15th, 1916.
A faithful son, a loving brother,
He bravely answered, Duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
Two years have passed, but still we miss him,
Some may think that we forget him
When at times they see a smile,
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.
—Gone, but never forgotten by his loving father, brothers and sisters.

PAYNE.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. E. PAYNE, who was killed in action, July 15th, 1916.
“ We do not forget him—nor do we intend,
We think of him daily—and will to the end ;
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—From his wife and children.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of our dear son, Sergt. B. PEARCE, 8th Bedfords, who was killed in action somewhere in France, July 12th, 1917.—From father, mother, brothers and sisters.
One year has passed since that sad day,
When our loved one passed away,
But the hardest part is yet to come,
When other lads return ;
When we shall miss amongst the cheering crowd,
The face of our dear son.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of our brother. Pte. A. H. THOMPSON, who died of wounds in France, July 17th, 1917.—Not forgotten by his brothers and sisters, Will, Tom, Emma, and Harry.

6th Jul 1918. Rugby Yeomen on Torpedoed Transport

RUGBY YEOMEN ON TORPEDOED TRANSPORT
There were six Rugby men—Lance-Corpl Cyril White, Troopers Ellis Reeve, Baker, Labraham, Cox, and Carew (R.T.H.), all of the Warwickshire Yeomanry on board the transport, Leasowe Castle, when she was torpedoed in the Mediterranean on May 27th. Lance-Corpl Cyril White, who is the son of Mr & Mrs Albert White, 155 Clifton Road, has this week returned home on leave, after an absence of three years and three months, having passed through many adventures, some very pleasant and others the reverse.
“ It was very early on Sunday morning—the Warwicks’ unlucky day,” he informed a representative of the Advertiser, “ that we were torpedoed. The sea was beautifully calm at the time, and the moon was shining brightly overhead. ‘ In the old days,’ he remarked, humorously, ‘ we often said, “ ‘What a glorious moon,’” “ but I can tell you we cursed it pretty well that morning after the ship was struck. At the time I was lying on the boat deck asleep. The force of the explosion threw me completely out of my bed, and the sudden rush of water swept my life-belt, equipment, &c, overboard. I was in charge of number 6 boat group, and after the explosion I got my crew together, and we managed to get three boats down. The spirit of the men was admirable, and as they were struggling in the water many of them sang, ‘ Swim, Sam, Swim,’ and other popular songs. While the men were being disembarked from the doomed vessel a Japanese destroyer circled round, throwing out a dense smoke screen, and at the moment when the bow of the vessel finally sank beneath the waves, dragging in her wake many brave fellows, the smoke obliterated the light of the moon, and the effect was most uncanny, the deathly stillness being broken only by the last despairing cries of some of the doomed men. The last I saw of our good old Colonel Col Cheape,” continued Corpl White, “ was just before the ship sank, when he was standing on the bridge talking to the Captain as calmly as if on parade. Sergt Viccars, whose wife lives in Wood Street, was unfortunately drowned. Together with another sergeant, he was attempting to carry an injured man to the side of the ship, when the vessel lurched forward, and he was swept away. The injured man and the sergeant were saved, but nothing more was seen or heard of Sergt Viccars, a very gallant N.C.O.—Corpl White added that the rescued men were taken on board a Japanese destroyer and very hospitably entertained. After a rest in Alexandria they embarked for Italy, and travelled overland to France, everywhere being most enthusiastically welcomed. While at Genoa Station he met a Rugby member of the Royal Warwicks, Mr J A Panther, of Little Church Street, who informed him that all the Rugby men in the R.W.R in Italy were quite well.”

FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT.
PILOT’S MIRACULOUS ESCAPE.

The story of a pilot’s miraculous escape from death was told at an inquest held on Monday to enquire into the death of Air Mechanic Richard Smith, R.A.F (23), son of Mrs Smith, 67 Sturgeon Street, Rishton, Lancs, which took place following an accident on Sunday morning last.

The pilot, Lieut John Joseph McDonald, stated that on the previous morning he decided to make a flight in a scout machine, and as the air mechanic in charge said it was working all right he took off straight away. The engine sounded in good condition in all the cylinders. Air Mechanic Smith asked witness to take him up, but he replied that he was not accustomed to taking passengers. Finally, however, he decided to take him. He started to fly towards the west, and when he was about 50 yards up the engine began to splutter. He tried to adjust matters, but as the engine did not pick up he pulled the throttle right off, and started to turn to the left. The machine began to nose dive ; and witness, seeing that a smash was inevitable, stood up in the seat behind Air Mechanic Smith, and caught hold of him with the intention of keeping him from falling forward on to the petrol tank. When the machine struck the ground witness was thrown clear of the machine, and the passenger was thrown against the petrol tank. Had the machine been 500ft up he would have been able to plane down all right, but there was insufficient depth at the time that he attempted to turn.

Second Air Mechanic James McCarron deposed that he examined the engine of the aeroplane before the flight, and it was then working satisfactorily. The aeroplane went up all right, but after she had been in the air a couple of minutes she began to choke and misfire owing to too much petrol passing into the engine. The pilot tried to turn as if he was returning to the Aerodrome, and the machine then crashed to earth.

Lieut Edward James Allman, R.A.F, corroborated this, and said when the pilot had half-turned the aeroplane the engine spluttered out as if it was choked. The aeroplane then spun round and nose dived to ground.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that when he was called to the scene of the accident deceased was sitting in the wrecked aeroplane. He was quite unconscious, and while they were extricating him he had a severe haemorrhage. He was suffering from a fracture of the front of the skull, his right eye was completely destroyed, and his brain injured. He also received other injuries. The cause of death was haemorrhage. Had it not been for this he might have lived for some time, in which case in all probability meningitis would have set in, as it had in other cases investigated locally where the injuries were similar. Death took place an hour and a-half after the accident. Had the pilot been able to hold deceased back as he tried to he would not have received the injuries to the front of his skull. Witness understood that Smith was up for a “ joy ride ” when the accident occurred.

Verdict : “ Accidental death.”

ACCIDENTS IN THE AIR FORCE.—Major Baird (secretary to the Air Ministry), replying to Mr Outhwaite in the House of Commons on Thursday last week, said it was not in the public interest to state how many officers and men of the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force had been killed by accident in this country during the past six months. There was no justification whatever for alarm on the ground that there was an undue number of accidents.

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT RUGBY STATION.

The inquest on the young Australian cadet, Walter Reginald Pick, aged 22, whose dead body (as we reported in our last issue) was found lying on the line at Rugby Station on Friday, June 28th, was conducted by Mr E F Hadow on Monday.

Lieut William Richard Bishop, Australian Flying Corps, deposed that deceased was a cadet in the 6th Officers’ Cadet Battalion, and was stationed at Oxford. He was preparing to take up a commission, and he left Australia in November, 1915.

Fred Percy Clare, 23 Essex Street, carriage shunter, employed by the L & N-W Railway Company, deposed that at about 3.20 a.m. on June 28th, he saw an object which he at first thought was a brown paper parcel, lying across the rails on the up line, but on a closer examination he found it was deceased, lying face downwards, with his head in the 4-foot way. The Preston train had shortly before gone over the rails, and the body could not have been lying there long, or it would have been seen, because a number of people crossed the rails at that spot. He informed the signalman of the discovery, and the train from Carlisle, which was then due, was stopped. With the help of the assistant stationmaster the body was removed. There was no sign of any struggle having taken place. A telephone message was sent through to London, and deceased’s stick and coat were found in a carriage in the Preston train at Euston.

Albert George Whiting, assistant stationmaster, deposed that the platform at Rugby was on the reverse side to that at most stations. After the discovery of the body he sent a message along the line, asking that the train should be searched. The first-class compartments were searched without success at Willesden, and deceased’s possessions were found in a 3rd-class carriage at Euston. No door was found open, and had there been any passengers in the carriage they could have left the train at Willesden. Deceased was travelling in a Caledonian coach, the doors of which shut automatically. There was no means of detecting whether such doors were shut deliberately, or whether they shut through the movement of the train. There was nothing to suggest that deceased fell out of the train ; but from the evidence witness was of opinion that he got out deliberately, and when the train moved off he tried to jump in again, and fell on to the line.

Ernest Wm Lines, 87 Abbey Street, carriage examiner, deposed that he examined the Preston train when it was in Rugby Station, and everything was then in order. No doors were open, and he saw no one outside. From the position of the body, he concluded that three vehicles passed over it.

The Coroner described the accident as a mystery, and said, in his opinion, the theory of Mr Whiting was borne out by the external evidence. It was for the jury to say how the accident occurred, for that it was an accident he thought they were all agreed.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned, the jury adding that there was no evidence to show how he got on to the line.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl C O Meates, Gloucester Regiment, of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte J E Hensman, R.W.R, of Rugby, is reported missing.

Pte A Moore, Leicestershire Regiment, Lutterworth, has been wounded.

Lieut T W Walding, Machine Gun Battalion, son of Mrs Walding, of “ The Limes,” who was recently reported missing, has written stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

Lance-Corpl Cox, of the Military Police, who before joining the Army was stationed at Dunchurch, has been awarded the Military Medal.

Mr J A Phillips, of St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, has received a letter, dated June 1st, from his son, Second-Lieut K Me N Phillips, 3rd Northumberland Fusiliers, attached 1/5 Durham Light Infantry, who was posted as missing on May 27th, stating that he is safe and well, but is a prisoner of war at Limburg, Nassau. He was in the 50th Division at Craonne.

Capt Rudolph Elwes (Coldstream Guards), second son of Mr Gervase and Lady Winefride Elwes, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was recently taken prisoner after taking part in the glorious 48 hours’ stand made by the Coldstreams from April 12th to the 14th. His company was eventually surrounded and cut off. Mr Gervase Elwes has sufficiently recovered from his recent operation to be able to return to Billing Hall.

We have received a letter from Corpl F Joyce, R.F.A, of Bilton, enclosing a copy of the “ Balkan News ” for June 15th, which contains the announcement that : “ An Old Rugbeian dinner will be held at the Officers’ Rest House, Salonica, on July 2nd. Hon Sec, Lieut W F Hawkins.” In his letter Corpl Joyce says he has been a constant reader of the Rugby Advertiser many years, and he always looks forward to it, as it keeps one “ in touch with things going on in the good old town of Rugby.”

Mr & Mrs H Colston, 82 York Street, Rugby, have been notified that their elder son. Pte Ernest H Colston, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on June 19th. Pte Colston, who was only just 19 years of age, had been in France since last December. He was an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School, where he was very popular, and was head boy when he left to enter the L & N-W Railway offices at Coventry. He was a member of the St Matthew’s XV, which won the Schoolsa’ Union Shield in 1913. He had been in St Matthews’s Church Choir for eight years. In a letter of sympathy to his parents his officer speaks of him as a young soldier of the highest promise.

Mr & Mrs Alfred Eyden, “ Denaby,” St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, have been advised that their younger son, Lieut Maurice V Eyden, 2nd Northants Regiment, reported missing on May 27th, is a prisoner of war in Germany and quite well. His only brother (Royal Engineers) was killed in France on May 19, 1918.

Mrs Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received a letter from the Captain of the Company to which her son Leonard, who died from wounds on May 29th, belonged. The writer says : “ He was wounded on the 29th by a machine gun bullet in the right side under the ribs. . . Your son was a splendid fellow, the ‘ life and soul ‘ of my Company, and was always so cheerful and full of good humour under the most trying circumstances. He was a very gallant soldier, and in the heavy fighting we had here for the first three days—April 12, 13 & 14—he did most excellent work for me by taking urgent messages to the Battalion Commander, running through an absolute hell to deliver them. This he volunteered to do when I had lost my Company runners. His were deeds of gallantry I shall never forget.”

IN ENEMY HANDS.—Subscriptions to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund during the past week have shown a marked improvement, £120 being received from all sources. The knowledge that in the absence of local support the men would become a charge on the funds of the British Red Cross Society has, no doubt, stimulated interest. To continue to provide in full for the Rugby and district men in enemy hands £400 per month has now to be raised for this branch of Red Cross work. Fortunately no additional names have been reported to the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee this week. There are now 130 Rugby and district men prisoners of war in Germany.

WAR BONDS.—During the week ended June 29th, Rugby contributed £1,030 to National War Bonds. The weekly quota for the town is £10,870.

ON THURSDAY (Independence Day) the Stars and Stripes were flown from several buildings in the town.

INFLUENZA is now very prevalent in the town, several hundred cases having occurred.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS H WEBB, Coventry Road, has received news from the War Office that her husband, Pte H Webb, of the Warwicks, is missing.—Pte P Grant, Mill Street, has been wounded in the leg, and is at St John’s Hospital, Barby Road, Rugby.

MRS W RICHARDSON, The Banks, has received news that her second son, Sergt L Richardson, of the K.R.R, has been killed. This is the second son Mrs W Richardson has lost. Sergt Richardson was a member of the Dunchurch Brass Band, and one of the best performers. He was very much respected in the village, where the news of his death has caused deep regret

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
MISSING.—Mr F Isham has received official news that his son, Pte David Isham, of the Royal Devons, has been reported missing in France since May 26th. He has been previously reported missing, but proved to be away from his unit.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
GASSED.—Sergt C T Tiff, Royal Shropshire Light Infantry, is in a base hospital suffering from gas poisoning.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
WOUNDED.—Information has been received by Mrs Fell that her husband, Corpl E T Fell, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been wounded severely by a shell in the thigh. He is now progressing favourably in hospital in Italy. It is just twelve months ago since Corpl Fell had a narrow escape and received very bad shell shock in France.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOY LABOUR ON THE LAND.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,—A considerable number of boys of 14 and 15 are anxious to help on farms during the holidays. They are too young for the ordinary camps, but capable of doing very useful work locally. If local farmers will let me know of their requirements I shall be pleased to pick out suitable boys. Only one reply was made to my former letter, and there, I understand, the boys did valuable work.—Yours faithfully,
Lower School. Rugby,
S R HART.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving memory of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died from wounds received in action on June 29, 1915. “Gone, but not forgotten.”—From his sorrowing Mother.

BLAND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. C. BLAND, killed in action on July 1, 1916.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes.
But never from our hearts.”
—From his loving Mother and Father, Brothers and Sisters.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. H. E. COLLINS, who was killed in action in France on July 3, 1916.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow.
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters & Brother, of 45 New Street, New Bilton.

COOPER.—9178 Sergt, JOHN COOPER, Yorks & Lancs. Regt., killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From Mother, Sister and Brother.

EADON.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. GEORGE EADON, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Some where abroad our dear one sleeps,
A hero laid to rest.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters and Brother.

SEENEY.—In loving memory of Signaller BILLY SEENEY, killed in action on July 2, 1916 ; aged 18.
“ Sleep on, dear one, in your foreign grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We shall remember thee.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Sisters and Brother.

WATSON.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR JAMES (JIM), dearly beloved son of Thomas and the late Harriett Watson, 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was killed in action on July 2, 1916.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.”
—From his Father, Brothers and Sisters.

WHITE.—In loving memory of ALBERT JAMES, dearly beloved husband of Ethel Maud White, and eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. James White, of 70 Murray Road, who gave his life for his country on June 30, 1917.