16th Jun 1917. Doctors and the War – Appeal to the Public

Doctors and The War.

APPEAL TO THE PUBLIC.

THE ARMY needs all the Doctors of military age who can be spared and this district has answered the appeal to best of its ability.

This means that the Doctors who are left must work much harder than usual, and they can only give the medical service that is really necessary if the Public help them.

YOU can help in following ways :-

If your Doctor has regular consulting hours never send for him to come to your house if the patient can go to the Doctor. This saves much time in visiting.

Never go to the Doctor’s house except during his proper surgery hours, except in great urgency.

Always send your messages for visits before he leaves home in the morning, except in urgent and sudden cases of illness.

Never send through the night except in urgent or sudden cases.

SPECIAL REQUEST.

Be loyal to your own Doctor if he is on Service. Tell any Doctor you may go to while he is away that your own Doctor is away on Service. You will then be attended FOR HIM, and when he comes back both you and the Doctor who has been acting for him will have the satisfaction of knowing that you did your duty by him while he was doing his duty by the Country.

Issued by the Central Medical War Committee, 429, Strand, London.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Rifleman Leonard Thompson, Rifle Brigade, whose parents live at 12 Union Street, has been reported missing since May 4th. He was 20 years of age, and was an old St Matthew’s boy. He joined the army two years ago.

Mr and Mrs Boyes, of Railway Terrace, Rugby, have received information that nothing further has been heard of their son, Pte F H Boyes, Royal Berkshire Regt, who was reported missing on July 1st, 1916, and it must be presumed he has been killed. Pte Boyes was a drummer in the 1st Rugby Boys’ Brigade before enlisting in March, 1915, when only 16 years of age. He was in France before attaining his 17th birthday. Another son, Pte F E Boyes, Oxon & Bucks L.I., has been twice wounded ; whilst a third son, Pte W J Boyes, 7th Warwicks, has also served.

The Misses Kathleen and Erica Cooke, daughters of Mr C J B Cooke, of Crewe, and formerly of Rugby, are doing war work in Paris—driving ambulances for the Red Cross.

The following have been reported wounded :- Pte Spooner (O & B), Rugby ; Pte F Burton (R.G.A), Dunchurch ; and Pte F Knight (Oxford & Bucks), Dunchurch, second time.

Mr Bernard Ellis, chairman of the well-known firm of Joseph Ellis & Sons, Ltd, has now received information which leaves little doubt that his second son, who as reported missing on May 20th, was killed in an encounter with German aeroplanes over the German lines He was not yet 19. Mr Bernard Ellis’s eldest son is recovering from very serious wounds received at the front during an attack last April.

BOMBARDIER BOSWORTH AGAIN HONOURED.

Bombardier F Bosworth, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been awarded the Medialle Militaire for the same action that gained for him the bar to his Military Medal.

A NEW BILTON MAN ESCAPES from GERMANY

On Saturday morning Mr & Mrs W J Wiltshire, of 18 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, received the welcome intelligence that their son, Pte W J Wiltshire, of the 1st Wilts Regiment, who was captured by the Germans at the Battle of the Marne, had escaped from Germany, and this was followed up by a telegram on Sunday to the effect that Pte Wiltshire had arrived in England, and was quite well. During the greater part of his imprisonment Pte Wiltshire, who was an old soldier and was called up as a reservist at the beginning the War, was interned in Hanover.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

PRIVATE THOMAS SPRAGGETT, Royal Warwicks, returned from the front for a short furlough. He has been in France since 22nd October, 1915, and has seen much fighting. On Saturday last he was married at Leamington to Miss F M Smith, of Emscote. The happy couple are spending their short honeymoon among their friends. Pte Spraggett is the son of Mr and Mrs Thos Spraggett of this village.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
FLAG DAY RESULT.

The total sum raised as a result of the special effort for local prisoners of war on Saturday, June 2nd, was £752 9s 3d, and a number of donations have been promised, but have not yet been received. This sum does not include the proceeds of the prize competition which has been organised on behalf of the fund by the Rugby Trades and Labour Council, and which is expected to produce a very handsome addition. The donations amounted to £512 5s 2d, and the sale of flags to £138 9s 2d in Rugby and £101 11s 11d the country.

SALVATION ARMY WAR FLAG DAY.—A Tommy has said : “ You cannot get away from the Salvation Army in France,” and such was the case last Saturday in Rugby, when helpers of the Salvation Army were very energetic in collecting for the war work of that denomination, which includes refreshment and recreation huts, hostels, and naval and military homes[?], motor ambulance, food parcels and clothing for prisoners of war, etc. Nearly 10,000 flags were sold, and the proceeds amounted to £51. The work was organised by Commandant J Walker. During the afternoon the Senior and Junior Bands paraded the town and collected £8. Those who collected were : Mr and Mrs Burton, Messrs Robert Neale, Arthur Reade, and =Robbins ; Misses Phyllis Dodd, Edith Giddens, Kate Mays, Ada Wild, Rosina Allen, Doris Fiddler, Mary Linley, Elsie Clifton, Esther Keen, F and M Robotham, and L Kirtland. Mrs Handford and family collected in Lutterworth, and Mrs Paget in Bourton.

A BEER FAMINE exists in many parts of Warwickshire, especially the country districts. Some houses have been temporarily closed because of the uncertainty of obtaining supplies, and it a common thing to see in the window of a public-house “ No draught beer on sale.”

THE WEATHER & THE CROPS.

The present spell of dry weather has given ample opportunity for the destruction of the heavy crop of weeds, both on the farm and in the gardens. Quite a number of women have been employed in terminating the unusual growth of thistles, &c, among the corn. A few copious showers would now be very acceptable. The rain is especially needful for the planting in the garden and as a refresher for early peas. The growth of the potatoes exhibits, as a rule, great irregularity, but in a few cases may be seen of exceptional promise. Wheat has decidedly improved lately and oats and barley look well. Beans too, will probably turn out better than was at one time expected. There is a good-show of grass, and hay-making will, doubtless, soon be in full swing.

RUGBY MEAT TRADE.

The London Central Meat Company asked for a renewal of exemption for their local manager, George Robinson, 40, married, B1, 142 Murray Road. Lieut Wratislaw explained that in view of the Tribunal’s contention that there should be no preferential treatment in the foreign meat trade the representatives of the three foreign meat companies held a conference with the Advisory Committee, and one of the firms offered to send a man to this shop, which could be managed by a female, to cut up the meat, but this offer was refused by the company. The firm’s representative explained that prior to the War there were 13 foreign meat shops in the town, but now there were only four, and three of these were selling English meat. The Central Meat Company was the only shop selling solely foreign meat. At the meeting with the Advisory Committee they pointed out that the scheme suggested was unworkable because all the meal arrived at the same time, and when the man was required by the Central Meat Company he would be busy at his own shop. The firm who made the offer had since agreed that the scheme could not be worked.—In reply to the Chairman, Lieut Wratislaw said he did not think any English butchers in the town had had to close down. The Chairman expressed the opinion that some re-adjustment was necessary in the meat trade. The present plan was absolutely restricting competition and in view of the facts elucidated, the Tribunal did not think it was the public interest that the man should taken into the Army. Three months’ conditional exemption.

AIR RAID ON LONDON.

A raid made by 15 aeroplanes on London on Wednesday resulted in 104 persons being killed and upwards of 400 injured. Ten children were killed and 50 injured in a school in the East-end, upon which a bomb fell. As far as is known only one enemy aeroplane brought down.

DEATHS.

CANHAM.—On May 28th, while on duty as a signaller, after only one week in France, ARCHIBALD, the second son of Mrs. Canham, Hillmorton, and dearly-beloved husband of Laura Canham, late of 19 Benn Street, Rugby, aged 36 years.

HIPWELL.-Died from wounds June 7th, “somewhere in France,” Gunner EDWARD WALLACE HIPWELL, second son of George Hipwell, Clifton-on-Dunsmore (late of Brinklow Station), aged 25 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

HANCOX.-In affectionate remembrance of our dear and only son and brother, CHARLES HANCOX, who died of wounds at Stationary Hospital, St. Omar, France, June 20th, 1915.
“ Somewhere in France ” there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave,
One of the rank and file-he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, and Sisters.

19th May 1917. A Rugby Lady Honoured

A RUGBY LADY HONOURED.

For good work at Caterham and other places, the Royal Red Cross has been bestowed by the King upon Miss E C Ellis, who for several years before the War commenced had been living in Horton Crescent, Rugby. Miss Ellis went up for investiture last week, and was received by the King and Queen at Buckingham Palace, and subsequently by Queen Alexandra at Marlborough House.

OLD ST MATTHEW BOY HONOURED.—P.C Herbert Archer, of the Metropolitan Police Force, son of Mr T Archer, of 41 York Street, has recently received the King’s Medal in recognition of bravery he displayed in March last year, when he rescued a boy from drowning in a caisson chamber at Rosyth Dockyard. The depth of the water was 40ft, and the constable showed conspicuous heroism in effecting the rescue. It was dark at the time, and he incurred great personal risk in entering the water. He has been presented already with the Royal Humane Society’s Medal and honoured by the Carnegie Hero Fund Trustees. The King’s Police Medal is usually handed to the recipient by his Majesty in person ; but owing to the War the presentation ceremony took place at the Dockyard, and the medal was handed to P.C Archer by the Rear Admiral Superintendent, who pointed out that this medal was not easily gained, but was only bestowed in cases of exceptional gallantry. P.C Archer, who was an old St Matthew’s boy and played in the first team from that school to win the Rugby School Shield in 1904-5, suitably replied.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The name of Sec.Lt. M H House (Rifle Brigade) is amongst the latest published list of officer casualties. At Rugby School he was in Mr G F Bradby’s house and was a prominent member of the 1916 Cricket XI.

Capt and Adjt R M Gotch, Sherwood Foresters, wounded and missing on July 1, 1916, now believed killed, gained his football cap at Rugby School, and during the 1913-14 season played forward for the Harlequin.

Sergt P G Miles, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, for several years a constable in the County Police Force, has been wounded in France. Miles was formerly in the Rugby and Stratford-on-Avon Division.

Capt Percy H Hollick, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is the fifth Coventry solicitor who has died at the front. A son of the late Mr Alfred Hollick, an Allesley farmer, the young officer was articled to his profession in Coventry, and early in the War joined the Honourable Artillery Co., and subsequently obtained his commission. He was wounded more than once.

NEW BILTON MAN KILLED.
Mr J Young, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has received information that his only son, Pte W C Young, of the Worcester Regiment, was killed in action on April 24th. Pte Young, who was about 23 yearn of age, was employed at the B.T H Lamp Factory, and enlisted in March, 1916.

DEATH OF A FORMER B.T.H PUPIL IN FRANCE.
Members of the Rugby Men’s Adult School learnt with sincere regret on Sunday morning of the death of Mr Kenneth Smith, who until the War broke out was actively associated with the school, and was working as a student apprentice at the B.T.H Works. It was decided to ask Mr Herbert Edmundson, the school president, to send a communication to the bereaved relatives, indicating the sense of the loss sustained by the school, and expressing appreciation of the high character of the late Mr Smith.

SERGT-MAJOR CLEAVER DIES OF WOUNDS.
Company-Sergt-Major Cleaver, Royal Warwicks, was wounded in action on May 8th, and died the following day. He was a native of Stockton, and had served upwards of 21 years in the Army, during which period he saw much foreign service. He went all through the South African campaign, and gained the Queen’s Medal and six bars. He was also mentioned in despatches on September 4th, 1901. He had a medal for 19 years’ long service and good conduct. After a serious operation, he was appointed drill instructor to the 7th (T) Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and was two years at Coventry and five years with “ E ” Company at Rugby, residing at the Drill Hall Cottage. He was mobilised with the battalion on the outbreak of War ; and in June, 1915, was promoted warrant officer. Deceased who was 42 years of age, leaves a widow and five children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

Major Claude Seabroke, in a sympathetic letter to the widow, said the news came as a great blow to him, for he felt that he had lost one of his greatest and truest friends. It was difficult to realise all at once all that the regiment owed to her late husband ; but, without doubt, during all those years of devoted and loyal service he gave of this very best ungrudgingly. To all the members of “ E ” Company, whom he had trained and helped, he had left a memory of a splendid example of a zealous soldier, who had passed gloriously, as he would have wished. He was an example to them all of unflagging industry and of the highest integrity, and in all that he did ‘Honour was his guiding star.’

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary, Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Regent Street, Rugby, who will gratefully acknowledge same.

RUGBY AND RUSSIA.

In connection with the recent Russian Flag Day, held in Rugby, the hon organiser, Mr J Reginald Barker, has received the following letter, dated May 11th :-

“ DEAR SIR,—May I, on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Russian Flag Day, express our deep gratitude for your invaluable aid to our Red Cross work ? We feel we owe a deep debt to everyone who has assisted us, to the local authorities for their patronage, to the organisers for their brilliant ability, to the sellers for their generous self-sacrifice, and to the residents for their warm-hearted support. I can assure you that we shall not forget, nor will Russia, what has been done, and in time to some we hope that your efforts will remain a pleasant and gratifying memory to yourselves, so it will be a sources of permanent indebtedness on our part.—Yours faithfully, CHARLES WATNEY, Hon Secretary, the Russian Flag Day.”

THE FOOD PROBLEM IN RUGBY.

There can no longer be any doubt that the food position in this country is serious. If scarcity, amounting to real want, is to be avoided, every class must practice the strictest economy in the consumption of all bread-stuffs. The German submarine campaign, coupled with a short wheat harvest last season throughout the world, has brought our surplus stocks of corn to danger point.

It should be clearly understood that the officials of the Food Ministry are watching carefully from day to day the danger-line below which the stocks of cereals in this country cannot be allowed to fall ; and although preparations are in progress to establish rationing machinery when the point of danger has been reached, it is hoped that the success of the voluntary campaign may avert the necessity for compulsion. The issue really rests with the people.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

WAR CHARITIES ACT.
The Rugby Waste Paper Committee was registered under the above Act.—The Chairman said it would be very interesting to Council to learn that Mr Barker had already collected something like 3 tons of waste paper.—Mr Evers congratulated the General Purposes on the arrangements made.—The Chairman : No thanks are due to the committee. The arrangements were made by Mr Barker and Mrs Blagden.—Mr Yates : Then congratulations are due to the committee for not stopping these people in any way (laughter).

THANKS FROM THE V.T.C.
A letter was read from Captain Fuller, thanking the Council for their kindly recognition of the V.T.C and the promise of financial support voted at the last meet of the Council. He assured them that their help and expression of goodwill would be of great assistance to them. The A and B men of the Battalion had been selected with similar men from one of the other battalions in the regiment to into the front line in the event of any invasion emergency arising, and they looked upon this as a compliment, and hoped it would be the means of more men joining the Corps, whose past excuse had been that them was no use for the force. He hoped the Local Government Board would raise no difficulty to the amount voted being handed over for purpose of Rugby Corps, and he added that he had noticed lately that where similar grant was made by a council the money was refunded by the Territorial Force Association to the Corps in consequence of the intention of the gift being expressed to be for the benefit solely of particular a corps. With reference to the last paragraph, the Council agreed with the Chairman that it was their wish that the grant should be applied solely for the use of the Rugby Corps.—Mr Wise said he was sorry that so few members of the general public were present at the inspection on Sunday. Anyone who was there must have been struck by the smart appearance the Corps made and the wonderfully efficient way in which they did their drill.

IN MEMORIAM.

PORTER.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, GEORGE RUPERT PORTER ; aged 21 years. Killed in action at St. Elia on May 8, 1915.

ROBINSON.-In ever-loving memory of FRED, who gave his life for his country on May 11, 1915.-“ Lost but never forgotten.”-BEATIE.

YOUNG.-In loving memory of PTE WILLIAM COTTERILL YOUNG, who was killed in action with the Forces in Salonika, on April 25th, 1917, the 25th year of his age. Deeply mourned.
Somewhere there is a nameless grave
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.
—From his FATHER and MOTHER and SISTERS, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Rugby.