20th Jul 1918. Obtaining Sugar by False Statements

OBTAINING SUGAR BY FALSE STATEMENTS.

Frank Nightingale, clerk, 20 Essex Street, Rugby, was summoned for making a false statement for the purpose of obtaining sugar for preserving fruit.—He pleaded not guilty.—Mr Reddish, for the prosecution, stated that defendant applied for sugar for preserving fruit grown by himself, and signed a declaration to the effect that he estimated that he would have 20lbs of soft fruit and 30lbs of hard fruit, in consequence of which he was allotted 10lbs of sugar for the former and 14lbs for the latter. On July 1st Mr Purchase (Enforcement Officer) called at defendant’s house and asked to see the fruit trees, in respect of which he had made the application. Defendant replied that he had twelve gooseberry trees and eight or ten currant trees, also some vegetable marrows. He added that the trees were not there, but on his allotment in Newbold Road. The Enforcement Officer asked when he could go to inspect the trees, and defendant replied, “ Not this evening, as I am due at a meeting shortly.” An appointment was made for the following evening, and when Mr Purchase kept the appointment defendant informed him that he had sent a letter on the matter to the office. This letter was to the effect that his application was not strictly in accordance with the regulations ; the trees were his own property, but were not on his own ground. He purchased them last July from Mr Allfrey, and they were still at Radford, near Leamington, unless they had been removed. He was prepared to surrender the permit for 14lbs of sugar which had not been used, and regretted that he had misled the committee, but his claim was perfectly just, as he would have sufficient soft fruit to use up more than the 10lbs of sugar. He had intended to plant the trees—twelve gooseberry and eight or nine currant in his allotment, but owing to delay in obtaining the land it was impossible to plant them in time. He therefore decided to leave them until the autumn, and was paying the person on whose land the trees were a small sum for the convenience. He was willing to surrender the permit for 14lbs, and suggested that he should be allowed to use the remainder. On July 4th Mr Nightingale wrote another letter to the committee, stating that he had a number of raspberry canes and currant trees in his garden which in a normal year would have yielded 20lbs of fruit ; and he therefore, claimed that his application was not a contravention of the order. The yield of the trees was 5lbs, and he asked that his application should be reduced by 75 per cent. In consequence of this letter, Mr Purchase called to see the trees, and found 14 raspberry canes, looking very sick, and which he estimated might yield 2lbs, and one red currant tree, which might yield 1ld. He asked Mr Nightingale about his Radford trees, and defendant then said he had purposely given a wrong name. He still persisted in saying that he owned the trees, but said he would not disclose the name of the person from whom he bought them. Other circumstances had arisen, as a result of which he refused to give any further names, but would take the whole responsibility himself.—Mr Reddish pointed out that the letter of July 4th was not signed, whereupon defendant signed it in Court.

After Messrs Burton and Purchase had given evidence, Defendant deposed that the declaration he made was perfectly true. The trees owned by himself, but which were not actually on the land which he was cultivating, did not enter into the question, as they had nothing to do with the statement he signed on April 3rd, because he included rhubarb and marrows in his estimate.—Mr Burton pointed out that it was not until after the application forms had been sent in that the committee decided to include rhubarb and marrows. Continuing, defendant said he had 10 pairs of raspberry canes and four single canes in his house garden, and he estimated that they would yield 15lbs of fruit, and that the currant tree would yield 5lbs.—Mr Reddish pointed out that the committee did not know which of defendant’s statements to believe.—Defendant : I actually own the trees in the neighbourhood of Leamington, but the name of the man bought them from was not Allfrey.—Mr Reddish : Don’t you see that the effect of that statement was that Mr Purchase could not investigate the facts ?—A : Yes.—The Chairman : Can’t you give the name now ?—A : No—for a particular reason.—The Chairman : It all goes against you ?—A : Unfortunately it does. I am aware of that.—The Chairman : You have been guilty of a very deliberate fraud, and we fine you £10.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

Practically everyone in this district has now received his or her ration book, and those which have not yet been delivered belong for the most part, to those persons who omitted to fill in the address on the application form. It was hoped that the work of despatching the books would be completed on Saturday last, and the failure to do this is in no way attributable to Mr J T Clarke and his staff of voluntary helpers, but rather to the carelessness of the general public, no fewer than 2,800 forms having to be sent back for corrections, in addition to upwards of 600 which contained no address. By the middle of the present week about 400 of these persons had been traced, but there were still about 200 cards waiting to be despatched.

Some idea of the magnitude of the task involved in the distribution of the books may be gleaned from the fact that between 45,000 and 46,000 books have been despatched to about 12,000 households, and that the most assiduous worker cannot average more than eleven sets of books per hour. Valuable assistance in the work has been lent by squads of boys from Rugby School and the Lower School and a number of ladies. Some of the elementary school teachers seized the opportunity to assist which was afforded by the closing of the schools through influenza.

Under the new scheme three coupons instead of two can be used for butchers’ meat, but the value of each coupon has been reduced from 8d to 7d. The coupons marked a/a, b/b, and c/c are available for butchers’ meat ; but the fourth, marked d/d, can only be used for bacon, poultry, tinned meat, &c ; 8ozs of bacon with bone or 7ozs without bone can be obtained with each coupon.

The values of the other coupons are :—Sugar, 8ozs per coupon ; butter, 4ozs per coupon ; margarine, 5ozs per coupon ; lard, 2ozs per coupon. Tea will be obtainable without the production of coupons, but only from the dealer with whom the person is registered. Retailers have received instructions not to allow more than 2ozs per head per week.

NO RATIONING OF BREAD.—One of the spare pages in the new ration books was originally intended for the rationing of bread, but it is now considered extremely unlikely that this will come into force. “ One can almost say with certainty,” said an official at the Ministry of Food on Saturday, “ that bread will not be rationed this year.”

RUGBY SCHOOL FARMING SQUADS.

With the approach of the end of the term the accounts of the above have just been closed and show that during the course of the last twelve weeks 183 squads (averaging about eight members to a squad) have gone out to assist the neighbouring farmers. In the month of May the squads planted about 80 acres at potatoes ; later on they spudded or hoed shout 280 acres of corn-land. and lately they have assisted in harvesting about 145 acres of hay, as regards about half of this acreage doing all the work themselves with the exception of rick-building. Payment in the case of only one squad out of the 183 has been cancelled by agreement on the score of careless work, and this record reflects much credit on the squad leaders.

The earnings total up to £167. The expenses come to £27, including purchase and repair of tools £8, and extra rations of tea and cake or bread £14. The balance of about £140 has been voted by the squads to the following objects : Hospital of St Cross £25, Rugby Prisoners of War £25, Mine-sweepers’ Fund £20, St Dunstan’s £20, Y.M.C.A. £15, Blue Cross £5, Serbian Relief £5. £25 is reserved as a guarantee against loss on the Holiday Farming Camp, but if this contingency does not arise the sum is ear-marked for the Home Mission of the School.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut J L Griffin, 2nd Hampshires, has been awarded the Military Cross. Lieut Griffin was in the office of the late Lieut Ivan B Hart-Davies, Rugby.

Lance-Corpl F H Bert Warden, Royal Warwicks, who was posted as missing on August 27th last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was a member of “ E ” Company at the outbreak of war, and went to France in March, 1915. For 18 months previous to his death he was a Lewis gunner, and had been recommended for a commission. He had been wounded four times previously. He was 20 years of age, and the younger son of the late Mr Edward Warden, who was for many years on the staff of the “ Midland Times.”

A FAMILY RECORD.

Pte A J Bennett, R.W.R, son of Mr T Bennett, of 8 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, has been severely wounded in the leg and feet. He is 18 years of age, and had only been in France a month when he received his wounds. Three of his elder brothers are serving. The eldest—Driver C H Bennett, A.S.C—was wounded during the Retreat from Mons, and has recently been invalided home from Salonika. The second—Pte W E Bennett, Welsh Fusiliers—has been wounded twice, and is still in hospital ; while the fourth—Pte A V Bennett, R.W.R—is serving in Mesopotamia, and was recently a patient in hospital suffering from a fractured knee.

BRETFORD.
PTE WM CLARKE MISSING.—Mrs Clarke has been informed that her husband has been missing since March 26th. He had been in France some length of time. He joined the Warwicks under Lord Derby’s scheme more than two years ago, and was later transferred to the Oxford and Bucks L.I. He had two bad attacks of dysentry, and on one occasion was sent home. Before the War he had been employed in the Celluloid Department of Messrs Bluemel’s (Ltd) at Wolston for 14 years. He has four children, and the youngest is only a few weeks old. Much sympathy is felt for his wife and family. At one time he proved an excellent bowler in many matches for the Brandon and Wolston Cricket Club. He has two more brothers on active service.

BOIURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
MILITARY MEDAL.—Major-General C R R McGregor in charge of Administration Southern Command, presented about 90 medals to soldiers at the 1st Southern General Hospital, Edgbaston, on Tuesday, July 9th. Pte F Loach, of this village, was presented with the Military Medal and bar. It was when he won the bar to his medal that he received the wound which caused him to be discharged from the Army.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PRISONER OF WAR.—Pte F J Sinclair, who in last week’s issue was reported missing, has now written home saying he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
WOUNDED.—News is to hand that Pte Percival Russell, R.W.R, who is attached to the British contingent off the Italian front, has been injured in the eyes and face from the effects of a bomb explosion. Pte Russell had located an Austrian outpost, and was witnessing its destruction by our bombers, and being in too close proximity, some of the splinters reached him and inflicted the injury he sustained.

LOCAL VOLUNTEER NOTES.

The King has been graciously pleased to sanction the use of the title, “ Volunteer Battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment,” for the Battalions of this Volunteer Force in Warwickshire, and of which the Rugby Volunteers form “ B ” Company of the 2nd Battalion.

“ B ” Company (Rugby) of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, R.W Regiment, met Rugby School O.T.C in a shooting match on the Clifton range last week, in which the O.T.C scored a total of 427 points against 392 by the Volunteers. Scores :—O.T.C : Second-Lieut Juts, 63 ; Sergt Bourne, 57 ; Corpl Roberts, 53 ; Sergt Kerr, 52 ; Lance-Corpl Berendt, 52 ; Pte Weinberg, 51 ; Sergt Nisbet, 50 ; Corpl Finch, 49. “ B ” Company : Q.M.S Alderson, 55 ; Pte Edwards, 54 ; Lance-Corpl Pywitt, 54 ; Sergt Murray, 49 ; Corpl Seymour, 49 ; Corpl Batchelor, 47 ; Lance-Corpl Burton, 42 ; Pte Mochrie, 42.

THE MASQUERADERS’ COSTUME CONCERT PARTY are giving a performance in the Co-operative Hall on Wednesday, July 24th, in aid of the Royal Artillery Prisoners of War Fund. This party is composed of officers, cadets, N.C.O’s, and members of the Queen Mary’s Army Auxiliary Corps of the No. 3 R.F.A Cadet Officers’ School, Weedon, who, in their spare time, are endeavouring to assist various war funds and charities. The Masqueraders have met with considerable success at the various places they have visited, and an enjoyable evening’s entertainment is guaranteed to all who patronise this performance. For full particulars see advt.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,—Local munition factories are hard put to it for timber among other materials, and recently the absence of common packing timber seriously delayed the despatch of important Admiralty munitions which were being telegraphed for. What a contrast to see within a few miles of Rugby thousands of pounds being expended in materials and labour, including much timber, on a house apparently intended for private occupation solely. Are Government permits responsible for such a strange diversion of effort and material ? In any event, the facts are as stated.—Your obedient servant,
July 16th.
“ RUGBY.”

RUGBY URBAN TRIBUNAL.

THE POSITION OF RUSSIAN-JEWS.
An interesting question was raised by the application of a master tailor (38, married).—On behalf of applicant Mr Eaden said his client was a Russian-Jew. Three years ago he applied for naturalisation, but this was not granted. He was born in Ukrania, and under the Military Service Act he was not liable for service ; but under the Military Service Allies Convention Act, 1917, mutual arrangements were come to between the Allied States, by which such men became liable for service if they remained in the country. Since the passing of this Act, owing to the disruption in Russia, the various States in that Empire, including Ukrania, had broken away and had formed self governing countries. The contention now was that this man did not come under either of the Acts cited, and that he was a free person to go his own way. This point had been fought out before Tribunals and the Police Court, and 47 Russian-Jews in Birmingham, Coventry, and Rugby were involved. When these men were taken to the Police Court as absentees it was the practice to adjourn the cases sine die until after a decision was given in the High Court in the test case of Wolf Cohen, of Coventry. For this reason he asked for exemption until the question was definitely settled.—Mr Hoper said the official instructions were that Russians were to be recruited.—Mr Eaden said if this was done his client would stand in with the others mentioned as the subject of an independent State.—Mr Hoper : The British Government do not recognise these different divisions. There is only one Government as far as we know officially.—Mr Wise said, in view of the fact that a case pending in the High Court, it would be practically impossible for a Bench to convict a man as an absentee until the decision was given.—The case was adjourned for 28 days.

DEATHS.

KENDRICK.—At Duston War Hospital, Northampton, on the 16th inst, from pneumonia, Private HAROLD KENDRICK, A.S.C., aged 33. eldest son of Harry and Elizabeth Kendrick, of 14 Warwick Street, Rugby.

NEALE.—On July 11th, 1918, in Hospital at Dover, after a very short illness, Pte. E. J. NEALE, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Neale, of Burton Dassett, age 25 years.
God took our loved one from our home,
But never from our hearts.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.
No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost their loved and dearest
Without saying “ Farewell.”
—Sadly missed by a loving wife, mother, father, brother, and sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVENPORT.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Gunner W. E. DAVENPORT, killed in action July 18, 1916.
“ Somewhere in France our dear son sleeps :
A hero laid to rest.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Father, and Sisters (Harborough Magna).

DICKEN.— In ever loving memory of Lce-Corpl S. H. DICKEN, who died of wounds in France, July 20th, 1916.
If God should call us to resign,
What most we prized it ne’er was mine ;
We only yield Thee what is Thine,
Thy will be done.
—Fondly remembered by brother and sister, Will and Amy.

HIPWELL.— In ever-loving memory of our dear son, Pte. JOHN HIPWELL, Lilbourne, who died of wounds received in action in France on July 23, 1916. Interred in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt, south-west of Albert.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He served his King and country :
God knows he did his best ;
But now he sleeps in Jesus, a soldier laid to rest.
He sleeps beside his comrades
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.”
—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers.

LENTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. W. LENTON, who died from wounds in France, July 19th, 1916. Ever remembered by Erne and Ethel, 64 Wood Street, Rugby.

LENTON.— In proud and loving memory of WILL, dearly loved son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Lenton, who died in France July 19th, 1916.—Ever in the thoughts of Tom, Ma, and Family.

SMITH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. S W. E. SMITH, Royal Fusiliers, killed in action at Beaumont Hamel on July 21, 1916.

WAREING.— In loving memory of Pte. STANLEY WAREING, 10th Warwickshire Regt., aged 18 years. Only dearly-beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. James Wareing, Lilboune Farm, killed somewhere in France, July 23rd. 1916.
Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you,
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.
From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, & Uncle.

 

Sinclair, Alfred. Died 9th Apr 1917

Alfred SINCLAIR was born in Crewe in late 1885. His parents were very much older, in 1901 they were living in Prince Arthur Street, Monk’s Coppenhall, Crewe. His father, Robert was 72 and still a working blacksmith; his mother, Harriet née Kettle, his father’s second wife whom he married in 1883, was 61, and Alfred was 15 and an ‘Apprentice Cabinet Maker’.   In 1919 when both his father and mother were dead, there were five step-brothers and two step-sisters still living, both Sinclairs and Kettles, with ages which ranged from 20 to 50.

In 1911 Alfred was in lodgings, a ‘visitor’, at the home of the Broadhurst confectioner family at 69 Bradwall Road, Sandbach. He was then a ‘Fitter’s Assistant [deleted], Fitter at Railway Works’. It seems likely that as Crewe was a ‘Railway Town’ he might well have worked for the L&NWR in Crewe and later transferred to Rugby. Prior to the war it seems that he had lived with one of his step-sisters, Mrs Francis Ann, née Kettle, Morgan of 62 Windsor Street, Rugby, whilst he was working at the London and North Western Railway Locomotive Sheds.[1]

Alfred’s Military Service Records survive, and include his Attestation Papers which show that he joined up early in the war on 1 September 1914, as a Rifleman, No.Y/535, in the 5th Battalion of the Kings Royal Rifle Corps. He was aged 29 years and 11 days; 5ft 3½in tall, weighed 142lbs, with fair complexion, blue eyes and dark brown hair. He was at Winchester Depot on 2 September 1914 and posted formally to the 5th (Reserve) Battalion, which had been in Winchester since August, on 3 September 1914. As a Depot and Training unit, they moved on mobilisation to Sheerness and remained in that area throughout the war.

However, Alfred was reposted on 30 October to the 14th (Reserve) Battalion. The 14th Bn. was formed at Sheerness in October 1914 for K4 and came under orders of 92nd Brigade of 31st Division then moved to Westcliff-on-Sea and on 10 April 1915 converted into a reserve battalion.   In May 1915 it moved to Belhus Park and in October to Seaford. Before then, on 3 September 1915, Alfred was posted from the Reserve to the B.E.F. (British Expeditionary Force) and went to France to join the 10th Bn..   This is confirmed by his Medal Card.

The 10th (Service) Battalion had been formed at Winchester on 14 September 1914 as part of K2 and came under orders of 59th Brigade in 20th (Light) Division.   They had moved to Blackdown, and then in February 1915 to Witley and in April to Hamilton Camp (Stonehenge). On 21 July 1915 the 10th Battalion landed at Boulogne and the Division concentrated in the Saint-Omer area. They moved to the Fleurbaix area for trench familiarisation. Alfred would have joined them some six weeks after they had arrived in France, probably in time for some of that familiarisation.

During June 1916 the 10th Bn. were involved in the Battle of Mount Sorrel, in the Ypres area responding to a German attack which attempted to take pressure off the British Somme offensive, which in turn was taking pressure off the German offensive against the French at Verdun. The 10th Bn. would later be posted to the Somme and were involved in the Battle of Delville Wood; the Battle of Guillemont; the Battle of Flers-Courcelette; the Battle of Morval; and the Battle of Le Transloy.

From 1 to 4 July the 10th Bn. were in billets in Poperinge, and later were working near the Prison in Ypres. Whilst there four mules were hit by shelling, but there is no record of casualties among the men. However, whilst with the 10th Bn. at about this date Alfred was wounded[2] and posted to the ‘Depot’ on 5 July 1916. His Military Record shows that he was wounded with a ‘SWLLeg’ – that is a Shell Wound to the Left Leg. He returned to UK for treatment and after his recovery he returned via Southampton to Le Havre, France on 8 December, and was posted to the 2nd Bn. on 9 December and re-posted ‘in the field’ to the 9th Bn. on 9 December 1916.

The French had handed over Arras to Commonwealth forces in the spring of 1916 and the system of tunnels upon which the town is built were used and developed in preparation for the major offensive planned for April 1917.

During April 1917, the 9th Bn. was in the Arras area and preparing for the offensive.   They were held in the caves in the old stone quarries under Arras, which had been much enlarged and provided cover.   The extract from the Ox. and Bucks. Diary[3] – they were in the same Brigade – provided information.

April 5th -7th

At Christchurch Cave supplying working parties.    Attack on the ‘Harp’.

The operations now in course of preparation were to take the form of a combined attack to the south of Lens. Elaborate Secret Orders were issued between the 3rd and 7th April, and from the 3rd to the 5th a heavy bombardment was carried out. At 7a.m. on the 7th the following Operation Orders were issued by the 42nd Infantry Brigade:

… The units of the 42nd Infantry Brigade will be distributed as follows at zero on “Z” day: … 9th K.R.R.C.: In Minnow Trench (250 yards). In Perch Trench (300 yards). In Bream Trench (200 yards). In Rudd Trench (150 yards). Total: 900 yards. … 9th K.R.R.C [leaving] … from Christchurch Cave by Exit No.14.E. (G.34.c.90.63). Battalion to be clear of the Cave by 9p.m. on the 8th inst. Route to Assembly Trenches: Rue de Temple – Arras Way and Hunter Street to Old German Front Line – Telegraph Lane and Fish Lane to Assembly Trenches; 200 yards distance to be maintained between platoons. Battalion to be in Assembly Trenches by 12 midnight 8th/9th inst.

The 9th K.R.R.C. Diary[4] relates that the 9th Bn. were to attack the ‘String’ of the ‘Harp’. Zero hour was 5.30a.m. and their wave set off at about 7.00a.m. under a ‘creeping barrage’. The objectives were successfully gained by about 9.15a.m. However, 6 Officers and 69 men were killed; 17 men were missing; and 4 officers and 118 men were wounded.

Alfred was one of those ‘Killed in Action’ on that Easter Monday, 9 April 1917. His body was not recovered or later identified and he is remembered on a Panel in Bay 7 of the Arras Memorial, located in the Faubourg-d’Amiens Cemetery, to the west of Arras, near the Citadel.

The Arras Memorial commemorates almost 35,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand who died in the Arras sector between the spring of 1916 and 7 August 1918, the eve of the Advance to Victory, and have no known grave. The memorial was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

Alfred Sinclair’s Military Records show that his Next of Kin was originally his aunt, Maggie Sinclair, 29 John Street, Crewe, but it seems that his step-sister ‘Francis Ann, née Kettle, Morgan’ at 62 Windsor Street, Rugby, took over the role as she received some unknown ‘effects’ on 7 September 1917 – the record is illegible.   She later received his 1915 Star on 4 March 1919; the British War Medal on 24 January 1921 and his Victory Medal on 9 April 1921.

As well as on the Arras Memorial, Alfred is remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gate and on Rugby Loco Steam Shed Memorial, which is ‘A bronze tablet bearing the names of the dead, mounted on white marble, superimposed on black slate. On either side of the tablet is hung a framed illuminated roll of honour, containing the names of members of the department who served in the forces during the war.’[5]

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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This article on Alfred Sinclair was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, December 2016.

[1]       Information from Rugby Advertiser, 5 May 1917.

[2]       Information also from Rugby Advertiser, 5 May 1917;   He ‘… was wounded in July 1916 and returned to France in the following December.’

[3]    Record of the 5th (Service) Battalion, Oxford and Bucks L.I., 1st July 1916 to 30th June 1917, Compiled by Steve Berridge, http://www.lightbobs.com.

[4]       Available to view at www.ancestry.co.uk [subscription site].

[5]       From a report of the unveiling, Rugby Advertiser, 11 March 1921; see also the Rugby Family History Group website at http://www.rugbyfhg.co.uk/rugby-loco-steam-shed-memorial .