5th Oct 1918. Margarine Shortage at Rugby

MARGARINE SHORTAGE AT RUGBY.

The non-arrival of the weekly supply of margarine last week, owing to the railway strike, occasioned considerable inconvenience locally. The majority of the grocers were left without supplies before the end of the week, and many of the late customers were unable to secure their rations. We understand that the supply arrived on Tuesday last, six days late.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Tuesday, Mr William Flint, C.C, presided. Also present: Mrs Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, Mr R P Mason, Mr J W Walton, Mr E Pepper, Mr F A W Shirley, and Mr J R Barker, hon organising secretary.

Mr Barker said the support given to the Fund from all quarters showed a most gratifying increase. The cost of the food parcels, etc, during the month of September was the highest on record, the amount being £517 14s. Yet it had been possible to meet this charge out of current subscriptions and donations, there being a surplus on the month of £2 8s 2d.

As an example of the great growth of the Fund, Mr Barker said the accounts showed that the cost of the food parcels, &c. during the-past three months amounted to £1,349 10s 6d, but so well had the Fund been supported that nearly all this amount had been raised during the same period, the deficit on the past three months’ working being only £73 15s 6d. A substantial sum could, however, be expected as a result of the recent effort organised by the General Help Society, which would wipe out this deficit and leave a good sum to carry forward towards the October parcels, which would not be less than £350.

There were now 142 local men to whom food parcels were being despatched, but he expected to have the addresses of the prison camps of eight other men very soon. Four men had been recently repatriated, who were taken prisoners at the end of March last. He regretted that these men were all badly wounded, and in consequence of the Germans not giving them proper medical and surgical treatment, in addition to half starving them, they reached England in a very serious condition. There had, of course, been no time for them to receive the food parcels which had been despatched to them from England, as in each of these cases the men had been removed from their prison camps for repatriation just before the arrival of their first parcels.

The Chairman said the splendid support the public of Rugby and District had given to the Fund had enabled them, in spite of the huge increase month by month to meet the cost of the food parcels without having to call on the British Red Cross Society to contribute anything towards the cost. He was sure the people of Rugby and district would do all they could to see that this splendid position was maintained.—Mr Shirley said he would like to associate himself with the Chairman’s remarks. He knew the working men of the district especially the railway men, were contributing splendidly, but he would like to see more organised weekly efforts from other works in the town.—Mr Barker said he thought the figures he had given showed that everyone was alive to the importance of regular and continued support. The month’s revenue was not made up by a few individual amounts, but by a very considerable number of small donations, as well as Works collections and organised efforts, so that if people were not subscribing in one particular way, they were doing it in some form or another.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sapper S J J Hodges, R.E, and Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, both of Rugby, have been taken prisoners by the Germans.

Corpl W S Bosworth, Royal Engineers, son of Mr S Bosworth, Rowland Street, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre. He is an old St Matthew’s boy.

Lieut E M W Boughton, M.C. Royal Engineers, has received an immediate award of a bar to the Military Cross which he gained in the Cambrai offensive of last year.

As a result of an egg collection amongst the staff of Mr J J McKinnell’s establishment on Saturday 37 eggs were handed over to the Infirmary V.A.D for the wounded soldiers.

Lance-Corpl A Lester, Royal Engineers, 92 South Street, Rugby, was killed in action on August 17th. For upwards of 18 years he was employed as a platelayer in Rugby. He had served in France since February last.

Mr & Mrs S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, have five sons in the Army. Four are still serving in France and one (Percy) was wounded and taken prisoner, and subsequently transferred to Switzerland. This is believed to be a record for the village.

Pte J J Hancocks, 1st Worcester Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Hancocks, Hillmorton Wharf, who was reported missing on November 22nd last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was employed at the Lodge Factory when he joined the Army on February 23, 1917, at the age of 21 years.

Pte W Lacey, R.W.R, son of Mrs F Holmes, 66 Rowland Street, has been wounded in the shoulder and neck. Pte Lacey, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, joined the Army in September, 1916. He was wounded in the following January. Fourteen months later he was invalided home with trench fever. He has an elder brother also serving in France.

Mrs G Cowley, late of Rugby, has recently received a letter from Major Eric Charles, commanding a battery of heavy gums in Italy, saying : “ Your son is one of the Subalterns in my battery. He has recently been responsible for a very brave act. The battery was being heavily shelled, a shell falling in the gun pit and setting alight to the camouflage, ammunition and the clothing of two of the wounded gun crew. Your son ran in and carried them out, thereby saving their lives.”

Lance-Corpl J A Maycock, M.M. Royal Warwicks, of Rokeby Cottage, Bennett Street, Rugby, was recently killed in a trench raid in Italy. He joined the Army three years ago, and was awarded the Military Medal for bringing in wounded men under heavy shell fire in November, 1917. He has also been twice mentioned in despatches. He was a member of Rugby Congregational Church, and also of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Prior to the War he was employed by Messrs Faulkner, St Matthew Street. He leaves a widow and two little children.

Recently the mother of the only child of the late Pte A W Bottrill received a cheque from his late father’s Captain, together with a letter, as follows :—Thank you so much for the photograph of the latest Coldstream recruit. He is very like his father, and I hope he will be as great a credit to it as his father was. I am sending these few pounds, which I hope you will put to the credit of your boy until the time when he joins the regiment. I hope your boy will be a great comfort to you and a worthy successor to his father. Pte Bottrill, who was killed in France on March 19th, was buried on his child’s third birthday. Lady Sybil Grant acted as godmother to the boy in consideration of the fact that his father was serving in the regiment at the time of the baby’s birth.

RUGBEIAN KILLED IN AUSTRALIA.—News has just been received of the death of Mr W Cox, late of 14 Market Street, Rugby, the result of a railway accident at Brighton, South Australia. Mr Cox emigrated to Australia nearly nine years ago. Two of his three sons have served for some time in the A.I.F. The eldest one at present in France, and the youngest had his discharge early this year after service in Egypt, the Dardanelles, and in France, where he was badly wounded.

HILL.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—News has come through from companions that Pte Henry Cockerill, of the M.G.C and of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of the late Mr T Cockerill and Mrs Cockerill, of Hill, was killed last week by a shell, which also very seriously injured a companion. After joining the Warwickshire Yeomanry, he went to Egypt three years ago, and was on the Seasowe Castle, which was torpedoed when the regiment returned to France.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—The sad news has reached the village that Lander Mann, formerly a choirboy in Stockton Church, has made the great sacrifice on the Western Front. The family, who now live at Rugby, have many friends in the parish, and great sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Mann in their sorrow. The lad was 19 years old.—Wheeler C Cleaver is home on leave from France. He belongs to the now historic Tank Corps, which is doing go much to make victory at the present time.

BRANDON.
ANOTHER SON WOUNDED.—Mr George Harris, who for some time has been in the employ of the L & N.-W Railway Company at Brandon Station, has received news that another of his sons has been wounded. Mr Harris had four sons, who willingly volunteered. One has already lost his life ; a second has just been released from hospital, after being there three years, half of which was spent in bed; the third son now lies in Bath Hospital. Two of his fingers have been amputated, and his left hand is badly damaged. Mr Harris’s fourth son is now with the Engineers in France. Much sympathy is felt for Mr Harris in his fresh trouble.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Several more of the village boys are reported wounded. Pte Harold Priest, Warwickshire Yeomanry, is suffering from a shrapnel wound through his left arm. He is not yet 19 years old, and has only lately gone to the front.—Pte Thos H Tandy, Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was at home less than a fortnight since, is also wounded, but it is hoped not seriously.—Pte Ernest Lane, R.W.R, whose brother Frank was lately reported missing, and whose brother Arthur has been killed, is also wounded, and cannot yet be located. He was formerly porter at Long Itchington Station. Mr & Mrs Joseph Lane, parents of the foregoing, have also received an intimation that their second son, Pte Fred Lane (another former L & N-W employee), is in hospital wounded in the right arm.—Pte Chas Biddle, Gloucester Regiment. is also in hospital suffering from a shrapnel wound in the left knee.—Pte Wm Hyde, South Staffs, is reported badly gassed, having lost his speech and sight, but it is hoped only temporarily.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains a list of 229 names of soldiers and sailors. Of these 27 have been killed in action, or have died on service, three are missing, four are prisoners of war, and 50 are known to have been wounded.

COVENTRY APPEAL TRIBUNAL .

Held on Wednesday. Present: Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and A Craig. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

In support of his appeal for exemption on domestic grounds, Joseph Hayes Davenport, brick setter, Brockhurst (45, B2) explained that he was recently ordered to take up work of national importance by the National Service Department and he accordingly obtained work as a labourer at the B.T.H.—Mr Meredith urged that bricklayers were in great need in the army.— Application refused, but given 21 days to settle up his affairs.

Bourton Page (33, Grade 1), butcher, Wolston, applied for a further exemption. Mr C A Kirby represented appellant, and said his client, who was formerly a C2 man. had now been placed in Grade 1.—Mr Meredith, however, said he did not think the question of age or grade entered into this case. It was a fact that between Coventry and Lawford on the one hand, and Brinklow and Wappenbury on the other, there was no other butcher.—The Chairman : There is very little meat to distribute, but what there is the people are entitled to share.—Mr Meredith : It seems that if one butcher is not left the people in this district will starve, or, rather, have to go without meat.—The Chairman agreed, and also reminded the Tribunal that a very satisfactory agreement had been entered into by appellant and another butcher whereby the latter joined up and was guaranteed financial assistance.—Four months conditional exemption, and excused the V.T.C.

Mr H Eaden represented Charles Francis Graham Hancox (36, Grade III, sedentary), accountant, who asked for a further exemption. He explained that his client had fulfilled the condition imposed by the Tribunal—i.e, that he should work thirty hours a week on the land. This work was proving too much, however, and in consequence Hancox was forced to remain in bed half a day each week. Mr Eaden accordingly asked that the hours should be reduced to twenty per week.—The Tribunal agreed to this, and a .National Utility order was granted subject to this condition.

Arthur James Haddon, butcher (B1), 38 Lawford Road, was exempted till January 15th, and excused the V.T.C.

The cases of four bakers—Wm Walter Perkins Cowley (34, Grade 1), Cambridge Street ; Austin William Harris (40), 37 Pennington Street ; Marcus Ophir Russell (36, Grade II) ; and Edgar Matthew Bates (35, general service), 106 Park Road—were down for hearing, but Mr Meredith asked for an adjournment for 14 days. A conference was to be held at Rugby that day with regard to the Food Trade of the town, and he hoped that after this conference they would be entirely agreed as to who was essential and who was not.—The application was granted.

Samuel Dowell, hay, corn, and coal merchant (40), Stretton-under-Fosse, who had lodged an appeal against the decision of the Monks Kirby Tribunal, wrote explaining that he wished to withdraw the appeal because he had a protection certificate.—Mr Meredith said he could never understand what the man had appealed for. The reason why he was refused exemption by the Lower Tribunal was that he already held a conditional protection certificate, and dual protection was not allowed. It was a most extraordinary case.

WAR WORK VOLUNTEER SCHEME.

It has been decided to extend offers of enrolment for the “ Z ” class of work under the above scheme until further notice. instead of until October 1st, 1918, only, as previously announced.

Offers of enrolment from men for the “ Z ” class of work under this scheme will continue to be open under certain conditions to Grade 3 men of any age ; to Grade 2 men of 35 or over on January 1st, 1918 ; and Grade 1 men of 43 or over on January 1st, 1918. Offers of enrolment from men for “ ordinary class ” war work volunteer vacancies are open, under certain conditions, to men of Grade 3 of any age to Grade 2 men of 45 or over on January 1st, 1918.

Men who are enrolled for either class of vacancy under the scheme will, as previously announced, be protected from military service so long as they continue in employment as war work volunteers, provided that they prove to be within the grades and ages named above and satisfy the other necessary conditions.

Opportunities for enrolment under this scheme are available at every Employment Exchange, where full particulars of the scheme can be obtained. There are at present many thousands of vacancies under the scheme.

DEATHS.

LESTER.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. ARTHUR (DICK), dearly beloved husband of Mrs. Lester, 92 South Street, killed in France on August 17, 1918.
“ God takes our loved ones from our home,
But never from our heart.”
— From his sorrowing Wife and little daughter.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. EDWARD, killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 20 years.
“ God knows how much we miss him,
More than loving words can tell ;
Not a day have we forgotten him
Since he bade us his farewell.
Daily in our minds we see him,
As we did in days of yore ;
But some day we hope to meet him
On that bright and golden shore.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Father in France, Brothers and Sisters.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear grandson and nephew, Pte. EDWARD, Killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 30 years.
“ We think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall ;
There is nothing left to answer but his photo on the wall.”
—Not forgotten by his loving Grandmothers and Grandfather, aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

HOUGHTON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action on October 4, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Wife and Child.

HOUGHTON.— In loving memory of our dear one, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on Oct. 4, 1917.
“ We pictured your sale returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LINDLEY.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. J. LINDLEY, who was killed in action on October 5, 1917.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
And heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For those he loved so well.
I think of him in silence.
And make no outward show ;
The heart that mourns most truly
Mourns silently and low.”
—From his loving Wife, Son and Daughter.

LUDFORD.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. C. H. LUDFORD (HARRY), who died of wounds in France on October 6, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love, honour, and remembrance live for ever.”
— Ever in the thoughts of Monica.

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28th Sep 1918. Food Prosecutions

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
FOOD PROSECUTIONS.

William D Barnwell, milk dealer, Dunchurch, was summoned for exceeding the maximum price for milk.— Mr H Lupton Reddish prosecuted, and Mr H Eaden defended, and pleaded not guilty.

Mr Reddish explained that on August 11th the price of milk locally was raised from 6d per quart to 7d, with the stipulation that if the milk was fetched from the seller’s premises the price should be 6d per quart. This case was different from one which came before that Court a few weeks ago, inasmuch as on August 8th Mr Purchase (the Enforcement Officer) saw defendant in Dunchurch, and informed him, in the presence of a man named Arthur Brinklow, that the new price of milk as from August 11th would be 2s 4d per gallon and 1d per quart less if fetched from the seller’s premises. On Friday, August 16th, defendant charged 3½d per pint for milk, but on the following day this price was reduced to 3d per pint.—This was confirmed by the Enforcement Officer, who, in reply to Mr Eaden, said the reason he was in Dunchurch on August 8th was to investigate complaints as to over-charging by defendant —Arthur Brinklow, manager for the Rugby Co-operative Society Branch, Dunchurch, corroborated, and said on August 16th he was charged 3½d for a pint of milk. No over-charge had been refunded.

Mr Eaden admitted that on the day named 3½d per pint was charged by defendant, who, he said, was a haulier by trade. For some time past his wife had been carrying on the milk business, and the offence was committed through ignorance. After Mr Purchase had seen defendant concerning the price of milk he told his wife of the occurrence, but added that he could not remember what the price should be, She accordingly made enquiries from several of her customers, but as she was not satisfied she wrote to the Food Control Offices. In his reply, Mr Burton (the Executive Officer) said : “ If the producer is also a retailer, the retailer’s price applies, except when the milk is fetched from the farm, in which case it is to be 1d per pint less.” As Mrs. Barnwell was not a producer, but obtained her milk from a farm, the paragraph misled her. She was under the impression that she was not included in this stipulation, and she thought she was quite right in charging 3 ½d per pint whether the milk was fetched or delivered. Annie Miriam Barnwell stated that, as a result of Mr Burton’s letter, she thought that a retailer was allowed to charge 7d per quart unless he was also a producer. On Friday, August 16th, she saw the notice of the Food Committee published in the Rugby Advertiser, and she reduced the price on the following day.—In reply to Mr Reddish, witness said the reason she raised the price from 6d per gallon to 7d per gallon was because everyone else was doing the same. The wholesalers had also raised the price. She did not trouble to enquire whether she was justified in raising the price ; she perhaps ought to have done so.—Asked if she had refunded the over-charges, she replied, “ I don’t consider I made any over-charge. When Mr Purchase told my husband we were charging too much I at once made enquiries.”

The Chairman said the Bench were of opinion that a technical offence had been committed. They were not surprised at the confusion in Mrs Barnwell’s mind after receiving the letter from the Food Office. It was a most puzzling letter, and they believed that Mrs Barnwell acted in perfect good faith.—Defendant would be fined 1s 6d.

Daniel Rushall, butcher, 64 Murray Road, Rugby was summoned for selling meat to Miriam Clift, and failing to detach the proper number of coupons from her ration book, and also for exceeding the maximum price for meat.—Mr Eaden defended, and pleaded not guilty.

Mr H Lupton Reddish, on behalf of the Food Control Committee, stated that on September 10th Mrs Clift went to defendant’s shop and asked for a pound of stewing beef. Defendant cut off 1½lb, and Mrs Clift complained that this contained too much fat, whereupon he said, “ You have got to take it as it is out, because it is weighed out to me.” Mrs Clift again protested, and pointed out that she could not eat fat stewing beef. Defendant charged 2s, or 1s 4d per lb, and detached four coupons, which only represented 1s 8d, as against the 2s charged. Far too much fat and sinew was included in the meat supplied to Mrs Clift. This should have been sold separately, and was only worth 2½d or 2¼d per lb. The point, therefore, they had to decide was whether too much fat and sinew was sold in regard to the fact that the top price was charged.

Mrs Clift gave evidence in support of this statement ; but, in reply to Mr Eaden, she admitted that when she went to see Mr Rushall later in the day she complained of short weight, and not of the quality of the meat.—In reply to Mr Reddish, she said the meat could not be stewed, and it was not fit for eating.—The Enforcement Officer (Bertram Purchase) stated that the primary complaint was as to the quality, and not the weight of the meat. He had the meat weighed by two butchers, but that was only to ascertain the proportion of fat ;10ozs consisted of gristly fat, and the other 13ozs was good meat.

Arthur Frank Hopecraft, butchery manager to the Co-operative Society, with 26 years’ experience, said the fat supplied to Mrs Clift was only worth about 2½d per lb. Had a customer asked him for shin of beef he would not have supplied so much fat.—Arthur Weaver, a butcher employed by Mr H V Wait, also expressed the opinion that the proportion of fat was excessive. He would not have served more than ¼-lb of fat with 1½lb of shin. Fat and sinew was not shin of beef.

Mr Eaden contended that it almost approached a scandal that such a case should be brought forward.

The first case was dismissed without costs, the Bench expressing the opinion that it was quite right of the Food Committee to bring it forward. With regard to the second case. Mr Eaden contended that Mrs Clift was in the habit of purchasing her meat twice a week at Mr Rushall’s, and he usually divided it out according to the number of coupons, and took half the coupons on each occasion. The meat purchased on this occasion did not quite equal the value of five coupons, and customers would protest against more coupons than necessary being removed. He believed a margin of about 2d more than the value of the coupons was allowed.

Mr Reddish pointed out that 4½ coupons should have been taken ; this would still have left a margin of l½d. The proper number of coupons must be surrendered for each transaction.—The Chairman said the Bench took a serious view of this case. Defendant must deal with the coupons as prescribed by law ; but as this was the first case of the kind, the fine would not be so heavy as subsequent fines would be.—Fined £5.

BLACKBERRY COLLECTION.—Warwickshire schools have already sent 15 tons 4 cwt of Blackberries to jam factories, and, should the weather prove favourable, many tons more will probably be picked. There is keen rivalry as to which school will collect the greatest weights.

EARLIER CLOSING OF SHOPS.
At a meeting of the Rugby Drapers’ Association it was decided, in view of the necessity for economising fuel and light, that shops associated with the trade should close at 6 p.m on Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, 7 o’clock Friday, and 8 o’clock Saturday from November 1st to March 1st. The closing time on Saturday to be optional.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier H A Clowes, of Churchover, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in action on September 1st. He joined the R.F.A in March, 1917, and is now with a heavy battery of the R.G.A.

The death is reported of Lance-Corpl Joseph Fairbrother, King’s Own Shropshire Light Infantry, who was shot through the heart by a machine gun bullet on August 23rd. He was a popular member of the Rugby Police Force, and soon after the War started he enlisted in the Military Police, and was drafted to Egypt. At his own request, he was subsequently transferred to an Infantry Battalion.

Pte George Cyril Slater, son of Mr & Mrs H W Slater, 24 Lodge Road, was killed in action in France on August 27th. He was an old Elborow boy, and previous to enlisting was employed as a clerk in Messrs Willans & Robinson’s offices.

Gunner F W Watson, Royal Marine Artillery, eldest son of Mr F Watson, of Hungerfield Farm, Easenhall, Rugby, was dangerously wounded on the 10th ult, but is progressing satisfactorily. Another brother is also serving in France.

Mr E Hunt, 122 Lawford Road, New Bilton, has received news that his son, Pte G H W Hunt, Royal Marines Light Infantry, was killed in action on September 3rd. He was an old St Oswald’s boy, and joined the Marines in November, 1915, at the age of 17. Previous to this he was employed in the Punch Shop at the B.T.H. He only returned to France a fortnight before his death.

Pte C Bates, R.W.R, eldest son of Mr and Mr. C C Bates, 162 Murray Road, has been awarded the Military Medal for, on September 9th, displaying coolness on a raid, and bombing a machine gun, thus enabling the platoon to advance, and carrying a mortally wounded man back under fire. He was presented with the medal ribbon by the General on September 16th.

Rifleman E J Cox, K.R.R, son of Mr and Mrs J E Cox, Lea Hurst, Bilton. who was reported missing on November 30th last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He enlisted in September, 1914, at the age of 17, and was wounded in April, 1917. Before the war he was employed as an engineer apprentice at Willans & Robinson’s, was a patrol leader of Bilton Scouts, and promising footballer.

Lance-Corpl Signaller Joseph Vale, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, brother of Mrs F Anderton, 12 Plowman Street, was killed by a shell while mending a telegraph line in France recently. He joined the Army in August 1914, and was drafted to France in the following January. He was 24 years of age.

Pte Horace Victor Wilson, London Regiment (late K.R.R), died in hospital at Birmingham on September 19th from wounds received on September 1st. He was the youngest surviving son of Mrs Ellis Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, and is the second of her sons to fall in the War. He was 31 years of age, an old St Matthew’s boy, and prior to joining the Army in September, 1914, was employed as a carpenter at the B.T.H. He had been in France for 3½ years.

Lance-Corpl W E Blythe, 9 Addison Terrace, Bilton, eldest son of the late Mr John Edward Blythe, has been killed in action. He joined the Army in 1916, and had been in France five months. He was formerly employed as a gardener by Mr J J McKinnell, and was also the organist at St Philip’s Church, Rugby. He was 31 years of age.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR HANDED OVER.—At Rugby Police Court on Wednesday, Reginald Carver, insurance agent, 23 Grosvenor Road, was charged with failing to respond to a notice calling him up for military service.—In answer to the charge, Carver admitted that he was an absentee, and said that he had adopted this attitude because he believed that all war was a crime.—The Magistrate (Mr J J McKinnell) said he could not go into that now ; he was sorry, but there was no alternative but to fine him £2 and remand him, pending the arrival of an escort.

FRANKTON.
WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Chas Blundell have received official news that their eldest son, Pte Gerard Blundell, has been wounded, and is now in hospital at Salonica.

MARTON.
MRS BOSWORTH has received news that her husband, Bombardier A Bosworth, was killed in France on September 13th. She has received a sympathetic letter from his officer to the effect that, along with several of his comrades, he was mortally wounded by a shell, which fell near the gun. The writer adds : “ Throughout the period I have had charge of his section he has shown himself to be a hard working, good, and trustworthy fellow, and I feel his loss very keenly indeed. You can rest assured your husband has done his duty well.”

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
WAR MEMORIAL.—A meeting was held on Monday to consider the question of starting a fund for the erection of a memorial to those parishioners who fall in the war. Mr H W Sitwell presided, and suggested the erection of a lych gate at the new churchyard, with a suitable plate fixed inside. Other suggestions were discussed, but it was decided to appoint a committee to get funds, as the form must in the end be dependent on the amount of money raised. The following were chosen as a committee : The Vicar, and Messrs Price, Gilks, Nokes, C J Cockerill, C Olorenshaw, Law, F Goode, and J Hopkins.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

ARTHUR BALDWIN KILLED.—Mr & Mrs Chas Baldwin, of the Model Village, have received intimation that their son, Pte Arthur Baldwin, 51st Hants Regiment, had been killed. He was 19 years of age. His parents received a cheery letter from him only the day before the sad news arrived. Mr & Mrs Baldwin have still three sons in the Army, and their son, Gunner Harry Baldwin, was killed in action last October. Sincere sympathy is accorded to them. Their son William was home on leave when the intelligence of his brother’s death arrived.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday morning last a special choral Eucharist was celebrated at the Parish Church in memory of Harry Cockerell and Arthur Baldwin, two village youths, who have recently fallen while fighting for their country. A good number of communicants were present.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Pte Leonard Marlow, R.W.R, son of Mr & Mrs Thos Marlow, is lying in Glasgow Hospital suffering from a wound in his thigh. Pte L N Wincote, 2nd Battalion Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, son of Mr & Mrs Charles Wincote, is in Dundee Hospital with wounds in the leg, gas and slight trench fever.

BRANDON.
LANCE-CORPL J WARD.—Lance-Corpl J Ward, who has been wounded and a prisoner in Germany for to last five months, is now in Switzerland. He is the son of Mr & Mrs Thomas Ward, who are well known and respected residents. Writing to his parents, he describes in glowing terms the splendid reception they had on arrival in Switzerland. He adds: “ I am more than happy to think that I only had to stay in that rotten country five months. I pity the poor creatures who have been there four years, but I think they are exchanging them all shortly. I am staying in a hotel, and it is a lovely place. There are about 100 of us at it. I have a nice little bedroom, all to myself, fitted up with every comfort. I think they will pull my arm into shape here. I had a bone broken in my shoulder, but I think if will be all right in time. Cheer up; England next move.”

WARWICKSHIRE MEMORIAL TO THE 29th DIVISION.
DUNCHURCH AVENUE.

On the 12th March, 1915, His Majesty the King reviewed the immortal 29th Division on the London Road in the parish of Stretton-on-Dunsmore shortly before they embarked for active service in Gallipoli. There is a widespread feeling in Warwickshire that there should be a permanent Memorial to the Review and at the 29th Division on the spot where the. King stood.

An opportunity for such a Memorial has now been afforded by the action of the Duke of Buccleuch in an arrangement he has made with the Warwickshire County Council with reference to the famous Dunchurch Avenue. His Grace has generously offered to make over to the County Council half the nett proceeds of the elm trees on condition that the Avenue is replanted ; the County Council have gratefully accepted the offer, have decided that the newly planted Avenue should form part of the Memorial to the 29th Division, and have constituted a Committee to undertake the replanting and to erect a Monument—suitably engraved of the Review. It is estimated that about £5,000 will be required for the Monument and for replanting and maintaining the Avenue. Sums amounting to £1,182 19s. 6d. have already been given or promised.

The Committee invite all who would wish to perpetuate for future generations the memory of the connection between the 29th Division and Warwickshire to send donations to their Honorary Treasurer, S. C. SMITH, Esq., County Treasurer, Warwick.

R OLIVER-BELLASIS,
Chairman of the Dunchurch Avenue Committee.

LAST DAYS OF SUMMER TIME.
The Home Secretary has issued notice that Summer Time will cease and normal time will be restored at three o’clock (Summer Time) in the morning of Monday next, September 30th, when the clock will be put back to 2 a.m. Employers are particularly recommended to warn all their workers in advance of the change of time. The public are cautioned that the hands of ordinary striking clocks should not be moved backwards ; the change of time should be made by putting  forward the hands 11 hours and allowing the clock to strike fully at each hour, half-hour, and quarter-hour, as the case may be. The hands should not be moved while the clock is striking. An alternative method, in the case of pendulum clocks, is to stop the pendulum for an hour.

DEATHS.

BROOKS.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. JOHN (JACK) BROOKS, of the 1st R.W.R., who fell in action on August 30th, 1918.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One at the best towards his mother ;
He bravely answered his country ‘s call,
He gave his young life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning ;
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till We meet in the Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

BLYTHE.—In ever-loving memory of our dear one, Lance-Corpl. W. E. Blythe, of 9 Addison Terrace, Old Bilton, eldest son of the late John Edward Blythe, who was killed in action on September 2, 1918 ; aged 31 years.
“ No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost a loved one
Without saying ‘ Farewell.’
We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Wife, Mother, Sisters & Brother.

COX.—In proud and loving memory of Rifleman E. J. Cox (ERN), 10th Battalion K.R.R.C., beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. E. J. Cox, “ Lea Hunt,” Bilton, reported missing on November 30th, now presumed killed on that date ; aged 20 years.—“ Until the day breaks and the shadows flee away.”—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

HUNT.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son, GEORGE HENRY W. HUNT, Royal Marine Light Infantry, killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on the 3rd September, 1918 ; aged 19 years and 10 months. Deeply mourned.

SUTTON.—Killed in action in France on August 23, 1918, JOHN HENRY HOLBECKE SUTTON, 2nd Bucks. and Oxon. Light Infantry, aged 19 years, younger son of the late N. L. Sutton, of Bilton, and at Mrs. Sutton, of Bloxham.

SLATER.—Killed in action in France on August 27th. CYRIL (GEORGE), the only dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Slater, 24 Lodge Road, Rugby (8th Berkshire Regiment), aged 19 years.
“ Good was his heart, and in friendship sound,
Patient in pain and loved by all around ;
His pains are o’er, his griefs for ever done,
A life of everlasting joy he’s now begun.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, and Olga.

SLATER.—In loving memory of the above GEORGE SLATER, 8th Berks. Regt.—From his sorrowing Grandpa and Grandma Taylor, also Auntie Bid and Auntie Kit.

WILSON.—H. V. WILSON, late K.R.R., died September 19, 1918, of wounds received in France on September 1, 1918 ; aged 31.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARBER.—In loving memory of dear FRED, killed in action at Ypres on September 25, 1915.—From all at home.

BYERS.—In ever-loving memory of Corpl. ANGUS BYERS, of the 1st K.O.S.B., killed in action in France on September 20, 1917.—From all at 82 Rowland St.

DRAKE.—In loving memory of our dear son, ALFRED HURST DRAKE, who was killed in France on September 25, 1916, son of Benjamin and Olive Drake, Lutterworth.
“ Two years have passed since thou, dear son,
Left this world of strife and sin ;
We never again shall be at rest
Until we meet thee as thou art blest.”

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. Frederick Frankton, killed at Loos on September 27, 1915.—“ In the midst of life we are in death.”—From his loving Wife and Children.

FRANKTON.— In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. F. FRANKTON, Grenadier Guards.—From his loving sisters, Sarah and Polly.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, JOHN HINKS, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who was reported missing in the Battle of Loos on September 25, 1915.— “ He gave his life that others might live.”—Not forgotten by his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

LEE.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte CHARLES R. LEE, of the Coldstream Guards, who died in the Hospital of St. Cross on September 6, 1916. Also of our dear son, Lance-Corpl SAMUEL GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxon, and Bucks., who fell in action at the Battle of Loos on September 25, 1915.—Never forgotten by their sorrowing Mother and Stepfather and Brothers ; also Winnie and May.

RUSSELL.—In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of WALTER RUSSELL, of Toft Farm, Dunchurch, who died of wounds in France on September 24, 1917 ; aged 27.
“ There is a link death cannot sever :
Love, honour, and remembrance live for ever.”
—From his ever-loving Brother and Sister, Harry and Annie.

SHONE.—In loving memory of Rifleman TOM SHONE, 12th Rifle Brigade, who was killed in action at Loos on September 25, 1915.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him ;
But, like others, must be brave,
For we know that he is lying
In a British soldier’s grave.
He lies besides his comrades
In a hallowed grave unknown,
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.”
—From Father, Mother, and Sisters.

SHONE.—In loving memory of our dear brother TOM, who was killed at the Battle of Loos on September 25, 1915.
“ We little thought his time was short
In this world to remain,
When from his home he went away,
And thought to come again.
We often sit in silence,
No eye may see us weep ;
But deep within our aching hearts
His memory we will keep.”
—Flo and Horace.

STENT.—In loving memory of PERCY VICTOR STENT, who fell in the Battle of Loos on September 25, 1915.
—From Mr. & Mrs. Harban and Family.

STENT.—In loving memory of my dear son. Corpl. P. V. STENT, who was killed in action on September 25, 1915, at the Battle of Loos.
“ Three years have past, but still we miss him ;
Some may think the wound has healed,
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Nobly he did his duty.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Brother and Sisters, and Friend.

WEST.—In proud and loving memory of FRANK WEST, Lieut.-Col., R.F.A., killed near Poziéres on September 28, 1916.—“ We have found safety with all things undying.”

6th Jul 1918. Rugby Yeomen on Torpedoed Transport

RUGBY YEOMEN ON TORPEDOED TRANSPORT
There were six Rugby men—Lance-Corpl Cyril White, Troopers Ellis Reeve, Baker, Labraham, Cox, and Carew (R.T.H.), all of the Warwickshire Yeomanry on board the transport, Leasowe Castle, when she was torpedoed in the Mediterranean on May 27th. Lance-Corpl Cyril White, who is the son of Mr & Mrs Albert White, 155 Clifton Road, has this week returned home on leave, after an absence of three years and three months, having passed through many adventures, some very pleasant and others the reverse.
“ It was very early on Sunday morning—the Warwicks’ unlucky day,” he informed a representative of the Advertiser, “ that we were torpedoed. The sea was beautifully calm at the time, and the moon was shining brightly overhead. ‘ In the old days,’ he remarked, humorously, ‘ we often said, “ ‘What a glorious moon,’” “ but I can tell you we cursed it pretty well that morning after the ship was struck. At the time I was lying on the boat deck asleep. The force of the explosion threw me completely out of my bed, and the sudden rush of water swept my life-belt, equipment, &c, overboard. I was in charge of number 6 boat group, and after the explosion I got my crew together, and we managed to get three boats down. The spirit of the men was admirable, and as they were struggling in the water many of them sang, ‘ Swim, Sam, Swim,’ and other popular songs. While the men were being disembarked from the doomed vessel a Japanese destroyer circled round, throwing out a dense smoke screen, and at the moment when the bow of the vessel finally sank beneath the waves, dragging in her wake many brave fellows, the smoke obliterated the light of the moon, and the effect was most uncanny, the deathly stillness being broken only by the last despairing cries of some of the doomed men. The last I saw of our good old Colonel Col Cheape,” continued Corpl White, “ was just before the ship sank, when he was standing on the bridge talking to the Captain as calmly as if on parade. Sergt Viccars, whose wife lives in Wood Street, was unfortunately drowned. Together with another sergeant, he was attempting to carry an injured man to the side of the ship, when the vessel lurched forward, and he was swept away. The injured man and the sergeant were saved, but nothing more was seen or heard of Sergt Viccars, a very gallant N.C.O.—Corpl White added that the rescued men were taken on board a Japanese destroyer and very hospitably entertained. After a rest in Alexandria they embarked for Italy, and travelled overland to France, everywhere being most enthusiastically welcomed. While at Genoa Station he met a Rugby member of the Royal Warwicks, Mr J A Panther, of Little Church Street, who informed him that all the Rugby men in the R.W.R in Italy were quite well.”

FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT.
PILOT’S MIRACULOUS ESCAPE.

The story of a pilot’s miraculous escape from death was told at an inquest held on Monday to enquire into the death of Air Mechanic Richard Smith, R.A.F (23), son of Mrs Smith, 67 Sturgeon Street, Rishton, Lancs, which took place following an accident on Sunday morning last.

The pilot, Lieut John Joseph McDonald, stated that on the previous morning he decided to make a flight in a scout machine, and as the air mechanic in charge said it was working all right he took off straight away. The engine sounded in good condition in all the cylinders. Air Mechanic Smith asked witness to take him up, but he replied that he was not accustomed to taking passengers. Finally, however, he decided to take him. He started to fly towards the west, and when he was about 50 yards up the engine began to splutter. He tried to adjust matters, but as the engine did not pick up he pulled the throttle right off, and started to turn to the left. The machine began to nose dive ; and witness, seeing that a smash was inevitable, stood up in the seat behind Air Mechanic Smith, and caught hold of him with the intention of keeping him from falling forward on to the petrol tank. When the machine struck the ground witness was thrown clear of the machine, and the passenger was thrown against the petrol tank. Had the machine been 500ft up he would have been able to plane down all right, but there was insufficient depth at the time that he attempted to turn.

Second Air Mechanic James McCarron deposed that he examined the engine of the aeroplane before the flight, and it was then working satisfactorily. The aeroplane went up all right, but after she had been in the air a couple of minutes she began to choke and misfire owing to too much petrol passing into the engine. The pilot tried to turn as if he was returning to the Aerodrome, and the machine then crashed to earth.

Lieut Edward James Allman, R.A.F, corroborated this, and said when the pilot had half-turned the aeroplane the engine spluttered out as if it was choked. The aeroplane then spun round and nose dived to ground.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that when he was called to the scene of the accident deceased was sitting in the wrecked aeroplane. He was quite unconscious, and while they were extricating him he had a severe haemorrhage. He was suffering from a fracture of the front of the skull, his right eye was completely destroyed, and his brain injured. He also received other injuries. The cause of death was haemorrhage. Had it not been for this he might have lived for some time, in which case in all probability meningitis would have set in, as it had in other cases investigated locally where the injuries were similar. Death took place an hour and a-half after the accident. Had the pilot been able to hold deceased back as he tried to he would not have received the injuries to the front of his skull. Witness understood that Smith was up for a “ joy ride ” when the accident occurred.

Verdict : “ Accidental death.”

ACCIDENTS IN THE AIR FORCE.—Major Baird (secretary to the Air Ministry), replying to Mr Outhwaite in the House of Commons on Thursday last week, said it was not in the public interest to state how many officers and men of the Royal Flying Corps and the Royal Air Force had been killed by accident in this country during the past six months. There was no justification whatever for alarm on the ground that there was an undue number of accidents.

THE FATAL ACCIDENT AT RUGBY STATION.

The inquest on the young Australian cadet, Walter Reginald Pick, aged 22, whose dead body (as we reported in our last issue) was found lying on the line at Rugby Station on Friday, June 28th, was conducted by Mr E F Hadow on Monday.

Lieut William Richard Bishop, Australian Flying Corps, deposed that deceased was a cadet in the 6th Officers’ Cadet Battalion, and was stationed at Oxford. He was preparing to take up a commission, and he left Australia in November, 1915.

Fred Percy Clare, 23 Essex Street, carriage shunter, employed by the L & N-W Railway Company, deposed that at about 3.20 a.m. on June 28th, he saw an object which he at first thought was a brown paper parcel, lying across the rails on the up line, but on a closer examination he found it was deceased, lying face downwards, with his head in the 4-foot way. The Preston train had shortly before gone over the rails, and the body could not have been lying there long, or it would have been seen, because a number of people crossed the rails at that spot. He informed the signalman of the discovery, and the train from Carlisle, which was then due, was stopped. With the help of the assistant stationmaster the body was removed. There was no sign of any struggle having taken place. A telephone message was sent through to London, and deceased’s stick and coat were found in a carriage in the Preston train at Euston.

Albert George Whiting, assistant stationmaster, deposed that the platform at Rugby was on the reverse side to that at most stations. After the discovery of the body he sent a message along the line, asking that the train should be searched. The first-class compartments were searched without success at Willesden, and deceased’s possessions were found in a 3rd-class carriage at Euston. No door was found open, and had there been any passengers in the carriage they could have left the train at Willesden. Deceased was travelling in a Caledonian coach, the doors of which shut automatically. There was no means of detecting whether such doors were shut deliberately, or whether they shut through the movement of the train. There was nothing to suggest that deceased fell out of the train ; but from the evidence witness was of opinion that he got out deliberately, and when the train moved off he tried to jump in again, and fell on to the line.

Ernest Wm Lines, 87 Abbey Street, carriage examiner, deposed that he examined the Preston train when it was in Rugby Station, and everything was then in order. No doors were open, and he saw no one outside. From the position of the body, he concluded that three vehicles passed over it.

The Coroner described the accident as a mystery, and said, in his opinion, the theory of Mr Whiting was borne out by the external evidence. It was for the jury to say how the accident occurred, for that it was an accident he thought they were all agreed.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned, the jury adding that there was no evidence to show how he got on to the line.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl C O Meates, Gloucester Regiment, of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte J E Hensman, R.W.R, of Rugby, is reported missing.

Pte A Moore, Leicestershire Regiment, Lutterworth, has been wounded.

Lieut T W Walding, Machine Gun Battalion, son of Mrs Walding, of “ The Limes,” who was recently reported missing, has written stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

Lance-Corpl Cox, of the Military Police, who before joining the Army was stationed at Dunchurch, has been awarded the Military Medal.

Mr J A Phillips, of St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, has received a letter, dated June 1st, from his son, Second-Lieut K Me N Phillips, 3rd Northumberland Fusiliers, attached 1/5 Durham Light Infantry, who was posted as missing on May 27th, stating that he is safe and well, but is a prisoner of war at Limburg, Nassau. He was in the 50th Division at Craonne.

Capt Rudolph Elwes (Coldstream Guards), second son of Mr Gervase and Lady Winefride Elwes, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was recently taken prisoner after taking part in the glorious 48 hours’ stand made by the Coldstreams from April 12th to the 14th. His company was eventually surrounded and cut off. Mr Gervase Elwes has sufficiently recovered from his recent operation to be able to return to Billing Hall.

We have received a letter from Corpl F Joyce, R.F.A, of Bilton, enclosing a copy of the “ Balkan News ” for June 15th, which contains the announcement that : “ An Old Rugbeian dinner will be held at the Officers’ Rest House, Salonica, on July 2nd. Hon Sec, Lieut W F Hawkins.” In his letter Corpl Joyce says he has been a constant reader of the Rugby Advertiser many years, and he always looks forward to it, as it keeps one “ in touch with things going on in the good old town of Rugby.”

Mr & Mrs H Colston, 82 York Street, Rugby, have been notified that their elder son. Pte Ernest H Colston, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on June 19th. Pte Colston, who was only just 19 years of age, had been in France since last December. He was an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School, where he was very popular, and was head boy when he left to enter the L & N-W Railway offices at Coventry. He was a member of the St Matthew’s XV, which won the Schoolsa’ Union Shield in 1913. He had been in St Matthews’s Church Choir for eight years. In a letter of sympathy to his parents his officer speaks of him as a young soldier of the highest promise.

Mr & Mrs Alfred Eyden, “ Denaby,” St Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, have been advised that their younger son, Lieut Maurice V Eyden, 2nd Northants Regiment, reported missing on May 27th, is a prisoner of war in Germany and quite well. His only brother (Royal Engineers) was killed in France on May 19, 1918.

Mrs Ingram, 61 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, has received a letter from the Captain of the Company to which her son Leonard, who died from wounds on May 29th, belonged. The writer says : “ He was wounded on the 29th by a machine gun bullet in the right side under the ribs. . . Your son was a splendid fellow, the ‘ life and soul ‘ of my Company, and was always so cheerful and full of good humour under the most trying circumstances. He was a very gallant soldier, and in the heavy fighting we had here for the first three days—April 12, 13 & 14—he did most excellent work for me by taking urgent messages to the Battalion Commander, running through an absolute hell to deliver them. This he volunteered to do when I had lost my Company runners. His were deeds of gallantry I shall never forget.”

IN ENEMY HANDS.—Subscriptions to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund during the past week have shown a marked improvement, £120 being received from all sources. The knowledge that in the absence of local support the men would become a charge on the funds of the British Red Cross Society has, no doubt, stimulated interest. To continue to provide in full for the Rugby and district men in enemy hands £400 per month has now to be raised for this branch of Red Cross work. Fortunately no additional names have been reported to the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee this week. There are now 130 Rugby and district men prisoners of war in Germany.

WAR BONDS.—During the week ended June 29th, Rugby contributed £1,030 to National War Bonds. The weekly quota for the town is £10,870.

ON THURSDAY (Independence Day) the Stars and Stripes were flown from several buildings in the town.

INFLUENZA is now very prevalent in the town, several hundred cases having occurred.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS H WEBB, Coventry Road, has received news from the War Office that her husband, Pte H Webb, of the Warwicks, is missing.—Pte P Grant, Mill Street, has been wounded in the leg, and is at St John’s Hospital, Barby Road, Rugby.

MRS W RICHARDSON, The Banks, has received news that her second son, Sergt L Richardson, of the K.R.R, has been killed. This is the second son Mrs W Richardson has lost. Sergt Richardson was a member of the Dunchurch Brass Band, and one of the best performers. He was very much respected in the village, where the news of his death has caused deep regret

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
MISSING.—Mr F Isham has received official news that his son, Pte David Isham, of the Royal Devons, has been reported missing in France since May 26th. He has been previously reported missing, but proved to be away from his unit.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
GASSED.—Sergt C T Tiff, Royal Shropshire Light Infantry, is in a base hospital suffering from gas poisoning.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
WOUNDED.—Information has been received by Mrs Fell that her husband, Corpl E T Fell, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been wounded severely by a shell in the thigh. He is now progressing favourably in hospital in Italy. It is just twelve months ago since Corpl Fell had a narrow escape and received very bad shell shock in France.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOY LABOUR ON THE LAND.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,—A considerable number of boys of 14 and 15 are anxious to help on farms during the holidays. They are too young for the ordinary camps, but capable of doing very useful work locally. If local farmers will let me know of their requirements I shall be pleased to pick out suitable boys. Only one reply was made to my former letter, and there, I understand, the boys did valuable work.—Yours faithfully,
Lower School. Rugby,
S R HART.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving memory of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died from wounds received in action on June 29, 1915. “Gone, but not forgotten.”—From his sorrowing Mother.

BLAND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. C. BLAND, killed in action on July 1, 1916.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes.
But never from our hearts.”
—From his loving Mother and Father, Brothers and Sisters.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. H. E. COLLINS, who was killed in action in France on July 3, 1916.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow.
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters & Brother, of 45 New Street, New Bilton.

COOPER.—9178 Sergt, JOHN COOPER, Yorks & Lancs. Regt., killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From Mother, Sister and Brother.

EADON.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. GEORGE EADON, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Some where abroad our dear one sleeps,
A hero laid to rest.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters and Brother.

SEENEY.—In loving memory of Signaller BILLY SEENEY, killed in action on July 2, 1916 ; aged 18.
“ Sleep on, dear one, in your foreign grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We shall remember thee.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Sisters and Brother.

WATSON.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR JAMES (JIM), dearly beloved son of Thomas and the late Harriett Watson, 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was killed in action on July 2, 1916.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.”
—From his Father, Brothers and Sisters.

WHITE.—In loving memory of ALBERT JAMES, dearly beloved husband of Ethel Maud White, and eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. James White, of 70 Murray Road, who gave his life for his country on June 30, 1917.

29th Sep 1917. Blackberry Picking

BLACKBERRY PICKING.-During the past fortnight the scholars of various schools in Rugby and the neighbouring villages have picked 2 tons of blackberries, to be used to make jam for the Army and Navy.

UTILITY POULTRY KEEPERS’ MEETING.-There was a satisfactory attendance at a meeting held at the Eagle Hotel on Saturday to consider the formation of a branch of the National Utility Poultry Society, which, in conjunction with the Agricultural Organisation Society, is seeking to put the poultry industry on a business footing. Mr Walter Barnett (Bilton) presided, supported by Mrs Barnett, Mr E B Covington, Mr W T Fischer, &c. Mr H Tarbox read letters from a number of interested poultry keepers ; from the Secretary of the N.U.P.S, and from Capt Peirson Webber, the County Council expert, regretting inability to be present that day. After discussion, it was resolved to form a society for Rugby and district, and to convene a further meeting when the experts can tend to give details of the working of similar existing branches.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CANTEENS.

It has been decided to close – at any rate, temporarily – the Food Economy Canteen opened at New Bilton in July last, and meals will not be obtainable there after today (Saturday). Although there is no doubt that if workers had been brought to realise that meals can be obtained there far cheaper than they could be prepared at home, the canteen has not been well patronised, and there has been a weekly loss since it opened. It is gratifying to note, on the other hand, that the Chester Street canteen continues to be a great success, and there are hopes of an extension in the accommodation. Not only is bread conserved, but, thanks to the willing aid of enthusiastic honorary helpers and to the hearty co-operation of an efficient paid staff, the prices as at New Bilton, rule low for very satisfying meals. The place is always full at meal times, and many people purchase cooked food to take home. Working expenses are being met, and a weekly profit, which will go to the liquidation of the debt incurred in setting up the canteen, is being made.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier Reg Covington, R.F.A, son of Mr Richard Covington, has been gassed during the recent fighting.

The latest list of war honours contains the name of Pte J French (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte George Ruddle, of James Street, Rugby, is reported missing, believed killed. From his comrades it was gathered that he was almost certainly killed. He was in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Sergt L C Cox, elder son of Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth House, Popular Grove, Rugby, after much active service in France with the King’s Royal Rifles, during which time he was wounded four times has passed first class in a special course of instruction and sails for Africa this weekend to join the King’s African Rifles. His younger Brother Albert, also with experience of the fighting in France, being twice mentioned and awarded the Military Medal, has been presented as a second-lieutenant in the King’s Liverpool Regiment.

Official intimation has been received from the War Office, that Bombardier S G Smith, son of Mrs Smith, 28 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, was killed in action in France on August 18th. He was formerly a member of the of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, and was employed by the Rover Company, Coventry when called up. A letter from the officer commanding the battalion speaks in high terms of Bombardier Smith’s performance of his duties.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.

CAPT E G PASSMORE, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr S A Passmore, is in hospital at Dieppe suffering from trench fever.

News has reached the village that Pte Stowe, who was reported missing, is now a prisoner of war. This is the second prisoner of war from this village, Pte Roberts having been wounded in the leg and taken prisoner a few months ago.

BRETFORD.

KILLED IN ACTION.-Mrs Archer College, Hill Farm, Bretford, has been notified that her husband, Pte Archer Colledge, Royal Warwicks, was killed in France on September 3rd. Pte College, who went to the front in June last, lost his life in his first engagement. He was educated at Pailton Church School and was employed at Coventry Ordnance Works until called up in March last. Pte College’s Company Officer, in a letter to Mrs College, writes :- “ Although he had recently joined us, by his cheeriness and courage he soon made himself liked, and his platoon feel his loss keenly, as I do myself.” A comrade of Pte College’s, who has been in continuous action for the last 16 months, writes that the present fighting is the bitterest he has yet experienced. Pte College was 29 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

TO HELP THE PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

AN IMPORTANT EVENT.

To-day (Saturday) an attractive event will take place in Benn’s Field, North Street, Rugby, in aid of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, for which a continuous and increasing flow of money is needed. The effort will consist of a great show and sale of agricultural and horticultural produce, which is being freely given by generous donors in the town and district.

Mr J J McKinnell, C.C, chairman of the Urban District Council, is the chairman of the committee, and, supported by leading residents, will open the affair at 2.30 p.m.

In the horticultural section 26 prizes are offered for competition ; and, of course, contributions of produce merely for sale will be gladly received. Already a large number of sheep, lambs, pig, rabbits, and poultry have been promised for the agricultural department ; and the auctioneers of the town, who will sell the goods, are giving their services gratuitously, as well as all others who are working so energetically to ensure success, and it only remains for the public to give their attendance-and their money-for which there will be plenty of bargains.

A large marquee. which will be lighted by electricity in the evening, will be provided ; and apart from the exhibition and sale, there will be various competitions and side-shows of an attractive nature. These will include a fire brigade competition-always an interesting item-and four brigades from Coventry will be represented in this. There will be dancing also for the young people.

For a small admission fee of 6d the visitor will, therefore, get plenty of money.

The Committee consists of Messrs. A Bell, chairman ; J Cash, hon treasurer ; G Allford, J Reginald Barker, C Cockerel, F Dunkerley, J Harker, G Harrowing, G Henton, J P Lennon, C Mewis, J J   Scrivener, F Starmore, with J R Blyth and H Lovell, joint hon secretaries.

DEATHS.

COLLEDGE.—In ever-loving memory of Private ARCHER COLLEDGE, 20249 Royal Warwickshire Regt., killed in action on 3rd September, 1917, somewhere in France, aged 29 years.
A loving husband, true and kind,
A better father you’d never find ;
But He who orders all things best,
Has given to him eternal rest.
The end was bitter, the shock severe,
To part with one we loved most dear.
We did not see him die or hear him say goodbye ;
We miss him and mourn for him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the days is his young life has seen.
—Deeply mourned by his Wife and Child.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed at the battle of Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915, son of the late James Barnett and Mrs. Sansome, 5 Gas Street. Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Step-father, Brothers, Winnie and May.
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of my pal, Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxford and Bucks, killed in action September 25th, 1915.
Two years had passed, my heart’s still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face
No pal on earth can fill his place.
BILLIE WEBB, somewhere in France.

BROWN.—In loving memory of our dear Son & Brother, PERCY EDWIN BROWN, who was killed in action on September 25th, 1915.
Sleep on dear son and brother in your far off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts,
We will remember thee.
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of PRIVATE C. CASHMORE, Oxon & Bucks L.I., who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
Our hero gone, but not forgotten,
Never shall his memory fade ;
Our sad thoughts so often wonder
To that far-off land where he is laid.
Yes, we think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall,
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his photo on the wall.
—From his loving Wife and Children.

EMERY.—In loving memory of ERNEST HARRY EMERY, Bdr. R.F.A., accidentally killed whilst on active service with the Salonica Forces, Oct. 1st, 1916. Interred in Mekes Cemetery.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, FRED, who was killed in France on Sept. 25th, 1915.
From POLLIE AND SARAH.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, JOHN HINKS, of 33 Essex Street, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who fell asleep in action in France on September 25th, 1915.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave,
Of a dear son and soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand,
When we meet again in the better land.”
—Not for granted by his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

STENT.—In loving memory of my dear son, Corpl. P. V. STENT, who was killed in action at Loos, on September 25th, 1915.
“ Two years have passed and friends around us
Think, perhaps, the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow,
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Silently mourned by his loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

STENT.—In loving memory of PERCY VICTOR STENT, who was killed at Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915. “ Death divides, but memory lingers.”—From Mr. and Mrs. HARBAN and family.

STONE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, PTE. C. G. STONE, who was wounded 28th Sept., and died the 1st October, 1915.
“ They miss him most who loved him best.”
—From his loving wife Amy.

WHITBREAD.—2nd Lieut. BASIL, 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Reported missing 22 July, 1916 ; now presumed to have been killed in action on that date.

WEST.—In proud and loving memory of FRANK WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel R.F.A. (T.), who was killed near Pozieres on September 28, 1916 ; aged 33.—“ We have found safety with all things undying.”

26th May 1917. Rugby & District War Prisoners’ Flag Day

PRISONERS OF WAR.—Owing to the greatly increased cost of the food parcels to the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, the committee are faced with the almost exhaustion of their funds, and to put them on a sound financial basis to meet the expenses of the coming months a special effort is being made on similar to last year. An appeal for donations has been issued, and a flag day will be held throughout the town and all the adjoining villages on Saturday next, June 2nd. It is interesting to note that a similar effort last year resulted in £50 being raised, and the committee are anxious that this year’s effort shall not fall short of that sum, especially as the expenses now, after allowing for guarantees, are no less than £100 per month. The whole of the organisation and arrangements for this effort have been entrusted to the indefatigable secretary, Mr J R Barker, who informs us that there has already been a very gratifying response to the appeal for donations, but a big effort must yet be made by the general public on June 2nd to enable the committee to secure the funds necessary to carry on their work during the next few months. We therefore appeal to the public to give generously when they buy their flags on War Prisoners’ Day.

WAR PRISONERS’ GRATITUDE.

The following are extracts from a few of the many messages received by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee from Rugby and district men interned in prison camps in Germany :-

PTE P J JESSETT (Old Bilton). Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Schneidemuhl. “ I am writing to thank you and the committee and all my kind friends in and around Rugby for the great kindness they have done in sending me food, for which I send my deepest thanks. I am pleased to say I am getting six good parcels a month of very nice eatables.”

PTE W F COLLEDGE (Rugby), Royal Regiment. Interned Dulmen. “ I am receiving your weekly in good condition, which are most acceptable

PTE W BRUCE (Easenhall), South Staffs Regiment. Interned Friedrichsfeld. “ I am receiving your parcels quite safely and in good condition. Thanks for same.”

PTE P J COLLOP (Monks Kirby), Suffolk Regiment. Interned at Friedrichsfeld. “ Just a line to say I am receiving the parcels from you all right, for which I am very grateful, as they are a great benefit.”

CORPL. T McDONAGH, South Staffs Regiment. Interned at Langenaalra. “ I am receiving your parcels safely and in good condition, for which I thank you very much.”

GUNNER T OWEN (Rugby), R.F.A. Interned at Wittenberg. “ I am pleased to say I am receiving parcels in good condition, and the contents quite satisfactory. Thanking you and all concerned for same.”

PTE R IRELAND, Northants Regiment. Interned Merneburg. “ I am writing thanking yourself and subscribers for parcels, which I have received regularly for the last eighteen months from Rugby.”

SERGT W KEMPTON (Rugby), 1st Rifle Brigade. Interned at Dulmen. “ I am receiving your parcels under the new scheme quite good in contents and condition.”

RIFLEMAN L J SMITH (Rugby), Rifle Brigade. Interned at Friedrichafeld. Writes saying he is receiving all parcels, and saying the only change to requires in the contents of the parcels is to send tobacco instead of cigarettes. A further card received from him on May 1st acknowledges receipt of a special tobacco parcel sent from Rugby on November 25th, which he received on 18th March. Over five months elapsed before acknowledgment of the receipt of this particular parcel reached the committee—a frequent occurrence, but a sure proof that no matter what delays there may be the parcels eventually get to the men.”

RIFLEMAN L WOOD (Rugby), Rifle Brigade. Interned at Friedrichafeld. “ I acknowledge receipt of your parcels of provisions, also underclothing, with best thanks.”

PTE W LINES (Bishops Itchington), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Sennelager. “ I wish to express my best thanks to you for the parcels, which I receive quite safely. Yours gratefully.” SERGT B G HITCHCOX (Rugby), Canadians. Interned at Soltan. “ This note is to let you know that the parcels are arriving safely through the Red Cross.”

PTE S C BEARD (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Munster. “ Just a line to let you know I am receiving parcels correct, and to thank one and all very kindly for same.”

SERGT A PHELPS (Rugby), 1st Rifle Brigade. Interned at Zerlist. “ Just a line to say I am getting the parcels for which you are contributing quite all right, and for the same I tender sincere thanks.”

PTE P MACK (Hilmorton), Oxford and Bucks L.I. Interned at Wahn. “ Very pleased to say I am receiving your parcels through the Regimental Care Committee in the best of condition.”

PTE J T GRANT (Napton), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Schneidemuhl. “ Many thanks for your parcels which I am receiving regularly and in good condition.”

PTE A KING (Hillmorton), Royal Scots. Interned at Minden. “ I am getting your parcels through all right and in good condition. Have also received a parcel of clothing.”

LANCE-CORPL A COWLEY (Bishops Itchington), Coldstream Guards. Interned at Dolmen. “ Thank you so much for the nice parcels you have sent to me. I cannot thank you and the other kind people enough for the nice things which I have received.”

GUNNER H CROFTS (Crick), R.F.A. Interned at Friedrichsfeld. “ Many thanks for parcels of food and clothing which I continue to receive from your fund, all in good condition. Give my thanks to all at Rugby.”

PTE M E CLEAVER (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Munster. “ I am pleased to say that I receive the parcels regularly and in good condition. The contents are very well assorted.”

These letters and many hundreds more may be seen at the Hon Secretary’s Office, 9 Regent Street, Rugby.

They show that the food parcels are absolutely essential, and that they get to the men safely.

The Rugby Committer are making a special effort to raise further funds to enable them to meet the increased cost of the parcels, and it is hoped a very generous response will be made by the general public on War Prisoners’ Flag Day, Saturday, June 2nd.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The Local Government Board have considered the question of the release for military service of Dr Gibbons Ward, deputy medical officer of health for the Mid-Warwickshire combined district, as well as medical officer of health for Leamington, and in view of all the offices now held by Dr Ward the Board have told the Central Medical War Committee that he cannot be spared at present.

Corpl W T Merrick, son of Mr T Merrick, Browsover, was wounded in Salonica on April 25th in the neck and left shoulder.

Mr & Mrs Deacon, of Newbold-on-Avon, received official intimation on Thursday that their son, Pte J Deacon, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was wounded in Salonica on May 10th. He is 21 years of age, and was employed at Mr Hunter’s Carriage Works prior to the War.

Mr T H Loveland, monotype mechanic, employed by the “ Advertiser ” Company, has this week joined the Colours. Mr Loveland is a Past Chief Ranger of the Loyal Stephenson A.O.F, and Thursday, before leaving, Mr W J Torrance, on behalf of the officials and members of the Court, presented him with a useful wrist watch as a mark of esteem and appreciation of his services in all the offices has passed through.

A queer experience recently befel Pte W Liggins, of the Army Veterinary Corps, who spent final leave in Rugby this week. One day, when entered the stable at the depot, he recognised one of the horses as one which was commandeered from his mother, Mrs Liggins, of James Street, and when he called the animal by its name it showed unmistakable signs of recognition.

The name of Co-Sergt-Major A C Tomlinson, Rugby, of the old “ E ” Company, R.W.R. was included in the list of officers and men mentioned for distinguished service in Field-Marshal Sir Douglas Haig’s recent despatch. Sergt-Major Tomlinson has now left the Army, but has made application for a commission.

The death has occurred of Pte Colledge, of a Canadian Regiment, son of Mrs Cleaver, and stepson of Mr T Cleaver, signalman, Benn Street, Rugby. Deceased was born at Long Lawford, but came to live at Rugby in his early years. When a young man, he was a prominent Rugby forward, a member of the Rugby Old Boys, and also a member of New Bilton St Oswald’s Football Team. He was also a member of the Britannia Band. Before emigrating to Canada about five years ago, he was employed at the B.T.H as a moulder, and he came back from Canada with a draft of soldiers some little time ago. In a letter from his Commanding officer to the Rev C T Aston, of Rugby, says : “ One of our stretcher-bearers informed me that Colledge went out to dress a friend who was wounded, and lying in the open, and evidently was instantly killed while engaged in this task. He was buried near where fell he fell on the battlefield, and when it is possible a cross will be erected to his memory. A letter of sympathy from the Commanding Officer has also been sent to Mrs Colledge. He leaves widow in Canada.

DISTRICTS APPEAL TRIBUNAL.
Held at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, on Friday last week. Present : Messrs K Rotherham (who presided), W Johnson, jun, G A Loveitt, and A Craig. Military representative : Lieut M E T Wratislaw. Agricultural representative : Mr J E Cox.

APPEAL FROM GRANDBOROUGH.
Mr Gilk, of Grandborough, appealed for Harry Rabin (26), carter and shepherd, passed for general service, stating that Rabin was the only man employed on a farm of 295 acres. He said he could not manage with a substitute who knew nothing about the work.—The Chairman : We all have to have substitutes and have to teach them.—Lieut Wratialaw said a substitute had been sent, but Mr Gilks would not take the man until he knew the result of that appeal.—Mr Cox said that, according to the recommendation given the substitute by two farmers, Mr Gilks should give the man a trial.-The Chairman : You have not taken the trouble to try the man. The appeal must certainly be dismissed.

A LONELY SPOT.
Coming to the case of Wm Cox, wagoner, The Ford, Churchover, Lieut Wratislaw said the employer—Mr Towers—had accepted a substitute.—Cox said he had got three children, one of whom was a cripple, and they had to be nearly 1½miles for bread and groceries.—Lieut Wratislaw said there was no obligation on Mrs Cox to remain in her present cottage, but Mr Towers was quite willing for her to stay there so that when the husband returned he would find his family in the cottage, and would be able to resume his employment.—The Chairman told Cox they had many cases which were even harder than his, and it was impossible for the Tribunal to do anything for him.—The appeal of the Military would be allowed, but the Tribunal would ask them to give 28 days, so that some arrangement could be made for the wife and family.

SCAVENGING CONTRACTORS TO JOIN UP.
The Rugby Rural Tribunal had exempted till next Michaelmas Samuel Upton, 30 New Street, New Bilton, on the ground that, with his brother George, he held a scavenging contract under the Rugby Rural District Council.-Lieut Wratislaw said in Upton’s family there were five people on about 35 acres of land, not one of whom was serving.—Mr Worthington said the man and his brother did the scavenging at Hillmorton and Clifton, which took them four days a week. The brothers held 35 acres of land, and the father an additional 37 acres.-Mr J E Cox said if the scavenging took four days a week it was evident the brothers could not devote very much time to the land. If Mr Geo Upton could get someone to assist him with the scavenging it looked as if his brother could be released.—The Chairman : That is the view of the Tribunal.—Mr Cox said if the scavenging could be dropped in one village, it could be dropped in another.—Mr Worthington : I don’t know : there is a good deal of disease in the village.—Mr Cox : There will probably be less if they don’t it.—The Chairman said the Tribunal were unanimously of the opinion that the appeal should be upheld.

MASTER BUTCHER’S MISLEADING STATEMENT.
Being of opinion that the slaughterers Rugby had been reduced to a minimum, the Rugby Urban Tribunal had refused to withdraw the conditional exemption granted to Fredk Wm Burbery (37), master butcher, 123 Abbey Street. Hence the Military appeal.—Lieut Wratislaw said in his original application Burbery stated : “ I have lost my assistant, and do my own killing, dressing, and selling.” He should call evidence to show that the “ assistant ” was only a boy who ran errands, and that at the time the application was filed a man named Robinson was doing the slaughtering.

Mr Highton, Military representative for Rugby, gave evidence of what transpired at the local Tribunal on April 26th, when Burbery stated that he killed a beast, seven sheep, two pigs, and one calf a week.—Mr Harold Eaden : He did not represent that he himself killed the beast ?—Mr Highton : I say most emphatically that he did.—Mr Eaden : Do you know from your knowledge that one man cannot kill a beast by himself ?—A : I know there are certain men called slaughterers, who are always supposed to do the killing.

John Henry Robinson said he was a slaughterman in the employ of Mr Dodwell. About two years ago he started killing for Burbery, who was then a foreign meat butcher, and he had an arrangement with him whereby he was paid 2s 6d for each beast and 2d for each sheep killed. He went into Burbery’s employ in April, 1915, and from that time until the 30th of April this year for him. During that time Burbery killed nothing himself to his knowledge. He was not what might be called a slaughterman. On April 30th, when in the ordinary way he went across to do Burbery’s slaughtering, he found the place shut up and the work done.

Mr Eaden : You felt rather aggrieved ?—A : Yes. Q : Your feelings towards Burbery are not the best ?-A : It was not a nice trick to serve me.—Q : You are of military age and a general service man ?—A : Yes.—It is necessary under this arrangement between the Rugby Butchers’ Association and the Tribunal that you should do a certain amount of slaughtering ? Yes.—Not only for Mr Dodwell and others, but formerly for Mr Burbery ? Yes.—In consideration doing all that slaughtering, you are allowed to remain in civil employment ? Yes.—Mr Eaden : If you lost Mr Burbery’s slaughtering it rather imperils your position ?

The Chairman : That is rather for the Military to say.—Mr Eaden : It shows the attitude.—The Chairman : I don’t think you can say so at all.

Mr Eaden : A man who has been in the butchery trade for years, and has a knowledge of meat, might pick it up in two years ?—Witness : He might pick a certain amount up, but I could not say he would pick it all up.—Q : Would you agree he is a second-class slaughterman ?7 —A : No.—Q : You don’t call him slaughterman at all ? : No, sir.—Q : Although he helped you for two years ?—A : Yes.—The Chairman said there did not seem to be a shortage of slaughtermen at Rugby. A butcher seemed able get rid of one slaughterman to get another in.—Mr Eaden said Burbery was passed in B(2)—labour abroad.—The Chairman (to Burbery) : The trouble seems to have been that you said you were killing your own animals, which you were not doing.—Mr Eaden asked Burbery how many sheep he had killed this year without assistance ? and he replied 50 or 60. He had dressed them himself, and got them ready for the shop.

The Chairman thought the man might be used as a substitute.

Lieut Wratislaw said, subject to Mr Reeve passing him as a slaughterman (which he doubted), they might use Burbery as a substitute for a single man.—Military appeal allowed. Substitution order made, the man to report within seven days.

A GUINEA A MINUTE FOR A SUBSTITUTE.
“ told Mr Pearson (the manager of the Labour Exchange) that I would pay a guinea a minute if he would get me a substitute,” said Mr Sam Robbins, who appealed on behalf of William Law, cabinet maker and undertaker, 11 Hunter Street, Rugby.—Lieut Wratislaw said the Military felt that to act as an undertaker did not justify the retention of a category A man.—Mr Worthington said that at the outbreak of war the firm employed between 110 and 120 men, and now they had only seven left. He thought the Tribunal would agree that few firms had been more patriotic.—The Chairman asked how many of the men had gone into the Army ? Mr Robbins replied that the majority had done so, and about 10 per cent. had gone into munitions.—Mr Worthington said Mr Robbins never appealed for a man unless he was the last man left in department. This was the only cabinet-maker now left, whereas prior to the war the firm employed between 20 and 30 cabinet-makers. The Chairman said they quite felt that Mr Robbins had got a difficult job, and had been depleted most tremendously, but that was not what they were there for.—Mr Worthington : The man is 36 years age.—Lieut Wratislaw : And they are going to take up to 50. The only thing against this man is—he is a general service man, and a cabinet-maker is not of such high importance at the present time.—The Chairman said they wanted to help Robbins as much as they could. The Military appeal should be upheld, but they would give till August 8th, and no further application could made without leave, which meant that before the date named Mr Robbins must do all he could to get somebody else.

SEEDSMAN’S EXEMPTION OPPOSED.
Conditional exemption whilst in his present occupation as a seedsman, &c, had been granted to Albert Edwd Townsend, 229 Regent Street ; but the Military appealed against this.—Lieut Wratislaw stated that Mr Townsend was 34 years of age, and had been passed for general service. They said it was a useful business, but it was not in the national interest that a man passed for general service should remain in it. Mr Townsend wife and assistant could manage the shop during his absence.—Mr Eaden argued that the business in seeds carried on by Mr Townsend was at the present time of high national importance. Ninety per cent. of Townsend’s turnover was for vegetable and farm seeds.—Final exemption to July 8th granted.

CONCERT.-An excellent concert was given at the Infirmary V.A.D Hospital on Thursday evening last week. All the artists, who displayed remarkable talent, are at present patients in the hospital, and the programme was highly appreciated by their fellow patients and the hospital staff. Songs were rendered by Ptes Head, Orange, Pinnell, Astridge, Heath, and Ord. Several of the wounded boys gave monologues and turns during the second half of the entertainment. They included Pte Green, ventriloquist ; Rifleman Pinnell, who was very funny as a Cockney girl at the theatre ; and two knockabout comedians, Whitwell and Wilson, both of whom deserve a wider range of popularity.

SALE OF WASTE PAPER CONTROLLED.

Under an Order issued by the Minister of Munitions no person shall offer to purchase or take delivery of any waste paper except under and in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the Royal Commission on paper, and no person shall offer to sell, supply, or deliver any waste paper except to the holders of such licences, and in accordance with the terms of such permits to purchase or take delivery as aforesaid.

Every holder of a permit under this Order shall furnish such return as to his purchases, sales, and deliveries of waste paper as shall be required by the Royal Commission on Paper.

Mr J R Barker, who is taking the paper collected by the Rugby Waste Paper Committee, sorting and baling same, and sending to the paper mills to re-pulped, has been granted the necessary permit.

PRIVILEGED NO LONGER.-The rooks which have for generations built their nests and reared their young in the topmost boughs of the stately elms in the School Close have always enjoyed a privilege extended to very few others of their species. The hand of the destroyer may have been set against rooks in the countryside, but so long as the fledglings of the School Close remained within the sacred precincts of their elms seater[?] they belonged to a race apart from the ordinary rook, and no shot gun or rook rifle has ever been aimed at them. But with the need to conserve our food supply comes also the need to protect it from the ravages of voracious rooks, and so during the last week, on quiet evenings when the birds have been taking an airing on the side of their nests or on the boughs in the immediate vicinity, a gentleman with a steady eye and trusty rook rifle has been taking heavy toll of them.

DEATHS.

BROWN.—In loving memory of Pte WILIE BROWN, King’s Own Scottish Borderers, son of Mrs. Brown, 15 Sandradice Street, Dundee. At rest.
—SAM and DORIS.

HARRATT.—On April 23rd (killed in action in Mesopotamia), Corpl. T. HARRATT. Also on May 3rd (killed in action in France), Pte. JOSEPH HARRATT, both late Monks Kirby.

JONES.—On April 29th, Corpl. DAVID JOHN JONES (Jack), Essex Regiment, who was killed in France, the beloved third son of John and Mary Jones, the Red House, Shuckburgh ; aged 28.
“ We love him—oh ! no tongue can tell
How much we love him and how well ;
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldier’s grave.”

LEESON.—Killed in action on March 20th, ALBERT WILFRED (BERT). Sergeant in Northampton Regiment, dearly beloved third son of Mr. and Mrs. Leeson, Leicester, and dearly beloved grandson and nephew of Mr. and Mrs Leeson, Newbold-on-Avon ; aged 21 years and 11 months.
“ Not gone from memory.
Not gone from love ;
But waiting for with his brother
In our Father’s home above.”

IN MEMORIAM.

HUNT.—In loving memory husband, ALBERT JOHN HUNT, Warrant Officer of the 15th Brigade, R.H.A., of the immortal 29th Division, killed in action in Gallipoli on May 27, 1916.
“ They whom Thy love hath guarded long.
They whom Thy care hath rendered strong.
In love and faith.
Their heart strings round Thy heart entwine.
They are and ever will be Thine :
In life, in death.”

Cox, Frederick William. Died 20th Apr 1917

Frederick William COX, was born in late 1893 in Long Lawford, his birth being registered in Rugby.   He was the son of Joseph Edgar Cox J.P., C.C., a farmer, of Long Lawford, who was born in Newbold in about 1864, and his wife, Mary Elizabeth née Parriss Cox, who was born in Lamington, Warwickshire, also in about 1864. Joseph and Elizabeth’s marriage was registered in Rugby in mid-1891.

In 1901, the family were living in the ‘Farm House’ in Long Lawford – this was presumably Lodge Farm, where his father, Joseph, had lived with his family in 1891 and where Joseph Edgar Cox and his family would continue to live in 1911, when his own children included Joseph Parris Cox, 19; Frederick William Cox, 17 died; George Herbert Cox, 16; Ernest Edgar Cox, 14; Alfred Leslie Cox, 12; and Roland Lee Cox, 7.

Frederick William Cox attended Lawrence Sherriff School and joined up at the beginning of the war, as did his brother, George; they were both in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

Frederick was No: 2280 in the 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, and was later in the Corps of Hussars, as No: 310088. His Medal Card shows that he went to No.3 Theatre of War, Egypt on 20 April 1915. A report in the Rugby Advertiser[1] in December 1915 noted that Frederick and George ‘… have been at the Dardenelles for some time’.   ‘Trooper F W Cox has been suffering from dysentery, but is now better, and is at Cyprus, …’ at that same date it recounted that ‘… his brother, Trooper G H Cox, is ill with jaundice, at Lemnos.’

George Herbert Cox was No. 2281 in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, thus joining up his brother, and he also went into the Egypt theatre of war on 20 April 1915, presumably having been with his brother since enlisting with him. He later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps as No. 164511.

The eldest son, Joseph Parris Cox, and his younger brother, Ernest Edgar Cox,[2] both joined up in December 1915, under Lord Derby’s scheme.[3] Together with George Herbert Cox, these three of Frederick’s brothers would survive the war.[4]

To return to Frederick Cox’s service in the 1/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, they …

… mobilised in August 1914, and moved to Bury St Edmunds and then on 31 August 1914, moved to Newbury and in November 1914 to Sheringham in Norfolk, and on 17 December to Norwich.

On 11 April 1915 they sailed from Avonmouth for Egypt on ‘Wayfarer’, but were torpedoed when 60 miles NW of Scilly Isles. Although the ship did not sink, the horses had to be rescued and volunteers of the regiment saved 763 horses, receiving a Military Cross and twelve Meritorious Service Medals. They were towed to Queenstown (Ireland) and finally sailed for Egypt and arrived at Alexandria on 24 April.

They were moved to Gallipoli for service as dismounted infantry and on 18 August 1915, landed at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli. They took part in the attack on Chocolate Hill and Hill 112 [the Battle of Scimitar Hill] on 21 August. By early September 1915, severe sickness together with battle casualties resulted in temporary reorganisation, merging with 1/1st Gloucestershire and 1/1st Worcestershire Yeomanry to form 1st South Midland Regiment, 1st Composite Mounted Brigade. However, they continued in trench warfare activities in the line in the Green Hill and Chocolate Hill sectors until evacuated to Mudros on 31 October 1915.

By December 1915 they had withdrawn from Gallipoli and returned to Egypt, where in January 1916, the brigade became an independent command and was renamed as the 5th Mounted Brigade, and in February 1917, was assigned to the Imperial/Australian Mounted Division, and saw action at the First and Second Battles of Gaza, the Charge at Huj as well as the Battle of Mughar Ridge and the Battle of Jerusalem.[5]

At some date, Frederick was promoted to Lance Corporal in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

On 28 February 1917, the cavalry of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force [EEF] – including the 1/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry entered Khan Yunus, which was between the Egyptian border and Deir el Belah, causing the Turks to withdraw to Gaza and Beersheba. The railway was pushed forward to Deir el Belah, which became the railhead on 4 April 1917, and an aerodrome and camps were established there.

In April, the 5th Mounted Brigade (under Brigadier General E. A. Wiggin) comprising the Warwickshire Yeomanry together with the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars and the Worcestershire Yeomanry, were part of the Australian and New Zealand Mounted Division (under Major General Sir H.G. Chauvel).

The First Battle of Gaza had been fought by the mounted divisions during an ‘encounter battle’ when speed and surprise were emphasised. Then Gaza had been an outpost garrisoned by a strong detachment on the flank of a line stretching eastwards from the Mediterranean Sea.

During the three weeks between the First and Second Battles of Gaza, the town was quickly developed into the strongest point in a series of strongly entrenched positions … The Ottoman defenders not only increased the width and depth of their front lines, they developed mutually supporting strong redoubts on ideal defensive ground.

The construction of these defences changed the nature of the Second Battle of Gaza, fought from 17 to 19 April 1917, to an infantry frontal attack across open ground against well prepared entrenchments, with mounted troops in a supporting role. …

The strength of the Ottoman fortifications and the determination of their soldiers defeated the EEF. The EEF’s strength, which before the two battles for Gaza could have supported an advance into Palestine, was now decimated. Murray commanding the EEF and Dobell commanding Eastern Force were relieved of their commands and sent back to England.[6]

It was probably during the Second Battle of Gaza that Frederick William Cox sustained the wounds from which he died, aged 23, on 20 April 1917. He was buried at Deir el Belah Cemetery, Palestine in grave ref: A.128.

Deir El Belah is in Palestine about 16 kilometres east of the Egyptian border, and 20 kilometres south-west of Gaza. The cemetery was begun towards the end of March 1917 and remained in use until March 1919. Most of the burials were made either from field ambulances from March to June 1917, or from April 1917 from Casualty Clearing Stations, and the 69th General Hospital.

Frederick’s death was reported in the Rugby Advertiser, where a memorial notice was also later posted.[7] He was awarded the Victory and British medals and the 1915 Star. He is remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gate, and also on the Old Laurentians Memorial and the Newbold Memorial.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Frederick William COX was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, April 2017.

[1]       Rugby Advertiser, 11 December 1915.

[2]       Ernest Edgar Cox initially joined up in Rugby on 8 December 1915, and one record suggests a short time in the 3rd Bn., Gloucestershire Regiment on 16 January 1917, and soon after, on 5 April 1917, transferred to the 3rd Bn., Machine Gun Corps, No:97564 [?also No.32817]; he survived the war and his Service Records exist.   He went to France, Basrah, Suez and Port Said during his war service.

[3]       Rugby Advertiser, 11 December 1915.

[4]       Joseph Parris Cox and Ernest Edgar Cox were Executors of their father, Joseph’s Will in 1932.

[5]       Edited from http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-yeomanry-regiments-of-1914-1918/warwickshire-yeomanry/ and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warwickshire_Yeomanry.

[6]         https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinai_and_Palestine_Campaign#First_Battle_of_Gaza.2C_26_March

[7]       Rugby Advertiser, 28 April 1917 and 5 May 1917 respectively.

3rd Mar 1917. Kilsby Soldier Decorated with the Albert Medal.

KILSBY SOLDIER DECORATED WITH THE ALBERT MEDAL.

Pte Joseph Thomas Laurence, second son of Mr and Mrs J Laurence, of Kilsby, has recently been decorated by the King with the Albert Medal for saving life on land. Pte Laurence is in the Army Serviced Corps, and has been out in France just two years. While a German 21-centimetre shell, in which several holes had been bored, was being ” steamed ” in a laboratory for the purpose of investigation, the box of shaving in which it was packed caught fire. The officer in charge of the laboratory at once sent for help to the nearest Army Service Corps fire station, ordered all persons to leave the building, and warned the inhabitants of the neighbouring houses that a serious explosion was imminent. On receipt of the request for help Pte Laurence was one of those who at once collected fire extinguishers and proceeded by motor to the laboratory. They entered the building, played on the fire, which had spread considerably, and after about two minutes were able to reach the burning shell, which they dragged into the yard and extinguished. At any moment after the fire broke out the shell might have exploded with disastrous results. Pte Laurence has just been on a visit to his home at Kilsby.

PROMOTION FOR MAJOR VISCOUNT FEILDING, D.S.O.

Major Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, is promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel as Assistant Adjutant and Quartermaster-General of the 8th Division. Viscount Feilding’s promotion has been very rapid, inasmuch as he re-joined from the Special Reserve as Junior Lieutenant Coldstream Guards.

OLD MURRAYIAN HONOURED.

Corpl Edwin Welsh, of the Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr E Welsh, 23 Oxford Street, has been awarded the Military Medal. Corpl Welsh, who is 21 years of age, was member of the old “ E ” Company, and went to France with them. He was an old Murrayian, and was at one time a member of the School Fifteen.

MURRAY SCHOOL AND THE WAR LOAN.

At the request of Dr David, the scholars attending the Murray School drew and painted nearly one hundred posters, which were distributed in the town for exhibition in shop windows. In addition, a number of attractive posters, which were changed every day, were exhibited outside the School. These were entirely the work of the boys. The Penny Bank and War Savings scheme, which is confined to boys attending the School, showed considerable improvement during the period devoted to the War Loan Campaign.

TWO SONS REPORTED DEAD.

Mrs H Hunt, of 99 Victoria Street, New Bilton, has received official information that her eldest son, Pte Leonard John Hopkins, Royal Marines, was killed in action on February 2nd. Pte Hopkins, who was 19 years of age, enlisted at the commencement of the war, prior to which he was employed at the B.T.H. He was an old St Oswald’s boy. Another son of Mrs Hunt, Pte Harold Hopkins, R.W.R, who had been missing since July 14th, 1916, was last week reported killed on that date.

ANOTHER B.T.H AIRMAN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lieut W E[?] Carse, .F.C, was killed in action while flying on February 18th. Before enlisting at the commencement of the War, Lieut Carse was employed in the Test Department at the B.T.H.

MIDLAND OFFICERS HONOURED.

For valuable services rendered in connection with the war the names of the following officers have, amongst others, been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War : Beech, Lieut-Col R J, Warwickshire Yeomanry : Elton, Lieut-Col A G G, R.W.R ; Fairbrother, Capt W H, R.W.R.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In the recent fighting on the Somme, Pte A Parsons, of the H.A.C,s son of Mr W H W Parsons, of Rugby, was wounded, and is now in Hospital in England.

The many friends of Dr and Mrs Relton will be pleased to hear that their son, Lieut B C Relton, who was dangerously wounded in action on the Tigris, is now making a good recovery. On Monday Dr Relton received a telegram from his son, in which he said he was doing well, and had embarked for Bombay.

Pte W Scarlett, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr H Scarlett, of Long Lawford, has been admitted to the British General Hospital at Sheikle Sard, suffering from severe wounds.

Mr and Mrs J H Phillips, of St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, have received news of the death from wounds received in action in France of their eldest son, Capt E S Phillips, of the Border Regiment. The deceased officer enlisted in the Oxon and Bucks L.I in September, 1914. He was given a commission in the 8th Battalion Border Regiment in November, 1914. He went to France September 1915, and was promoted Lieutenant in November, 1915. After being in several actions on the Somme, he was invalided home September, 1916. He rejoined his regiment on November 30th, 1916, and was promoted to Captain in December. He died on February 21st, aged 22 years. His Colonel writes : “ He was a most excellent young officer, always willing and cheerful. During the time when he was in charge of the Machine Gun Detachment of the Battalion he did very good work. He was very plucky under fire, and a very good leader. We shall all miss a cheery plucky comrade, and a great favourite in the Battalion.”

Lieut A B Crump, South African Heavy Artillery, has been promoted to Captain, R.G.A.

MR C J Packwood, of Warwick Street, has already three sons serving with His Majesty’s Forces. Another son (John N Packwood) is joining up on Monday when he will enter the wireless department of the Royal Naval Reserve.

An interesting occurrence took place at the Training Camp of the 7th Reserve Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment on Wednesday, when three medals, awarded for conspicuous bravery in the field, were presented by Brigadier-General F H Gorges, C.B, D.S.O, commanding South Midland T.F Reserve Brigade. The recipients were : Corpl W Holyoak (Nuneaton), Military Medal ; Pte T Mason (Coventry), Military Medal ; and Pte L G Eaton (Rugby), Distinguished Conduct Medal. During and enemy raid on Messines on May 28, 1915, being in a listening post with one N.C.O and two other men, after being wounded in the head and after losing one of party (killed), Eaton carried on til the raid was successfully passed. This man is also in possession of the Croix de Guerre (French honour).

Driver C E Cox, of the R.F.A, residing in Abbey Street, Rugby, met with an accident in France a few months ago, by which he sustained a fractured skull. He was treated in a hospital at Newcastle and a convalescent home in Northumberland, after which he visited his home in Rugby. On the strength of a medical certificate, he obtained an extension of leave, and returned to his depot on Thursday, February 22nd. His relatives desire to state that there is no truth in the statement which has been made that he was a deserter and was taken to the depot under escort.

PRISONERS OF WAR.

As an outcome of the resolution unanimously passed by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee (reported in another column), by which that body has undertaken to complete the whole cost of six regulation food parcels and 26lbs of bread every month to each of the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, the sujoined letter has been received from headquarters in London :-

THE HON SECRETARY,

Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee,

DEAR SIR,-Sir Starr Jameson and his committee are very pleased to hear that your committee have set before themselves the tack of providing the entire cost of feeding the 67 local men who are prisoners of war in Germany. If this can be done, it speaks very well for the public spirit of a small town like Rugby. We often find that people wonder why the cost of feeding all our prisoners of war is not borne by the British Government. The answer is that there was no unwillingness on the part of our Government to shoulder the burden, but that under the Hague Convention it is the duty of the enemy country to feed and provide clothing for all prisoners of war taken prisoners by that country. The German authorities do not admit that they fail in the duty imposed on them by the Hague Convention in any way, but they are willing to allow gifts to prisoners to any extent. We in England consider that without these “ gifts ” our prisoners would starve.

The entire organisation of sending food and clothing to all our prisoners has now been undertaken by the British Red Cross Society, of which the Central Prisoners of War Committee and its allied associations are a branch. The entire cost of the scheme is estimated to be close upon £1,00 per day, and this is guaranteed by the British Red Cross Society. You will, therefore, see that all local help that can be obtained is as necessary as it is welcome.-Yours faithfully,

P D AGNEW, Managing Director,
Central Prisoners of War Committee,
4 Thurloe Place, London, S.W,
26th February, 1917.

DEATHS.

FRENCH.-In loving and lasting remembrance of Pte. OLIVER FRENCH, Royal War. Regt., youngest son of Mr. R. French, Napton, who died of pneumonia February 10th at a Military Hospital in France ; aged 36 years.

SMITH.-Killed in France, January 29th, GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, Kilsby.

“ Had he ask’d us-well, we know
We should cry, ‘O spare this blow !
Yes, with streaming tears should pray :
Lord, we love him, let him stay.”