5th Oct 1918. Margarine Shortage at Rugby

MARGARINE SHORTAGE AT RUGBY.

The non-arrival of the weekly supply of margarine last week, owing to the railway strike, occasioned considerable inconvenience locally. The majority of the grocers were left without supplies before the end of the week, and many of the late customers were unable to secure their rations. We understand that the supply arrived on Tuesday last, six days late.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Tuesday, Mr William Flint, C.C, presided. Also present: Mrs Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, Mr R P Mason, Mr J W Walton, Mr E Pepper, Mr F A W Shirley, and Mr J R Barker, hon organising secretary.

Mr Barker said the support given to the Fund from all quarters showed a most gratifying increase. The cost of the food parcels, etc, during the month of September was the highest on record, the amount being £517 14s. Yet it had been possible to meet this charge out of current subscriptions and donations, there being a surplus on the month of £2 8s 2d.

As an example of the great growth of the Fund, Mr Barker said the accounts showed that the cost of the food parcels, &c. during the-past three months amounted to £1,349 10s 6d, but so well had the Fund been supported that nearly all this amount had been raised during the same period, the deficit on the past three months’ working being only £73 15s 6d. A substantial sum could, however, be expected as a result of the recent effort organised by the General Help Society, which would wipe out this deficit and leave a good sum to carry forward towards the October parcels, which would not be less than £350.

There were now 142 local men to whom food parcels were being despatched, but he expected to have the addresses of the prison camps of eight other men very soon. Four men had been recently repatriated, who were taken prisoners at the end of March last. He regretted that these men were all badly wounded, and in consequence of the Germans not giving them proper medical and surgical treatment, in addition to half starving them, they reached England in a very serious condition. There had, of course, been no time for them to receive the food parcels which had been despatched to them from England, as in each of these cases the men had been removed from their prison camps for repatriation just before the arrival of their first parcels.

The Chairman said the splendid support the public of Rugby and District had given to the Fund had enabled them, in spite of the huge increase month by month to meet the cost of the food parcels without having to call on the British Red Cross Society to contribute anything towards the cost. He was sure the people of Rugby and district would do all they could to see that this splendid position was maintained.—Mr Shirley said he would like to associate himself with the Chairman’s remarks. He knew the working men of the district especially the railway men, were contributing splendidly, but he would like to see more organised weekly efforts from other works in the town.—Mr Barker said he thought the figures he had given showed that everyone was alive to the importance of regular and continued support. The month’s revenue was not made up by a few individual amounts, but by a very considerable number of small donations, as well as Works collections and organised efforts, so that if people were not subscribing in one particular way, they were doing it in some form or another.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sapper S J J Hodges, R.E, and Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, both of Rugby, have been taken prisoners by the Germans.

Corpl W S Bosworth, Royal Engineers, son of Mr S Bosworth, Rowland Street, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre. He is an old St Matthew’s boy.

Lieut E M W Boughton, M.C. Royal Engineers, has received an immediate award of a bar to the Military Cross which he gained in the Cambrai offensive of last year.

As a result of an egg collection amongst the staff of Mr J J McKinnell’s establishment on Saturday 37 eggs were handed over to the Infirmary V.A.D for the wounded soldiers.

Lance-Corpl A Lester, Royal Engineers, 92 South Street, Rugby, was killed in action on August 17th. For upwards of 18 years he was employed as a platelayer in Rugby. He had served in France since February last.

Mr & Mrs S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, have five sons in the Army. Four are still serving in France and one (Percy) was wounded and taken prisoner, and subsequently transferred to Switzerland. This is believed to be a record for the village.

Pte J J Hancocks, 1st Worcester Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Hancocks, Hillmorton Wharf, who was reported missing on November 22nd last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was employed at the Lodge Factory when he joined the Army on February 23, 1917, at the age of 21 years.

Pte W Lacey, R.W.R, son of Mrs F Holmes, 66 Rowland Street, has been wounded in the shoulder and neck. Pte Lacey, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, joined the Army in September, 1916. He was wounded in the following January. Fourteen months later he was invalided home with trench fever. He has an elder brother also serving in France.

Mrs G Cowley, late of Rugby, has recently received a letter from Major Eric Charles, commanding a battery of heavy gums in Italy, saying : “ Your son is one of the Subalterns in my battery. He has recently been responsible for a very brave act. The battery was being heavily shelled, a shell falling in the gun pit and setting alight to the camouflage, ammunition and the clothing of two of the wounded gun crew. Your son ran in and carried them out, thereby saving their lives.”

Lance-Corpl J A Maycock, M.M. Royal Warwicks, of Rokeby Cottage, Bennett Street, Rugby, was recently killed in a trench raid in Italy. He joined the Army three years ago, and was awarded the Military Medal for bringing in wounded men under heavy shell fire in November, 1917. He has also been twice mentioned in despatches. He was a member of Rugby Congregational Church, and also of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Prior to the War he was employed by Messrs Faulkner, St Matthew Street. He leaves a widow and two little children.

Recently the mother of the only child of the late Pte A W Bottrill received a cheque from his late father’s Captain, together with a letter, as follows :—Thank you so much for the photograph of the latest Coldstream recruit. He is very like his father, and I hope he will be as great a credit to it as his father was. I am sending these few pounds, which I hope you will put to the credit of your boy until the time when he joins the regiment. I hope your boy will be a great comfort to you and a worthy successor to his father. Pte Bottrill, who was killed in France on March 19th, was buried on his child’s third birthday. Lady Sybil Grant acted as godmother to the boy in consideration of the fact that his father was serving in the regiment at the time of the baby’s birth.

RUGBEIAN KILLED IN AUSTRALIA.—News has just been received of the death of Mr W Cox, late of 14 Market Street, Rugby, the result of a railway accident at Brighton, South Australia. Mr Cox emigrated to Australia nearly nine years ago. Two of his three sons have served for some time in the A.I.F. The eldest one at present in France, and the youngest had his discharge early this year after service in Egypt, the Dardanelles, and in France, where he was badly wounded.

HILL.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—News has come through from companions that Pte Henry Cockerill, of the M.G.C and of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of the late Mr T Cockerill and Mrs Cockerill, of Hill, was killed last week by a shell, which also very seriously injured a companion. After joining the Warwickshire Yeomanry, he went to Egypt three years ago, and was on the Seasowe Castle, which was torpedoed when the regiment returned to France.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—The sad news has reached the village that Lander Mann, formerly a choirboy in Stockton Church, has made the great sacrifice on the Western Front. The family, who now live at Rugby, have many friends in the parish, and great sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Mann in their sorrow. The lad was 19 years old.—Wheeler C Cleaver is home on leave from France. He belongs to the now historic Tank Corps, which is doing go much to make victory at the present time.

BRANDON.
ANOTHER SON WOUNDED.—Mr George Harris, who for some time has been in the employ of the L & N.-W Railway Company at Brandon Station, has received news that another of his sons has been wounded. Mr Harris had four sons, who willingly volunteered. One has already lost his life ; a second has just been released from hospital, after being there three years, half of which was spent in bed; the third son now lies in Bath Hospital. Two of his fingers have been amputated, and his left hand is badly damaged. Mr Harris’s fourth son is now with the Engineers in France. Much sympathy is felt for Mr Harris in his fresh trouble.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Several more of the village boys are reported wounded. Pte Harold Priest, Warwickshire Yeomanry, is suffering from a shrapnel wound through his left arm. He is not yet 19 years old, and has only lately gone to the front.—Pte Thos H Tandy, Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was at home less than a fortnight since, is also wounded, but it is hoped not seriously.—Pte Ernest Lane, R.W.R, whose brother Frank was lately reported missing, and whose brother Arthur has been killed, is also wounded, and cannot yet be located. He was formerly porter at Long Itchington Station. Mr & Mrs Joseph Lane, parents of the foregoing, have also received an intimation that their second son, Pte Fred Lane (another former L & N-W employee), is in hospital wounded in the right arm.—Pte Chas Biddle, Gloucester Regiment. is also in hospital suffering from a shrapnel wound in the left knee.—Pte Wm Hyde, South Staffs, is reported badly gassed, having lost his speech and sight, but it is hoped only temporarily.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains a list of 229 names of soldiers and sailors. Of these 27 have been killed in action, or have died on service, three are missing, four are prisoners of war, and 50 are known to have been wounded.

COVENTRY APPEAL TRIBUNAL .

Held on Wednesday. Present: Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and A Craig. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

In support of his appeal for exemption on domestic grounds, Joseph Hayes Davenport, brick setter, Brockhurst (45, B2) explained that he was recently ordered to take up work of national importance by the National Service Department and he accordingly obtained work as a labourer at the B.T.H.—Mr Meredith urged that bricklayers were in great need in the army.— Application refused, but given 21 days to settle up his affairs.

Bourton Page (33, Grade 1), butcher, Wolston, applied for a further exemption. Mr C A Kirby represented appellant, and said his client, who was formerly a C2 man. had now been placed in Grade 1.—Mr Meredith, however, said he did not think the question of age or grade entered into this case. It was a fact that between Coventry and Lawford on the one hand, and Brinklow and Wappenbury on the other, there was no other butcher.—The Chairman : There is very little meat to distribute, but what there is the people are entitled to share.—Mr Meredith : It seems that if one butcher is not left the people in this district will starve, or, rather, have to go without meat.—The Chairman agreed, and also reminded the Tribunal that a very satisfactory agreement had been entered into by appellant and another butcher whereby the latter joined up and was guaranteed financial assistance.—Four months conditional exemption, and excused the V.T.C.

Mr H Eaden represented Charles Francis Graham Hancox (36, Grade III, sedentary), accountant, who asked for a further exemption. He explained that his client had fulfilled the condition imposed by the Tribunal—i.e, that he should work thirty hours a week on the land. This work was proving too much, however, and in consequence Hancox was forced to remain in bed half a day each week. Mr Eaden accordingly asked that the hours should be reduced to twenty per week.—The Tribunal agreed to this, and a .National Utility order was granted subject to this condition.

Arthur James Haddon, butcher (B1), 38 Lawford Road, was exempted till January 15th, and excused the V.T.C.

The cases of four bakers—Wm Walter Perkins Cowley (34, Grade 1), Cambridge Street ; Austin William Harris (40), 37 Pennington Street ; Marcus Ophir Russell (36, Grade II) ; and Edgar Matthew Bates (35, general service), 106 Park Road—were down for hearing, but Mr Meredith asked for an adjournment for 14 days. A conference was to be held at Rugby that day with regard to the Food Trade of the town, and he hoped that after this conference they would be entirely agreed as to who was essential and who was not.—The application was granted.

Samuel Dowell, hay, corn, and coal merchant (40), Stretton-under-Fosse, who had lodged an appeal against the decision of the Monks Kirby Tribunal, wrote explaining that he wished to withdraw the appeal because he had a protection certificate.—Mr Meredith said he could never understand what the man had appealed for. The reason why he was refused exemption by the Lower Tribunal was that he already held a conditional protection certificate, and dual protection was not allowed. It was a most extraordinary case.

WAR WORK VOLUNTEER SCHEME.

It has been decided to extend offers of enrolment for the “ Z ” class of work under the above scheme until further notice. instead of until October 1st, 1918, only, as previously announced.

Offers of enrolment from men for the “ Z ” class of work under this scheme will continue to be open under certain conditions to Grade 3 men of any age ; to Grade 2 men of 35 or over on January 1st, 1918 ; and Grade 1 men of 43 or over on January 1st, 1918. Offers of enrolment from men for “ ordinary class ” war work volunteer vacancies are open, under certain conditions, to men of Grade 3 of any age to Grade 2 men of 45 or over on January 1st, 1918.

Men who are enrolled for either class of vacancy under the scheme will, as previously announced, be protected from military service so long as they continue in employment as war work volunteers, provided that they prove to be within the grades and ages named above and satisfy the other necessary conditions.

Opportunities for enrolment under this scheme are available at every Employment Exchange, where full particulars of the scheme can be obtained. There are at present many thousands of vacancies under the scheme.

DEATHS.

LESTER.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. ARTHUR (DICK), dearly beloved husband of Mrs. Lester, 92 South Street, killed in France on August 17, 1918.
“ God takes our loved ones from our home,
But never from our heart.”
— From his sorrowing Wife and little daughter.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. EDWARD, killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 20 years.
“ God knows how much we miss him,
More than loving words can tell ;
Not a day have we forgotten him
Since he bade us his farewell.
Daily in our minds we see him,
As we did in days of yore ;
But some day we hope to meet him
On that bright and golden shore.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Father in France, Brothers and Sisters.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear grandson and nephew, Pte. EDWARD, Killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 30 years.
“ We think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall ;
There is nothing left to answer but his photo on the wall.”
—Not forgotten by his loving Grandmothers and Grandfather, aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

HOUGHTON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action on October 4, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Wife and Child.

HOUGHTON.— In loving memory of our dear one, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on Oct. 4, 1917.
“ We pictured your sale returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LINDLEY.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. J. LINDLEY, who was killed in action on October 5, 1917.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
And heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For those he loved so well.
I think of him in silence.
And make no outward show ;
The heart that mourns most truly
Mourns silently and low.”
—From his loving Wife, Son and Daughter.

LUDFORD.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. C. H. LUDFORD (HARRY), who died of wounds in France on October 6, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love, honour, and remembrance live for ever.”
— Ever in the thoughts of Monica.

16th Mar 1918. The Advertiser Passing on Scheme Works Smoothly

THE “ ADVERTISER ” PASSING ON SCHEME WORKS SMOOTHLY
THANKS TO SUBSCRIBERS & AGENTS.
ADVERTISEMENTS TO BE RATIONED.

We should like to take this opportunity of thanking our readers for the generous way in which they received the suggestion we made last week with regard to sharing copies of the Advertiser with their friends, and for the wholehearted co-operation of a very large number in giving effect to it ; and in this acknowledgment we desire to include our agents who are giving their loyal assistance in the practical working of the idea.

It may be useful to again remind all concerned that the object of the drastic reduction of paper supplies by the Government is to limit the importation of pulp and other materials from which news-paper is made in order to release shipping for the conveyance of food to our shores, and other purposes vital to the carrying on of the war. To make one copy of the paper serve as many readers as possible is, therefore, a distinctly patriotic action.

Our sincere apologies are due to our readers for so much space in our last issue being taken by advertisements and official notices. The change we had to make came upon us so suddenly that we had no time to re-arrange our advertising contracts, but we are now taking steps to ration the space allotted to this class of matter, as well as our output of papers.

It should not, however, be forgotten that a medium like the Advertiser for making public one’s announcements is of national importance to the commercial and social life of the community. This applies especially to auctioneers’ announcements of agricultural sales, which this time of the year are always very numerous.

Then, too, space must be found for official announcements, and we were further handicapped last week by a heavy demand upon our already crowded columns by a lengthy notice under “ The Representation of the People Act,” which it was necessary to insert on that date.

Advertisements are generally read with interest, but our readers may feel assured that we shall do our best to keep them within reasonable limits, and that all important happenings in the town and district will be duly recorded in the Advertiser as heretofore.

MARKETING SURPLUS VEGETABLES.

The first general meeting of shareholders of the Warwickshire Fruit and Vegetable Collecting Society Ltd (registered under the Industrial and Provident Societies’ Act), was held at the County Hall, Warwick, last week. The primary business was to amend and pass the rules of the society. The report of the Provisional Committee was then read and adopted. Great interest was shown in the progress made towards establishing branch depots in the rural districts for the collection and marketing of surplus produce from cottage gardeners and allotment holders. It is probable that the neighbourhoods of Warwick, Rugby, Solihull, and Brailes will be the first to benefit under the scheme, and that the method of working these depots will be the same as those already found successful at Stratford-on-Avon, where a pioneer collecting and marketing depot was established last summer. The report of the Provisional Committee showed that already 6,63l shares had been applied for. The Provisional Committee was elected en bloc, with power to add to their number, as the Committee of the Warwickshire Fruit ans Vegetable Collecting Society. They comprise : Lord Leigh, Lady Ilkeston, Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, Mrs Arkwright, Mrs Melville, Mr A Allsebrook, Mr F Quartley, Mr J James, Mr H C Smith, Mr A Trafford. and Miss C Margesson.

RUGBY FOOD SUPPLY.

During the past few weeks the food problem has been much easier locally, and most people have been able to obtain provisions of one kind or another. The usual quantity of stock was sent to the Cattle Market on Monday ; and although the local butchers failed to secure their full quota of beef, mutton was fairly plentiful. Since Monday several beasts have been sent to the local butchers, so that there is every prospect of householders obtaining fair supplies this week-end.

The quantity of cheese has been very limited of late, but it is hoped that this state of affairs will now rapidly improve.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

Held at Rugby on Friday test week, before Messrs E M G Carmichael (chairman), J Findlay (assessor for the employers), and E G Evans (workmen’s assessor).

DISTURBANCE BY A DRUNKEN FITTER.
R. J. Skinner, 83 Abbey Street, pleaded not guilty to refusing to leave the workshop while the worse for liquor and creating a disturbance by persisting in remaining until he was ultimately carried out.—The foreman stated that on February 15th defendant was ordered to come back at seven o’clock and work all night. He did not turn up at seven o’clock, and at 10.15, while witness was at supper, he was fetched to Skinner, whom he found lying in the balance pit. Witness roused him, and he then appeared to be dazed. Witness told him he had better go home and come in in the morning, but he was mad drunk and commenced to use filthy language. He picked a hammer up and said, “ I will smash your brains out if you give me the sack.” Defendant produced a bottle of beer, and after drinking the beer he smashed the bottle on the wall. As witness could not persuade him to go home, he sent for the watchman.—Defendant : Perhaps he is the bloke who knocked me about.—Witness added that the watchman tried to persuade defendant to leave but he took his coat off and threatened to fight. They had to send for another watchman, and in the end to carry him out.—Defendant stated that he had been on the premises a quarter of an hour before he was accused of being drunk, and he also contended that he was entitled to sleep from 10 till 11, and should not have been disturbed—The night watchman deposed that defendant was very drunk and kept the other men from working. After he was put out he tried to get back, and was swearing and raving near the gate till two o’clock in the morning.—This was corroborated by another witness.—Defendant said the reason he would not go away was that someone said, “ Put him out.” He replied, “ There is not one amongst you can put me out.” They then started upon him and knocked him about.—In reply to the Chairman, he said he had been in the Army, and had been wounded and blown up. He had not been discharged, but lent to the firm.—The representative of the firm stated that Skinner had asked to be returned to the Colours. They had done so, and at the same time they sent a copy of the report to the Ministry of Munitions. He was a skilled fitter, and served his apprenticeship with them. They were very sorry the affair had happened, but defendant held up the whole shop.—Fined 60s in one case, and the other adjourned.

A QUIET NAP.
G Bailey, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, was summoned for sleeping during working hours.—It was stated that defendant was found lying on a table in the winding department fast asleep. The man who worked with him had complained that he had to do most of the work, and the foreman had remonstrated with him on the matter.—Defendant said he had a pain in his stomach ; he laid down to ease it, and he dropped off to sleep. He contended that he had always done his fair share of work.—Adjourned till May 17th.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr D H Hefford, stepson of Mr W F Wood, has recently been gazetted Second-Lieutenant and attached to the 5th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment.

Mr Arthur Morson (clerk to the Rugby Urban Council) and Mr A H Moseley (formerly of Rugby) attended an Investiture by the King of the Order of the British Empire at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday last.

PRISONERS OF WAR.

Pte P Mace, 2nd Oxford and Bucks L.I, of Hillmorton, who was recently transferred from his internment camp in Germany to Murren, Switzerland, writes : “ I can assure you it is quite a relief to be away from that wretched barbed wire. Everything here is so different to what it used to be in Germany. There you had a snarling Hun and a rifle following you everywhere.” After expressing his thanks for the splendid parcels sent to him, he adds : “ I suppose you know that all we have to live on was what you kind people sent from England. . . .”

Sergt Walter Kempton, Rifle Brigade, of Rugby, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany for exactly 3½ years, has been transferred to Holland. For 2½ years food parcels and bread have been regularly despatched to Sergt Kempton through the Rugby Committee, and grateful letters of thanks have been received from him.

A Dunchurch man, Rifleman W Pearce, K.R.R.C, who is a prisoner of war at Cassel, has this week been added to the Rugby list. Arrangements have been made for the regular despatch of his food parcels.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
A PIONEER AVIATOR.—One of our village lads, Joseph Henry Dell, though barely 17 years old, joined the R.F.C. nine weeks ago as a fitter. On Saturday last he ess[?]yed his first aerial voyage, and writes in glowing terms of his experiences. With Dell on board as his passenger, the pilot flew some 70 miles at a height of 2,000ft. and while in the air looped the loop twice and performed other revolutions. The embryo airman [illegeable] writes :—“ It made me feel nervous for a while, being so young, but I enjoyed it afterwards.”

DUNCHURCH.

A EWE belonging to Mrs Cosby, the Lodge Farm, has given birth to three fine lambs ; and Mr W Harker, Bilton Grange Farm, has a ewe which has followed suit.

DURING the last few weeks collections of eggs for the use of hospitals and the wounded soldiers have been made by the scholars. The boys collected no fewer than 335, and the girls and infants about 100—a splendid result, of which Dunchurch Schools may be proud.

THE COMMITTEE OF THE NURSING ASSOCIATION are very glad to state that Nurse Ridout having completed her training and successfully passed her examination in London, has returned to take up her duties as district nurse. She is most highly recommended by the matron under whom she has trained.

WATFORD.

SERIOUS DAMAGE BY A BOY.—At the Daventry Divisional Children’s Court on Tuesday, Walter Ernest West, aged 15, of Watford, was charged with maliciously maiming a bullock, the property of Wm Cullen, of Ashby St Ledgers. He inflicted such injuries with a stick that the bowels of the bullock were perforated, and it had to be slaughtered.—The father was ordered to whip the boy in the presence of the police, and also to pay a fine of £5 inflicted on the boy.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

MR & MRS THOMAS BONEHAM, of Bretford, have been notified that their son, Francis Wm Boneham (Dorsets), has been wounded.

BUSINESS MEN’S WEEK.
RUGBY’S MAGNIFICENT RESPONSE.
£45,000 AIMED AT—£85,000 RAISED.

As was anticipated, Rugby played up well towards the end of last week. The £45,000 aimed at was easily surpassed, and when the list was closed on Saturday evening the amount reached was £75,000. Two other sums of £5,000 each arrived on Monday, thus bringing the total up to £85,000, or nearly double the figure required for the purchase of a squadron of aeroplanes, which was the object in view.

Satisfactory as this result was, however, there is little doubt but that, had the committee had longer notice, a considerably higher figure could have been fixed up ; and, in view of Rugby’s past achievements, this would, doubtless, have been forthcoming.

The suits on the first three days were very meagre, but on Thursday things began to improve, and a total of £19,921 was realised on that day ; Friday’s total was £29,965, and Saturday’s £20,431. Of the £85,000 subscribed £73,800 was invested in War Bonds and £11,000 in War Savings Certificates.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCRIBBLING ON WALLS.

SIR,—I am glad to see that attention has been drawn by a letter in your last issue to the growing nuisance in Rugby of scribbling with chalk upon wills and gates, and even on the doors of private houses. Quite apart from the more seriously objectionable nature of some of the writings and drawings, such disfigurement of our streets is a very great eyesore, and a source of annoyance to the more respectable inhabitants. Moreover, it is a step towards the hooliganism which is filling our principal streets any evening with yells and shrieks and forms of rowdiness on the part of youths and girls—suggesting pandemonium itself, and bringing discredit to our town in the eyes of visitors from elsewhere. Cannot the teachers in our elementary schools add their already valuable services by organising a crusade against this undesirable state of affairs, and so obviate the possible necessity of police action ?

I am, Sir, yours faithfully,
A HOUSEHOLDER.

IN MEMORIAM.

GIDDINGS.—In loving memory of Corpl. A. GIDDINGS, Hillmorton, who was killed in action on March 11, 1915.—Not forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

SKINNER.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. G. SKINNER, 19th Canadians, who was killed in Belgium on March 15, 1916.
“ I do not forget him, nor do I intend ;
I think of him daily and will till the end.
I miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—From his loving wife, Charlotte.

STEEL.—In loving memory of our dear son, EDWARD, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on March 16, 1915.
“ It’s hard, dear son, to lose you,
Who have filled your place so well ;
May God above now repay you
For your acts which but Him can tell.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers & Sister.

 

 

6th Nov 1915. The Munitions Tribunal

THE MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL

There was a further sitting of the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Monday, thirteen cases being down for hearing, twelve informations being laid by employers for breach of regulations under the munitions Act. Mr F Tillyard presided, and the assessors present were Messrs A Lord for the employers and G Wainwright for the men.

WORKERS’ WASTE OF TIME.

Found smoking in the lavatory at the B.T.H Works (Coventry), H Clarke (18), of 110 Kingsway, Coventry, was summoned and fined 10s. He explained to the Court that he had no work to do, but the Foreman stated that there was work if he wanted it.

Against F J Moran, 55a Lower Ford Street, and Wm James Bolton, 68 East Street, Coventry, both capstan hands at the B.T.H, the information was that they wasted time in the lavatories and were found gambling. The youths, who were before the Tribunal a month ago, were each fined 15s for the present offence.

ABSENCE FROM WORK.

Alleging three days’ absence without reasonable excuse, Willans and Robinson’s, Rugby, brought proceedings against Robert Toothhill, a tool-fitter, of Rugby, who explained that he lost two days in paying a visit to his father, who was ill. Toothill, who was stated to have lost over 60 hours in the last six weeks, was fined £1.

DUNCHURCH ARTILLERYMEN HOME FROM THE FRONT.

Two Dunchurch artillerymen, Driver R Elkington, 117th Battery R.F.A, and Bombadier C Carter, 127th Battery R.F.A, who have been at the front since the commencement of the war, are at present on short leave of absence, which, after their arduous life during the past fifteen months, is proving very welcome. The two young men were schoolboys together, and have been friends all their lives, and, by a strange coincidence, their respective batteries were located in the same field for three months, during which time they were unaware of each other’s presence, and never met until they did so in Dunchurch. They both went through the retreat from Mons, La Gateau, Ligny, and the Battles of the Marne and the Aisne. Driver Elkington’s battery afterwards moved off to Ypres, and he took part in the first great fight for that much-contested town. In this battle—which was one of the hottest in which he was engaged—he was twice wounded (once in the head), and one of the other drivers was killed and one wounded, while two of the horses attached to the gun were killed. After a spell in hospital he was transferred to La Bassee, and afterwards to Ypres, where he participated in the severe fighting and the gas attack near there on Whit Monday. In this battle he experienced a very narrow escape. While near the famous Cloth Hall a shell burst in front of his gun, killing his horse, and he himself sustained injuries that necessitated his spending nine weeks in hospital. Driver Elkington feelingly added that he was one of the few men who were left in his battery of those who went out in August, 1914.

Bombardier Carter, who has two brothers (one of whom has been wounded) at the front with the Royal Warwicks, also went through the whole of the earlier fighting, and has had many thrilling and exciting experiences. He has brought home a number of interesting souvenirs picked up on the battlefield, including a great grey coat belonging to a dead Uhlan of the 9th Regiment.

Both men are agreed that the morale at the Allied troops is superior to that of the Germans, and that the British artillery has now secured a definite superiority. The British shells, too, are more effective than those fired by the Germans. The munitions were now coming up well, but they wanted still more and more men. Bombardier Carter is of opinion that, given the necessary amount of ammunition and a good supply of reserves, the Allies will soon be able to smash through the German defences and bring the war to a satisfactory conclusion, but to do this more men and munitions are required. He added that the British anti-aircraft guns are very effective in bringing down German aeroplanes. He had met the “ E ” Company and Rugby Howitzers while at the front, and they both seemed to be doing well.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has been received that Rifleman Lionel T Smith, K.R.R, known as “Tiger” Smith, of Rugby, who was posted as missing after the great British advance in September, is wounded and a prisoner in Germany.

The death has occurred in London of Lieut Robert Emmet, Life Guards, elder son of Major Robert Emmet, Warwickshire Yeomanry, whose home is at Moreton Paddox, Warwick. Lieut Emmet was formerly an officer of the Yeomanry, and was only recently transferred to the Life Guards. He had been ill for some weeks.

After a stay of some 14 months in Towcester, the 2nd/1st Northants Yeomanry left on Monday morning. The men during their stay in Towcester have behaved in an exemplary manner, and had become universally liked. The town generally has greatly benefited by having the troops billeted there, and they will be very much missed. The 3rd/1st Regiment is for the time being still at Towcester.

The Territorial Forces’ Record Office have communicated with the Coventry City Police, as they are anxious to trace the next-of-kin of Private E. J Barker, No 1557 Warwickshire Yeomanry. A letter concerning him, addressed to “Mrs G Barker, Buckland House, Coventry,” has been returned through the Post Office marked “ Not to be found ” The police will be glad if Mrs Barker would communicate with them.

AN OLD “ E ” COMPANY MAN KILLED.

To the list of local heroes who fell in the gallant charge by the Territorials on the German lines has to be added the name of Pte William Baines Harris (27), nephew of Mr and Mrs James Capell, of Featherbed Lane Farm, Bilton. Pte Harris came to Rugby in 1900, and worked on Mr J H Loverock’s farm for eight years, and afterwards for Mr J E Cox. When war broke out he was working as a shunter on the railway at Bescot, and joined the North Midland Territorial Division some six weeks after. He was a member of “ E ” Company (Rugby) for some years.

PROMOTION OF A RUGBY TERRITORIAL.

Farrier Quartermaster sergeant R C Snewing, elder son of Mr and Mrs Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been appointed to a second-lientenancy in his regiment the 2nd County of London Yeomanry (Westminster Dragoons), Second Lieut Snewing enlisted as a trooper in September, 1914, and subsequently received promotion to Lance-corporal in November. Lance-sergeant in March, Sergeant in April, and Farrier-major in August last. He served in the last year of the Volunteer Form with the old F Company of the 2nd V.B Royal Warwickshire Regt, and on the inauguration of the Territorial Force, entered the Rugby Howitzer Battery, attaining the rank of Corporal. On leaving Rugby, he transferred to the 4th Kent (Howitzer) Battery, with whom he served as Sergeant during the remainder of his term.

OLD MURRAYIAN GASSED.

Rifleman Chas Read, 2nd K.R.R, an old Murrayian, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges, says : “ I have been out at the front twelve months, and have been in every action of any consequence, but I came to a full stop on September 25th, the day we started the big advance. I was gassed with poisonous gas, but I am almost well now. My word, what a time it was a couple of days before the attack ! The shelling was terrible, but it gave me great pleasure to think that at last we were going to get them going, and so we did ; but I suppose this is stale news now. I am pleased to see that so many of the old Murray boys have answered the call. Many have paid the great sacrifice, but it cheers one up very much to know that the old boys of the Murray School have not been found wanting when our country’s call to arms sounded.

PTE MACE OF HILLMORTON A PRISONER.

Pte P Mace, 2nd Oxon and Bucks L.I, a son of Mr S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, who was reported last week to be missing, has written to his sister, stating that he is a prisoner in Prussia, and adding, “ I am sorry to say I was wounded, and could not get back to our lines. I think they have got me now for the duration of the war, and I shall be glad of anything you can I send me, especially cigarettes, as I am spun right out. I must thank God that I am alive, as I had a very narrow escape. I was wounded in the legs and face, and they very nearly cut my nose off.” In a postcard to his parents, Pte Mace states that he would be thankful for gifts of food or cigarettes. He adds that he is now doing well.

WITH THE RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

Driver Clifford Tomes of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, writes from somewhere in France” to his parents, who reside at 177 Cambridge Street :- “ There was an attack on our front yesterday, but it was repulsed by us. The 7th Warwicks are catching it pretty well. It amuses us chaps when a fellow comes back off leave and he says that people ask him if we have had any fighting yet ! I should not think they ever read the papers. It is because they never see any casualties mentioned, but that is because we have such extraordinary good luck. The gunners of our battery are everlastingly under fire, but my being a driver, I only get into it occasionally, and many a time when I have been up with the rations, the rifle and maxim fire has been terrific. We start the old rum issue next Sunday, and we are having sheep skins to keep us warm. We look like a lot of bears.; but I regard myself as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Still I may have altered, for I think this life breaks anybody. We shall want plenty more men. Please post me an Advertiser every Friday night.

GRAMOPHONE FOR THE 1/7th WARWICKS

Miss Evans, of 13 James Street, who has a brother serving in the Rugby Company of the 1/7th Warwicks at the front, has recently collected between £5 and £6 with which she procured a gramophone and set of records, etc., from Mr J T E Brown. Albert Street, Rugby. The instrument was sent out to the C Company on the 3rd of October, and Miss Evans has received the following letter in acknowledgment :-

“ DEAR MISS EVANS,—I hardly know how to adequately thank you and all the people of Rugby for the handsome way in which you all think of us all out here. I need hardly say we all greatly appreciate your kindnesses which you are always showing to the Rugby contingent of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The latest contribution, the gramophone, will greatly cheer our periods of rest, and will always be a welcome and practically indispensable part of our sing-songs, which we hold whenever opportunity offers. I am requested to thank you for this trouble and time taken up in collecting for us, and also the subscribers for the generous way in which they responded.—Assuring you of our best thanks, yours sincerely, H. B. MASON, Capt.
1/7th R. War. R.”
October 90, 1915.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been less brisk at Rugby Drill Hall this week, but the recruiting authorities are anticipating a busy time next week, when the canvassing returns come in. The following have been accepted :—J W Oliver and P G Burton, R.W.R ; F F Walter and A Commons, Royal Flying Corps ; J V Sanders, C H Meacham, and A E V Meacham, R.G.A ; A C Lamb, Middlesex Regt ; T A White, H Cutler, J R Wildman, and G W C Pargetter, R.A.M.C ; W T Bridgman, A H Meadows, W O Watts, A H EASON, A W Isham, J W Gray, M J B Amey, R.F.A ; W T Hinks and R Herring, 220th Co R.E ; W H Hammond and L Sheasby, R.E (drivers); R E Clements and H Essex, A.S.C ; and C Prestidge, A.O.C.

A number of other men offered themselves, but were rejected. Recruits are still urgently required for the Infantry, and all regiments of this branch of the service are open.