15th Apr 1916. Alien Woman’s Roaming Habits

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

TUESDAY.—Before Lord Braye, Dr Clement Dukes, T A Wise, A. E Donkin, and J J McKinnell, Esqrs.

ALIEN WOMAN’S ROAMING HABITS.-Marth E Goodman, 16 Charlotte Street, Edgbaston, Birmingham, was charged on remand with that she, being an alien, failed to furnish to the registration officer of the district particulars within 48 hours of her change of address, at Rugby, on the 5th inst.—Defendant said she was an English woman by birth and married a Russian. The husband wrote to the effect that his wife had left his home without his consent to roam about. She had done so before last year, and at such time her mind became unhinged. He asked the Bench to deal with under probation with such a warning as would make such an impression on her as to compel her to return to her husband and child and lead an honourable life.—The Clerk : Why don’t you stay with your husband ?—Defendant : I do.—The Chairman : Then why are you here ? Defendant replied that she had come away on business connected with some work that she was doing.—The case was adjourned till the following day, for her husband to be sent for.-Defendant : In the meanwhile, where will I be.—The Clerk : Down below.—Defendant I : don’t like being down below very well. Good morning.

On Wednesday defendant was brought before T A Wise, Esq. Her husband appeared, said he was willing to take her home, and was allowed to do so, defendant being warned by the magistrate that she must not roam about without registering herself.

WINDOWS NOT SHADED.

Arthur Willis, engineer, 137 Murray Road, Rugby, was summoned for not shading or reducing the inside lights of his dwelling-house so that no more than a dull subdued light was visible outside, at Rugby at 9.55 p.m on 4th Inst.—Defendant claimed that the light was sufficiently dull, there being curtains drawn across.—P.S Percival said he went to the back of defendant’s premises and saw a gas jet full on in the back kitchen, there being no blind down or curtain drawn. The light was showing on to the house adjoining. There was also another window, screened with a light buff blind, which was showing the light through. When this was pointed out to defendant he laughed, and said if he had got to pay he could do so, and didn’t care.—Defendant said the light in the scullery was put up because he heard somebody in next garden, and this proved to be the police officer.-The Clerk said the order stated that there must be no more than a dull light visible from any direction outside.-Sergt Percival (recalled) said the light had been in the scullery for some time before they went into the adjoining garden.—The Chairman said they found there was a light from the house, and fined defendant £1.

SUMMONS AGAINST SUPT. CLARKE FAILS.

Supt Edward J Clarke, Rugby, was summoned by Charles Gay, 87 Sandown Road, Rugby, for not shading or reducing the inside lights of a room at the Police Court at Rugby on the 3rd inst.—Mr Harold Eaden defended, and pleaded not guilty.—Complainant stated that on the evening of the 3rd April, at 9.58 p.m. he was in Railway Terrace, and saw a brilliant light coming from three electric lights situate in a room beneath the Police Court. It was coming from the room on the right-hand side of the entrance door.—By Mr Eaden : He did not take the trouble that evening to enquire whether Supt. Clarke was in possession of this room. He saw one of Supt Clarke’s officers in the room on previous evening.

John William Higginbotham, called by complainant, said he saw in the room a man in plain clothes turning over papers.—By Mr Eaden : He was in as good a position as complainant to see who was in the room, but could not see below his bust, and it was agreed among the crowd to shout to the man to pull the blinds down. The rest of the building was darkness.

John Roland Fletcher corroborated.

Mr Eaden said the room in question was in the occupation or control of the Superintendent until November last year, when the Royal Warwick Reserves asked for the room for an orderly room. Supt Clarke put the suggestion forward to his superior officer, and it was returned with a suggestion that the proposal should come before the Bench, because it was considered at Warwick that it was a matter more for the local Justices, in conjunction with the Superintendent, and he understood that as a result the room was given entirely to the military for the time being. Since November last the police had had no occupation of the room. They were not responsible for the cleaning and even had not a key of the room. If an offence had been committed, it was done by neither Supt Clarke nor his servant.

Supt Clarke gave evidence in support of Mr Eaden’s statement.

P.S Brown said on the night in question he was in charge room at the Police Station when a representative of the Military Police came in with someone in charge, and then went across to the orderly room.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had come to the conclusion that the prosecution entirely failed, and the prosecutor in this case must pay the costs. It seemed quite clear that the premises had been handed over to another body other than the police, and therefore that body was responsible for what took place in that room. The prosecution, therefore, against the police was entirely misdirected.—Mr Eaden asked for defendant’s costs, including the solicitor’s fee, and Lord Braye said these would be allowed. He added that the Bench were entirely satisfied with the manner in which Supt Clarke had carried out his duties under the Lighting Order in the premises over which he had direct control.

ALLEGED INACCURATE STATEMENT.—Mr Woodworth, of Hillmorton Road, summoned last week for an infringement of the Lighting Order, attended the Court and took exception to certain statements reported in our local contemporary. It was there stated that Inspector Lines said he had previously cautioned defendant. This, Mr Woodworth said, was incorrect, as no previous warning had been given, and as the heavy had been levied probably under a misapprehension, he asked for mitigation of the penalty.—Inspector Lines was called, and denied that any such statement was made by him. Defendant had not been previously warned.—Mr Woodworth also pointed out that in another case Mr Donkin was reported to have said : “ In no case have the police taken action without previous warning.” This statement by Mr Donkin was therefore incorrect, as no warning had been given in his (Mr Woodworth’s) case.—It was pointed out that the fine of £2 was in respect of two windows, and Lord Braye said the Bench were not prepared to go back upon their decision of previous week.—Mr Woodworth then expressed hope that the representative of the paper he referred to, who was present, would correct his report this week.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL, Monday.—W W Wilson, 9 St John Street, Rugby, assistant metallurgical chemist, v Willans and Robinson, Ltd, Rugby. This was an allegation that his leaving certificate was unreasonably withheld. He said he had obtained an appointment with the Aeronautical Inspection Department at an increased salary, his present remuneration being 50s a week. The firm’s representative said they could not spare the man. The Court refused the certificate, and the applicant was informed that if he asked for an increase of salary no doubt the firm would consider it.

RUGBEIANS generally will be sorry to learn that Major C Beatty, D.S.O., Canadian Headquarters, has had the misfortune to lose his left arm, which was amputated at the elbow, as the result of a bullet wound. Major Beatty, it will be remembered, was training at Bedford Cottage, Newmarket,, where he had charge of Lord Howard de Walden’s horses, as well as of others in different ownerships. He is an elder brother of Admiral Sir David Beatty, and won his D.S.O. in the South African war.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

A telegram has been received from the War Office stating that Capt A N C Kittermaster, O.R., Worcestershire Regiment, is reported from Basra as “ Missing, believed killed, April 4th to 5th.”

Mr and Mrs Keen, of 2 Winfield St, Rugby, received official report on Friday last that their son, Rifleman A Keen, Rifle Brigade, was killed. Deceased has previously been reported missing since 9th,May, 1915. He was 19 years of age, and before the war was apprenticed to the carpentry trade under Mr Bodycote, builder, Murray Rd.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry, who for sometime past have been stationed in Norfolk, have just been removed to another county on the East Coast.

Official intimation has been received that Lieut C H Ivens, only son of Mr J H Ivens, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has been wounded, but whether seriously or not has not yet been indicated.

DUNCHURCH.

H Carter and E Doyle have joined the Warwicks.

WITHYBROOK.

The sad news has been received that Percy Ingram, the only son or Mr and Mrs Walter Ingram, has been killed in action. The deceased was one of the first men of the village to volunteer for active service, and the joined the Warwickshire Regiment. Deep sympathy is felt for his parents.

MARTON.

WORKING PARTY FOR SAILORS AND SOLDIERS.-The result of the working-parties held in this village during the winter months on behalf of our sailors and soldiers is that some 90 shirts and 30 pairs of socks have been made and distributed to them through different channels. After forwarding a parcel at Christmas to all local men on active service, it was decided that the rest of the garments should be divided between the Jackanapes Society (for hospitals) and the British Prisoner of War Depots. Several friends who were unable to attend the meetings worked diligently in their own homes, one worker having knitted a dozen pairs of socks since the war began. Many others kindly gave money for the purchase of materials, the total subscriptions for this purpose amounting to £11 5s 6d.

DANCE.—On Friday evening a dance, arranged by Willans and Robinson’s Athletic Club, was held in the Co-op Hall on behalf of a fund for sending comforts to men in the Rugby Howitzer Battery. The company numbered over 200. Messrs Crowther and F Ward were the M.C’s, and Mr Flowers’ orchestra supplied the music.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday Mr Arthur Ingram, stage manager at the Empire, left his employment to join his group under the Derby Scheme. Mr Ingram, who lives at Avenue Road, New Bilton, has three brothers serving in the Army. On Saturday he was presented by the staff and artistes with a silver watch, and a collection was made at each performance on his behalf, and resulted in £5 being realised.

 

 

Note: In recent weeks the Rugby Advertiser has been reporting on the Appeal Tribunals. We have not been posting these as the names of the men concerned were not published. This week they have started including the names, so we will include these in the next post.
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1st Jan 1916. Unseasonable Weather for Christmas

UNSEASONABLE WEATHER FOR CHRISTMAS.

GREAT GALE.

Heavy rain occurred on several days before Christmas, and with the barometer at a very low reading there seemed little prospect on Christmas Eve that more enjoyable conditions would prevail. On Christmas Day the weather was as unseasonable and depressing as it could be. Drenching rains, accompanied by sharp winds, set in about noon, and continued without intermission till after dark.

There was a rapid rise of the barometer during the night. Keen dry winds on Sunday improved the condition of the roads somewhat. But more heavy rain on Sunday night had prepared people for an unpleasant Boxing Bay—how unpleasant few could have anticipated. During the night and in the early hours of the morning drenching rain fell, and a wet holiday appeared inevitable. Then, however, there came a change. The rain ceased, but the wind blew with redoubled energy, and walking became exceedingly difficult.

The gale, which blew without ceasing throughout the day and into the night, developing at times into a hurricane, damped all enthusiasm for outdoor entertainment, and those who decided to “ keep the home fires burning ” had much the best of the argument.

Many trees in the neighbourhood were blown down, and roads were blocked in several places. A large elm tree in Miss Elsee’s garden, Bilton Road, and another at Westfield—about 200 yards further along the road—were brought down, and the thoroughfare was quite blocked to vehicular traffic till about seven o’clock in the evening by which time some of the obstructing limbs had been removed.

Great havoc was caused to the trees forming the avenue on the London Road between Dunchurch and Knightlow Hill. A great many of the trees were blown down, and the telegraph wires which pass along each side of the road suffered badly, being broken down in many places. During the evening a motor car ran into the dis-placed wires near the junction with the Fosse Road, and before it could be stopped the wires had diverted its course into a ditch. Fortunately the occupants were unhurt.

At Bilton four large elm trees on the north-west side of the village were uprooted, and one of them, falling across the Lawford Lane, completely blocked it for several days till the Duke of Buccleuch’s estate men from Dunchurch, who were fully occupied on the London Road, were able to turn their attention to it. A substantially-built summer house in an exposed part of the grounds of Mr F Merttens, Bilton Rise, was lifted bodily over the hedge into the adjoining field and deposited upside down.

On the morning following the storm the Rugby Post Office was cut off for a time from the London trunk telegraph service, and communication by either telegraph or telephone was found impossible with Welford, Lutterworth, Dunchurch, and quite a number of places in Northamptonshire, including the county town. This was due to the snapping of wires caused by the falling branches of trees.

During the gale the auctioneers engaged in selling gifts for the British Farmers’ Red Cross Fund experienced much difficulty in keeping their position on the planks from which they were selling. Indeed, one exceptionally strong gust lifted Mr B H Cattell and his booking clerk clean off their feet and deposited them amongst the people. Mr T Tait, while selling in another part of the market, had a like experience.

The framework of an outside blind at Mr Edward Grey’s shop in Bank Street was shattered shortly before three o’clock, and the pole crashed through a plate glass window, smashing it to fragments and exposing the millinery displayed therein to the mercy of the boisterous wind the window could be boarded up by a local builder.

Several large trees in the School Close’ were blown down and fell across the fencing on the Dunchurch Road, but fortunately without any serious result. Several trees on the Barby Road were also destroyed, some being broken off close to the base, and others uprooted. A hoarding and wall in Chapel Street was blown down, and a wall dividing two front gardens on the Clifton Road shared a similar fate. The flag-staff on the Parish Church was broken off, and other cases of minor damage are reported from the town and district.

At Dunchurch, in addition to the havoc to trees and telegraph wires on the London Road, considerable damage was caused to roofs, chimneys, and fowl-houses. A very large elm tree near Mr Arkwright’s house was levelled, and a gate was pulled up with the roots. At Bilton Grange much damage was done to the wood fencing round the gardens.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

Before A E Donkin and C G Steel, Esqrs.

HELPING HIMSELF TO FALLEN TIMBER.— Alfred John Bathe (16), 93 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was charged with committing wilful damage to timber to the amount of 5s in the School Close on the 29th December, the property of Messrs Travis and Arnold, timber merchants, Rugby, also with assaulting P.C’s Lovell and Bryan while in the execution of their duty.—Defendant admitted taking boughs, as other people were also doing, and that he kicked the police in struggling with them.—P.C Lovell said at 2 p.m on the previous day he received a complaint from Mr Herbert, manager to Messrs Travis and Arnold, find went to the School Close, where he saw defendant cutting off limbs from a fallen tree with a saw. He had sawn through a bough a foot thick, and had started on another 10 inches thick. Defendant told witness he had got permission, and eventually complied with the officer’s request to come into the road. Defendant refused to give his name and address, and used bad language. He kicked P.C Bryan. Witness arrested him, and in the struggle was also kicked several times.—P.C Bryan corroborated, and said defendant kicked him in the stomach.-Defendant said there were several people in the field getting the wood, and one of them was given permission to do so.—Wm Herbert, manager for Messrs Travis and Arnold, said he had never seen defendant before, and did not give him permission. His firm were taking away the fallen timber from the School Close, and there was considerable labour involved. He felt he was justified in complaining to the police, and backed them up in the charge. People had been taking away the timber for two days, and the firm had lost more than they would get.—In reply to the Magistrates, witness said he gave one man leave to take away the brushwood.—The boy’s mother said no one tried to bring up children better than she had done.—The Chairman told defendant he had no business to cut big limbs of trees nor to use bad language or kick the police. For the damage he would have to pay 3s, for the assault on the police 4s 6d,—The boy’s mother protested that she would not pay a halfpenny, and that the fine ought to be stopped out of the boy’s pocket money.—A week was allowed in which to pay.

THURSDAY.—Before A E Donkin, Esq.

DRUNKENNESS.—Frederick Bidmead, millwright, 52 King Edward Road, Rugby, pleaded guilty to being drunk at Rugby at 9.45 p.m on December 29th.—P.S Goodwin found him helplessly drunk in James Street. He could not tell the officer where he lived, and he was locked up for his own safety.—Fined 1s 6d.

A CHARGE OF DESERTION.—Wilfred Rainbow, living with Mrs Kendrick at 30 Worcester Street, Rugby, was charged with being a deserter from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment since December 8th, 1914.—Defendant, who denied that he was a deserter, had a fit whilst in the dock, and had to be removed from the Court.—Superintendent Clarke said he received a telegram from the commanding officer asking him to arrest defendant.—Detective Mighall said defendant had re-enlisted in the Worcestershire Regiment, but was now employed at one of the works.—Remanded in custody to await an escort.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT IN THE PARISH CHURCH.—On Tuesday afternoon in last week as Richard Clarke, the assistant verger at the Parish Church, was working in the belfry he became giddy, and fell from the ladder upon which he was standing, through a trap door, a distance of about 30ft. As a result he broke his arm and severely injured his legs and face. There was no one in the church at the time, and although he was suffering great pain, the unfortunate man succeeded in reaching Mr George Over’s shop in Market Place, from whence he was conveyed to the Hospital of St Cross. After his injuries had been attended to he returned to his home. Clarke, who is nearly 70 years of age, has been employed at the Parish Church for about 40 years, and is well known to all who worship there. Despite his age, he is making good progress towards recovery.

FIRE IN A FANCY SHOP.—At about 5.30 on Tuesday afternoon a fire broke out in the window of Mr Austin’s fancy shop, 31 Chapel Street. The alarm was given by a lady who was passing, and Mr Austin fortunately succeeded in extinguishing the flames before a great deal of damage was done. The window was full of Christmas fancy goods, which burned very quickly, and the heat was so intense that the plate glass window was broken. The damage is estimated at about £10. The cause of the fire is unknown.

Clarke, Walter. Died 15th Nov 1915

Walter Clarke was born in Barby in 1889. His father was Edward Thomas Clarke, a builder and grocer, and Martha (nee COLEMAN). Both parents were born in Barby but must have spent a brief time in Rugby, as their two elder children were born there. In 1905 Edward Clarke died at the age of 50 and the family moved to Rugby. In 1911 Martha was living at 19 Temple Street with Walter, aged 21 and his brother Edward Thomas, 23, a bricklayer. Walter was employed as a factory hand.

When the war started, Walter was one of the first to enlist on 7th September 1914, at the age of 23 years and 3 months. He was 5ft 5½in tall with brown eyes and dark brown hair. He joined the 6th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment. This battalion was a mixture of recruits from Dorset, 400 volunteers from London, 400 from Warwickshire and 70 Welsh miners. The battalion was part of the 17th Northern Division which was intended for Home Defence duties, so much time was spent training at Bovington Camp. However by 1915 they were needed in France and Walter arrived in Boulogne on 14th July 1915 and they were soon serving in the trenches near Ypres.

Water Clarke died on 15th November 1915, presumably as a result of sniper fire. His death was reported in the Rugby Advertiser of 18th December 1915:

Pte R Compton, a life-long friend of deceased, in a letter to Mrs Clarke, states that they were talking together in the trench a few minutes before the occurrence. He adds that Pte Carke died almost instantly; he passed away quite peacefully, and never spoke or moved. He was buried right away from the firing line, and the Sergts and men of the platoon sent their sympathy to his friends.

The Captain of his company, in a letter of sympathy to Mrs Clarke, says: “He was a good soldier, and I was sorry to lose him. In your great loss you have one consolation – he died fighting for his country against a cruel, treacherous, and barbarous race, the greatest honour a man can have in this life.”

Pte Clarke, who was only 26 years of age, was very popular with his companions.

Walter Clarke is buried at Birr Cross Roads Cemetery. He was transferred from his original grave at Gordon House No 1 Cemetery on 3rd April 1919 together with three other men from the Dorsetshire Regiment. The inscription on his headstone reads “of Rugby, Warwickshire”

Note: The Commonwealth War Grave Commission gives his date of death as 5th November 1915 – the same date as the death of the other men in the original grave. His Service record and other documents record his death as 15th November 1915.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

13th Nov 1915. Letter from old St Matthew’s boys

LETTER FROM OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOYS.

Pte Frank Morley, R.A.M.C, an “old boy” of St Matthew’s School, writing from Gallipoli to Mr R H Myers, the headmaster, say :-

It is always a pleasure to receive the Advertiser and read of the doings of the “ old boys.” St Matthew’s has indeed contributed its quota, and I feel proud to be included amongst the number.

We, in company with the 11th Division, took part in the new landing on the Peninsula. As you are aware, we did not quite achieve our object, but I feel sure that the surprise landing demoralized the Turks, who were anticipating an attack from the Asiatic coast.

It seems to me that people at home are only just beginning to realise the gravity of the situation. The fighting out here is of a different character, and on a different scale to that in France. I think Mr Winston Churchill aptly described the position when he said, “ The armies there are like men fighting on a high and narrow scaffolding above the surface of the earth.” We must indeed be prepared to make great sacrifices before the final goal is reached.

I will not trouble you with details of the new landing. We certainly had an exciting time, and for the first ten days had to work like Trojans, We were generally up at 3.30 a.m, and walked fully three miles to the Regimental Aid Post to collect the wounded. Motor or horse transport was out of the question, as there were no roads, and the ground generally very rough and treacherous. It was a poor sort of “ joy ride ” the patients had, yet I cannot call to mind, a single word of complaint.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry came along a fortnight after the landing was made. They acquitted themselves well in their first engagement, for it was no easy task to cross an open plain with shells bursting thick and furious. They helped to carry out a good piece of work, and all honour due to them.

We have had a splendid opportunity of watching the Navy at work, and can fully appreciate their good work. Without their aid it would be absolutely impossible to land, let alone exist, on the Peninsula.

For the present we have turned our back on the Peninsula, and are now in a different country, where we await orders. Mr Censor will not permit me to disclose our whereabouts, so I must leave you guessing.

Pte Arthur Tacey, A.S.C, another “ Old boy,” writes to Mr Myers from the Dardanelles :- “ We are having a hard time of it out here, strenuous work every day and nothing to eat but biscuits, bully beef, and jam. Still, we are not downhearted, and keep looking for the bright side, which we hope will not be very long in appearing now, though we all feel that we are on a very funny outing. One’s thoughts often turn to the old school and the happy times spent there. In the waits in our dug-outs we often amuse ourselves with making up doggerel rhymes, and I send you my last contribution.”

Summerdown Convalescent Hospital,

E Division, Hut 1, Eastbourne.

5/11/15.

DEAR SIR,—I am writing to ask you if you would kindly be good enough to insert this in your paper, as you see by the above address that I am writing this from a convalescent hospital and pleased to say that I am progressing favourably. I should, however, like the people of Rugby to know how the boys answered the country’s call last August ; as near as I can say about 100 enlisted in the 5th Oxford and Bucks, and I am pleased to say there are still some of them left, although, perhaps, few. We had what they call our baptism of fire on June 16th while waiting in reserve for the 6th Division. Here we lost one officer and 50 N.C.O and men whale taking over the position on June 19th. I might say I unluckily got gassed and somewhat blinded, and was away from my regiment six weeks. When I did rejoin on August 17th I luckily escaped a shell, which burst only a matter of a few feet off ; but on September 25th I was wounded and now I am enjoying my convalescent rest. I tell you it is not really so bad being a soldier, and if this letter should reach the eye of any “ slacker,” I hope it will have some effect in changing his mind, for I can assure them that men are wanted and will be had. So play the game and join.

I am, yours faithfully,

PTE. E. JACKSON.

OUR YOUNGEST TERRITORIAL.

We reproduce a photograph of Alfred Charles Hayward, son of Mr H E and Mrs Hayward, of 38 Winfield Street, Rugby, who is, we understand, the youngest of Rugby’s Territorials. Before the outbreak of war he was attached to E/Company of the 1/7th Warwickshires, and went with them to Rhyl for the annual encampment during the August Bank Holiday week in 1914. He was then within a month of being 14 years of age. As will be remembered, the battalion had scarcely, arrived in camp when they were ordered to mobolise at their war station in the south of England. They were eventually moved by stages to Leighton Buzzard, from whence they had a route march of 135 miles through Dunstable, Hitchin, Ware, Epping, Brentwood, Stock, Chelmsford, and other places to Totham. This occupied 11 days, and the distances covered each day ranged from 3 to 20 miles. On another occasion they went out on a three days’ march. Young Hayward marched with them, and never had to fall out. The sight of such a youngster striding along with the regiment naturally attracted much attention from spectators, and if is said that sympathetic mothers were often moved to mingle tears with admiration. He was medically examined and reported fit, but not old enough for active service, and when the battalion went to France, Bugler Hayward returned to Coventry to act with the reserve lines. He is still there waiting for the time when he can go on active service. It would be interesting to know whether there if a younger territorial in the country.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-corporal Arthur Mason, 6th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who has been spending eight day’s leave at his mother’s resident 40 Rutland Gardens, Hove, returned to Flanders on November 6th.

Mr J Walker, of 58 Lawford Road. Rugby, who went to East Africa with Colonel Driscoll’s Legion of Frontiersmen in April, is now serving as second-lieutenant, the promotion dating from September 8th.

It is reported that six members of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment-the County battalion—have been reported for Distinguished Conduct in the Field : Second-Lieuts Brian Ash and Sherwood ; Pte P W Hancocks (a Warwick man), Lce-Cpl Berry, Sergt Gerrard, and Q-M Shepherd.

A considerable number, of the clerical staff at the London and North-Western Railway Company’s works at Crewe have received permission to join the colours, and their places will be taken temporarily by women. Many of the unmarried men are enlisting under Lord Derby’s group scheme.

Mr H Pratt, of 4 School Street, Rugby, has enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps, and left Rugby for the Farnborough Flying Station yesterday (Friday) morning.

Since it was drafted to the front in June last, the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, in which many Rugby and district men enlisted, has been continuously engaged in strenuous work in an important position of the British line where fighting had been most desperate, and it has nobly upheld the glorious traditions of this famous regiment. The casualties have been exceptionally heavy, and are as under : Officers killed, 13 ; wounded, 19 ; N.C.O’s and men killed, wounded, and missing, nearly 900.

THE KING’S MESSENGER.

Corpl Fred Clarke, who carried out instructions to summon a doctor to attend his Majesty the King on the occasion of his recent accident in France, has been recognised by Hillmorton people from his portrait in a pictorial paper as a soldier of the same name who at the time he enlisted resided in the village.

ANOTHER LOCAL SOLDIER MISSING.

Pte Percy Woodhams, of the 2nd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, is reported to have been missing since September 25th, the date of the great advance by the Allies in France. At the time Pte Woodhams enlisted, shortly after the outbreak of war, his father resided in Cambridge Street but he has since left the neighbourhood. Pte Woodhams was working at the B.T.H until within a short time of his enlistment.

TWO LOSSES IN TWELVE MONTHS.

Official news was received by Mrs Dodd on Saturday that her son, Corpl E Dodd, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action on October 16th. Corpl Dodd, whose home was at 11 Bennett Street, joined, the regiment when the war broke out. He formerly worked at the Gas Works and subsequently for Mr Young, contractor. He was 37 years of age and single. He became a smart soldiers and five weeks after enlistment was made corporal. Although he joined in August, 1914, he did not go out till October 1st, and he was killed on the 16th. On the 20th October last year his father died from the effects of an accident, so that Mrs Dodd has sustained two heavy losses within the twelve months, and the greatest sympathy will be extended to her.

LORD DERBY’S RECRUITING SCHEME.

CANVASSING COMMENCES LOCALLY,

The great efforts to secure recruits for the Army inaugurated by Lord Derby it now in full swing locally. Sub-canvassing committee rooms have been opened in the various wards, the blue cards were issued on Monday, and canvassing commenced the same evening.

The voluntary system is now on its trial, and only three weeks remain in which to prove whether it will or will not suffice to give up the number of men required to carry the war to a successful issue. To make the scheme a success every eligible man who can be spared should enlist, either for immediate service, or in the reserve, and it therefore behoves everyone to ask themselves whether the reasons which the held to be valid for not enlisting are not, after all, mere excuses.

Rugby has already done remarkably well—few towns have done better-but there are still many young men who could well be spared and who have no legitimate excuse for holding back, who should answer to the call ; and the fact that the single men are to be called on first will doubtless assist many married men, hesitating between two duties, to make a decision.

So far, the result of the canvass has been disappointing, and eligible men have not responded to the call with the readiness which was at one time anticipated. Only a few men have, so far, enlisted under the group system. The only regiments which are open at present are infantry of the line.

The groups in which recruits may place themselves are for single men numbered 1 to 23, for each year of age respectively, from 18 to 40; and for married men the groups are numbered 24 to 46 inclusive for ages respectively 18 to 40.

The following have enlisted during the past week :-W J Timms, G Beck, A Frisby, S H Garlick, B Hardy, T C Manby, E C Long, J R M Cave, R.G.A ; T W Rennison, 13th Batt E Yorks ; L A Fudge, H W Driver, R.H.A ; P Smith, W Nown, W J Dunkley, G Baker, C Allen, G Hollis, R.F.A ; E G Bristow, W G Heighton, H C Robinson, W J Riley, F J Hornby, A Varney, A Richardson, R.W.R ; C P Croft, C T Newcomb, K.R.R ; A Varney, 220 F Co, R.E ; J Masters, Coldstream Guarda ; W Parrett, F C Warren, C W Maycock, G Blundell, R.E ; J O’Brian, and J Webster, R Scots Fusiliers.

30th Oct 1915. Soldiers Appreciate the Rugby Advertiser

SOLDIERS APPRECIATE THE “ RUGBY ADVERTISER.”

DEAD COMRADE’S PHOTO RECOGNIZED IN THE TRENCHES.

Bandsman B Wilkins, of the Rifle Brigade, in a letter to a friend in Rugby, indicates that those who are in the habit of sending the Rugby Advertiser to men in the trenches are doing a service that is much appreciated. He says : “ I have just had a look at this week’s Advertiser, which one of our chaps had received, so do not trouble to send it this week In it you will see Rifleman Freeman’s photo. Well, I helped to bury him. He was a very decent fellow. I was only joking with him two or three hours before, but I didn’t know he lived at Kineton, so was surprised to see his photo in the Rugby paper. Rifleman Wilkins states that he is quite well, and hopes to come home on leave very shortly.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corporal E Wiggins, Northants Yeomanry, eldest son of Mr W Wiggins, has, been gazetted to a second-lieutenancy.

Lance-Corporal Esplin, of the 8th Seaforth Highlanders, an employe of Messrs Frost and Son, has been wounded, and is now in hospital at Rubery, near Birmingham.

Mr F G Greenhill, who some years ago held the office of assistant surveyor to the Rugby Urban District Council, and who is an ex-captain of the Rugby Football Club, has received a commission as lieutenant in the Royal Engineers, and expects to proceed abroad immediately.

Official notification has been received by Mr H Newitt, 58 Abbey Street, Rugby, that his son, Pte G V Newitt (Oxon and Bucks) is in hospital at Boulogne suffering from a severe bullet wound in the abdomen. Pte Newitt worked at the B.T.H before enlistment, and has been at the front since May, He was slightly wounded about two months ago.

BILTON RIFLEMAN WOUNDED.

Rifleman Harold Smith, of the K.R.R, whose parents live at Bilton Hill, has been wounded by shrapnel and is in hospital at Cambridge. Last week he underwent a successful operation. In a letter home, he states that the Rev W O Assheton (Rector of Bilton) has visited him

ANOTHER EMPLOYE OF MESSRS FROST AND SONS KILLED.

Official news has been received that Pte W Munnings, R.A.M.C, another employe of Messrs A .Frost & Sons, printers, Warwick Street, has been killed while attending to the wounded. Pte Munnings joined the Army in September, 1914, but was discharged on medical grounds. He entered a hospital and underwent an operation. however, and was then accepted.

HOME FROM THE FRONT.

Sergt F H Lines, of the Howitzers, son of Inspector Lines, of the Rugby Police Force, has this week been home from the front.—Pte Walter R Clarke, of the Rugby Infantry Co, whose home is at 26 George Street, Rugby, is also on furlough. Both are old St Matthew’s boys, and appear none the worse for their experiences at the war.

THE SILENT NAVY.

Pte W P Clarke, Royal Marines, of H.M.S Shannon, in a letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, F.E.I.S, says :—“ I see quite a large number of old boys have enlisted, and that several have been laid low. Still, they have died doing their duty, as the rest of us young men are prepared to do. I am very sorry that I cannot tell you what we have done, and what we are going to do, but we have been doing our bit. Our Navy has got the right name, the ‘ Silent Navy.’ We are all longing for the big naval battle to come. I can assure you it is a bit monotonous watching and waiting for an enemy which never turns up. The only thing which they seem to have out in our line is submarines, and they always steer clear of us. Through Mr Sidwell’s tuition I have managed to represent the Royal Marines at Deal, and Chatham, and also two ships, at cricket.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Although the canvas for recruits has not yet commenced locally, the new appeal for men has had the effect of stimulating business at the Drill Hall, and the number of men who have offered themselves has been higher than for many weeks past. The following have been attested :

J W Shrimpton (driver), G G Batchelor and A E Beech (Royal Engineers) ; F W Anderson, P G Major, A Higgins, L Boyles, F Holder, W R Townsend, E Shirley, A Mathews, W D Reeve, T Walker, E T Dunkley, H A Muddeman, J Moore, E G Marsh, A Newhound, R.F.A ; W Gunn, M.F.P. ; E Waring, Leicesters ; E G W W Hollins, J R Holder, and H E Goodwin, R.W.R ; F R M Lee and G H Neale, R.F Corps ; G T Palmer, 220th Co A.S Corp R.E ; E A Foxon, H Bartlett, H Kendrick, A.S.C ; W. J Payne, R.A.M.C ; J G Gowing, A.S.C, M.T ; A G Hone and E Osborne, A.S.C, H.T.

The following offered themselves, but owing to medical reasons were not accepted: E Eales, T Cleaver, L Painter, W E Summerfield, H C Walden, H W Kennard, and H W Duckett.

Infantrymen are urgently required.

 

TERRITORIALS COMFORTS’ COMMITTEE.

LETTERS OF THANKS FROM THE FRONT.

Mr A Adnitt (hon secretary) and members of the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee have received a number of letters of thanks from the recipients of the cakes which were recently sent to the local Territorial units at a result of the cake competition, held in the Church House. Below we give a few extracts :—

FROM THE HOWITZER BATTERY.

Battery S M George Hopewell, of the Howitzer Battery, writes :-“ Will you please convey to the Rugby Territorial Comforts Committee our heartiest thanks for the splendid gift of cake which we received on Saturday. I received 24 parcels in all, and sent half of them to our drivers at the wagon line and some to the Rugby men who are on the Headquarters’ Staff and in the 4th Battery, so that 160 Rugby, boys had the pleasure of enjoying their tea with cake from HOME ; and I am sure we feel greatly honoured to think that so much time, trouble, and expense has been expended on our behalf by our many generous friends, who we feel, have adopted this very practical way of expressing all their good wishes for our welfare. We were very pleased to see that a good many ladies had enclosed their names and addresses, as it is a great satisfaction to know whose hospitality one is partaking of, and to be able to thank them personally. . . . I am pleased to say that we came through the bombardment without any casualties, and thoroughly enjoyed the extra REAL work which we had to do, and are eagerly looking forward to the next similar occasion, which we hope will be more prolonged, and the last word in this long argument of nations. . . . With the exception of a few colds and other minor ailments, we are all well and in the best spirits.”

Quartermaster-Sergt Painter, of the Howitzer Battery, in a letter to Mrs C P Nickalls, states that his section had the honour of receiving the first and fourth prize winners and two highly commended cakes. He adds :—“ We were fortunate enough to receive them on Sunday morning, and they were much appreciated by the men at tea-time. If the judging had been left to the men, I am afraid they would all have been awarded first prize. On behalf of the members of the Battery I beg to take this opportunity of thanking you and the members of the Rugby Comforts Committee for the various presents which have been sent out to us from time to time.”

THE INFANTRY COMPANY.

Corporal A Branston “ C ” Company, 1/7th R.W.R (T.F), acknowledging the receipt of the cakes, says :-“ On behalf of the men I am to express their thanks to you and the good people of Rugby for their kindness to us. I can assure you that we all enjoyed the cakes immensely. There are only a few articles badly wanted by the men in my section, such as handkerchiefs and housewives, so if you know of any good person who would send us those little articles I should be very grateful.

Quartermaster-Sergt Tomlinson, of the Rugby Infantry Co, 7th R.W.R, also acknowledges the receipt of the cakes in good condition, and says :—“ With the help of Sergt Bryant I have distributed them, and we were able to reach every Rugby man now serving with the Battery, including two men in other companies and one with the second line A.S.C. Everyone was delighted with their change of fare, and scarcely know how to sufficiently thank the kind donors. However may I, on behalf of the company, ask you to convey to all concerned our deep and grateful thanks. I am sure they would have felt somewhat repaid if they could have seen the happy little groups at tea last Sunday. The happiness, too, was extended, as many shared their cake with comrades from other towns. I think our friends who made the good things, and who attached labels, will receive personal letters of thanks from the recipients. With reference to comforts you are so kindly collecting, may I ask you to withhold sending pants for the time being. We have just had an issue of these articles ; this will probably be the only issue we shall get, and wear and tear is very hard, therefore later on we shall be glad of some to replace them. I will let you know immediately the need arises. If I may I should like to suggest the following articles of which many are in need : Razors, jack knives, and enamel mugs. We are in a district where it is almost impossible to buy anything. It is a country district, and the inhabitants have all been cleared, out, and we spend several weeks in or near the firing line.”

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

BOY SCOUTS’ AMBULANCE AT THE FRONT.

DEAR SIR,—As some of your readers may be aware, there is an ambulance which was equipped by the Boy Scouts, and manned by six ex-scouts. This has been doing good service at the front, but the engine is wearing out, and the body has been found unsuitable for getting over the roads near the fighting line, where they are broken up with shell fire.

Sir Robert Baden Powell, as Chief Scout, is anxious, therefore, to provide them with, a new car, and has appealed, to the scouts throughout the country to raise the necessary funds.

It is a stringent rule of the Scout movement that there shall be no touting or begging for subscriptions, and the only way, therefore, scouts can raise money is by working for it.

In asking you, therefore to publish this letter, I am not asking for donations, but only that those of your readers who: are able, will help the scouts to raise the money themselves by providing them with work.

We have set aside the week ending November 6th for this purpose, and I would earnestly ask that any householders who are appealed to by scouts during that time will endeavour to give them some work—grass cutting, wood chopping, cycle cleaning, or, indeed, any odd jobs for which scouts are always prepared. If anyone will write to me offerings any special work, I will see that their requirements are met if possible.

Scouts applying for work should be in uniform, and all money earned by them will be devoted to the above object, being turned in to their scoutmaster, with a statement of the work done and money received.—Yours truly,

C COURTENAY WHARTON.

Assistant District Commissioner, Rugby Division of Boy Scouts.

 

WILD WEST EXHIBITION.—Broncho Bill’s exhibition will visit Rugby on Thursday next, November 4th. This exhibition has a reputation because of the originality and realism of the productions. The fact that it has to do with life “ out west ” gives it a fascination which can be rarely exceeded by other entertainments. Pictures of Wild West episodes have been produced with success, and have always appealed to audiences, but to see the real thing one should visit this exhibition. Life on the prairies is represented with striking realism, cowboys, cowgirls, Indians, and fiery prairie mustangs taking part. The scenes will leave vivid impressions in the mind of the visitor. The peculiar expertness so characteristic of a Western “ character ” is displayed with great effect. An idea of the scenes depicted will be found in our advertisement columns. There will be two exhibitions whatever the state of the weather, and arrangements have been made for the convenience and comfort of 10,000 visitors.