31st Jan 1919. “Woodbine Willie” Former Rugby Curate’s War Experiences

“ WOODBINE WILLIE.”
A FORCEFUL PERSONALITY.
FORMER RUGBY CURATE’S WAR EXPERIENCES.

“ The Bookworm,” writing the “ Weekly Dispatch ” says :—There is a man now in France who will soon be one of the great forces guiding England. His name is Kennedy, and he is a parson—the Rev G A Studdert-Kennedy, M.C., C.F. He is known the length of the British line as “ Woodbine Willie ” because while the fighting was on he was always in the front line trenches distributing encouragement and Woodbines. He is the man whom the authorities chose to hearten the men in the retreat of 1918. His fame is almost legendary in France. They say he should have won the V.C., and tell you the story of how he met the Hun face to face. He is a brave man, but he is more than that—he is a man who by sheer downright sincerity and earnest eloquence has captured the hearts of men—real men. His fame is spreading at home. He has written books, two small volumes of poetry, “ Rough Rhymes of a Padre,” one of “ Rough Talks,” and a third called “ The Hardest Part,” which, as the author says, is “ literally theology hammered out on the field of battle.” These books are not selling by the thousand, they are selling by the hundred thousand. The first printing of “ More Rough Rhymes ” was 30,000 copies, and they were sold out at once. A word as to the man himself. Before the war he was Vicar of St Paul’s, the poorest parish in Worcester. He is of Irish extraction and is the son a Leeds vicar. He was educated at Leeds Grammar School and Trinity College, Dublin. Taking holy orders he started first as curate at St Peter’s, Rugby. He first preached to soldiers in Worcester Cathedral. He was a power before the war. He will be a force after it. The war has set the fire in him ablaze. He has been through the hell of it. Religious books leave me cold, but I read “ The Hardest Part ” and “ Rough Talks ” at one sitting. They are the most powerful books their kind since Bunyan.

WAR CHARITIES’ ORGANISER.
PUBLIC PRESENTATION TO BE MADE MR J REGINALD BARKER.

With a view of showing the appreciation of Rugby and district of voluntary services that have resulted in the raising of some £14,000 locally for charitable purposes during the war, and services that have saved much more by providing free office accommodation and clerical assistance, it is proposed to make a public presentation to Mr J Reginald Barker. To that end, a subscription list has been opened, and Mr R P Mason, of the London Joint City and Midland Bank, is acting as hon Treasurer and secretary of the presentation fund.

Mr Barker’s activities have been especially pronounced in connection with his work as hon organiser of the Rugby and District Prisoners of War Fund, but as hon organiser and secretary of all the Rugby official Flag Days his name has also been constantly before the public throughout the war period, and his energy in raising, for charitable purposes, money in Rugby and district has been eminently creditable to all concerned—few towns of its size have, indeed, a better record in that respect than Rugby.

The end the war, and the resultant happy closing down of the operations of the Prisoners of War Fund, is deemed to be an especially appropriate occasion for giving Mr Barker some expression of the appreciation of the town and district of the services he has so ungrudgingly and at considerable self-sacrifice rendered, and Mr Mason’s invitation to the public to forward subscriptions to him for this purpose is signed by Mr J J McKinnell, J.P, C.C, Chairman of Rugby Urban District Council, and by Mr W Flint, C.C, Chairman of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund.

LOCAL SOLDIERS HONOURED.—Farrier-Sergt G H Sumner, 26th Battery, 17th Brigade, R.F.A, and Sapper R H Read, R.E, both of Rugby, have been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal in recognition of valuable services rendered with the armies in France and Belgium.

MR AND MRS CLEMENTS, 33 Winfield Street, Rugby, have received information that their second son, Corpl Fred Clements, aged 21, died in Zebest War Hospital, Germany, on October 24. He joined the army in 1914, and went to France in June, 1915. On June 22 he was wounded and taken prisoner. Prior to joining up he was employed in the export office, B.T.H. This is the second son Mr Clements has lost in the war, and a third is still with the Army in France.

ACCIDENT TO DEMOBILISED SOLDIER.—An accident happened last week to a fitter named Clarke, of 102 Grosvenor Road, who is employed at the Engine Sheds of the L & N.-W Railway. He was removing a heavy axle-box, when it slipped, and pinned his right hand against the wall the “ pit,” badly lacerating one of his fingers. Dr Hoskyn is hopeful of saving it. The strange thing about the accident is that it was only the fifth day of Mr Clarke’s return to civil employment, after fighting for four years and five months in the war, through which he passed unhurt.

BRINKLOW.

A meeting of the Parish Council was held in the Schools on the 21st inst, Mr F Gwinn presiding. The Clerk was instructed to put a notice on the Parish Board asking discharged soldiers who required land for small holdings to give in their names to the Council as early as possible. Mr A Pegg was appointed the Council’s representative on the School Management Board. A discussion followed upon a suitable War Memorial for the village.

BILTON WAR MEMORIAL.
A VARIETY OF SUGGESTIONS.
COMMITTEE TO DEVISE A SCHEME.

Several interesting suggestions as to the form of a proposed parish memorial to the Bilton men who have fallen in the war were put forward at a meeting called for the purpose and held in the Church House, Bilton, on Friday evening. Capt M E T Wratislaw (chairman of the parish council) presided, and there were also present Messrs J H Veasey, F M Burton, A J Askew, J Cripps, G H Frost, R Lovegrove, E J Smith, F Blick (parish councillors), Lady Rowena Paterson, Rev W O and Mrs Assheton, Mr. and Mrs W Barnett, Rev C C Chambers, Mr and Mrs R B Wright, and a number of parishioners.

The Chairman, in opening the proceedings, said if there was one lesson which they had learned by the war, it was the value of co-operation and comradeship, and therefore hoped that whatever form their memorial might take it would be a parish memorial. He did not wish to see one committee in Bilton collecting for one purpose and another in New Bilton collecting for another. If separate memorials were required in either ward they should be quite apart from what called the war memorial. Hitherto there had been a feeling that New Bilton should be put on one side ; but he wanted them, on this occasion, to unite and have one parish memorial. If they decided to have a memorial in each ward, he thought they should be identical in character, and that each should commemorate the men from both wards, and not only the names from the ward in which it was to be erected. The question as to what form the memorial should take had been considered by the Parish Council, and various suggestions, such as the provision of a recreation ground, parish room, reading room, and museum had been made ; but it was felt that none of these would be a proper war memorial. In his opinion a war memorial should be distinctive ; it should commemorate the names of fallen men, it should be inexpensive as regarded upkeep, and no portion of the expenses should fall upon the rates. For these reasons the parish council were unanimous that these suggestions were quite outside the scope of a war memorial. However, they were quite willing to receive suggestions.

It having been formally decided that steps be taken to raise a memorial to the men from both wards who have fallen, the following were elected to serve on the committee, a nucleus of which was formed by the members the parish council :—The Rural District councillors ; Mr and Mrs Barnett, Rev W O and Mrs Assheton, Miss Line, Mrs West, Mrs G H Frost, Mr M Watkiss, and Mr G Spencerley, with power to co-opt additional members, on the understanding that both wards shall be equally represented on the full committee.

Suggestions were then invited. The Chairman suggested that whatever memorial be erected it should contain only the names of men who have died in the war. In addition a volume could be prepared containing the names of all men who had served in the forces.

Mrs West, who was unable attend, wrote suggesting the names of all men who had served in the forces should be inscribed somewhere where all could see them. She also thought it would be a good idea to erect a water trough and drinking fountain on the green, or that a really good Celtic Cross should be erected, or the old village cross be restored by a first-class man.

Miss Watts wrote proposing that either a large room be erected over the Working Men’s Club in which parish meetings, etc, could be held, or a stained glass window should be placed in the church.

A Lady suggested that a fund should be raised to assist the widows and children of fallen soldiers.

Mr Barnett said he thought the most suitable place to erect any monument would be the Churchyard. All their men who had fallen in the war would naturally have found a resting-place there, and would add greatly to the beauty of their church and churchyard if a lych gate was erected as a memorial.

Lady Rowena Paterson asked if it would be possible to endow a bed at the Hospital of St Cross.—Mr Barnett : It would cost £1,000.

Mr Burton supported Lady Rowena Paterson’s suggestion. With regard to Mr Barnett’s proposal, he thought that gentleman would agree with him that if the idea was approved it should include a similar gate at the other place of worship, because they must take into consideration the fact that men of more than one denomination had fallen for their country.—Mrs Assheton : But the churchyard is the churchyard of the parish. It is not denominational, and a lych gate there could represent all.—The Chairman : Yes, every resident has the right to be buried there.—Mrs Assheton : Then it is necessary to have a gate at each place ?—Mr Burton agreed that every resident had the right of burial in the churchyard, but that was only owing to the force of circumstances over which some people had no control. One could not get away from the fact, however, that the churchyard was sectarian.

It was decided to refer the suggestions to the committee, who will report on them or any other idea which they may prefer at the annual parish meeting.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
RUGBY’S WAR MEMORIAL.

SIR,—It would appear that the reports in the local Press of the recent meeting of the Urban District Council to consider the form which the Rugby War Memorial should assume have conveyed to the minds of many of our townspeople a wrong conception of the suggestion I was privileged to make on behalf of a number of my fellow-workers.

The great war, with its horrors of cruelty, destruction, and death, is not at all likely to be forgotten by the present generation, as history will hand it down through the years that are yet to be, but we consider homage is certainly due to the brave men whose heroism and sense of duty have secured for humanity the Dawn of Liberty and Peace. It was with this object in view that we suggested a monument to our local lads erected at the Whitehall. Most of them we had worked with in factory, office, or shop, and whether they had sprung from “ the Villa ” or “ the slum,” had done their bit to give the world a speedy and lasting Peace. We asked for a memorial worthy of the town, worthy of the object it was intended it should commemorate, and which should record the name and protect from oblivion the individual identity of each soldier who enlisted from the Rugby Parish. Unfortunately, many of these brave lads are now taking their final rest beneath foreign soil, far beyond the reach of relatives or friends. Might not our suggested memorial provide an appropriate Shrine whereon each recurring Anniversary of Peace tokens of affection and remembrance could be placed ?

The present moment can hardly be considered opportune to embark upon a large and elaborate scheme of town improvement. That has to depend for its successful accomplishment upon public subscriptions, especially when our local charitable and benevolent institutions are appealing for increased financial assistance that they may efficiently carry on their work, and Disabled Soldiers and Sailors and their dependents, along with similar organisations, are all urgently pressing their claims to our townspeople’s support. Would it not be advisable, under existing circumstances, to promote a less pretentious scheme like ours, which would adequately meet all desires to commemorate an event of such world-wide importance and the honourable part taken therein by Rugby’s citizens ?—Yours etc, WILL F HARDMAN,
26 Murray Road, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

McDOWELL.—In loving memory of my beloved husband, Corpl. WILLIAM McDOWELL, 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers, missing January 27, 1917, now reported killed.
“ I who love you sadly miss you,
As it dawns another year ;
In my lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of are ever near.”
—Sadly missed by his Wife.

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Clarke, Charles Edward. Died 20th Aug 1917

This biography of Charles Edward Clarke appears on this blog one year after the centenary of his death in 1917. He is listed on the Rugby Memorial Gates as G E Clarke and has only recently been identified.

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Charles Edward Clarke was born in Barby, Northants and baptised there on 6th May 1894. His father was Joseph, a labourer born in Stretton on Dunsmore and his mother Eunice Hannah (nee Burnell). Joseph and Eunice were married in Southam on 15th Jul 1890.

In 1901 the family were living at 2 Hibberts Cottages in Barby, where Joseph was a farm stockman. By 1911 the family had moved to Pailton. Joseph was a labourer for the County Council and sixteen year old Charles was a farm labourer. Charles had an elder brother James and two sisters Lilly and Sophia plus a younger brother Omer.

When war broke out, Charles Edward Clarke was working for the London and North Western Railway in Rugby. He is listed in the Rugby Advertiser of 3rd September 1914 as one of the many men from the Locomotive Department, who had enlisted.

He joined the 9th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (no. 4447) but was later transferred to the 2nd Battalion, Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry (Private, no. 20233). According to his Medal Record he arrived in France on 6th May 1915.

The Duke of Corwall’s L.I. (D.C.L.I.) served in France, where they took part in the second battle of Ypres, until late 1915. They were then sent to Salonika, arriving there on the 5th Dec 1915 and were engaged in various actions against the Bulgarian Army.

Bulgaria was coming under the control of Germany and Austro-Hungary and French and British troops were sent to the area to protect Serbia from attack. Between December 1915 and July 1916, the British Salonika Force was entrenched in a line of defence about 20 miles from Salonika. They then moved up the Struma valley. The autumn offensive captured over 400 square miles of territory including Karajakois (30 Sep – 2 Oct), Yenikoi (3-4 Oct) Tumbitza Farm (17 Nov and 6-7 Dec) but were unable to capture the Serbian town of Monastir.

The D.C.L.I. spent time road making and building entrenchments before attacking Bulgarian held villages below Seres. Casualties were not great; the main enemies were mosquitoes and malarial fever. In spring 1917 the river flooded and troops retired to the hills. They made frequent excursions across the Struma river and although unable to make a significant impression on the Bulgarian position, they succeeded in their primary objective of preventing enemy forces moving west of the Vardar.

In the whole campaign, British losses were 3,875 other ranks killed or died of wounds, 3,668 died of disease. Private Clarke died of heart failure on 20th August 1917. He had been engaged on transport duties for several months and was found dead in his tent an hour after he had been seen in his usual duties.

His Platoon Officer wrote that he was “one of the most popular men in the Battalion and liked by everyone.”

Charles Edward Clarke was buried in Struma Military Cemetery.

He was awarded the Victory and British War Medals and the 1915 Star.

As well as the Rugby Memorial Gates he is remembered on the Rugby Steam Shed Plaque and the Pailton War Memorial.

Charles’ elder brother, James who died on 25th Sep 1915 is also listed on the Pailton Memorial but not on the Rugby Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

Information about Charles Edward Clarke and the Salonika Campaign found at http://www.ww1wargraves.co.uk/ww1_cemeteries/memorials_pailton.asp

30th Mar 1918. Fatal Flying Accident in Rugby

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.

The death took place at the Brookfield Nursing Home this (Tuesday) morning of Mr H N Van Duzer, an officer in the American Flying Corps, as the result of injuries received in an aeroplane accident on Sunday.

The deceased officer and another aviator had been flying over the town at a very low altitude, and at about 5.30, while they were over the Eastlands Estate, something apparently went wrong with Mr Van Duzers’ engine, which caused the machine to nose dive and crash to earth. Mr Van Duzer received shocking injuries to the head, arms and legs, and was conveyed to the Brookfield Nursing Home in an unconscious condition, from which he never rallied.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte W H Linnell, jun, R.E, son of Mr W H LINNELL, has been wounded in the leg.

Mr J A Middleton, son of Mr & Mrs Middleton, of Watford, near Rugby, has recently been gazetted Second-Lieutenant in the M.G Corps, after serving three and a-half years in Gallipoli and Palestine.

The death from wounds is reported of Lieut H C Boycott, Coldstreams, the International hockey full back. Boycott won many prizes at lawn tennis tournaments, was a brilliant cricketer, and a smart golfer, being the first secretary of the Northamptonshire Golf Club.

Sergt H Collins, son of Mrs Collins, 73 New Street, New Bilton, has been transferred from his interment camp at Wittenberg in Germany to Holland. Sergt Collins was taken prisoner of war in the early days, and had spent four Christmases in Germany. Food parcels have been regularly sent to him through the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee.

News has been received that Pte A W Bottrill, Coldstream Guards was killed in action on March 18th. Pte Bottrill, whose parents reside at 94 Bridget Street, was an old St. Matthew’s boy. He went to the front in the first month of the War, and was in the retreat from Mons and many of the subsequent heavy engagements, being badly wounded on two occasions. The Captain, writing to his friends, remarks : He has been all through the war without once going home, except on leave, which surely is a magnificent record. There are too few of our original Expeditionary force left to tell their glorious story, and now there is yet another gone.

THE GREAT GERMAN OFFENSIVE.
SLOWING DOWN.

Since Friday last week the British Armies on the Western Front have been fighting with traditional valour and endurance against the stupendous forces launched against them by the Germans in making their promised offensive movement. In the course of three or four days of the bitterest fighting, unprecedented in the annals of war, our front line troops had to give way in front of vastly superior numbers, but have systematically retired on prepared defences. The result is, we are on an average of 15 miles farther back on a frontage of 50 miles than when the attack commenced. There has never been in the history of the War a battle of such continued intensity, and the reason for this is very clear. There has not been one wave attack, but at least three, carried out on the German side by three relays of armies. The usual breathing space which has hitherto followed the most intense period of battle has been denied to our troops, for the simple reason that the German has no sooner exhausted on army than he has put in another, the fresh troops passing through the forces which have been exhausted and carrying on the battle without loss of time.

We are not for the moment interested in German losses. They have (remarks the well-informed London correspondent of the “ Birmingham Daily Post ”) undoubtedly been colossal. We cannot even console ourselves with the effect which those losses will have upon the people of Germany when they are revealed. The only thing which interests us is the question : “ Will the German succeed in breaking the British Army and destroying our power to continue the War ?” It is treason of the worst kind to rave about a British defeat. We are not defeated because we have given ground. We cannot be defeated until our Armies are broken. The German is defeated on the day the official despatch admits that he is checked and held. The German advance is perceptibly slowing, the intensely active front is becoming perceptibly restricted. Of the 96 divisions on the British front 73 have already been identified. Considerably more than a third of all the German’s strength in France is at Present in motion against our Armies, and that enormous force has been met, checked, and decimated by less than a third of the British Army. The people who draw comparisons between this offensive and the offensive against Italy or the big push against Russia are wide of the mark. In point of morale and armament of the defender there is no comparison. So far as reserves and readiness to meet the attack are concerned there is no comparison.

Thursday morning’s news was to the effect that the Allies are holding the line, and the fighting was more in our favour.

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

At a meeting held on Thursday in last week there were present : Mr T A Wise (chairman), Mr H Tarbox (vice- chairman), Mrs Dewar, Mrs Shelley, Mrs Townsend, Mrs Peet, Messrs A Appleby, G H Cooke, C Gay, W A Stevenson, J Cripps, J H Meller, T A Smart, A Humphrey, R Griffin, and A T Watson.

Messrs Bluemel were given permission to purchase sugar for use in their factory canteen, which, it was said supplied meals to 300 workpeople daily.

The B.T.H Company applied for permission to purchase 40 lbs of sugar for the month ending April 20th for use as a lubricant for drawing wire in their lamp factory.—Mr Stevenson enquired how the company had obtained their sugar for this purpose in the past ?—The Executive Officer replied that they had been taking it from the supply allowed for their canteen, but he had informed them that this must not be done in the future.—Mr Stevenson enquired if the company would still be allowed the same quantity for their canteen ?—Mr Mellor said the past they had been drawing 3lbs per week from the canteen for this purpose, but the difficulty experienced in getting carbon for arc lamps had caused a great run on electric lamps, and an increased quantity of drawn wire was required, with the result that they were now using about 10lbs of per week for this purpose.—The permission was granted.

On the application of the L & N-W Railway Company, it was decided to allow the licensee of the Royal Oak, Brandon, to keep a quantity of tinned meat in stock for the use of fogmen.

A letter was read from the Divisional Commissioner with reference to the new wholesale price for milk, and suggesting co-operation between districts where similar conditions are uniformity of price. The Executive Officer read the price list as under :—April, 1s 3d ; May, 1s ; June, 1s ; July, ls 2d ; August, 1s 3d ; September, 1s 3d—average ls 2¾d.—In reply to a question, the Executive Officer stated that the resolution of the committee agreeing to the price remaining at 1s 9d per gallon till the end of April would have no effect, as it had not been confirmed by the Divisional Commissioner.—In reply to Mr Stevenson, it was stated that local committees had no control over wholesale prices.—The matter was referred to the Rationing Committee.

The Finance Committee reported that they had received £216 3s 1d from the Ministry of Food, which would meet all expenses incurred by the late Urban Committee up to December 31st. A cheque had been sent to the Urban Council for this amount, and it was decided to apply to the appointing authorities for a further grant.

SUGAR FOR JAM.
OUTLINES OF DISTRIBUTION SCHEME.

Following on the statement made by Lord Rhondda in the House of Lords with regard to the distribution of sugar for jam-making, the following announcement is made by the Sugar Department of the Ministry of Food :—

Forms of application can be obtained on and after March 23rd at the offices of the Local Food Control Committees, and must be returned on or before April 4th. Applications will considered only when they are made by persons actually growing the fruit which they wish to preserve. The form of application will require the applicant to state, among other things, the number of persons rationed for sugar as members of his household and the amount of fruit which he is likely to have available for preserving. The extent to which such applications can be met will be determined by the Director of Sugar Distribution in conjunction with the Local Food Committees.

Two classes of permit will be issued to applicants, one for soft fruit available between June 8th and July 31st, and the other for hard fruit available between August 1st and September 30th. “ Soft fruit ” will be taken to mean any fruits normally ready for preserving before the end of July, and in this category rhubarb may be included. “ Hard fruit ” will be taken to mean any fruits ready for preserving after July 31st, and in any area where vegetable marrows are usually preserved the local committee may in its discretion include them also in this category.

It has been decided that in no case shall the total amount of sugar for making jam for home consumption exceed 10lbs per head of the household. There will be many people, however, who will have fruit in sufficient quantities to enable them to use more sugar than this, and in these cases they will be invited to state what weight of fruit they are prepared to convert into jam on the understanding that they are to place the jam so made at the disposal of the local food committees at prices not exceeding the current wholesale prices.

It is most important that the application forms should returned on or before April 4th.

LOOKING AHEAD.
DISAPPOINTMENT FOR WEDDING PARTY.

Considerable amusement was caused at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday afternoon last week when a letter was read from a Craven Road grocer to the effect that a customer had ordered a 12-lb ham from him for a wedding which was to take place in few months’ time. He asked for permission to sell the ham, and keep it in stock until the event took place.—The Chairman (Mr T A Wise), in reply to Mr Mellor, stated that if the customer bought the ham he could possibly be prosecuted for hoarding. A person was not allowed go into a shop and buy what he wanted, and arrange with the trader to keep it in his warehouse until it was wanted, instead of the customer keeping it himself. That would get over the hoarding order at once : and, if they consented to this, it would open the door very wide.—Mr Cooke : If it means getting excess food we shall all be getting married soon.—The committee instructed the Executive Officer to reply that thy did not approve of the arrangement.

WOMEN’S INSTITUTES.

So many of these Institutes have now been started in Warwickshire, and have been so warmly received, that a County Federation has been formed in order to link them up together, and to co-ordinate the work generally. The first Federation meeting was held at Leamington last week, when a large number of delegates from the different villages where institutes have been successfully started attended. Lady Isabel Margesson, (hon secretary of the Worcestershire Federation), speaking on behalf of the London Federation Committee, explained the scheme. In her preliminary remarks Lady Isabel laid special emphasis on the revival of rural industries, and on the development of the whole of the rural life of the country. She pointed out that, although the great object of that development was Food Production, it was not restricted to that most important endeavour. The village institutes were the response of the women of the countrywide to the call to do their utmost for their own neighbourhood. Force and strength came from acting and meeting together, and results showed that every institute had its own character and individuality. Women’s institutes were NOT to interfere with, but to co-ordinate, the activities of a place. The Government concerned itself more and more with the homes and families of the land, and women’s institutes provided a homely organisation that could receive what the Government wished to give.

Several of the secretaries present spoke of the useful work done by the institutes, and Mrs Miller (Coundon, Coventry), gave an interesting account of a scheme in hand for promoting the toy-making industry.

The meeting, having unanimously decided to form a Federation for Warwickshire, proceeded to elect its officers and executive committee. Mrs Fielden (Kineton) was duly elected vice-president, the Mayoress of Leamington chairman, and Miss Bryson hon secretary.

The eight members of the committee proposed and elected were : Lady Likeston, Lady Nelson, the Mayoress, Mrs Fielden, Mrs Miller, Miss Fortescue, Miss Sargeaunt, and Miss Bryson.

It should be noted that anyone desirous of starting a women’s institute should apply to the War Agricultural Committee, Warwick. Once started, the institute is handed over to the care of the County Federation.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.—In memory of Pte. THOMAS BATCHELOR, of the 5th Royal Berks, who died of wounds in Germany, December 25, 1917.
“ God knows how we shall miss him,
And He counts the tears we shed,
And whispers, ‘ Hush, he only sleeps ;
Thy brother is not dead.’”
—Sadly missed by his loving Sisters Lizzie, Nellie, Ida, Hetty, and Beatie.

CLARKE.—In ever loving memory of Pte P. CLARKE, 31st T.R., who died in the Military Hospital at Dover, March 29th, 1917.
“ The flowers we place upon his grave,
May wither and decay ;
But the love we bear for him,
Will never fade away.”
—From father, mother, brothers, and Sisters at Kilsby.

TOMPKINS.—In memory of PRIVATE WILLIAM TOMPKINS, 24th T.R., dearly-loved youngest son of the late A. J. and Mrs Tompkins, Barby, died in Fulham Military Hospital, March 25th, 1917, aged 19 years.
“ Nobly he answered duty’s call,
And for his country gave his all.
A year has passed ; our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more.
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
—Sadly missed by his loving Mother, Brother, & Sister.

 

 

15th Apr 1916. Alien Woman’s Roaming Habits

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

TUESDAY.—Before Lord Braye, Dr Clement Dukes, T A Wise, A. E Donkin, and J J McKinnell, Esqrs.

ALIEN WOMAN’S ROAMING HABITS.-Marth E Goodman, 16 Charlotte Street, Edgbaston, Birmingham, was charged on remand with that she, being an alien, failed to furnish to the registration officer of the district particulars within 48 hours of her change of address, at Rugby, on the 5th inst.—Defendant said she was an English woman by birth and married a Russian. The husband wrote to the effect that his wife had left his home without his consent to roam about. She had done so before last year, and at such time her mind became unhinged. He asked the Bench to deal with under probation with such a warning as would make such an impression on her as to compel her to return to her husband and child and lead an honourable life.—The Clerk : Why don’t you stay with your husband ?—Defendant : I do.—The Chairman : Then why are you here ? Defendant replied that she had come away on business connected with some work that she was doing.—The case was adjourned till the following day, for her husband to be sent for.-Defendant : In the meanwhile, where will I be.—The Clerk : Down below.—Defendant I : don’t like being down below very well. Good morning.

On Wednesday defendant was brought before T A Wise, Esq. Her husband appeared, said he was willing to take her home, and was allowed to do so, defendant being warned by the magistrate that she must not roam about without registering herself.

WINDOWS NOT SHADED.

Arthur Willis, engineer, 137 Murray Road, Rugby, was summoned for not shading or reducing the inside lights of his dwelling-house so that no more than a dull subdued light was visible outside, at Rugby at 9.55 p.m on 4th Inst.—Defendant claimed that the light was sufficiently dull, there being curtains drawn across.—P.S Percival said he went to the back of defendant’s premises and saw a gas jet full on in the back kitchen, there being no blind down or curtain drawn. The light was showing on to the house adjoining. There was also another window, screened with a light buff blind, which was showing the light through. When this was pointed out to defendant he laughed, and said if he had got to pay he could do so, and didn’t care.—Defendant said the light in the scullery was put up because he heard somebody in next garden, and this proved to be the police officer.-The Clerk said the order stated that there must be no more than a dull light visible from any direction outside.-Sergt Percival (recalled) said the light had been in the scullery for some time before they went into the adjoining garden.—The Chairman said they found there was a light from the house, and fined defendant £1.

SUMMONS AGAINST SUPT. CLARKE FAILS.

Supt Edward J Clarke, Rugby, was summoned by Charles Gay, 87 Sandown Road, Rugby, for not shading or reducing the inside lights of a room at the Police Court at Rugby on the 3rd inst.—Mr Harold Eaden defended, and pleaded not guilty.—Complainant stated that on the evening of the 3rd April, at 9.58 p.m. he was in Railway Terrace, and saw a brilliant light coming from three electric lights situate in a room beneath the Police Court. It was coming from the room on the right-hand side of the entrance door.—By Mr Eaden : He did not take the trouble that evening to enquire whether Supt. Clarke was in possession of this room. He saw one of Supt Clarke’s officers in the room on previous evening.

John William Higginbotham, called by complainant, said he saw in the room a man in plain clothes turning over papers.—By Mr Eaden : He was in as good a position as complainant to see who was in the room, but could not see below his bust, and it was agreed among the crowd to shout to the man to pull the blinds down. The rest of the building was darkness.

John Roland Fletcher corroborated.

Mr Eaden said the room in question was in the occupation or control of the Superintendent until November last year, when the Royal Warwick Reserves asked for the room for an orderly room. Supt Clarke put the suggestion forward to his superior officer, and it was returned with a suggestion that the proposal should come before the Bench, because it was considered at Warwick that it was a matter more for the local Justices, in conjunction with the Superintendent, and he understood that as a result the room was given entirely to the military for the time being. Since November last the police had had no occupation of the room. They were not responsible for the cleaning and even had not a key of the room. If an offence had been committed, it was done by neither Supt Clarke nor his servant.

Supt Clarke gave evidence in support of Mr Eaden’s statement.

P.S Brown said on the night in question he was in charge room at the Police Station when a representative of the Military Police came in with someone in charge, and then went across to the orderly room.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had come to the conclusion that the prosecution entirely failed, and the prosecutor in this case must pay the costs. It seemed quite clear that the premises had been handed over to another body other than the police, and therefore that body was responsible for what took place in that room. The prosecution, therefore, against the police was entirely misdirected.—Mr Eaden asked for defendant’s costs, including the solicitor’s fee, and Lord Braye said these would be allowed. He added that the Bench were entirely satisfied with the manner in which Supt Clarke had carried out his duties under the Lighting Order in the premises over which he had direct control.

ALLEGED INACCURATE STATEMENT.—Mr Woodworth, of Hillmorton Road, summoned last week for an infringement of the Lighting Order, attended the Court and took exception to certain statements reported in our local contemporary. It was there stated that Inspector Lines said he had previously cautioned defendant. This, Mr Woodworth said, was incorrect, as no previous warning had been given, and as the heavy had been levied probably under a misapprehension, he asked for mitigation of the penalty.—Inspector Lines was called, and denied that any such statement was made by him. Defendant had not been previously warned.—Mr Woodworth also pointed out that in another case Mr Donkin was reported to have said : “ In no case have the police taken action without previous warning.” This statement by Mr Donkin was therefore incorrect, as no warning had been given in his (Mr Woodworth’s) case.—It was pointed out that the fine of £2 was in respect of two windows, and Lord Braye said the Bench were not prepared to go back upon their decision of previous week.—Mr Woodworth then expressed hope that the representative of the paper he referred to, who was present, would correct his report this week.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL, Monday.—W W Wilson, 9 St John Street, Rugby, assistant metallurgical chemist, v Willans and Robinson, Ltd, Rugby. This was an allegation that his leaving certificate was unreasonably withheld. He said he had obtained an appointment with the Aeronautical Inspection Department at an increased salary, his present remuneration being 50s a week. The firm’s representative said they could not spare the man. The Court refused the certificate, and the applicant was informed that if he asked for an increase of salary no doubt the firm would consider it.

RUGBEIANS generally will be sorry to learn that Major C Beatty, D.S.O., Canadian Headquarters, has had the misfortune to lose his left arm, which was amputated at the elbow, as the result of a bullet wound. Major Beatty, it will be remembered, was training at Bedford Cottage, Newmarket,, where he had charge of Lord Howard de Walden’s horses, as well as of others in different ownerships. He is an elder brother of Admiral Sir David Beatty, and won his D.S.O. in the South African war.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

A telegram has been received from the War Office stating that Capt A N C Kittermaster, O.R., Worcestershire Regiment, is reported from Basra as “ Missing, believed killed, April 4th to 5th.”

Mr and Mrs Keen, of 2 Winfield St, Rugby, received official report on Friday last that their son, Rifleman A Keen, Rifle Brigade, was killed. Deceased has previously been reported missing since 9th,May, 1915. He was 19 years of age, and before the war was apprenticed to the carpentry trade under Mr Bodycote, builder, Murray Rd.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry, who for sometime past have been stationed in Norfolk, have just been removed to another county on the East Coast.

Official intimation has been received that Lieut C H Ivens, only son of Mr J H Ivens, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has been wounded, but whether seriously or not has not yet been indicated.

DUNCHURCH.

H Carter and E Doyle have joined the Warwicks.

WITHYBROOK.

The sad news has been received that Percy Ingram, the only son or Mr and Mrs Walter Ingram, has been killed in action. The deceased was one of the first men of the village to volunteer for active service, and the joined the Warwickshire Regiment. Deep sympathy is felt for his parents.

MARTON.

WORKING PARTY FOR SAILORS AND SOLDIERS.-The result of the working-parties held in this village during the winter months on behalf of our sailors and soldiers is that some 90 shirts and 30 pairs of socks have been made and distributed to them through different channels. After forwarding a parcel at Christmas to all local men on active service, it was decided that the rest of the garments should be divided between the Jackanapes Society (for hospitals) and the British Prisoner of War Depots. Several friends who were unable to attend the meetings worked diligently in their own homes, one worker having knitted a dozen pairs of socks since the war began. Many others kindly gave money for the purchase of materials, the total subscriptions for this purpose amounting to £11 5s 6d.

DANCE.—On Friday evening a dance, arranged by Willans and Robinson’s Athletic Club, was held in the Co-op Hall on behalf of a fund for sending comforts to men in the Rugby Howitzer Battery. The company numbered over 200. Messrs Crowther and F Ward were the M.C’s, and Mr Flowers’ orchestra supplied the music.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday Mr Arthur Ingram, stage manager at the Empire, left his employment to join his group under the Derby Scheme. Mr Ingram, who lives at Avenue Road, New Bilton, has three brothers serving in the Army. On Saturday he was presented by the staff and artistes with a silver watch, and a collection was made at each performance on his behalf, and resulted in £5 being realised.

 

 

Note: In recent weeks the Rugby Advertiser has been reporting on the Appeal Tribunals. We have not been posting these as the names of the men concerned were not published. This week they have started including the names, so we will include these in the next post.
RugbyRemembers

1st Jan 1916. Unseasonable Weather for Christmas

UNSEASONABLE WEATHER FOR CHRISTMAS.

GREAT GALE.

Heavy rain occurred on several days before Christmas, and with the barometer at a very low reading there seemed little prospect on Christmas Eve that more enjoyable conditions would prevail. On Christmas Day the weather was as unseasonable and depressing as it could be. Drenching rains, accompanied by sharp winds, set in about noon, and continued without intermission till after dark.

There was a rapid rise of the barometer during the night. Keen dry winds on Sunday improved the condition of the roads somewhat. But more heavy rain on Sunday night had prepared people for an unpleasant Boxing Bay—how unpleasant few could have anticipated. During the night and in the early hours of the morning drenching rain fell, and a wet holiday appeared inevitable. Then, however, there came a change. The rain ceased, but the wind blew with redoubled energy, and walking became exceedingly difficult.

The gale, which blew without ceasing throughout the day and into the night, developing at times into a hurricane, damped all enthusiasm for outdoor entertainment, and those who decided to “ keep the home fires burning ” had much the best of the argument.

Many trees in the neighbourhood were blown down, and roads were blocked in several places. A large elm tree in Miss Elsee’s garden, Bilton Road, and another at Westfield—about 200 yards further along the road—were brought down, and the thoroughfare was quite blocked to vehicular traffic till about seven o’clock in the evening by which time some of the obstructing limbs had been removed.

Great havoc was caused to the trees forming the avenue on the London Road between Dunchurch and Knightlow Hill. A great many of the trees were blown down, and the telegraph wires which pass along each side of the road suffered badly, being broken down in many places. During the evening a motor car ran into the dis-placed wires near the junction with the Fosse Road, and before it could be stopped the wires had diverted its course into a ditch. Fortunately the occupants were unhurt.

At Bilton four large elm trees on the north-west side of the village were uprooted, and one of them, falling across the Lawford Lane, completely blocked it for several days till the Duke of Buccleuch’s estate men from Dunchurch, who were fully occupied on the London Road, were able to turn their attention to it. A substantially-built summer house in an exposed part of the grounds of Mr F Merttens, Bilton Rise, was lifted bodily over the hedge into the adjoining field and deposited upside down.

On the morning following the storm the Rugby Post Office was cut off for a time from the London trunk telegraph service, and communication by either telegraph or telephone was found impossible with Welford, Lutterworth, Dunchurch, and quite a number of places in Northamptonshire, including the county town. This was due to the snapping of wires caused by the falling branches of trees.

During the gale the auctioneers engaged in selling gifts for the British Farmers’ Red Cross Fund experienced much difficulty in keeping their position on the planks from which they were selling. Indeed, one exceptionally strong gust lifted Mr B H Cattell and his booking clerk clean off their feet and deposited them amongst the people. Mr T Tait, while selling in another part of the market, had a like experience.

The framework of an outside blind at Mr Edward Grey’s shop in Bank Street was shattered shortly before three o’clock, and the pole crashed through a plate glass window, smashing it to fragments and exposing the millinery displayed therein to the mercy of the boisterous wind the window could be boarded up by a local builder.

Several large trees in the School Close’ were blown down and fell across the fencing on the Dunchurch Road, but fortunately without any serious result. Several trees on the Barby Road were also destroyed, some being broken off close to the base, and others uprooted. A hoarding and wall in Chapel Street was blown down, and a wall dividing two front gardens on the Clifton Road shared a similar fate. The flag-staff on the Parish Church was broken off, and other cases of minor damage are reported from the town and district.

At Dunchurch, in addition to the havoc to trees and telegraph wires on the London Road, considerable damage was caused to roofs, chimneys, and fowl-houses. A very large elm tree near Mr Arkwright’s house was levelled, and a gate was pulled up with the roots. At Bilton Grange much damage was done to the wood fencing round the gardens.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

Before A E Donkin and C G Steel, Esqrs.

HELPING HIMSELF TO FALLEN TIMBER.— Alfred John Bathe (16), 93 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was charged with committing wilful damage to timber to the amount of 5s in the School Close on the 29th December, the property of Messrs Travis and Arnold, timber merchants, Rugby, also with assaulting P.C’s Lovell and Bryan while in the execution of their duty.—Defendant admitted taking boughs, as other people were also doing, and that he kicked the police in struggling with them.—P.C Lovell said at 2 p.m on the previous day he received a complaint from Mr Herbert, manager to Messrs Travis and Arnold, find went to the School Close, where he saw defendant cutting off limbs from a fallen tree with a saw. He had sawn through a bough a foot thick, and had started on another 10 inches thick. Defendant told witness he had got permission, and eventually complied with the officer’s request to come into the road. Defendant refused to give his name and address, and used bad language. He kicked P.C Bryan. Witness arrested him, and in the struggle was also kicked several times.—P.C Bryan corroborated, and said defendant kicked him in the stomach.-Defendant said there were several people in the field getting the wood, and one of them was given permission to do so.—Wm Herbert, manager for Messrs Travis and Arnold, said he had never seen defendant before, and did not give him permission. His firm were taking away the fallen timber from the School Close, and there was considerable labour involved. He felt he was justified in complaining to the police, and backed them up in the charge. People had been taking away the timber for two days, and the firm had lost more than they would get.—In reply to the Magistrates, witness said he gave one man leave to take away the brushwood.—The boy’s mother said no one tried to bring up children better than she had done.—The Chairman told defendant he had no business to cut big limbs of trees nor to use bad language or kick the police. For the damage he would have to pay 3s, for the assault on the police 4s 6d,—The boy’s mother protested that she would not pay a halfpenny, and that the fine ought to be stopped out of the boy’s pocket money.—A week was allowed in which to pay.

THURSDAY.—Before A E Donkin, Esq.

DRUNKENNESS.—Frederick Bidmead, millwright, 52 King Edward Road, Rugby, pleaded guilty to being drunk at Rugby at 9.45 p.m on December 29th.—P.S Goodwin found him helplessly drunk in James Street. He could not tell the officer where he lived, and he was locked up for his own safety.—Fined 1s 6d.

A CHARGE OF DESERTION.—Wilfred Rainbow, living with Mrs Kendrick at 30 Worcester Street, Rugby, was charged with being a deserter from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment since December 8th, 1914.—Defendant, who denied that he was a deserter, had a fit whilst in the dock, and had to be removed from the Court.—Superintendent Clarke said he received a telegram from the commanding officer asking him to arrest defendant.—Detective Mighall said defendant had re-enlisted in the Worcestershire Regiment, but was now employed at one of the works.—Remanded in custody to await an escort.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT IN THE PARISH CHURCH.—On Tuesday afternoon in last week as Richard Clarke, the assistant verger at the Parish Church, was working in the belfry he became giddy, and fell from the ladder upon which he was standing, through a trap door, a distance of about 30ft. As a result he broke his arm and severely injured his legs and face. There was no one in the church at the time, and although he was suffering great pain, the unfortunate man succeeded in reaching Mr George Over’s shop in Market Place, from whence he was conveyed to the Hospital of St Cross. After his injuries had been attended to he returned to his home. Clarke, who is nearly 70 years of age, has been employed at the Parish Church for about 40 years, and is well known to all who worship there. Despite his age, he is making good progress towards recovery.

FIRE IN A FANCY SHOP.—At about 5.30 on Tuesday afternoon a fire broke out in the window of Mr Austin’s fancy shop, 31 Chapel Street. The alarm was given by a lady who was passing, and Mr Austin fortunately succeeded in extinguishing the flames before a great deal of damage was done. The window was full of Christmas fancy goods, which burned very quickly, and the heat was so intense that the plate glass window was broken. The damage is estimated at about £10. The cause of the fire is unknown.

Clarke, Walter. Died 15th Nov 1915

Walter Clarke was born in Barby in 1889. His father was Edward Thomas Clarke, a builder and grocer, and Martha (nee COLEMAN). Both parents were born in Barby but must have spent a brief time in Rugby, as their two elder children were born there. In 1905 Edward Clarke died at the age of 50 and the family moved to Rugby. In 1911 Martha was living at 19 Temple Street with Walter, aged 21 and his brother Edward Thomas, 23, a bricklayer. Walter was employed as a factory hand.

When the war started, Walter was one of the first to enlist on 7th September 1914, at the age of 23 years and 3 months. He was 5ft 5½in tall with brown eyes and dark brown hair. He joined the 6th Battalion of the Dorsetshire Regiment. This battalion was a mixture of recruits from Dorset, 400 volunteers from London, 400 from Warwickshire and 70 Welsh miners. The battalion was part of the 17th Northern Division which was intended for Home Defence duties, so much time was spent training at Bovington Camp. However by 1915 they were needed in France and Walter arrived in Boulogne on 14th July 1915 and they were soon serving in the trenches near Ypres.

Water Clarke died on 15th November 1915, presumably as a result of sniper fire. His death was reported in the Rugby Advertiser of 18th December 1915:

Pte R Compton, a life-long friend of deceased, in a letter to Mrs Clarke, states that they were talking together in the trench a few minutes before the occurrence. He adds that Pte Carke died almost instantly; he passed away quite peacefully, and never spoke or moved. He was buried right away from the firing line, and the Sergts and men of the platoon sent their sympathy to his friends.

The Captain of his company, in a letter of sympathy to Mrs Clarke, says: “He was a good soldier, and I was sorry to lose him. In your great loss you have one consolation – he died fighting for his country against a cruel, treacherous, and barbarous race, the greatest honour a man can have in this life.”

Pte Clarke, who was only 26 years of age, was very popular with his companions.

Walter Clarke is buried at Birr Cross Roads Cemetery. He was transferred from his original grave at Gordon House No 1 Cemetery on 3rd April 1919 together with three other men from the Dorsetshire Regiment. The inscription on his headstone reads “of Rugby, Warwickshire”

Note: The Commonwealth War Grave Commission gives his date of death as 5th November 1915 – the same date as the death of the other men in the original grave. His Service record and other documents record his death as 15th November 1915.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

13th Nov 1915. Letter from old St Matthew’s boys

LETTER FROM OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOYS.

Pte Frank Morley, R.A.M.C, an “old boy” of St Matthew’s School, writing from Gallipoli to Mr R H Myers, the headmaster, say :-

It is always a pleasure to receive the Advertiser and read of the doings of the “ old boys.” St Matthew’s has indeed contributed its quota, and I feel proud to be included amongst the number.

We, in company with the 11th Division, took part in the new landing on the Peninsula. As you are aware, we did not quite achieve our object, but I feel sure that the surprise landing demoralized the Turks, who were anticipating an attack from the Asiatic coast.

It seems to me that people at home are only just beginning to realise the gravity of the situation. The fighting out here is of a different character, and on a different scale to that in France. I think Mr Winston Churchill aptly described the position when he said, “ The armies there are like men fighting on a high and narrow scaffolding above the surface of the earth.” We must indeed be prepared to make great sacrifices before the final goal is reached.

I will not trouble you with details of the new landing. We certainly had an exciting time, and for the first ten days had to work like Trojans, We were generally up at 3.30 a.m, and walked fully three miles to the Regimental Aid Post to collect the wounded. Motor or horse transport was out of the question, as there were no roads, and the ground generally very rough and treacherous. It was a poor sort of “ joy ride ” the patients had, yet I cannot call to mind, a single word of complaint.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry came along a fortnight after the landing was made. They acquitted themselves well in their first engagement, for it was no easy task to cross an open plain with shells bursting thick and furious. They helped to carry out a good piece of work, and all honour due to them.

We have had a splendid opportunity of watching the Navy at work, and can fully appreciate their good work. Without their aid it would be absolutely impossible to land, let alone exist, on the Peninsula.

For the present we have turned our back on the Peninsula, and are now in a different country, where we await orders. Mr Censor will not permit me to disclose our whereabouts, so I must leave you guessing.

Pte Arthur Tacey, A.S.C, another “ Old boy,” writes to Mr Myers from the Dardanelles :- “ We are having a hard time of it out here, strenuous work every day and nothing to eat but biscuits, bully beef, and jam. Still, we are not downhearted, and keep looking for the bright side, which we hope will not be very long in appearing now, though we all feel that we are on a very funny outing. One’s thoughts often turn to the old school and the happy times spent there. In the waits in our dug-outs we often amuse ourselves with making up doggerel rhymes, and I send you my last contribution.”

Summerdown Convalescent Hospital,

E Division, Hut 1, Eastbourne.

5/11/15.

DEAR SIR,—I am writing to ask you if you would kindly be good enough to insert this in your paper, as you see by the above address that I am writing this from a convalescent hospital and pleased to say that I am progressing favourably. I should, however, like the people of Rugby to know how the boys answered the country’s call last August ; as near as I can say about 100 enlisted in the 5th Oxford and Bucks, and I am pleased to say there are still some of them left, although, perhaps, few. We had what they call our baptism of fire on June 16th while waiting in reserve for the 6th Division. Here we lost one officer and 50 N.C.O and men whale taking over the position on June 19th. I might say I unluckily got gassed and somewhat blinded, and was away from my regiment six weeks. When I did rejoin on August 17th I luckily escaped a shell, which burst only a matter of a few feet off ; but on September 25th I was wounded and now I am enjoying my convalescent rest. I tell you it is not really so bad being a soldier, and if this letter should reach the eye of any “ slacker,” I hope it will have some effect in changing his mind, for I can assure them that men are wanted and will be had. So play the game and join.

I am, yours faithfully,

PTE. E. JACKSON.

OUR YOUNGEST TERRITORIAL.

We reproduce a photograph of Alfred Charles Hayward, son of Mr H E and Mrs Hayward, of 38 Winfield Street, Rugby, who is, we understand, the youngest of Rugby’s Territorials. Before the outbreak of war he was attached to E/Company of the 1/7th Warwickshires, and went with them to Rhyl for the annual encampment during the August Bank Holiday week in 1914. He was then within a month of being 14 years of age. As will be remembered, the battalion had scarcely, arrived in camp when they were ordered to mobolise at their war station in the south of England. They were eventually moved by stages to Leighton Buzzard, from whence they had a route march of 135 miles through Dunstable, Hitchin, Ware, Epping, Brentwood, Stock, Chelmsford, and other places to Totham. This occupied 11 days, and the distances covered each day ranged from 3 to 20 miles. On another occasion they went out on a three days’ march. Young Hayward marched with them, and never had to fall out. The sight of such a youngster striding along with the regiment naturally attracted much attention from spectators, and if is said that sympathetic mothers were often moved to mingle tears with admiration. He was medically examined and reported fit, but not old enough for active service, and when the battalion went to France, Bugler Hayward returned to Coventry to act with the reserve lines. He is still there waiting for the time when he can go on active service. It would be interesting to know whether there if a younger territorial in the country.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-corporal Arthur Mason, 6th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who has been spending eight day’s leave at his mother’s resident 40 Rutland Gardens, Hove, returned to Flanders on November 6th.

Mr J Walker, of 58 Lawford Road. Rugby, who went to East Africa with Colonel Driscoll’s Legion of Frontiersmen in April, is now serving as second-lieutenant, the promotion dating from September 8th.

It is reported that six members of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment-the County battalion—have been reported for Distinguished Conduct in the Field : Second-Lieuts Brian Ash and Sherwood ; Pte P W Hancocks (a Warwick man), Lce-Cpl Berry, Sergt Gerrard, and Q-M Shepherd.

A considerable number, of the clerical staff at the London and North-Western Railway Company’s works at Crewe have received permission to join the colours, and their places will be taken temporarily by women. Many of the unmarried men are enlisting under Lord Derby’s group scheme.

Mr H Pratt, of 4 School Street, Rugby, has enlisted in the Royal Flying Corps, and left Rugby for the Farnborough Flying Station yesterday (Friday) morning.

Since it was drafted to the front in June last, the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, in which many Rugby and district men enlisted, has been continuously engaged in strenuous work in an important position of the British line where fighting had been most desperate, and it has nobly upheld the glorious traditions of this famous regiment. The casualties have been exceptionally heavy, and are as under : Officers killed, 13 ; wounded, 19 ; N.C.O’s and men killed, wounded, and missing, nearly 900.

THE KING’S MESSENGER.

Corpl Fred Clarke, who carried out instructions to summon a doctor to attend his Majesty the King on the occasion of his recent accident in France, has been recognised by Hillmorton people from his portrait in a pictorial paper as a soldier of the same name who at the time he enlisted resided in the village.

ANOTHER LOCAL SOLDIER MISSING.

Pte Percy Woodhams, of the 2nd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, is reported to have been missing since September 25th, the date of the great advance by the Allies in France. At the time Pte Woodhams enlisted, shortly after the outbreak of war, his father resided in Cambridge Street but he has since left the neighbourhood. Pte Woodhams was working at the B.T.H until within a short time of his enlistment.

TWO LOSSES IN TWELVE MONTHS.

Official news was received by Mrs Dodd on Saturday that her son, Corpl E Dodd, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action on October 16th. Corpl Dodd, whose home was at 11 Bennett Street, joined, the regiment when the war broke out. He formerly worked at the Gas Works and subsequently for Mr Young, contractor. He was 37 years of age and single. He became a smart soldiers and five weeks after enlistment was made corporal. Although he joined in August, 1914, he did not go out till October 1st, and he was killed on the 16th. On the 20th October last year his father died from the effects of an accident, so that Mrs Dodd has sustained two heavy losses within the twelve months, and the greatest sympathy will be extended to her.

LORD DERBY’S RECRUITING SCHEME.

CANVASSING COMMENCES LOCALLY,

The great efforts to secure recruits for the Army inaugurated by Lord Derby it now in full swing locally. Sub-canvassing committee rooms have been opened in the various wards, the blue cards were issued on Monday, and canvassing commenced the same evening.

The voluntary system is now on its trial, and only three weeks remain in which to prove whether it will or will not suffice to give up the number of men required to carry the war to a successful issue. To make the scheme a success every eligible man who can be spared should enlist, either for immediate service, or in the reserve, and it therefore behoves everyone to ask themselves whether the reasons which the held to be valid for not enlisting are not, after all, mere excuses.

Rugby has already done remarkably well—few towns have done better-but there are still many young men who could well be spared and who have no legitimate excuse for holding back, who should answer to the call ; and the fact that the single men are to be called on first will doubtless assist many married men, hesitating between two duties, to make a decision.

So far, the result of the canvass has been disappointing, and eligible men have not responded to the call with the readiness which was at one time anticipated. Only a few men have, so far, enlisted under the group system. The only regiments which are open at present are infantry of the line.

The groups in which recruits may place themselves are for single men numbered 1 to 23, for each year of age respectively, from 18 to 40; and for married men the groups are numbered 24 to 46 inclusive for ages respectively 18 to 40.

The following have enlisted during the past week :-W J Timms, G Beck, A Frisby, S H Garlick, B Hardy, T C Manby, E C Long, J R M Cave, R.G.A ; T W Rennison, 13th Batt E Yorks ; L A Fudge, H W Driver, R.H.A ; P Smith, W Nown, W J Dunkley, G Baker, C Allen, G Hollis, R.F.A ; E G Bristow, W G Heighton, H C Robinson, W J Riley, F J Hornby, A Varney, A Richardson, R.W.R ; C P Croft, C T Newcomb, K.R.R ; A Varney, 220 F Co, R.E ; J Masters, Coldstream Guarda ; W Parrett, F C Warren, C W Maycock, G Blundell, R.E ; J O’Brian, and J Webster, R Scots Fusiliers.