21st Apr 1917. Wounded Soldiers Entertained at the Co-operative Hall

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED AT THE CO-OPERATIVE HALL.

Some idea of the large amount of voluntary work that is being done for our wounded soldiers in Rugby and district could be gathered from the large attendance at an entertainment given for their benefit at the Co-operative Hall on Saturday Afternoon. The promoters were the Educational Committee of the Co-operative Society, and invitations were sent to the wounded and sick in the different V.A.D Hospitals of the town and neighbourhood. About 300 soldiers in all assembled at the Hall, and they greatly appreciated the bill of fare provided for their relaxation. Artistes from the Rugby Picture Palaces gave “ turns,” which included vocal and instrumental music, humorous items, a ventriloquial sketch, &c, and every item was generously applauded. Cigarettes were distributed amongst the men, and afterwards they sat down to a bountiful tea, to which most of them were able to do full justice.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt W Duckett, 61st Field Company, R.E, whose parents live at 38 Chester Street, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant and meritorious conduct in Ypres Salient between May, 1915, and February, 1916. He has also been promoted sergeant-major.

Mr Smith and friends entertained the wounded at Te Hira on Friday last week with a musical programme, sketches, &c. The programme was sustained by Misses Robinson, Ward, Brown and Hadfield, Mrs Ewer, Messrs J Smith and Haycock. Cigarettes and chocolates were passed round. The soldiers were very appreciative.

The Rugby postwomen entertained the wounded at Bilton Hall on Wednesday last with a long musical programme, &c. The pianists were Miss Lucas, Mrs Ewer, and Master Keen ; soloists, Mrs Ewer, Mrs Askew, Misses Lucas, Field, Messrs Davis and Smith ; recitations, Miss Ward and Mr Smith ; violin solos, Miss Coles ; sketch, “ Mixed Pickles,” Messrs Haycock and Smith, Misses Coles and Hadfield. Cigarettes, tobacco, and chocolates were given to the soldiers.

SECOND-LIEUT J GOODMAN KILLED.

The news that Second-Lieut James Goodman, of Flecknoe, was killed at the head of his troop (Northants Yeomanry) by a shell in the recent fighting in France, will be received with great regret by numerous friends. Cricketers and hockey players in a wide circle—but particularly in the Rugby and Northampton districts—will feel genuinely grieved to learn of the death of the popular “ Jimmy ” Goodman. Apart from those who knew him in connection with these games, he had many friends in hunting and other circles, who will also sincerely mourn the loss of so good a sportsman. When at Wellingborough Grammar School he gained his colours at both cricket and association football. He had been in the Northamptonshire Yeomanry for some years, and at the outbreak of the War at once volunteered for active service.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR NEWBOLD MAN.

Mr F Gamble, of Newbold, has received a letter from his son, Pte W Gamble, belonging to the 6th Leicesters, in which he states that he has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field. The special act for which the medal was given was carrying messages under heavy shell fire on the Somme front last autumn. This is the first instance in the present War in which a soldier from Newbold has been awarded the medal.

LIEUT E G PASSMORE WOUNDED.

Mr G A Passmore, of Ashby St Ledgers, has received official news that his elder son, Lieut Gilbert Passmore, of the 7th Northants, was wounded last week with gunshot wounds in the face, and is now in hospital in Manchester. Lieut Passmore returned to the front only a few weeks ago.

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK

WARWICKSHIRE APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At the Appeals Tribunal at Coventry on Wednesday there were present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P Lovett, S J Dicksee, and A E Craig. Lieut M E T Wratislaw (Military representative) and Mr F Channing (agricultural representative) also attended.

NOT A BAKER.

The Military appealed against the conditional exemption of Thomas William Harrowing (40), assembler, 26 Manor Road, Rugby.—Lieut Wratislaw pointed out that the man was given conditional exemption in February in order that he might be used as a substitute for a baker. The Military sent him to a place at Radford, and he then said he was not used to hand baking, but that he was accustomed to baking by machinery. He was subsequently sent to the Rugby Co-operative Society to release a man for the Army, but he proved a failure there too.—Mr Mitchell, manager of the Bakery Department, stated that the man was not a baker, and knew nothing of the work of the ovens.—Lieut Wratislaw said there was no doubt the man hoped the Tribunal would send him back to his father-in-law, where he could slack about.—Appeal upheld.

AUCTIONEER’S CLERK TO GO.

The Military appealed against the exemption til June 1st, given to George Smith (36, married), general service, auctioneer’s clerk, employed by Messrs Cropper Steward Cattell.—Lieut Wratislaw pointed out that Mr Cattell had not satisfied the Military that he had made a real effort to get a substitute. They had taken the clerk of a similar firm in the town, and other arrangements had been made there.—Mr H Lupton Reddish, for respondent, said Mr Cattell had supplied another local auctioneer with a clerk when his man was called up. He was an agricultural auctioneer and tenant right valuer, and in addition to holding a weekly sale at Rugby Cattle Market, he was trustee for a number of estates and agent for several others, which required constant supervision. — In reply to questions, it was stated that the man released by Mr Cattell was 50 years of age. He was released because the auctioneer in question had no one to assist him.—Mr Rotherham pointed out that respondent knew this man Smith would be called up, and yet he released a man over military age, and retained one of military age.-Mr Reddish : It was practically done to assist the Military. —Mr Wratislaw : There was no question of substitution.—Mr Reddish said both the Military and Mr Cattell had unsuccessfully tried to get a substitute.—Lieut Wratislaw said the Military could have sent him as substitute a low category man who had been engaged in another auctioneer’s office.—Mr Cattell replied that the man in question knew nothing about cattle and sheep.—Lieut Wratislaw : He was competent to take charge of the accounts. He was accustomed to figures, but he would not be competent as a tenant right valuer or to value stock.—Mr Reddish intimated that Mr Cattell informed him that the man released gave him notice because Mr Wiggins offered him more money.—The Chairman : You should have kept him by offering more.—The Chairman : This sale (Rugby Market) is held one day a week. There happens to be six days in a week. We think the appeal ought to be upheld on national grounds, but we will ask the Military not to call him up for 56 days from now.

HELPING A NEIGHBOUR.

Mr H W Worthington represented Sidney Strong, Royal Oak Inn, Hillmorton Wharf, a small-holder, who had been exempted till March 31st, and now asked for a further period. He pointed out that the man had a quantity of stock on his holding. He also assisted another farmer, Mr Gibbs, who had met with an accident, and it was in consideration of this that his original exemption was granted. Mr Gibbs had not yet quite recovered from his accident, and was unable to do the work of the farm. Mr Strong was prepared to help him in this work.—Mr Channing expressed the opinion that Mr Strong was doing his best in the national interest to assist his neighbours, and he thought he should be retained, if possible.—Exempted for two months ; no further application without leave.

OTHER CASES.

In view of the serious inconvenience which would be caused to the civil population if the only remaining practical optician and lens grinder in the town was taken, Ernest Eugene Crowhurst (39, married), of Albert Street, Rugby, who was represented by Mr H W Worthington, was exempted till June 30th.

WARWICKSHIRE EDUCATION COMMITTEE.
CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR AT RUGBY.

At Tuesday’s meeting of Warwickshire Education Committee the Dismissals Committee reported that the managers of Rugby Eastlands Boys’ School appointed Mr Trew Cary as assistant teacher at that school. After his appointment it transpired that Mr Cary was a conscientious objector, and the teachers of the school asked the managers to re-consider his appointment. The managers thereupon decided to dismiss him. Mr Cary asked for an inquiry under rule 25 of the rules for school management. Councillor Dewar and Miss McClure represented the managers at the inquiry, and Mr Cary was also present. After hearing the evidence, it was decided to confirm Mr Cary’s dismissal. Mr Cary informed the committee that in order to take up his post Rugby at once he had resigned without notice a temporary appointment at Yeovil, and had lost a month’s salary in consequence. They decided to pay Mr Cary the salary thus lost, viz, £3 3s 1d, and his return fare from Yeovil, £1 10s.—The report was adopted without comment.

PUBLIC SCHOOLBOYS ON THE LAND.

A party of Rugby boys, who have been working on the Devonshire farm controlled by the Army Canteen Committee for the first half of their holidays, have just given place to a party of Clifton boys, who will complete the work of planting during the remainder of the month.

 

Goodman, Fred. Died 3rd Aug 1916

Fred Goodman was born in 1896 and baptised that year on 23 Aug at Hillmorton Parish Church. His father was Henry Goodman, a railway servant and Janet nee Franklin. Janet was  born in Shenley, Bucks and they married in Hillmorton on 16 Dec 1886. At the time they lived in Lower Street Hillmorton, but by 1901 they had moved to 5 East Street, Rugby.

In 1911 Fred was 14 years old and working as an Office Boy at B.T.H. His father was still working on the railway, a Fire-dropper for L&NW Railway. Fred was the youngest of four children, two brothers Walter and Lewis and a sister, Nellie. Walter was away in 1911, serving with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in India (He was to die in the first month of the war, Goodman, Walter George. Died 27 Aug 1914.) The rest of the family were at 12 Bridge St, Rugby.

Fred enlisted with the 78th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, number 11032. He arrived in France on 12th July 1915. The Brigade was concentrated near St Omer, then moved to the Southern Ypres salient. In early July 1916 they moved south to the Somme during the Battle of Albert.

Fred Goodman died of wounds on 3rd August 1916. He was buried at Dernancourt Communal Cemetery. Dernancourt was a village, close to Albert, the location of the XV Corps Main Dressing Station.

According to the In Memoriam notice put in the Rugby Advertiser by his parents in August 1921, Fred died on his 20th birthday.

He is also remembered on the B.T.H. Memorial.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

15th Apr 1916. Alien Woman’s Roaming Habits

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

TUESDAY.—Before Lord Braye, Dr Clement Dukes, T A Wise, A. E Donkin, and J J McKinnell, Esqrs.

ALIEN WOMAN’S ROAMING HABITS.-Marth E Goodman, 16 Charlotte Street, Edgbaston, Birmingham, was charged on remand with that she, being an alien, failed to furnish to the registration officer of the district particulars within 48 hours of her change of address, at Rugby, on the 5th inst.—Defendant said she was an English woman by birth and married a Russian. The husband wrote to the effect that his wife had left his home without his consent to roam about. She had done so before last year, and at such time her mind became unhinged. He asked the Bench to deal with under probation with such a warning as would make such an impression on her as to compel her to return to her husband and child and lead an honourable life.—The Clerk : Why don’t you stay with your husband ?—Defendant : I do.—The Chairman : Then why are you here ? Defendant replied that she had come away on business connected with some work that she was doing.—The case was adjourned till the following day, for her husband to be sent for.-Defendant : In the meanwhile, where will I be.—The Clerk : Down below.—Defendant I : don’t like being down below very well. Good morning.

On Wednesday defendant was brought before T A Wise, Esq. Her husband appeared, said he was willing to take her home, and was allowed to do so, defendant being warned by the magistrate that she must not roam about without registering herself.

WINDOWS NOT SHADED.

Arthur Willis, engineer, 137 Murray Road, Rugby, was summoned for not shading or reducing the inside lights of his dwelling-house so that no more than a dull subdued light was visible outside, at Rugby at 9.55 p.m on 4th Inst.—Defendant claimed that the light was sufficiently dull, there being curtains drawn across.—P.S Percival said he went to the back of defendant’s premises and saw a gas jet full on in the back kitchen, there being no blind down or curtain drawn. The light was showing on to the house adjoining. There was also another window, screened with a light buff blind, which was showing the light through. When this was pointed out to defendant he laughed, and said if he had got to pay he could do so, and didn’t care.—Defendant said the light in the scullery was put up because he heard somebody in next garden, and this proved to be the police officer.-The Clerk said the order stated that there must be no more than a dull light visible from any direction outside.-Sergt Percival (recalled) said the light had been in the scullery for some time before they went into the adjoining garden.—The Chairman said they found there was a light from the house, and fined defendant £1.

SUMMONS AGAINST SUPT. CLARKE FAILS.

Supt Edward J Clarke, Rugby, was summoned by Charles Gay, 87 Sandown Road, Rugby, for not shading or reducing the inside lights of a room at the Police Court at Rugby on the 3rd inst.—Mr Harold Eaden defended, and pleaded not guilty.—Complainant stated that on the evening of the 3rd April, at 9.58 p.m. he was in Railway Terrace, and saw a brilliant light coming from three electric lights situate in a room beneath the Police Court. It was coming from the room on the right-hand side of the entrance door.—By Mr Eaden : He did not take the trouble that evening to enquire whether Supt. Clarke was in possession of this room. He saw one of Supt Clarke’s officers in the room on previous evening.

John William Higginbotham, called by complainant, said he saw in the room a man in plain clothes turning over papers.—By Mr Eaden : He was in as good a position as complainant to see who was in the room, but could not see below his bust, and it was agreed among the crowd to shout to the man to pull the blinds down. The rest of the building was darkness.

John Roland Fletcher corroborated.

Mr Eaden said the room in question was in the occupation or control of the Superintendent until November last year, when the Royal Warwick Reserves asked for the room for an orderly room. Supt Clarke put the suggestion forward to his superior officer, and it was returned with a suggestion that the proposal should come before the Bench, because it was considered at Warwick that it was a matter more for the local Justices, in conjunction with the Superintendent, and he understood that as a result the room was given entirely to the military for the time being. Since November last the police had had no occupation of the room. They were not responsible for the cleaning and even had not a key of the room. If an offence had been committed, it was done by neither Supt Clarke nor his servant.

Supt Clarke gave evidence in support of Mr Eaden’s statement.

P.S Brown said on the night in question he was in charge room at the Police Station when a representative of the Military Police came in with someone in charge, and then went across to the orderly room.

The Chairman said the Magistrates had come to the conclusion that the prosecution entirely failed, and the prosecutor in this case must pay the costs. It seemed quite clear that the premises had been handed over to another body other than the police, and therefore that body was responsible for what took place in that room. The prosecution, therefore, against the police was entirely misdirected.—Mr Eaden asked for defendant’s costs, including the solicitor’s fee, and Lord Braye said these would be allowed. He added that the Bench were entirely satisfied with the manner in which Supt Clarke had carried out his duties under the Lighting Order in the premises over which he had direct control.

ALLEGED INACCURATE STATEMENT.—Mr Woodworth, of Hillmorton Road, summoned last week for an infringement of the Lighting Order, attended the Court and took exception to certain statements reported in our local contemporary. It was there stated that Inspector Lines said he had previously cautioned defendant. This, Mr Woodworth said, was incorrect, as no previous warning had been given, and as the heavy had been levied probably under a misapprehension, he asked for mitigation of the penalty.—Inspector Lines was called, and denied that any such statement was made by him. Defendant had not been previously warned.—Mr Woodworth also pointed out that in another case Mr Donkin was reported to have said : “ In no case have the police taken action without previous warning.” This statement by Mr Donkin was therefore incorrect, as no warning had been given in his (Mr Woodworth’s) case.—It was pointed out that the fine of £2 was in respect of two windows, and Lord Braye said the Bench were not prepared to go back upon their decision of previous week.—Mr Woodworth then expressed hope that the representative of the paper he referred to, who was present, would correct his report this week.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL, Monday.—W W Wilson, 9 St John Street, Rugby, assistant metallurgical chemist, v Willans and Robinson, Ltd, Rugby. This was an allegation that his leaving certificate was unreasonably withheld. He said he had obtained an appointment with the Aeronautical Inspection Department at an increased salary, his present remuneration being 50s a week. The firm’s representative said they could not spare the man. The Court refused the certificate, and the applicant was informed that if he asked for an increase of salary no doubt the firm would consider it.

RUGBEIANS generally will be sorry to learn that Major C Beatty, D.S.O., Canadian Headquarters, has had the misfortune to lose his left arm, which was amputated at the elbow, as the result of a bullet wound. Major Beatty, it will be remembered, was training at Bedford Cottage, Newmarket,, where he had charge of Lord Howard de Walden’s horses, as well as of others in different ownerships. He is an elder brother of Admiral Sir David Beatty, and won his D.S.O. in the South African war.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

A telegram has been received from the War Office stating that Capt A N C Kittermaster, O.R., Worcestershire Regiment, is reported from Basra as “ Missing, believed killed, April 4th to 5th.”

Mr and Mrs Keen, of 2 Winfield St, Rugby, received official report on Friday last that their son, Rifleman A Keen, Rifle Brigade, was killed. Deceased has previously been reported missing since 9th,May, 1915. He was 19 years of age, and before the war was apprenticed to the carpentry trade under Mr Bodycote, builder, Murray Rd.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry, who for sometime past have been stationed in Norfolk, have just been removed to another county on the East Coast.

Official intimation has been received that Lieut C H Ivens, only son of Mr J H Ivens, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has been wounded, but whether seriously or not has not yet been indicated.

DUNCHURCH.

H Carter and E Doyle have joined the Warwicks.

WITHYBROOK.

The sad news has been received that Percy Ingram, the only son or Mr and Mrs Walter Ingram, has been killed in action. The deceased was one of the first men of the village to volunteer for active service, and the joined the Warwickshire Regiment. Deep sympathy is felt for his parents.

MARTON.

WORKING PARTY FOR SAILORS AND SOLDIERS.-The result of the working-parties held in this village during the winter months on behalf of our sailors and soldiers is that some 90 shirts and 30 pairs of socks have been made and distributed to them through different channels. After forwarding a parcel at Christmas to all local men on active service, it was decided that the rest of the garments should be divided between the Jackanapes Society (for hospitals) and the British Prisoner of War Depots. Several friends who were unable to attend the meetings worked diligently in their own homes, one worker having knitted a dozen pairs of socks since the war began. Many others kindly gave money for the purchase of materials, the total subscriptions for this purpose amounting to £11 5s 6d.

DANCE.—On Friday evening a dance, arranged by Willans and Robinson’s Athletic Club, was held in the Co-op Hall on behalf of a fund for sending comforts to men in the Rugby Howitzer Battery. The company numbered over 200. Messrs Crowther and F Ward were the M.C’s, and Mr Flowers’ orchestra supplied the music.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday Mr Arthur Ingram, stage manager at the Empire, left his employment to join his group under the Derby Scheme. Mr Ingram, who lives at Avenue Road, New Bilton, has three brothers serving in the Army. On Saturday he was presented by the staff and artistes with a silver watch, and a collection was made at each performance on his behalf, and resulted in £5 being realised.

 

 

Note: In recent weeks the Rugby Advertiser has been reporting on the Appeal Tribunals. We have not been posting these as the names of the men concerned were not published. This week they have started including the names, so we will include these in the next post.
RugbyRemembers

8th Apr 1916. Zeppelin Raids

ZEPPELIN RAIDS.

DAILY VISITS.

During Friday night last week five Zeppelins raided the East Coast, and as a result 43 persons were killed and 66 injured. One of the Zeppelins was hit by gunfire and eventually fell into the sea off the mouth of the Thames. The crew surrendered, and the airship was taken in tow, but unfortunately broke in two and sank. A machine gun, petrol tank, and other pieces of machinery from an airship were also found on land, and it is believed another of the raiders had been damaged.

A number of our aeroplanes went up to attack the raiders. Lieut Brandon, R.F.C, on rising to 6,000ft, at 9.45 p.m, saw a Zeppelin about 3,000ft. above him. At 9,000ft. he got over it and attacked, dropping several bombs, three of which he believes took effect. At 10 p.m. he over the airship again, and let off two more bombs over her nose. His own machine was hit many times by machine-gun bullets.

This may have been the Zeppelin which dropped the machine gun, ammunition, petrol tank, and machinery.

Another raid was made on the North-east Coast on Saturday night, when eight dwelling-house were demolished and a fire caused. Sixteen persons were killed and 100 injured.

A third raid on Sunday night and Monday morning covered a large area, but the casualty list was very light, in comparison with the enemy’s expenditure of energy and bombs. Six airships took part in the raid, and dropped in the South-Eastern Counties of Scotland, on the North-East Coast of England, and in the Eastern Counties 188 bombs. The 53 bombs dropped by force of the Zeppelins in Scotland killed 10 persons and injured 11. In England 135 bombs were dropped—so far as is known—without causing a single casualty.

A Zeppelin again visited England very early on Tuesday morning, crossing the East Anglian Coast between two and three o’clock. Apparently it was not long over land. It did no damage and caused no casualties. Though several explosions have been reported, no fragments of bombs have been discovered.

Three Zeppelins visited the North-East Coast during Wednesday night. One was fired at, and numerous observers stated that it was struck. They dropped 48 bombs, and the casualties were 1 child killed and 8 persons injured. No military damage was caused.

“ Another Zeppelin was hit somewhere off the coast of this country at the same time as the L15, and I don’t think it was possible for it to be saved.” Mr Tennant made this positive assertion in the House of Commons when answering criticisms in another forcible speech by Mr Pemberton Billing.

HOW THE ZEPPELIN WAS BROUGHT DOWN.

A Rugbeian in one of the anti-aircraft gun batteries writes :—“ Our guns fetched the Zepp down, and we are claiming the prize (£500) offered by the Lord Mayor for the first one brought down. I saw the whole thing from start to finish—it was magnificent. When first discovered by our lights the bird was flying towards London. Then one of our guns got going and almost at once hit her twice in the tail. That proved a bit too much for her. Immediately she turned round and tried to clear out, but one of our other guns took it up, and she was hit again. The airship was now in a parlous state, and the last we saw of her she was gradually coming down tail first. We are very keen here, and heaps of people have been congratulating us.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Boys under military age who have left school may now be enrolled in the University College, Nottingham, O.T.C., with a view of obtaining commissions in the Army. Suitable boys are urgently needed, and, as will be seen by advertisement in another column, Capt S R Trotman, the O.C., will supply all particulars.

Signaller J Goodman, R.F.A, in a letter from France to Mr W T C Hodges, says :-“ Up to now we have had some very hot positions as regards telephone communications. We have been in two attacks made by the Germans, and have also been gassed. This occurred on the 19th December, 1915, and we had to wear our gas helmets for five hours.”-Mr Hodges has also received communications from the Rev R W Dugdale and Sergt G H Renshaw (captain of the Rugby Football Club), both of whom are keeping well.

Sergt-Major J Tait, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was in the heavy fighting at Sulva Bay and Chocolate Hill, has returned home from Egypt.

HOW PTE. NORMAN WON THE D.C.M.

Pte A Norman, 3rd Rifle Brigade, of .York Place, Rugby, who, as we reported last week has been awarded the D.C.M, gained this honour for conspicuous gallantry in volunteering to carry an important message to headquarters nearly a mile away. He succeeded in getting through under heavy shell fire, and on another occasion he did the same thing. This is the second St Matthew’s boy who has won the D.C.M ; two others have won the Military Cross, and six have been mentioned in despatches.

RUGBY RURAL DISTRICT.

Thursday. Present : Messrs J Johnson (chairman), W Dunn, H Tarbox. J H Walker, T Flowers, T Ewart, and C E Boughton-Leigh. Military representative : Mr M E T Wratislaw.

TOO LATE.

A Lawford Heath farmer attended in support of an application for exemption for one of his men, but the Clerk said this was made too late, and he had now received notice from the Military Authorities that the man had joined the colours.—The Chairman : There is nothing more to be said. You cannot get him out again.—Applicant : If we can’t get him back, he must stop, I suppose.

IN MEMORIAM.

DALE.—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother, George Frank Dale, who was killed at Ypres, March 22nd, 1915.

Although he has gone from our sight, he is not forgotten by those who loved him.
“ Sleep on, beloved ; sleep, and take thy rest ;
We loved thee well, but Jesus loved thee best,
And has taken thee to thy eternal rest.”

PRESTIDGE.—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother, Joseph Prestidge, Barby, killed in action in France, April 11th, 1915.

“ He steeps not in his native land,
But under foreign skies,
Far from those that loved him best,
But in a hero’s grave he lies.”

26 Dec 1914. No Cause to Grumble – At the Front

NO CAUSE TO GRUMBLE.

Pte J Richardson, of the 3rd Battalion Coldstream Guards, writing from the front on December 9th to his sister, says :—“ You saw it in the paper about the Coldstreams being praised up, but you can take it from me it was hard-earned, and not without losing some good lads over it. . . . We are about making a general advance right into Germany, so I expect by that we shall lose a few. Still, I know the lads will meet it with a good heart . . . We can’t grumble out here ; we get plenty of tobacco and clothes—as much as you can expect. Those who talk about it being cold on the moots just want to have a night in the trenches. The bombs and the ‘ Jack Johnsons ‘ keep you ‘ warm.’ I hope you will enjoy yourselves together at Christmas. Don’t bother about me ; I shall be all right. It would only disappoint me if I thought you were sitting worrying about me. If you send me anything, send me some cake or plum pudding, and some writing paper, as I have more tobacco now than I could smoke in a month. It is ‘ get out and get under ‘ all right here. You can hear them singing in the air—the fifth of November—a long time before they reach you ; but that is what we have to watch up above, dropping the little bomb down. You must remember me to all the ‘ boys,’ and tell them to be quick and give us a hand, or else there won’t be any left for them.”

THE WARWICKSHIRE R.H.A IN ACTION.

The Warwickshire R.H.A, whose headquarters are at Warwick, went to France about six weeks ago, and after doing patrol and other work on lines of communication, eventually reached the firing line. They have been in action, and letters from gunners in the Battery state that they were successful in doing a good deal of damage to the enemy’s trenches. The Germans turned two heavy batteries upon them, and the “ Black Marias ” dropped all round the Battery, till at last the order was given to retire and leave the guns for the time being. The men retreated to a village a short distance to the rear while a heavy battery of 4.7-inch guns pumped shells into the enemy, and eventually silenced their batteries sufficiently to enable the Warwickshire men to return to their guns and man-handle them into a safer position. It was an absolute marvel how they managed to get out without being smashed up and without any casualties.

CLIFTON SOLDIER KILLED WHILE WRITING HOME.

As we briefly announced last week, Pte W J Hutt (7698) Northamptonshire Regiment, of Church Lane, Clifton, was killed at the front on November 5th. Although early this week no official intimation had been received by his wife, to whom he had only been married a short time, there is no doubt that the news is true. From particulars furnished by a friend of his, and the four men who assisted in his burial, and who have returned home wounded, it appears that the unfortunate young man was killed near Ypres while writing a letter home. He was with his regiment in the trenches for five weeks in the Battle of the Aisne, during which time they made almost imperceptible progress. Their losses in this battle were very heavy. In one week Private Hutt went through five bayonet charges, and escaped without a scratch. Previous to being called up he was employed in the Winding Department at the B.T.H.. He would have been 26 years of age next month.

 

RUGBY SOLDIER’S EXPERIENCES.

Pte J Lickorish, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has written a lengthy letter home, in which he recounts a number of interesting experiences. Referring to their first taste of modem warfare, he says :— “ We hastily entrenched, but had to evacuate them, as the German guns were getting terribly close. We retired behind a farm in open formation, the — Regiment leading the way, and our regiment following. It was here I saw the first horrors of war. The Germans got the range on the farm, and dropped shells all round it, killing and wounding several men. As we lay waiting for the next move a shell burst directly in front of me, and the time fuse went “ plonk ” into the earth about a yard in front of me. At first I thought it was a piece of dirt, as I could see it coming, and my pal reached out for it, but soon dropped it ; it was so hot. I have got it as a souvenir. Our captain, who was afterwards taken prisoner, behaved splendidly here, and it was a treat to watch him walking about, laughing and chatting to us, while we were under shell fire. By-and-bye a battery of ours dashed up, and so diverted the shell fire from us, and we were able to retire again in safety : but about half-a-mile to our right we could see the deadly shrapnel following our troops up with hellish persistency, but with few casualties on account of the open formation. We kept this up until nightfall. Up to this we had not sighted the enemy, but behind us was one consistent rifle fire, which showed that our troops were giving the Germans some of their own medicine. . . . We could see the — Regiment piling arms. All of a sudden a whole nest of German machine guns opened fire on them, and in less than five minutes the greater part of the battalion was either killed or wounded. We could see it all, but could not help them. Transport and all was lost. That morning, and for several days afterwards, we had to live without rations as best we could. In a graphic account of an artillery duel, and relating how 2,000 Uhlans who charged the British guns were repulsed, the writer says : “ Our guns were greatly outnumbered, and gradually gun after gun of the battery was put out of action, and the gunners killed of wounded. We were forced to retire again and again and leave the guns, which we took back off the Germans the next day. Those brave gunners sang and whistled during the whole time.” The writer refers to the retirement of the Germans, and says : “ Here we could see where they had left their trade mark behind them-guns, ammunition, two aeroplanes ; in fact, nearly everything military, and thousands of empty wine bottles. They had also smashed the village and shops, and had left numbers of their dead and civilians lying about. Occasionally we scooped up numbers of prisoners. . . . A German aeroplane dropped two bombs close to us, and killed a woman and two children, causing a great panic among the people. British and French aeroplanes fought the German in mid-air and brought him down.” Describing a sanguinary fight, in which both sides lost heavily and the gallant major of his regiment was killed, the writer says : “ It was here that the Germans hoisted the white flag, and shot our men down. Can you wonder after this that we used our bayonets mercilessly ? The Germans have behaved rotten in this war so far. . . . In one place he says 1,200 German shells were fired over their trench in 24 hours, nine-tenths of which failed to explode, being very old ammunition, and this goes to prove, he adds, that the German supplies are running short.”

NORTHAMPTONSHIRE YEOMANRY AT THE FRONT.

The squadron of the Northamptonshire Yeomanry, to which Q.M.S Goodman, of Flecknoe, belongs, has for some time past been on active service at the front. The men have taken their turn in the firing line, and find the conditions in the trenches bitterly cold. One member of the squadron has had his feet frost-bitten ; but the yeomen write cheerful letters to friends, although for obvious reasons the exact locality in which they are serving with the Expeditionary Force is not disclosed.

Another trooper in the regiment writes:—“ Well, we are absolutely right among it. The Northamptonshire Yeomanry are taking their turns just as infantry in the trenches, doing three days and three nights—72 hours in all—six days’ rest before going in again. However, before we went to the trenches we did a lot of patrolling and scouting on our horses. and it was then that I found the benefit of being able to ride, which I learnt to do when following the hounds in Old England, In fact, it’s just like hunting ; only no hounds, but bullets instead. Quite half our Yeomanry are fellows who hunt, and whenever we meet another troop the first thing that happens is the giving of the ‘ View Hallo,’ so you, can rest assured that we are in high hopes of seeing the fox as well as hearing the ‘ View Hallo’ next season. Only you must keep the thing going while we are away, as you see it does good in more then one one way. Many a soldier has got a good horse out here and able to get over this country who would not be able to do so had his horse not been schooled in the hunting field, so whatever you do you must keep it going ; if you don’t,there will be no fellows to join another Yeomanry.”

E Wiggins, son of Mr Wiggins, Rugby, a member of the Northants Yeomanry, writes under date December 13th :— We returned from the trenches on Thursday last. We went in on the previous Monday. I will not describe it. All I can say is, I am thankful to have returned safely to our billet. We had our first christening under fire, and were up to our knees in mud and water most of the time. We had one casualty and some narrow escapes. The fighting went on all the night, and we were digging and making up the trenches in the daytime. We were along with an infantry regiment, and real good chaps, too, who would do anything for us. They had been in action several times. . . . and gave us some useful tips, the chief being, as the ‘ Scotties’ say, ‘ To keep your head below the bone.’ The Germans made a charge on our left, but were repulsed with loss. They charged shoulder to shoulder in hundreds. You have only to keep your head and blaze away, and bowl them over right and left. They are forced to charge, poor beggars ; and all those who retire are shot by their own officers. The Germans are very much afraid of the Gurkhas, who steel up their trenches armed only with their ‘kuris’ (long knives), and do them in. We left our horses at the farm in charge of our No. 3’s. We ride in sections of 6, and the third looks after the horses while we are away. They do not do any fighting, as we ride only within two miles of the firing line, and they bring our horses back to the billet. . . . I am pleased to say we have a good billet in a big loft, and all sleep like tops. It is a terrible job getting on and off our top coats, which get plastered from top to bottom. It is a rough lot out here, but I hope to get back soon.”

THREE DAYS AND NIGHTS IN THE TRENCHES.

GRAPHIC STORY BY A RUGBEIAN.

“ We always manage to enjoy ourselves, and I never get depressed,” wrote a Rugby tradesman’s son, serving at the front with the Honourable Artillery Company, in a letter just received by his parents. This remark followed a description of three days and three nights in the trenches during a drenching rain, and under very trying conditions. “ I am off again to the trenches,” he wrote light-heartedly. “ The strain of war has been too much for a lot of our fellows, but the physique of the H.A.C is recognised as being quite as good as that of any regiment.

NOVEL HAIR-CUT.

“ At, present I am billeted in a barn at a farmhouse. This is the best barn we have been in up to the present ; it is rainproof and not so draughty. You should have seen me in this barn, sitting on an up-turned tub having my hair-cut with a pair of nail scissors by our drummer-boy ! We are like schoolboys when the mail comes in. If General French could see us, he would say, ‘ The morale of the troops is excellent.’

“ I have just returned from three days and three nights in the trenches. Fortunately, there was only one killed out of the Company, but two officers had to be taken away ill, and several men are queer to-day as the result of the trying time we have had.”

The march to the trenches in the early morning through a turnip field, with mud over the shoe-tops and rifle fire in progress, was next described.

“ At one place we had to cross an old trench and I tried to jump it. Instead of clearing it I fell in and sank over my knees in mud and water. I scrambled up the bank and through a hedge, just in time to see our bugler disappear in another trench. I helped him out, and we presently reached our trenches in safety, although the fellow immediately behind me had a bullet through his cap.”

WITHIN FIFTY YARDS OF THE ENEMY.

The mud in the trenches was awful, but, fortunately, the part I was in was drier, being covered over with old doors and straw. We were only fifty yards from the Germans, and you can tell we had to keep a sharp look out. We had half an hour on guard and one hour off. The first day we had plum pudding for dinner and afterwards cigars supplied by the officers and the chocolate father sent. . . . It rained all night, and, in spite of our covering, the rain came through. At about 9.0 o’clock in the morning there was a very furious rifle fire, so we all jumped up and opened fire, thinking the Germans were attacking, and expecting every minute to see them rushing through the fog not 20 yards away. We kept up a terrific fire for a short time and then ceased. We were told afterwards it was an attack. When the fog cleared some of our fellows played the Germans at their own game of sniping and killed four of them.”

Orders came for the Company to spend another 24 hours in the trenches. About 20ft of the trench in which the writer was situated fell in, and he spent most of the third day on his back repairing it. There being no other food supply for the third day, the men had to draw upon their emergency rations-consisting of “ bully ” beef, biscuits, Oxo, etc.

DEAD FRENCHMEN.

“ We felt it was rather risky drinking the water,” he went on, “ as dozens of dead Frenchmen were lying all about. I fell over one on my way back in the darkness, and it was a gruesome sight. Whilst we were repairing the trench we came across a dead body. I don’t know whether it was a Frenchman or a German—the body was so decomposed. On the third day the Germans fired on our No 4 Section, and the Company drew their fire and apparently created a panic in the German lines. We were glad when the relief came, and it was a tiring march over the fields to the village. One fellow tumbled into a stream, for me to pick him out, and Turner, a ‘ Prudential ‘ man, collapsed. I carried his rifle and helped to get him to the village, where we were given some tea and had a good night’s rest.

ALWAYS CHEERFUL.

“ It was very fatiguing—three days and nights without lying down and without proper sleep. However, I am quite well and happy, but very tired. . . . Chocolate is no longer a luxury, but a necessity. I don’t know what I should have done if I had not had what father sent to me. At present we are pulling crackers. We always manage to enjoy ourselves, and I never get depressed. We don’t mind if the mud is over our boot tops. We thank goodness it to not over our knees ; and if a sniper shoots at us in the trench, we have a competition as to who can be the first to ‘spot’ him. Our officer says we all have wonderful hearts. At present I am cook. I have to get supper ready for two fellows who will be back late, and cook bacon for forty in the morning.” In conclusion the correspondent put in a good word for his officer, whom he describes as “ a Jolly good sport, and as cool as a cucumber under fire, so you need not worry about our losing heart.”

 

Goodman, Walter George. Died 27 Aug 1914

No. 228 1st Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Picture from Rugby Advertiser 31 Oct 1914

Picture from Rugby Advertiser 31 Oct 1914

Walter George Goodman was born on 23 November 1887 and baptized in Hillmorton Parish Church on 1st January 1888. His parents were Harry, a labourer, and his wife Janet, sometimes called Janetta (nee Franklin) who had married on 16th December 1886. The family lived in Lower Street, Hillmorton but by 1901 had moved to 5 East Street, Rugby, where Harry was a railway labourer. Walter was aged 13 and a baker’s apprentice.

By 1911, Harry and Janet were living at 12 Bridge Street, Rugby with children Nellie, Lewis and Fred. Eldest son Walter had already joined the army – he was in India and his age was given as 25.

Rugby Advertiser 31 Oct 1914
“No further news has been received of the three Rugby men, all members of the Royal Warwicks – Pte Walter Geo Goodman, Pte Busson, and Lance-Corpl Hancox, who were reported as missing after the fighting round Ligny on August 26th. The tree men were firm friends, the two latter being cousins. Pte Goodman was a son of Mr & Mrs Goodman, of 170 Oxford Street, and was 27 years of age. He served in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment for nine years, and was discharged as a first class reservist in October. He served twelve months in Ireland and seven years in India, taking part in the fighting on the North-West Frontier in 1908 and 1910, for which he received the Afghanistan medal and clasp. Prior to his discharge he was stationed at barracks in England. Since leaving the Army Pte Goodman has been employed on the Birmingham Tramway system. His younger brother has joined Kitchener’s Army.”

His brother Fred died in 1916, on his 20th birthday.

In Memoriam from Rugby Advertiser - 1921

In Memoriam from Rugby Advertiser – 1921

Walter George Goodman was buried in Honnechy British Cemetery: Plot 1, Row C, grave no. 20.
This was reburial. He had originally been buried in Clary German Cemetery, by the French. It was a collective grave of 46 British Soldiers. There had been a cross on the grave and his body was identified by clothing, buttons and disc. The disc and 2 halfpence were forwarded to Base.

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM