Morris, Richard. Died 30th Nov 1917

Richard W MORRIS was born at Newbold in 1894, the son of Richard W Morris (b.c.1862 at Harborough Magna, Warwickshire,) and his wife, Fanny, née Walker, Morris, who had married at St Andrew’s church, Rugby on 7 October 1886, when he was living at 780 Old Station, Rugby, and she was also living in ‘Old Station’.

By 1901, when Richard was 7 years old, the family had moved to live at Newbold and his father was a labourer at a ‘cement works’. By 1911 the family was living at 86 Abbey Street, Rugby.   Richard’s father was now a ‘Blacksmith’s Striker’ at the ‘BTH Works’ and Richard was the fourth of six children aged between 13 and 24, who were all living at home – three of his siblings had died before 1911. Richard was a ‘labourer’ and like his father was also at the ‘BTH Works’.

There are no extant military Service Records, only Richard’s Medal Card which shows that he went into the French ‘theatre of war’ on 16 June 1915. He had joined up as No.Z/258, Rifleman R. Morris in the 11th Battalion [Bn.] of the Rifle Brigade.   However he doesn’t appear to be under that name or number in the December 1915 to January 1916 Roll Book.

The 11th (Service) Battalion of the Rifle Brigade was formed at Winchester in September 1914 as part of K2 and came under command of the 59th Brigade in the 20th (Light) Division. They moved to Blackdown, going on in February 1915 to Witley and then in April to Hamilton Camp (Stonehenge). On 21 July 1915 the Battalion landed at Boulogne which appears to be a month or so after Richard is recorded as having arrived in France – maybe he was initially in another unit.

On 20 November 1917, after having taken part in various actions earlier in the Battle of 3rd Ypres, the 11th Battalion were part of the British Third Army which launched an attack towards Cambrai. The method of assault was new, with no preliminary artillery bombardment. Instead, a large number of tanks were used in significant force. However, having started well, with large gains of ground being made, the German reserves brought the advance to a halt. Ten days later, a counter-attack regained much of the ground.

It was probably during this German counter-attack that Richard Morris was killed in action on 30 November 1917. His Medal Card declares that he was ‘Acc[epted] as Dead’ as his body was either never found or never identified. He is remembered with his fellow Riflemen on Panels 10 and 11 of the Cambrai Memorial which is located an elevated terrace in the Louverval Military Cemetery, Louveral, France, 11 kms north of Arras. The monument commemorates more than 7,000 servicemen from Britain and South Africa who died in the Battle of Cambrai and whose graves are not known.

Richard MORRIS was awarded the British War and Victory Medals and the 1915 Star. He is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby; on the BTH List of ‘Employees Who Served’; and on the BTH War Memorial.[1]

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Richard MORRIS was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, October 2017.

[1]       The List is that published in the Rugby Advertiser, 4 November 1921.

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Green, George Bernard. Died 30th Nov 1917

George Bernard Green was born on the 24th April and baptised on 12th June 1898 at St Barnabas Church in Oxford. His father Frederick was an iron moulder and lived at 11 St Barnabas Street. He and George’s mother Louisa Greenfield (nee Palmer) had married in Stockbridge RD (Hampshire). Louisa was from nearby Bowerchalke, in Wiltshire and Frederick from Oxford.

The family moved several times, with children born in Oxford, Stoke on Trent and the two youngest, Margaret Ann and John Palmer, five and two in the 1911 census, in New Bilton. George Bernard, aged 12, was still at school at this point and the family was living at 4 Gladstone Street. Frederick was still working as an iron moulder.

George’s older brother, Frederick John, signed up at the start of the war and was wounded in the Battle of the Somme and died in September 1916.

George Bernard would have enlisted later – he was only 16 in 1914 and he received only the British and Victory Medals. He joined the Montgomery and Welsh Yeomanry, part of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. In January 1917, reorganisation caused am amalgamation of regiments and on 4th March 1917 it became 25th (Montgomery and Welsh Horse Yeomanry) Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and joined the 231st Brigade of the 74th (Yeomanry) Division which took part in the Second Battle of Gaza (17-19 April 1917). Tis was an unsuccessful attempt to capture the town of Gaza. After a summer of stalemate they took part in the Third Battle of Gaza (27 Oct – 7 Nov) which resulted in the Turks abandoning the town and a rapid British advance to capture Jerusalem (8-9 December).

It must have been during this advance that Private George Bernard Green (no 60104) was killed. His body was not identified and he is remembered on the Jerusalem Memorial, which stands in Jerusalem War Cemetery, 4.5 kilometres north of the walled city and is situated on the neck of land at the north end of the Mount of Olives, to the west of Mount Scopus.

He is also remembered, with his brother on the Croop Hill Memorial

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Lissimore, Hugh Harold. Died 28th Nov 1917

Hugh was the youngest of the four sons of Thomas Lissimore and Hannah Mary nee Roberts who were married in Wellingborough Registration District, Northamptonshire, in April Quarter 1891.   His brothers were Ernest John b 1893, Cecil Joseph b 1895, both at Wellingborough, and Arthur Thomas b 1897 at Stanwick Northants; Hugh was born in 1899 at Higham Ferrers, Northants.

In 1901 the family was living in Irthlingborough, Northants, Thomas was a cement works manager born in Tividale near Dudley Staffordshire, his wife Hannah came from Chesterfield.   Perhaps his occupation was the reason for coming to Rugby to work at the cement works here, but in 1906 Thomas died at Dudley aged only 38. Was he on a family visit or did Hannah have ties with the town? Certainly Hannah was at 45 Jubilee Street in New Bilton in 1907 when all four of her sons were baptised at Bilton Church on 17 February, their father is noted in the register as “deceased”. It has not been established whether she came to Rugby before or after her husband’s death.

Hannah was still at Jubilee Street in 1911, with just the two youngest boys Arthur and Hugh – she says she is “on an allowance”.

According to Soldiers Died in the Great War Hugh enlisted at Warwick and joined the 2nd Battalion Coldstream Guards as Private 19339.   He was killed in action on 28 November 1917, his death was reported in the Birmingham Daily Post on 21 December when his mother was living at 23 Lodge Road. Hugh is described as a former scholar of St Matthew’s School in Rugby who had only been at the front for a few months.

Hugh is commemorated on the Cambrai Memorial at Louvreval, France. His mother and sole legatee received his back pay of £5.14s.8d and a War Gratuity of £4. According to the Commonwealth War Graves Commission citation, she was living in Coventry Road, Dunchurch when the memorial was set up. She died in 1962, her Executor was her son Cecil, a retired Lieutenant Commander in the Royal Navy.

Hugh was awarded the Victory and British War Medals. As well as being commemorated on the Memorial Gates, his name appears on the memorial at St Philip’s Church, Wood Street, although as this church is now closed, it is not known if the memorial is still there. The names were recorded by The Rugby Advertiser on 12 November 1920 when it was unveiled.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

24th Nov 1917. Food Parcels for Men on Active Service

FOOD PARCELS FOR MEN ON ACTIVE SERVICE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—Enquires into the reason for the local shortage of certain essential foodstuffs have brought the information that the Authorities were making first claim upon these for our Armies in the field ; and having had the opportunity on several occasions lately of mixing with a number of men straight from the trenches, and quite unknown personally to me, I have raised the question of food supplies, and feel sure that Rugbeians will be glad to know that without exception the men, who belonged to various units from different parts of the front, gave me the assurance that they were now very well fed, and that of most of the things which we are short they are receiving a sufficiency. They have been unanimous, too, in stating that it was quite unnecessary, and even wasteful, to send them either food or tobacco from home, and that I should be justified in giving publicity to the fact that the majority of them would prefer money, with which they can obtain little comforts when they have opportunities of getting them—tobacco and cigarettes they can buy duty free, and of practically any brand they choose. One article they are always glad to see, and cannot get enough of, is the humble sock. They assert that a clean pair of socks is a luxury, and often hard to obtain even to come home in for their leave.

I understand, too, that the old ration of biscuit and bully beef has been modernised, and is now served in an appetising mince.

At this season numbers of people will be contemplating sending parcels to the boys : and feeling that they would mostly desire to do their bit in the most acceptable way, I respectfully suggest that it take the form of money and socks.—Yours faithfully,

HARRY TARBOX,
Chairman Rugby Rural Food Control Committee.

PIGS FOR HOME CONSUMPTION.

AN UNFOUNDED RUMOUR.

A rumour has been widely circulated in the Midland Counties to the effect that pig-keepers are forbidden to kill their pigs for their own consumption, and as the consequence has been that large numbers have been killed in an immature condition.

Mr Ernest Parke, the chairman of the Brailes Rural District Council, has received a letter, dated November 21st, from the Minister of Food, as follows :—

“ There is no truth in the rumour that any order made by this Department forbids farmers and their labourers to kill their pigs for their own consumption.”

THE FOOD QUESTION.

NATIONAL VALUE OF THE POTATO.

An interesting discussion as to the best means of turning the present abundant potato crop to the greatest national advantage took place at the Ministry of Food on Monday. After providing for the normal consumption, there is, said Sir Arthur Yapp, a surplus of considerably over 2,000,000 tons of potatoes, which, if utilised during the next six months—a most critical period—in lieu of bread, will save 500,000 ton of grain, this being sufficient to keep the whole of the United Kingdom in bread for two months. In the course of an interest Dr J Campbell gave some important figures illustrating the economic food value of the potato. The said that 2 2/3 lbs of potatoes had an equivalent food value of 1 lb of bread. There was a national gain in the fact that one acre of land devoted to the growth of potatoes produced twice the quantity of flesh-forming protein compared with the same land devoted to wheat 4½ times more starch, and 3½ times more potash. He thought, therefore, that the acreage given over to potatoes should be increased to rather than reduced. Having recommended the greater use of potato flour in bread-making, he suggested that no bread should be served at meals when potatoes were abundant.

THE FOOD SHORTAGE LOCALLY.

The shortage of certain articles of food locally, which has during the past fortnight become acute, is causing considerable uneasiness and inconvenience in the town. Several commodities, such as matches, tea, butter, bacon, and other fats, are practically unobtainable, and then only in very small quantities. Several shops dealing largely in these articles have been besieged with customers, and housewives complain bitterly of the many hours spent, without result, in shopping. Shopkeepers are their wits’ end to supply the demands of the public, and in many cases commodities, of which the supply is limited, are reserved for regular customers. The Co-operative Society has adopted the rationing system in respect of a number articles, members being served only on the production of their old sugar cards—those issued by the society. In many cases customers have added to the difficulties of retailers by adopting an unreasonable attitude, and a reflection of this state of affairs was provided at the County Appeals Tribunal on Wednesday evening, when a grocer’s manager was exempted for six months, a representative of the firm pleading that it was unsafe to leave a woman in sole charge owing to the threatening attitude of numerous customers.

RUGBY BUTCHERS BEFORE THE TRIBUNAL.

A special sitting of the Appeal Tribunal was held at Rugby on Wednesday evening to consider the claims of the Rugby butchery trade. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), KV Rotherham, S J Dicksee. Capt M E T Wratislaw was the National Service representative.

The first three cases were applications for further periods of exemption.—On behalf of George William Thomson, 39, married, West Street, Mr Eaden suggested that the position was such that the man should not be called upon to join the Army. His wife’s health was delicate, and she had been advised by a specialist that she must shortly undergo an operation.—Capt Wratislaw said this was one of the men he was pressing for. The man’s business was situated in a district where there were plenty of shops to supply the public, and Mrs Thomson was capable of carrying on her husband’s business. Messrs Thomson and Haddon worked together, and he suggested that Mr Haddon should co-operate, and so release Thomson, whose business could still be preserved by his wife carrying it on.—Mr Thomson said his wife occasionally assisted in the shop by serving a pennyworth of suet, and so on ; but she was unable to cut up meat to advantage. Her health too, was delicate, and she could not stand for any length of time.—Mr. Eaden also appeared for Mr A J Haddon, 38, married, Lawford Road.—Capt Wratislaw suggested that this man should be allowed to remain in order that he could co-operate with Mrs Thomson to keep her husband’s business going.—George Roland Harris, 30, married, 41 Park Road, was described by Mr Eaden as one of the best slaughterers in the town, and he was always willing to help other butchers in case of need. His business premises were situated in a thickly populated part of the town, and on both sides the nearest butchers were some distance away. His wife assisted in the shop.—Capt Wratislaw said this was also one of the men he was asking for.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl E E Simons, of the Royal Engineers, landlord of the New Inn, Sharnford, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lieut Herbert Proctor, of the Royal Engineers, who prior to the War was engaged in the Special Engineering Department, died on November 11th as the result of an accident in France.

Mr & Mrs Collins, 45 New Street, New Bilton, have received official news that their eldest son, Pte A Collins, Royal Warwicks, aged 29, was killed in action in France on October 26th. He was also wounded in September last year. He is their second son who has fallen in the War, and their youngest son, who is now recovering from wounds, has been wounded twice in France.

NEWS has reached Rugby that Capt Ernest Wood, Manchester Regiment, elder son of Mr T Wood, a Rugby accountant, has won the Victoria Cross. He enlisted in a Pals Battalion as a private in the early months of the War, and his brother, Capt Arnold Wood, also serving in the Manchesters, was another Pals Battalion recruit. Details of the exploits for which the coveted distinction has been awarded have not yet been known to his friends.

D.S.O. FOR CAPT P F FULLARD, M.C.

The D.S.O has just been awarded to Capt P F Fullard, M.C, Worcestershire Regiment and Royal Flying Corps, a son of Mrs Fullard, now living at 44 Clifton Road, Rugby. This gallant officer was educated at Norwich Grammar School. He joined the Inns of Court O.T.C in September, 1915, and subsequently received a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment and the R.F.C. He went out in April, 1917, and speedily won the Military Cross, and subsequently a bar to the same for daring work in the air. He is only just 20 years of age. On Saturday last, when taking part in a Rugby football match behind the lines in France, he unfortunately had his legs broken.

DISCHARGED SAILORS AND SOLDIERS.—A whist drive and dance was held in the Co-operative Hall on Friday, November 16th, in aid of the branch funds. The prize-winners were : Mrs A Neal, Miss C Gilbert. Miss Lockwood (Mr H V Ramsey, Mr Griffiths. A large number attended. Brown’s orchestra supplied the dance music. The first prize for ladies was a gramophone, value £6 6s, kindly presented by Mr J T E Brown.

PERSONAL PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.

A new scheme comes into force on December 1st, which will enable the NEXT-OF-KIN of a prisoner of war to send a “ Personal Parcel,” not exceeding 11lbs in weight and not less than 3lbs in weight, so as to minimize the risk of loss in the post. The “ Personal Parcel ” may be sent once a quarter only. It may NOT be packed and dispatched by any authorized association, and must NOT bear the British Red Cross label. It must be packed and dispatched through the Post Office by the next-of-kin or relative, who receives a special coupon, and the coupon must be affixed to the parcel.

In the case of men in the care of Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee applications for coupons should be addressed to the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby ; where the applicant is not the prisoner’s next-of-kin the written permission of the next-of-kin must accompany the request for the coupon.

WHAT MAY BE SENT.

Any of the articles noted below may be included :—

Pipe, housewife, cloth brushes, sponge, handkerchiefs (one a quarter), buttons, pencils, shaking soap (one stick a quarter), tooth powder, health salts, chess, draughts, dominoes, pomade, insecticide powder, cap badges and badges of rank, braces and belts (provided they are made of webbing and include no rubber or leather), dubbin, hob-nails, shaving brush, sweets, safety razor, combs, medal ribbons, bootlaces (mohair), hair brushes, brass polish, pipe lights, tooth brushes, mittens and mufflers (one pair each every quarter).

Relatives are warned that the inclusion in the parcel of any article not mentioned in the above list will entail the confiscation of the parcel. Persons who pack their parcel should use strong cardboard boxes, and should have pack the articles in such a manner that they will not move or rattle.

DEATHS.

PATCHETT.—Died of wounds on November 14, 1917, in Egypt, WILLIAM IVENS PATCHETT, 1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, the beloved husband of Ellen Patchett, 7 Manor Road, Rugby.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear.
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain ;
But trust in Christ to meet again.”

BEASLEY.—Pte. C. Beasley, of Napton, was killed in France Oct. 26th, 1917. Deeply mourned by his loving mother, father, brothers, and sisters.
Only a private soldier,
But a mother’s son,
Buried on a field of battle,
His duty he done.
He served King and country—
God known did his best ;
But now he sleeps in jesus,
A soldier laid to rest.
He sleeps besides his comrades,
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
His name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he has left at home.
A day of remembrance sad to recall,
A dearly loved son and brother missed by us all.
—Deeply mourned by us all at home.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. COLLINS, of the 15th Royal Warwicks, who was killed in action in France on October 26, 1917 ; aged 29.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear ;
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain,
But trust in Christ to meet again.”
—Deeply mourned by Father and Mother, Sisters and Brother.

FRENCH.—In loving memory of Pte J. FRENCH, of the R.W.R. (of Long Itchington), who killed in action on 26th October, 1917.—From his beloved Wife, Children, Father and Mother.
When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
he did best for one and all,
And them who loved him well.

THOMAS.—In ever-loving remembrance of Pte. W. H. THOMAS, killed in action in France on October 24, 1917. —From sorrowing Aunt and Uncle, Amy and Will.

THOMAS.—Killed in action Oct. 24, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY THOMAS, beloved nephew of Mr. and Mrs. ROSE, 78 Boughton Road.—Deeply mourned.

IN MEMORIAM.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly-loved son of H. and C. PEARCE, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark, Nov. 26th, 1914.
There is link death cannot sever.
Love and remembrance last for ever.
—From Father and Mother.

 

Neville, Frank Septimus. Died 24th Nov 1917

Frank was the youngest of the nine children of Thomas Johnson Neville and his wife Lilian nee Lord who were married at St Paul’s Chiswick, Middlesex on 18 March 1872.   Thomas and Lilian returned to Thomas’s birthplace of Dunchurch after their marriage where he was a butcher and farmer.   Although Lilian was born in Hoxton Middlesex, her father Richard was also born in Dunchurch.

Frank was baptised in Dunchurch on 25 October 1891, his birth being registered in December Quarter of that year.

In 1901 Frank was aged 9, living with his parents and five older siblings in Dunchurch, but by 1911 he was 19 and had become a teacher in Stamford. This is confirmed by his detailed obituary in the Rugby Advertiser of 1 December 1917. This records that he was educated at Dunchurch School, then at the Lower School in Rugby (now Lawrence Sheriff). He was a member of the Howitzer Battery in Rugby, and “being a well-set up young fellow, was selected as one of the Guard of Honour when King Edward visited the town” in 1909.   He left Stamford for a post as assistant master at St Matthews School in Rugby where he took a great interest in the new Scout movement.

Just before war broke out he passed high in a Civil Service examination which enabled him to become a member of the Inns of Court Officers’ Training Corps (OTC) as Private 1013.   He was transferred to the Northampton Regiment as 2nd Lieutenant in 1914, posted to France on 26 July 1915 and was gazetted as Temporary Captain on 4 January 1917. He was involved in heavy fighting at the Somme in July 1916 in which his brother Captain George H Neville  was killed and Frank severely wounded. He was invalided home for nine months and had command of a cadet corps during his recovery.

He returned to France about August 1917 and went through a lot of heavy fighting. He died from a bullet wound in the abdomen on 24 November 1917 and is buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery near Poperinghe to the west of Ypres. Although this area was outside the front held by the Commonwealth forces in Belgium during the war, groups of casualty clearing stations were placed at three positions in July 1917. These were called by the troops with typical dry humour Mendinghem, Dozinghem and Bandagem.   3309 casualties are buried at Dozinghem, Frank’s grave is no XIII.E9 in the section to the extreme left in front of the Stone of Remembrance.

He received the Victory and British War medals and the 1915 Star. He is commemorated on the Old Laurentian Roll of Honour and Dunchurch War memorial as well as Rugby’s Memorial Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Holmes, Bertie. Died 20th Nov 1917

Bertie Holmes was born in Leicester in 1894 and baptised on 3rd June at St Lukes, Leicester, to William and Sarah Ann (nee Facer).

In 1901 he was living at 18 Union St., Rugby with his parents and 2 siblings. William was a bricklayer’s labourer.

By 1911 Bertie was with his with his mother at 26 New St., New Bilton. His profession was given as “Bore-maker Cylinder” and he was aged 16. Sarah Ann, a char woman, is listed as married, although William is not with the family. Perhaps he had died, as in early 1912 she married George Etherington.

Bert must have signed up at the start of the war, joining the 1st battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (service no. 1664) a letter written to the Rugby Advertiser on 24 July 1915 states that he had been in France from November 1914:

A REQUEST FOR RAZORS.
Pte H Holmes, 1664 B Company, 1st Royal Warwicks, serving with the British Expeditionary Force, whose home is at 47 Wood Street, Rugby, has written us stating that there are twelve or more men in the regiment to his knowledge without razors, and if any of our readers have old razors that will shave the men referred to would be glad of them. We understand that all men have razors served out to them as part of their equipment, but apparently the men Pte Holmes refers to have lost theirs. Our correspondent informs us that he went out to France on November 11th last year, and has been in hospital twice. He adds:” We are out of the trenches now for a longer rest. Our regiment took part in that affair on July 6th. We were called up on the night we were going to be relieved, but had to stop owing to the Germans keeping on counter-attacking. The Old Warwicks helped to hold them back well.”

 

Another report on 18th September 1915 records a letter sent to his old schoolmaster at Murray School:
“I have been in hospital myself with gas poison, but it was not very serious. The first time they gassed us was about the 27th of April, and we lost a terrible number of men. The time I got the gas was last Whit-Monday morning (it was not so bad that time). The gas seems to take all the use out of your body, make your eyes smart and run, and your throat sore. It is rotten stuff. We had only got respirators then, but now we have got gas helmets, which are very good, as no gas can get through for two hours. So now we are prepared for it, but on the first occasion we had nothing at all for it. The next time we stepped into the mud again was on the 8th of July, when the Rifle Brigade took the trenches alongside of the Yser Canal. The order came up for us to reinforce the Lancashires because the Germans continued to make counter-attacks. On the 10th they made seven attacks, but they were no good, because a German officer and 26 men were made prisoners, and he said they were all that were left of 600. I have met both lots of Rugby Territorials. We have had the Infantry on the left of us in the trenches, where we are now, and we have had the Battery firing on the trenches in front of us.”

He would have fought in most of the battles on the western front and was awarded the DCM with the following citation:
For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. Acting as a company runner for two years, he has been in the majority of the actions in which the battalion has taken part. He has always proved himself most reliable, and on many occasions has taken messages through very heavy fire, displaying singular devotion to duty.

He died in the aftermath of Passchendaele. His death is “officially accepted to be” on 20th November 1917.

His name is listed on the Arras Memorial.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

17th Nov 1917. The Payment of Wroth Silver

THE PAYMENT OF WROTH SILVER.

This ancient custom was duly observed on Monday morning last before sunrising at the usual spot on Knightlow Hill. Mr John Heap, from the Estate Office, Dunchurch, again attended on behalf of the Duke of Buccleuch, to whom the tribute is payable. He read the charter and received the amounts due from the respective parishes called upon to pay it. In all but a few instances the money was either sent or thrown into the hollow stone by the parish representatives, and the exceptions were made good by the bystanders, numbering between 20 and 30. This small assemblage was strangely in contrast with the large crowds of people who in pre-war years found their way there to witness the proceedings. The falling off was attributable to the exigencies of the War, the petrol restrictions, and so forth, and not lack of interest ; and from the same primary cause the ceremony was shorn of an important adjunct—the breakfast, with its potations of hot milk and rum, which from time immemorial has followed. But ancient custom cannot prevail against licensing regulations and the Food Controller’s restrictions ; and so, instead of adjourning to the neighbouring inn for a substantial repast, the drinking of healths and smoking church warden pipes and tobacco, the visitors were invited by Mr Heap to partake of the Duke’s hospitality to the maximum extent circumstances permitted—to wit, hot coffee, which was provided in Mr Quarterman’s house close by.

Several old faces were to be seen in the modest group, including Mr D Borsley, of Stretton ; Mr Kelcey of Wolston (in khaki) ; Mr R T Simpson, who came from Edinburgh to demonstrate his undiminished interest in the time-honoured custom. Mr David Whiteman, of Church Lawford, woodman on the estate, acted as bailiff.

The ceremony did not last long, and as the company separated speculation was rife whether it would disappear altogether, and whether the magnificent avenue of trees, at the end of which Knightlow Hill is situated, would go with it. The hope was unanimously expressed that both would survive and be passed on to posterity.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.

At Warwick Town Council meeting on Friday last week Ald J C Purser, who represented the authority on the committee which met at Rugby recently to consider measures to be taken with a view to securing the preservation of Dunchurch Avenue, moved a resolution expressing the regret of the Town Council to hear of the proposal to cut down the trees and the hope that arrangement would be made by which the avenue might be preserved. He pointed out that the County Council Committee which was appointed to act in the matter had co-opted the Mayors of Warwick, Coventry, and Leamington, and that he attended the first meeting in the absence abroad of the Mayor and the inability of the Deputy-Mayor to attend. From what he learned at the meeting they were determined that no step should be left untaken to secure the preservation of the avenue. The committee decided to ask the Duke for a personal interview before he took any further step. A point of interest in connection with the preservation of the avenue was that it was contemplated to erect there a memorial to the immortal 29th Division, which were reviewed there by the King before going on active service, and the people of Rugby and Dunchurch felt that if the avenue was destroyed the memorial would be robbed of historic and picturesque surroundings.—Ald Purser’s resolution was carried unanimously.

WASTE PAPER COLLECTION.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—With reference to the waste paper collection which is being made in the town, and which not only helps the nation in supplying the raw material for paper, but also is of very great use in realising money for some of our local charities, I desire to call attention to the fact that these happy results could not be arrived at if it were not for the immense amount of hard work and keenness put into the movement by the boys of the Elementary schools, who do the collecting.

I think it reflects very great credit on these lads, and hope that their parents and the inhabitants of Rugby at large will realise what good work they are doing.

I regret to say that the quantity   collected has fallen off ; and I hope, therefore, that all who have any suitable paper will make a point of immediately advising Mr Simmonds, of Elborow School, or Mr Hodges, of the Murray School, and boys will be sent to collect.—Yours very truly,
J J McKINNELL.
27 Sheep Street, Rugby November 14th.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte F Smith, Royal Warwicks, the second son of Mr J G Smith, Bath Street, has been wounded in both thighs.

Pte Albert Coaton, Machine Gun Company, son of Mr C K Coaton, 42 Grosvenor Road, has been wounded by gunshot in the back.

Lieut R O Gladstone, Royal Engineers, who prior to the War was engaged on the outside construction staff of the B.T.H, was killed in action on November 2nd.

Mr W Eadon, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received information that his son, 2nd-Lieut L W Eadon, R.F.A, who been in France since September, 1916, and has been in most of the recent heavy fighting round Passchendaele, has been injured and is in hospital.

Lance-Corpl J A Maycock, Royal Warwicks, of Rokeby Cottage, Bennett Street, Rugby, son of Mr & Mrs J Maycock, of Market Harborough, who has been twice mentioned in despatches for good work and bringing in wounded under heavy shell fire, has now been awarded the Military Medal. His brother, Quarter-Master-Sergt C Maycock, has also received the Military Medal.

Sergt F Tucker, Rifle Brigade, Rugby, an employee of Messrs Frost & Sons, has been awarded a bar to his Military Medal ; and the following other Rugby soldiers have also gained the Medal :—Lance-Corpl F E Butler, Rifle Brigade ; Pte A Horne, Northumberland Fusiliers ; Bombardier W Vears, R.F.A ; and Gunner S F Painter, R.F.A, who is returned as having enlisted at Rugby.

PTE C B JONES.

News been received that Pte C B Jones, Gloucester Regiment, was killed in action on October 9th. Pte Jones formerly carried on business as a hairdresser in Murray Road, and he was also agent for the Rugby Advertiser. Before joining the Army in January last, however, he was employed in the Lamp Shipping Office at the B.T.H.

DEATHS.

GARDNER.—Died of wounds on October 28, 1917 in France Pte. CHARLES GARDNER, PO2163, 2nd Batt. Royal Marine Light Infantry, only son of Richard and Alice Gardner, Lower Shuckburgh ; aged 21 years.

HOWARD.—In loving memory of our youngest son, HARRY LEE HOWARD, who fell in action on October 26, 1917 ; aged 26.

JONES.—Killed in action on October 9th, “ somewhere in Flanders,” Pte. CHARLES BRADLAUGH JONES, 1/6th Gloucesters, the beloved husband of Ellen D. Jones, 148 Bath Street, Rugby.—“ Thy will be done.”

SARGENT.—Killed in action on October 23rd in France, Pte. ALBERT HARRY, aged 30, youngest son of the late J. H. Sargent and Mrs. Sargent, of Barby.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear.
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain,
But trust in Christ to meet again.”
—Deeply mourned by Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

WILLARD.—In proud and loving memory of KENNETH HUGH WILLARD, 2nd-Lieut, York and Lancaster Regt., attached to R.F.C., killed in action on the Western Front on October 12, 1917 ; second son of T. W. and Tryphena Willard, Rugby ; aged 19 years.