Hopkins, Leonard John. Died 30th Oct 1918

It is unusual for soldiers from Dunchurch to be included on the Rugby War Memorial Gate, so it was uncertain if the correct L. Hopkins had been identified.  However, no other more suitable candidate has been found.  If any information for any other L Hopkins is available, please advise this site, and he can be included.  Meanwhile, a young man, who died aged only 18, is certainly deserving of being Remembered.

 

Leonard John HOPKINS was born on 16 July 1900 in Dunchurch and registered there in Q3, 1900.  He was baptised St Peter’s Church, Dunchurch on 26 August 1900.  He was the first child of Elphinstone Henry Edward Hopkins, (b.c.1872 in Kilsby, Northamptonshire – d.c.1953 in Rugby), and his wife, Annie Maria, née Norman, Hopkins (b.c.1875, in Dunchurch – d.c.1955, Birmingham).  Their Banns were called on Sundays, 17 and 24 September and 1 October 1899, at Dunchurch, where they married on 11 October 1899, when she was 25 and he was 27.  He was then a ‘hedge carpenter’,[1] and the son of a ‘miller’ and her father was a ‘thatcher’.

In 1901, Leonard was 8 months old, and the family were living in Dunchurch.  Leonard’s father was now a ‘carter for a corn dealer’.

In 1911, when Leonard, was 10, the family was living in a three room house on The Green, at Dunchurch.  The head of the household was Leonard’s 78 year old maternal grandfather, John Norman.  His father was working as a ‘horse driver, waggoner’ for a ‘corn & coal carter’.  Leonard now had a four year old younger brother, Archibald.  It seems that Leonard attended the Dunchurch Boys’ School.

Unfortunately no Service Record has survived for Leonard, and the only information is from a listing in ‘Soldiers Died in the Great War’,[2] and information on the CWGC site.

Leonard joined up in Coventry,[3] and he served as a private, No: 81288, in the 4th (Reserve) Battalion (Territorials) of the Devonshire Regiment.

3/4th, 3/5th and 3/6th Battalions of the Devonshire Regiment formed at Exeter, Plymouth and Barnstaple respectively on 25 March 1915.  They moved to Bournemouth in August 1915, and then on 8 April 1916  became Reserve Battalions and the 4th then absorbed the 5th and 6th on 1 September 1916 at Hursley Park near Winchester.  The Battalion remained in England (moving to Bournemouth in October 1916, Sutton Veny in March 1917 and Larkhill in early 1918), until going to Ireland in April 1918.  Thereafter it was stationed at various times at Belfast, Londonderry and Clonmany.[4]

This confirms why Leonard was in Ireland in later 1918.  When he joined up he was probably still too young to go abroad, and the 1st/4th and 2nd/4th Devonshires were already in India, or by 1918, in Egypt or Mesopotamia respectively.  Whilst he was in Ireland, he became ill and died of pneumonia in the Waveney Hospital, Ballymena, Ireland.

Leonard’s body was returned to his home village of Dunchurch, for burial.  The family included an expression of gratitude to their friends in the Rugby Advertiser, 9 November 1918,[5]

MR & MRS. HOPKINS would like express their gratitude to all their kind friends who have shown such kindness and sympathy to them in their great sorrow; also for the beautiful Floral Tributes and all those who contributed towards them.

Also in that edition of the Rugby Advertiser was a report on the funeral.

DUNCHURCH – the funeral of Leonard J Hopkins, aged 18 years, son of Mr and Mrs Hopkins of Dunchurch, took place at Dunchurch on Tuesday last.  Deceased, who was a private in the Devon Reserves, died after a short illness in Waveney Hospital, Ballymena, Ireland.  Before joining the army he was employed as gardener at Thurlaston Grange, and a bunch of mauve chrysanthemums (his favourite flower) was sent by Mr Appleby, bearing the words, ‘These flowers he tended so carefully during his life are sent as a token of deep sympathy from all at Thurlaston Grange’.  The funeral service was conducted by the Vicar, the Rev E P Rowland, and the coffin was borne by four soldiers staying in the village.  Among the flowers were tributes from Mrs Mallam, Mr and Mrs Appleby, Mr and Mrs Dew, Mrs Borsley, Mr and Mrs Tomlin, and Mrs Busby.  The deceased was very popular with the boys of the village, and in addition to the above were wreaths from ‘His chums’, Pte R Jennings (serving in France), and the Scholars and Staff of Dunchurch Boys’ School.  The people of the village feel the greatest sympathy with Mr and Mrs Hopkins in their bereavement.’[6]

Leonard was buried in Dunchurch churchyard, and has a CWGC gravestone.  The inscription added to his gravestone by his family was, ‘HIS SUN WENT DOWN WHILE IT WAS YET DAY’.  His father’s name, Mr E Hopkins,  is given as the next of kin in the CWGC records.

As Leonard did not serve abroad – Ireland was part of the United Kingdom and counted as a ‘Home’ posting – he was not entitled to any medals and thus there is no Medal Card.

As well as his CWGC gravestone in St Peter’s church churchyard in Dunchurch, where he is remembered as ‘Hopkins L J’, Leonard is also remembered the War Memorial Gates, Whitehall Road, Rugby as ‘Hopkins L’ and as ‘Leonard J Hopkins’, on the Dunchurch War Memorial, on the Green opposite Guy Fawkes House, Dunchurch.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Leonard John HOPKINS was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, August 2018.

[1]      He may have just been a ‘hedger’, although http://www.grown-furniture.co.uk/history.html notes that ‘the Irish ‘hedge carpenter’ was a recognised craftsman, able to create a variety of useful wooden items.  He was so called for his ability to find many of the shapes he needed for his products – be they tools, farm implements, or furniture – growing naturally.’

[2]      UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, from www.Ancestry.co.uk.

[3]      UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919, from www.Ancestry.co.uk.

[4]      Edited from: https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-infantry-regiments-of-1914-1918/devonshire-regiment/.

[5]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 9 November 1918.

[6]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 9 November 1918.

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Neville, Frank Septimus. Died 24th Nov 1917

Frank was the youngest of the nine children of Thomas Johnson Neville and his wife Lilian nee Lord who were married at St Paul’s Chiswick, Middlesex on 18 March 1872.   Thomas and Lilian returned to Thomas’s birthplace of Dunchurch after their marriage where he was a butcher and farmer.   Although Lilian was born in Hoxton Middlesex, her father Richard was also born in Dunchurch.

Frank was baptised in Dunchurch on 25 October 1891, his birth being registered in December Quarter of that year.

In 1901 Frank was aged 9, living with his parents and five older siblings in Dunchurch, but by 1911 he was 19 and had become a teacher in Stamford. This is confirmed by his detailed obituary in the Rugby Advertiser of 1 December 1917. This records that he was educated at Dunchurch School, then at the Lower School in Rugby (now Lawrence Sheriff). He was a member of the Howitzer Battery in Rugby, and “being a well-set up young fellow, was selected as one of the Guard of Honour when King Edward visited the town” in 1909.   He left Stamford for a post as assistant master at St Matthews School in Rugby where he took a great interest in the new Scout movement.

Just before war broke out he passed high in a Civil Service examination which enabled him to become a member of the Inns of Court Officers’ Training Corps (OTC) as Private 1013.   He was transferred to the Northampton Regiment as 2nd Lieutenant in 1914, posted to France on 26 July 1915 and was gazetted as Temporary Captain on 4 January 1917. He was involved in heavy fighting at the Somme in July 1916 in which his brother Captain George H Neville  was killed and Frank severely wounded. He was invalided home for nine months and had command of a cadet corps during his recovery.

He returned to France about August 1917 and went through a lot of heavy fighting. He died from a bullet wound in the abdomen on 24 November 1917 and is buried at Dozinghem Military Cemetery near Poperinghe to the west of Ypres. Although this area was outside the front held by the Commonwealth forces in Belgium during the war, groups of casualty clearing stations were placed at three positions in July 1917. These were called by the troops with typical dry humour Mendinghem, Dozinghem and Bandagem.   3309 casualties are buried at Dozinghem, Frank’s grave is no XIII.E9 in the section to the extreme left in front of the Stone of Remembrance.

He received the Victory and British War medals and the 1915 Star. He is commemorated on the Old Laurentian Roll of Honour and Dunchurch War memorial as well as Rugby’s Memorial Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

18th Aug 1917. Fatal Accident to an Aviator

FATAL ACCIDENT TO AN AVIATOR.

A shocking aeroplane accident, resulting in the instant death of a pilot, Lieut William Alexander Taylor, of the Royal Flying Corps, occurred near Rugby early on Friday evening last week. Lieut Taylor, who was only 21 years of age, and the son of Mr William Taylor, of Mary Hill Park, Glasgow, was flying at a height of about 3,000 feet, when one of the plane collapsed, and the machine fell to the earth. The engine was deeply embedded in the pound, and the unfortunate aviator was badly mangled. His skull and practically every bone in his body were broken, and Dr Wardrop, who was quickly on the spot, was only able to state that death had been instantaneous.

The inquest was held by Mr C H Davis, Northampton, on Saturday evening. Mr J G Harper was foreman of the jury.

Second-Lieut Frank William Balls, R.F.C, identified the body, and said deceased was 22 years old. He had been in the Flying Corps at least 18 months.

Captain Kenneth Graeme Leask, R.F.C, said the accident happened about 5.53 p.m on Friday last week. Witness was in the air at the time testing a new machine, and saw the accident. Deceased’s machine was the only other one a in the air. It went up vertically at great speed. Witness than saw the left-hand wing collapse. The machine spun upwards one turn, and then fell to the earth with a spinning nose dive. There were no flames about the machine. When deceased went up vertically witness thought he was trying to loop the loop, and probably he pulled the control back too suddenly, pausing a great strain on the planes and the left-hand plane to collapse. The machine was in order, and had been used the same day by Lieut Park, while witness had used it the night before, when he looped and spun it, and everything was all right. The speed must have been very great for the machine to speed upwards as it did. Witness was about half-a-mile away when deceased went up. Deceased had done observing in France, and also acted as a pilot. In witness’s opinion deceased was very capable pilot for the time he had flown, and on one occasion witness saw him show great presence of mind in saving two machines from clashing together. Deceased had only been in witness’s flight about ten days. Immediately witness saw the occurrence he came down.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned.

A REMARKABLE COINCIDENCE.

This is only the second fatal mishap that has occurred at the aerodrome since its institution, and when we take into account the number of aeroplanes that go up daily year in and year out, this immunity from more numerous accidents is quite re-assuring.

But there was a remarkable co-incidence about the two accidents. The records kept by Surgeon-Major Collins, the Medical Officer of the Flying Corps, show that both happened on the same day of the month, August 10th, within a few minutes of the same time of the evening, and at a spot which might be said to be identical. The other fatality was twelve months ago, when two officers came into collision.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl W Hyam, Lincolnshire Regiment, son of Mr H Hyam, Drury Lane, was wounded in the last big push. He is going on well. He ia an “ Old boy ” of St Matthew’s School.

Mr P F Fullard, R.F.C., son of Mr A H Fullard, of West Haddon, who recently received his captaincy, has just been awarded the Military Cross for services at the front.

Mrs May, 8 Ringrose Court, North Street, has received information from the War Office that her youngest son, Joe, who is in the Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded in action on July 18th, and is now making satisfactory progress. Before the War he was an apprentice at Willans & Robinson’s.

Captain Alan Greenshields-Leadbetter, R.H.A, who was killed last week, was an Old Rugby boy. He served in Gallipoli with the 29th Division until January 8, 1916 — the night of the evacuation of Helles.

Quarter-Master-Sergt Painter, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been injured in action by his horse falling upon him.. His foot was fractured.

Mrs John French, of 3 Bridge Street, Rugby, has received news that her husband, Pte J French, R.W.R., has won the Military Medal in France. He has been wounded three times, and has returned to the trenches for the fourth time. He also won the Queen’s Medal in the South African War. He is the son of Mr and Mrs James French, Long Itchngton.

REV. F. B. HARBORD KILLED IN FRANCE.

General regret was occasioned in Dunchurch and Thurlaston and the district around at the news, which arrived on Sunday morning, of the death from wounds while serving as chaplain with the R.F.A of the Rev F R Harbord, vicar of Dunchurch. Mr Harbord was 49 years of age, and was the youngest son of the late W Engledow Harbord, of the Manor House, Stutton. He was preparing for Cambridge when he had a breakdown in health, and was ordered to South Africa, where he took Holy Orders. For many years he was stationed in the Orange Free State, and for two years was an acting chaplain with the Forces in the Boer War. On returning to England he was curate of Yorktown and Camberley, Surrey, 1909-10, and then rector of Pershore till his subsequent appointment to Dunchurch. On the outbreak of the present War he volunteered for service, but was not called up until August, 1916, and had completed exactly a year of service abroad on the day of his death, August 8th. He had just arranged for a further extension of leave from his parish, and in one of his last letters home wrote :- “ I cannot leave the Army when the hardest fighting is to take place.” Mr Harbord succeeded the Rev C T Bernard McNulty, Leamington, as vicar of Dunchurch five years ago, and he was exceedingly popular in the parish. He was a true friend to the poor, taking a keen interest in all matters appertaining to the welfare of his parishioners. He was one of the governors of the Boughton Trust, chairman and correspondent to the Managers of the Schools, chairman of the Almshouse Trustees, a trustee of the Poor’s Plot Charity, and a member of the Committee of the Dunchurch Working Men’s Club. He is the 19th man from Dunchurch to fall in they present War. Until recently the vicarial work at Dunchurch was undertaken by the Rev B B Carter, who relinquished duty about a fortnight ago, and has been succeeded temporarily by the Rev A F G Wardell.

In a letter to Mrs Harbord, an officer of the R.A.M.C. Writes :—“ I have just come back from a little military cemetery, where we laid to rest this afternoon, at three o’clock, the body of your husband—and to all of us—our Padre. We got the sad news this evening. I went down to the dressing station after breakfast this morning to see the arrangements carried out, and we took him back a few miles to our wagon lines. At the dressing station there was a Church of England chaplain, who saw him when they brought him in, and the end was peaceful and quiet. The doctor there assured me that he was beyond human aid. He had a billet on the main road, and, as was his custom, he used to give a cheery word to the men as they passed. It was while talking to a sergeant and one or two men that the fatal shell came. I do not think he could have suffered much pain—the shock would be so great. There were five officers and five men at the funeral, and Major Dickinson, the senior chaplain, conducted the Burial Service. How much we miss him I cannot say. We had known him now since August of last year, and had lived with him, and out here a constant friendship of a year means a great deal. We, the officers of the staff, are having a cross made to mark the spot where he is laid, and as long as we are in his area you can rest assured that the grave will be looked after. He was a personal friend to everyone, and in that degree the loss to us is a personal one. How vividly some of his great thoughts stand out-thoughts that had helped many of us to bear these hard things in the past and to look forward with some hope to the future. He used to say to us in his service and in the mess that whosoever made the supreme sacrifice out here made it as it was made two thousand years ago. It is a fine thought.”

Another officer writes :—“ I cannot possibly tell you how terribly grieved we are at the death of our Padre. He was a friend of every single man in the Divisional Artillery, and especially in this Brigade, with whom he had lived since he came out last August, and there were very few whom he did not know personally. I should think the greatest consolation you could possibly have must be the knowledge that he died as he himself would have wished—talking to some of the men outside his billet on the road where the infantry pass on their way down from the trenches, and the gunners bring their guns and ammunition wagons.”

The Commanding Officer has written :—“ I regret to have the sad task of informing you of the death of your husband in action. The best consolation I can offer you is that he suffered no pain, and that he has been tireless in his efforts throughout this trying time in cheering and looking after the men of this brigade. My staff and the whole Brigade feel his loss very deeply, and we offer you our very heartfelt sympathy in your great loss. It may comfort you to know that he performed his duties often under severe fire with cheerfulness and personal bravery. The Brigade, one and all, are deeply grieved.”

[Memorial Service also reported in this issue]

WOUNDED ENTERTAINMENT.—On Wednesday last Mr Smith and friends entertained the wounded at “ Te Hira ” with a musical programme. A sergeant acted as chairman. During the concert cigarettes were passed round, and the soldiers were very appreciative.

RUGBY SCHOOL NOTTING HILL MISSION.—Following the visit of the girl members of this Mission which is supported by past and present members of Rugby School, about 60 boys, all employed in munition work in the east end of London, have had a week’s holiday at Rugby. They arrived on Saturday, and were accommodated at the School Gymnasium. On Tuesday they played a team of wounded soldiers at cricket, and they were entertained by the R.F.C. Officers at Lilbourne on another day this week.

VARIETY OF FOOD IN WAR TIME.

In the pursuit of national economy, the daily round of mealtime is apt to become a little monotonous in these days. Any suggestions which provide change, without adding to the cost, and also show the way to use up in the form of tasty dishes such commonplace items as left-over rice pudding and stale bread , will be more than welcome to our readers.

The well-known firm of Messrs Alfred Bird & Sons, Ltd. Have sent us a copy of their very useful and well-produced cookery booklet, entitled “ Pastry and Sweets.” This contains about 120 well-tried household recipes of great interest to every housewife. They have placed a limited number of these books at our disposal. Any reader, therefore, of the Rugby Advertiser who would like to have a copy sent to them post free can obtain same by writing on a post-card to Alfred Bird & Sons, Ltd, Birmingham, and mentioning the name of this paper. As the number available is strictly limited, early application is necessary.

DEATHS.

PARNELL.—On July 23rd, 1917, Corpl. JAMES PARNELL, of Withybrook, 1st Batt. R.W.R., killed in action in France ; aged 22 years.
“ So ready to answer the call to the brave,
Although you now rest in a far-distant grave ;
More or better could any man give
Than die for his country that others might live.”

IN MEMORIAM.

LEACH.—In loving memory of our dear son, PERCY JOHN LEACH, who died at Sulva Bay, August 4th, 1915.
Two years have passed—our hearts still sore.
Day by day we miss him more ;
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say “ Good bye ”
Before closed his eyes.
Still sadly missed by his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

7th Apr 1917. Death of Lieut G Redmayne

DEATH OF LIEUT G REDMAYNE.

Sincere regret was felt in the Rugby district last week-end when news was received of the death from pneumonia at Windermere of Lieut G Redmayne, who for about two years had been serving in France as a gunner with the Rugby Howitzer Battery. He won the Military Medal, and had been granted a Commission, and it was whilst on leave in England as a result of this promotion that he contracted the serious illness which resulted in his death.

For several years Mr Redmayne lived at Dunchurch, where he was a pupil to Mr C G Bolam, late agent to the Duke of Buccleuch, and during that time he assisted Rugby F.C as a three-quarter back, doing valuable service with the 1st XV. Afterwards he took up Association Football. He was very popular in the district, and sincere regret is felt at the untimely end of so gallant and promising a soldier.

Mr Redmayne was the mainstay of the Dunchurch Cricket Club and a good runner, and while at Dunchurch always took part in the cross-country run on Good Friday. Apart from his athletic prowess, he was generous and kind-hearted, and will be much missed by Dunchurch people. He was a keen supporter of the Working Men’s Club, the members of which have sent a letter of condolence to Mr and Mr Redmayne, and also a handsome wreath. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Wednesday evening. Special hymns and Psalms were sung, and an appropriate address was delivered by the Rev B B Carter. Mr E R Gilling, the organist, played “ Prelude in C Minor ” (Chopin), “ O rest in the Lord ” (Mendelssohn), and “ Dead March ” from “ Saul ” (Handel). A large number of parishioners attended.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Recent casualties announced include :- Wounded : W J Edwards (Stockingford), Royal Fusiliers ; A Taylor (Rugby), Royal Welsh Fusiliers ; A Lee (rugby), King’s Royal Rifle Corps.

Mr William George Thompson, son of Mr Edward Thompson, East Haddon, had just been gazetted as First Lieutenant in the 2nd 20th London Regiment.

Harry Judd, only surviving son of Mr H Judd, Winfield Street, has passed his examinations as Fourth-class artificer in the Royal Navy, and goes to Portsmouth in a few days. Until recently he had been working in the drawing offices at the B.T.H Works.

Last month’s casualties to “ old boys ” of St. Matthew’s School include Pte E J Hewitt, Warwickshire Regiment, and Pte A K Reeve, Berkshire Regiment, whose deaths have been notified in previous issues of the Advertiser. Pte A P Prowse, Northamptonshire Regiment, a member of the School staff, has recently been severely wounded, having lost his left arm and received a number of shrapnel wounds, in addition to shell shock. He has been removed to England, and hopes are entertained of his recovery. Pte Prowse attested in the early days of the Derby scheme, was called up last June, and went to the front in September.

MARRIAGES

BUSH-BOURNE.-On March 29th, at St. Stephen’s Church, Westbourne Park, by the Vicar, the Rev. Shepley Smith, PAUL FRANCIS WHELER BUSH, Lieut., R.F.C., eldest son of Robert Evans Wheler Bush, of Oakfield, Rugby, and Mrs. Bush, of 21 Abbey Court, Abbey Road, to KATHLEEN, youngest daughter of the late Wykeham Bourne and Mrs. Bourne, of 53 Oxford Gardens, W.

DEATHS.

KINGHAM.—On March 1st (killed in action), Pte. CHARLES H. KINGHAM, M.G.S., 54th Battalion, Canadians (brother of Mrs. James Cave, 3 Charlotte Street, Rugby) ; aged 32.—In loving memory.

LANGHAM.—On March 23rd, Pte. HAROLD ALFRED, Churchover, (died of wounds, in France); aged 18 years and 9 months.

SALISBURY.-In loving memory of WILFRID JOHN SALISBURY, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Salisbury, 65 Manor Road, who was killed on active service (mine sweeping), March 25th, 1917.
“ Our hearts are broken,
But wait a little while,
And we shall pass the golden gates
And clasp thy loving hand.”
—From Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

IN MEMORIAM.

PRESTIDGE.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOSEPH PRESTIDGE, Barby, aged 21 years. Killed in action in France, April 11, 1915.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies;
Far from those who loved him best,
But in a hero’s grave he lies.”

2nd Sep 1916. The Recruiting Officer Asks For Information

Rugby Advertiser, 2 September, 1916.
THE RECRUITING OFFICER, RUGBY, ASKS For INFORMATION
regarding the following men, as to whether they
(a) Have joined the Army ;
(b) Are excepted from the provisions of the Military Service Acts, 1916 ;
(c) Are in possession of a definite certificate or badge exempting them from liability for Military Service
(d) Are in a reserved occupation ;
(e) Have moved to another district ;
or any other information concerning them.
The above information is required to complete records in Recruiting Offices, and any communication will be treated in strict confidence.

LIST OF MEN FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE FIRST MILITARY SERVICE ACT. 1916.
The following are their last-known addresses :-
O. PICKLES, Railway Hotel, Rugby, age 28.
F. SMITH, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 29.
W. HEWITT, “ Zotha House,” Park Road, Rugby, age 30.
J. W. WALKER, 37 Wood Street, Rugby, age 30.
J. ROSS, Spring Hill, Rugby, age 18.
O. JACKSON, White Lion, Warwick Street, Rugby, age 38.
H. FRANCIS [or HEENEY], 186 Murray Road, Rugby, age 39.
T. W. ELLERTON, Bridget Street, New Bilton, age 24.
A. E. CAPEWELL, Wharf Farm, Hillmorton, age 34.
G. COOPER, Radford, age 39.
W. FIELD, Mount Pleasant, Stockton, age 27.
J. H. CARTER, 16 Oxford Street, Rugby, age 29, married.
J. TOMSON, 8 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 31, married.
A. H. WEST, Bishops Itchington, age 31, married.
A. THOROGOOD, “ Alpina,” Banbury Road, Southam, aged 32, married.
W. POMFRET, 49 James Street, Rugby, age 21, married.
A. A. BALL, Whitnash, aged 38, married.
W. CALLODENE, Licensed Hawker, Dodson’s Field, Rugby, age 40, married.
F. C. BATES, Station Road. Rugby, age 40, Rugby, married.
J. E. CRAMP, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 24, married.
J. W. BOSTON, 40 Railway Terrace, Rugby, age 40, married.
WM GEORGE TRUSSLER, 14 Sheep Street, Rugby, age 31, married.
G. THOMAS, 2 Elborow Street, Rugby, age 34, single.
W. H. BRERETON, 11 Rowland Street, Rugby, age 25, single.
P. COWLEY, 91 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 22, married.
J. W. WILLIAMS, 21 Worcester Street, Rugby, age 22, married.
T. BOYLES, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 26, married.
P. JOHNSON, Long Itchington, age 28, single.
W. T. HARREN, Butlers Marston, Kineton, age 24, married.
JOHN FITZSIMMONS, 121 Oxford Street, Rugby, age 32, married.
A. ARTHUR, 51 Manor Road, Rugby, age 37, married.
A. K. FRAZER, 3 Castle Street, Rugby, age 36, married.
H. SMITH. 36 Poplar Grove, Rugby, age 37, married.
H. WILSON, 50 King Edward Road, Rugby, age 28, married.

LIST OF MEN FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM.
The following are their last-known addresses :-
H. E. TREECE, 17 Boughton Road, Brownsover, age 26, married.
WILLIAM HENRY WALKER, Westhorpe, Willoughby, age 25, single.

It must be clearly understood that Lists of Men who have failed to report themselves are compiled after every endeavour has been made to trace them, both by the Military Authorities and the Police, who furnish a written report on each individual case.
Under these circumstances any mistakes made are owing to the default either of the employers or men concerned or their relatives, who have failed to notify the change of address as required by the National Registration Act.

F. F. JOHNSTONE, Lieut.-Colonel, Recruiting Officer.
2nd September, 1916.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt-Major James Ward, late of the Old Manor House, Kilsby, serving in the Ammunition Column Brigade, Canadian Artillery, who recently was awarded the D.C.M, has now been promoted to a lieutenancy in the Trench Mortar Battery of a Canadian Division.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Pte H Perrin, elder son of Mr J Perrin, Victor’s Street, Rugby, who was invalided to England on June 28th suffering from influenza and acute rheumatism, his numerous friends will be pleased to learn that a letter has been received from Sister Chell, of Seafield Hospital, Blackpool, stating that he is now well on the way to recovery. Bandsman G A Walden, of the Worcester Pioneers, whose parents reside at 20 Campbell Street, New Bilton, is in hospital in France suffering from shrapnel wounds ; but letters from two officers of the company to which Walden belongs state that he is progressing favourably.

Second-Lieut Eric P St George Cartwright, Leinster Regiment (Machine Gun Section), youngest son of Mr Arthur Cartwright, late H.M Inspector of Schools for Northamptonshire District, was killed on August 13th. He was educated at Bilton Grange, Rugby, and at Charterhouse, where he was a member of the O.T.C.

Pte John Waring, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action on July 27th. The soldier, who was aged 28, and single, was the son of Mr James Waring, of Bubbenhall. For many years he was engaged under the Warwickshire County Council in superintending road repair work.

B.T.H. MEN KILLED.

Pte C Cashmore, of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, reported missing since September 25th last year, is now regarded by the Military Authorities as having been killed on or about that date. He formerly worked in the foundry at the B.T.H.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs H Smith, of Newbold. was notified on Saturday last that her husband, Corpl Horace Smith, of the Royal Engineers, had been wounded in the back and arm. Corpl Smith enlisted soon after the war commenced. He is in hospital in France, and is progressing favourably.

BRETFORD.

CORPL WELLS WOUNDED AGAIN.—Mr George Wells has been notified that his son, Corpl F A Wells, has been wounded again. He belongs to the Royal Warwicks (T.F), and had been in France again for some time, having recovered from his previous wounds. Another brother, Harvey Wells, has been suffering from shell shock ; whilst another is at the front. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Wells.

A BRAVE FELLOW.—Particulars have been received in the village of the bravery of the eldest son of Mr Fred White, who for many years resided at Bretford. Bert White as a boy attended Brandon School, and left there for agricultural work. He eventually emigrated to Canada, and when war broke out he returned to fight for the Old Country, He was eventually rejected because of a crooked toe. However, this did not quench his ardour, for he had the toe taken off, and is doing good work with the Royal Engineers. His father and mother now reside at St George’s Road, Coventry. The people of Bretford and the teachers and scholars of his old school feel proud of him.

DUNCHURCH.

CASUALTIES.—Second-Lieut J D Barnwell, of the R.W.R, second son of Mr W D Barnwell, is now seriously ill with blood poisoning, and Mrs Barnwell is still in France with him.—Mr and Mrs Bull, Mill Street, have received intimation that their son in the 3rd Dragoon Guards has been wounded ; and Mrs Richardson, Tail End, has received similar news in regard to Pte R Richardson, K.R.R. Pte E Walton, of Thurlaston, same regiment, has also been wounded.

BRINKLOW.

REFUGEES.-A meeting of the subscribers to the Refugees’ Fund was held in the Church Room on Friday evening in last week. The Rev G A Dawson presided, and Mr W E Brown presented the audited accounts, showing a balance in hand of £1 14s. It was also explained that the family had left the village, and the man had been at work for some time ; and was, therefore, independent of any further support from the subscribers. The balance in hand (£1 14s) was unanimously voted to the Prisoners of War Fund. A very hearty vote of thanks was accorded to Mr Brown for the admirable manner the arrangements in connection with their guests had been carried out. In response, Mr Brown expressed his readiness to further any good cause during this time of national stress.

AN UNCENSORED LETTER FROM A PRISONER OF WAR.

A letter has this week been received by Mr. J. Reginald Barker, Hon, Secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, from Bandsman C. Rowe, 1st Royal Welsh Fusiliers, a British prisoner of war, who has had the good fortune to be sent from Germany to Switzerland. Bandsman Rowe has been receiving help for some months from the Rugby Fund, and his letter is additional proof that the parcels of food sent every week to the local men who are war prisoners in Germany do actually reach them. It also emphasises the fact that unless these parcels are continued the men will undoubtedly starve. It therefore, hoped that the special effort the committee is making to raise funds to ensure the continuance of the weekly parcels of food and clothing will meet with a very generous response, that everyone in Rugby and the surrounding villages will give all they can possibly spare on Saturday next, September 2nd. Donations toward the Fund should be sent to Mr. Barker at 9 Regent Street, and same will be gladly acknowledged.

LEYSIN, SWITZERLAND.

August 14th, 1916.

DEAR SIR,—Just a line to ask you to discontinue any parcels to Germany, as you will see by the above address that I have had the splendid luck to get into a civilised country. I received your parcels during my stay in Germany, and beg to tender my sincere thanks to your subscribers and Committee for the good they are doing.

No one at home can believe the great appreciation our boys in Germany have towards the kind people who send the parcels. They are very anxious to know whether the parcels will always continue, as otherwise THEY WON’T COME OUT OF GERMANY ALIVE.

I have been in Germany twenty-one months, and endured the terrible hardships of the first six or eight months when no packets came through.

Only just lately, at Mannheim, the parcels were delayed on account of shifting from different camps, and consequently nineteen men out of my room were in HOSPITAL ON ACCOUNT OF EATING THE GERMAN FOOD. Most of them were wounded and out of Cologne Hospital. I will be only too pleased to answer any enquiries regarding the parcels, &c.

With my sincere thanks, I am, Sir,
Yours sincerely,
C. ROWE.

Mr. J. Reginald Barker,
Hon. Secretary,
Prisoners of War Help Committee,
9 Regent Street, Rugby.

ACHIEVEMENTS by the WARWICKS
HOW THEY CAPTURED A STRONG POSITION AND 600 PRISONERS.

During July and August, the Warwickshire Territorials were in the thick of the fighting in France, and had a very hard time of it, and, that is to be regretted, had many casualties ; but they covered themselves with glory. Their brave deeds have been eulogized in unqualified turns by the Special Press Correspondents, who have been privileged to visit the area in which the fighting has been going on. These citizen soldiers have been drawn from Birmingham and all parts of the county of Warwick, and have left all kinds of peaceful occupations to voluntarily undertake the training necessary to fit them for such an arduous campaign. The unanimous verdict of all the correspondents is to the effect that now that fighting is their trade, our Warwickshire lads are more than a match the best professional soldiers Germany can put up against them.

Early in July they formed part of the attacking force upon Anere, a little later they were in at capture of Ovillers-la-Boiselle, and afterwards led the great push towards Thiepval. They meritoriously carried out the work allotted to them, and captured one of the Germans’ strongest points, which had hitherto successfully resisted our attacks ; and they captured 500 prisoners, which one correspondent says was the big bag of the week.

In this particular operation the Warwicks were ordered to attack at a certain time, and after the usual artillery preparation, which was violently returned by the Germans, who used gas and tear shells, they went forward with an irresistible rush—in some places having to traverse 200 or 300 yards of open ground swept by machine guns before they could come to grips with Fritz. But their own machine guns and snipers, meanwhile, played great havoc among the defenders, and so terrific was the onslaught of the Warwickshire men that many machine gun crews (who, by the way, are among the bravest of German soldiers, and most stubborn) surrendered with a freedom which had never been observed before. But, nevertheless, there were several instances of typical Hun treachery after the hoisting of white flags—but with the inevitable result to the treacherous ones.

When the Warwicks had cleared the Germans from their trenches and dug-outs, and had a little time to look round, they discovered in the dug-outs and luxuriously equipped funk holes no lack of evidence in the way of half-consumed meals and luxuries, also cigars and cigarettes which had been partly smoked, that the Germans had no idea of being “ outed ” in such a hurry.

In one dug-out there was in the midst of all the horror a comic episode, like that of a clown in tragedy. A curtain divided the dug-outs, and a Warwickshire man thrust his bayonet through it. Suddenly the curtain was drawn on one side and German soldier, yawning loudly and rubbing his eyes with the knuckles of one hand, stood there, as though to say, “ What’s up?” He had slept heavily through the bombardment and attack, and now, when he saw the English soldiers facing him believed he was dreaming. So the Warwicks took 400 yards of trenches along a front of 600 yards, and thrust the wedge closer to Thiepval.

The men were splendidly led, and the officers-among whom there were, unfortunately, many casualties—had nothing but praise for the fighting qualities of the rank and file.

Both the courage and skill of these Warwickshire troops (who have received official congratulations from Headquarters and most whole-hearted thanks from the Anzac troops fighting on their right) saved them from heavy casualties. Since then the Wilts and Gloucesters have had a similar opportunity, of distinguishing themselves and they rose to the occasion with equal success.

And these men are typical of our citizen army

COUNTY TRIBUNAL PUTTING ON PRESSURE.

Realising that men are still urgently required for the Army, the County Appeals Tribunal, sitting at the Benn Buildings, Rugby, on Friday last week, intimated, through the Chairman, that they had got to put on pressure. In several cases appeals were dismissed, and in others the period of exemption was reduced.

The members of the Tribunal present were : Messrs M K Pridmore, W Johnson, jun, P G Loveitt. Messrs M E T Wratislaw and F M Burton represented the Military Authorities, and Mr J E Cox watched the proceedings in the interests of agriculture.

A MUNITIONS ORDER.

The first case was that of Wm Tisot, scrap iron and metal merchant, 7 Lawford Road, New Bilton, whose appeal had been adjourned, and respecting whom a munitions order was now made.

OPPOSITION WITHDRAWN.

The Military representatives had appealed against the granting by the local Tribunal of temporary exemption till February 1st to Francis T H Oldham, art student, The Cedars, Long Lawford ; but, in view of a recent Army order, that youths are not to be called up before attaining the age of 18 years 8 months, they withdrew their appeal.

MAKING UP FOR LOST TIME.

“ I do as much work now in a day as I used to do in a fortnight,” said Wm Frank Holloway, (36, married), stud groom, Toft House, Dunchurch. Whose exemption to October 1st to enable his employer to make other arrangements was appealed against by the Military Authorities.—Mr Wratislaw said there were two other men on Mr Rodoconachi’s farm of less than 100 acres.—Mr Holloway said, in addition to attending to the hunter stud, he helped on the farm and assisted at any job that wanted doing.—Given to September 25th, with the warning that it was very improbable that further time would be granted.

A PROBLEM FOR OLD AGE PENSIONERS.

Fredk Ernest Wm Lowe (36, married), 112 Lawford Road, New Bilton, claimed exemption on various grounds, including that of being sub-postmaster, as which he paid on Fridays 37 old age pensions.-Mr Harold Eaden pointed out the serious inconvenience it would be to these aged people to have to walk up to the General Post Office at Rugby.—The Chairman : Which concerns them most—the Germans coming or having to go a few yards extra to get their pensions ? In his statement, Mr Lowe said it would mean absolute ruin to him to join the Army, as he would have to sell everything at a sacrifice.-Given till September 25th, the Chairman remarking that men were very urgently needed, and they had got to put on pressure.

DATE AGREED UPON.

Being only passed for Labour A, John Harry Clowes, stationary engine driver for Messrs Parnell & Son, 4 Chester Street, Rugby, asked for the renewal of a certificate of exemption granted by the local Tribunal.-Mr Eadon said the firm would be content with exemption till October 1st, and this date was agreed upon.

A MATTER OF OPINION.

As William Leslie Morgan (24, single), dentist, 5a Regent Street, Rugby, did not, for the second time, attend personally to support his claim (although represented by Mr Eaden), Mr Wratislaw intimated that he considered the man was a shirker.—Mr Eaden : I should be sorry to say that. On the other hand, he is a very busy man.—Appellant had been passed for home garrison duty only, and asked for either a substantial period of exemption, or for the liberty to withdraw his appeal and renew it when he received his papers calling him up.—The Clerk to the Tribunal pointed out that as appellant was an unattested man, the Tribunal could not take the latter course.—Appeal dismissed.

COAL MERCHANT TO JOIN THE COLOURS.

Temporary exemption till October 1st had been given to William Fredk Perrin (30, single), haulier and coal merchant, 177 Oxford Street, Rugby ; but the Military lodged an appeal, which was upheld on their promising not to serve the papers for a month.

BADGED.

Another Military appeal was that in respect of Thos Wm Harrowing, boysman at a school boarding house, 26 Manor Road, Rugby, who had been given till September 1st to find work of national importance.—Mr Worthington said the man was now working at the B.T.H, and was badged.—The Chairman : As long as he is badged he is all right.

THE SHIFTING OF ORANGE BOXES.

Asserting that he supplied vegetable food for over three-quarters of Rugby, Mr J Craze asked to be allowed to retain his foreman, Harry Hyde (27, married), 16 York Street, whose exemption till November 1st did not meet with military approval.

Mr Craze said a man not used to the business and over military age was not able to lift orange boxes. Both his sons and another man had gone into the Army, and he should be hopelessly at sea (in case of illness) without his foreman.—The Chairman said we had got into such a position that we could not help ourselves, and he told applicant that he would have to see if two girls could shift his orange cases.

The foreman appealed on domestic grounds, he having a mother to support ; but the Chairman assured him his case was nothing like so hard as some others.—Exempted till October 25th, and the Chairman told Mr Craze they were rather stretching the point because he had such a good record as to his sons.

BROWNSOVER FARMER AND HIS SON.

Daniel Lloyd, farmer, Brownsover, had claimed temporary exemption on behalf of his son, Evan Harrison Lloyd (23, and single), but neither attended the Tribunal.—Appellant, in a written statement, said if his son did not obtain exemption he should have no alternative to selling the stock and giving up the farm.—The appeal was dismissed.

ANOTHER DENTISTRY CASE.

John Gardner Hall, dentist and manufacturer of artificial teeth, 20a High Street, Rugby, who had been granted time to complete his business contracts, &c, was also absent when his case was called on, and his appeal was likewise dismissed.

DEATHS.

HUGHES.—On August 16, 1916, Rifleman John Hughes, aged 18, son of the late Arthur William Hughes, late storekeeper of Rugby Sheds. Killed in action. Rifleman John Hughes is a cousin of Driver W. Chadburn, in France.—“ He gave his young life for his King, and country.”-From MOTHER, SISTER and BROTHER.

MESSENGER.—Killed in action on August 5, 1916, in France, Private John Thomas Messenger, of the Australian Imperial Force, son of Mr. T. T. Messenger, Barby.

SHAW.—In loving memory of Pte J. C. Shaw, of the R.W.R., second son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Shaw, of the Coventry Road, Dunchurch, who was killed in action in France on August 1, 1916 ; aged 26 years and 11 months.

“ No loved one stood beside him
To hear his last farewell ;
But we hope to meet in heaven,
And there for ever dwell.”
—From his loving MOTHER, FATHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

LINES.—Killed in action, “ somewhere in France ,” Henry, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Lines, Napton ; aged 27 years.

“ We often sit and think of you,
And tenderly breathe your name ;
Nothing left of you to look at
But your photo in a frame.”
—Deeply mourned by his FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHER, SISTERS, and MAY.

OSBORN.—In loving remembrance of George Osborn, who died in the Dardanelles on August 30,1915.

“ I often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘
Before he closed his eyes.”
BESSIE.

 

Neville, George Henry. Died 2nd Jul 1916

George Henry Neville’s birth was registered in the fourth quarter of 1880 in Rugby. He was baptised on 28 November 1880 in Dunchurch. His parents were Thomas Johnson Neville, b.c.1840 in Dunchurch, and Lillian née Lord, b.c.1851 in London. Their marriage was registered in Q1, 1873 in Brentford, Middlesex.

In 1891 the family were living in the village of Dunchurch. George now had three older brothers and three younger siblings. His father was a ‘Butcher (Master) & Farmer’. George received his early education at Dunchurch School, and then at the ‘Lower School, Rugby’ now the Lawrence Sheriff School, between 1893 and 1895. When he left school …

… He came on the staff of the Rugby Advertiser for a time, and then went into the employ of Mr G E Over till he was 18, when he joined the army. He served through the Boer War, and afterwards in India. On the outbreak of the present war he came home and took service in the 9th Lancers, but, promotion being slow, he transferred to the Oxford and Bucks. [This appears to be incorrect, but occurs twice in the newspaper report.][1]

For the 1901 census, when George would have been 20, he was not at home, although the family were still living in Dunchurch. He was serving overseas in the Boer War (1899-1902). After the end of the Boer War, he served in India and then returned home and ‘took service in the 9th Lancers’.

Before 1911, when George was 30, he was a Corporal, No.7532 in the Somerset Light Infantry and for the 1911 census he was with about 50 other soldiers at the Clydach Vale Hotel in Rhonda, Wales. There were also three police constables at the hotel. This was probably in connection with the Tonypandy riots of 1910 and 1911 (also known as the Rhondda riots) …
… a series of violent confrontations between coal miners and police that took place at various locations in and around the Rhondda mines of the Cambrian Combine. … Home Secretary Winston Churchill’s decision to allow the British Army to be sent to the area to reinforce the police shortly after the 8 November riot caused ill feeling towards him in South Wales throughout his life.[2]

Soon afterwards, in mid 1912, George Neville married Alice E Culverwell at Weymouth.

In August 1914, the 1st Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry was in Colchester, as part of 11th Brigade, 4th Division. On 22 August 1914 the Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the British Expeditionary Force. The 11th Brigade fought at Mons, Le Cateau, Nery, Marne, Aisne, Meteran and Messines in 1914; Ypres, St Julien, Frezenberg Ridge, and Bellewaarde Ridge in 1915; Albert and Transloy Ridges at the Somme in 1916.

George was with the Battalion when it went to France, arriving on 21 August 1914, and it was later recorded that he had served at the Battle of Mons. Before mid-1915 he had been promoted to Company Sergeant-Major, and on 30 July 1915 he received a Commission as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Somerset Light Infantry. As a 2nd Lieutenant, on 1 January 1916, he was ‘Mentioned in Dispatches’,
SOMERSET LIGHT INFANTRY. Neville, Second Lieutenant G. H.[3]

On 14 January 1916, his award of the Military Cross for valour in the field was gazetted …

The Supplement to the London Gazette, 14 January 1916:
Awarded the Military Cross
No. 7532 Company Serjeant-Major (now Second Lieutenant) George Henry Neville,
Somerset Light Infantry.

Also in 1916 he was promoted to Captain, and would again, but posthumously, be ‘Mentioned in Dispatches’ as ‘2nd Lt (temp. Capt.)’ on 4 January 1917.[4]

The 1st Battalion of the Somerset Light Infantry was in the 11th Brigade of the 4th Division of the Infantry and on 1 July 1916, George Henry Neville M.C. would have taken part in the attack on Redan Ridge which is between Serre Road and Beaumont Hamel, France.   In June 1916, the road out of Mailly-Maillet to Serre and Puisieux entered No Man’s Land about 1,300 metres south-west of Serre. On 1 July 1916, the 31st and 4th Divisions attacked north and south of this road and although parties of the 31st Division reached Serre, the attack failed and George was killed during the next day.

A report on the attack from a Sergeant who had returned, wounded, to Bilton, was also reported in the Rugby Advertiser.
This sergeant was behind Captain Neville, who was leading his company in a charge, and saw him receive a shot in the arm. But, undaunted, he went on, and presently was struck again in the chest, and fell. The company continued the advance, and nothing more was seen of the wounded officer – the search parties failing to find him.[5]

The Battalion Diary for 1 July 1916 relates that ‘Battn casualties were 26 Officers and 438 O.R.’   Among those listed as ‘Missing believed killed’ was ‘Capt. G. H. Neville.’

Whilst the records of the CWGC state that Captain George Henry NEVILLE, MC, MiD, of 1st Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, was killed the next day on 2 July 1916, age, 35, this is in conflict with the Battalion Diary.

George is now buried in Plot: XIV, Row: G, Grave 12, in Serre Road Cemetery No.2. His gravestone is inscribed, ‘Beloved Husband’ ‘Love conquers all things even death’. His body was moved into the Serre cemetery from a location about 100 metres to the south-east, and although his original burial was not marked, his body was identified from the ‘uniform & buttons’. A ‘sleeve, cuff, 2 buttons Prince Albert’ identifying him as from ‘Somerset Light Infantry (Prince Albert’s)’ were forwarded to base. He was reburied in a coffin.

He was awarded the British War Medal and Victory Medal; he was also listed for the 1914 Star, but it seems that on 28 August 1919, his widow, Mrs A E Neville, had to apply for its issue. It seems that the clasp for having been ‘under fire’ may already have been issued.   He had qualified for the 1914 Star when he was a Sergeant.

It seems that by mid-1919, his widow had returned to her home area and was then living at 107 Chiswell, Portland, Dorset. She later remarried in late 1920 with Victor J Pearl, the marriage being registered in Weymouth, and she is listed by the CWGC as Alice Ethel Pearl.

George Henry Neville is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates and on the Old Laurentians’ Memorial Plaque. His death is also recorded on the website of Somerset Light Infantry.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

– – – – – –

 

This article on George Henry Neville was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by Anne Rogers and John P H Frearson and is © Anne Rogers, John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, June 2016.

[1]       Rugby Advertiser, 15 July 1916.

[2]         https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tonypandy_riots

[3]       Medal Card, and ref: London Gazette, 1 January 1916, p.36.

[4]       Medal Card, and ref: London Gazette, 4 January 1917, v.29890, p.224.

[5]       Rugby Advertiser, 15 July 1916.

 

8th Jan 1916. Pigeons on War Service

PIGEONS ON WAR SERVICE

WARNING AGAINST SHOOTING

Attention is called by the War Office to the fact that a large number of carrier or homing pigeons are being utilised for naval and military purposes, and that recently many of these birds have been shot at and killed or wounded when homing to their lofts.

The public are earnestly requested to exercise the greatest care to avoid repetition of such unfortunate incidents, and are warned that persons convicted of wilfully shooting such birds are liable to prosecution.

Persons who are unable to distinguish with certainty carrier or homing pigeons on the wing from wood pigeons, doves, and the like, should refrain from firing at any birds of these species.

Any person who finds any carrier or homing pigeon dead or incapable of flying from wounds, injuries, or exhaustion is earnestly requested immediately to take the bird to the nearest military authorities or to the police, or if unable to secure the bird he should immediately give information to one or other of those authorities.

Information regarding the shooting of such birds should be given to the same authorities.

LOCAL WAR NOTES

Lieut C T Morris Davies, of Rugby – the Welsh international hockey player, and Captain of the Rugby Hockey Club – who has been in France for about ten months, is now on a week’s leave from his regiment, the 6th Warwickshire. He visited Rugby on Saturday last on his way to his home near Aberystwyth. The hardships of trench life do not seem to have affected his health, as he was looking exceedingly well.

L-CORPL W H ADAMS, OF DUNCHURCH, PRESUMED TO BE DEAD.

This week Mr and Mrs H Adams, of Dunchurch, received a communication from the Government to the effect that as no further news had been received concerning Lance-Corpl William Henry Adams, of the 2nd R.W.R, who has been missing since about October 20th, 1914, it was presumed that he was killed at about that date. The usual letter of condolence was enclosed. Lance-Corpl Adams, who was 24 years of age, had served nearly seven years in the Army, and had secured a first-class certificate for signalling. At the front he acted as a bicycle despatch rider, but had only been in France a week or two before he met his death. Some time ago the parents received news that their son was a prisoner at Gottingen, Germany, but inquiry being made it was ascertained that this was not so.

WELL-KNOWN JOCKEY INTERNED IN GERMANY

Mr and Mrs Davies, of Lower Street, Hillmorton, have since the outbreak of the war been anxiously waiting for news of their son, Fred Davies, who was in Germany in the summer of last year and was interned there. At last a letter has been received from him by his sister, living in Surrey. He is interned at Ruhleben, and writes to acknowledge the safe arrival of a top coat, which he says “fits a treat and is very warm.” At night the coat is used as a blanket for his bed. He adds that he is now all right for clothes, but would much appreciate condensed milk, butter, sugar, a bit of cheese, or a little tin of salmon. As a jockey Fred Davies has done well, having finished second on the list in that country. He was riding for Mr Beit, a Hamburg owner of race horses, when diplomatic relations were broken off between this country and Germany, with the result that, with many others in Germany at the time, he was detained.

OLD MURRAYIAN’S LETTER

Sapper Geo A Golby, a former scholar at the Murray School, and an “Over” Prize man, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges from the front says: “I have been out here since early in October, and have got quite used to the shells, etc, screaming over my head… I look forward to receiving the Rugby Advertiser every week, and am always pleased when I see the name of one of my old school chums in the list of recruits. I think by the number of names I have seen that our school is doing its share to free the world of these barbarians, and I am sure that if those who have not enlisted could just have a glimpse of this country, they would not hesitate for a minute. Only this morning we passed about a dozen old people (all between 60 and 70 years of age, I should think) whom the Germans had shelled out of their homes. It is a sight such as these that make us so anxious to get at the Huns. .. I am pleased to say we are having a spell of fine weather just now, and goodness only knows we want it, as we are nearly up to our knees in mud in some places. This is the only thing to complain of out here; the food is extra.”

Pte George Leach (“Bogie”), another Old Murrayian, who is at present in the Near East, in a letter to his old headmaster, says: It is most interesting to see some of the natives with their garbs and costumes, and their methods of transport with market wares, which vividly remind me of the Biblical times we read about.

FROM AN OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY

The following extract from letters of an “old boy” of St Matthew’s School to Mr R H Myers, headmaster, will be read with interest:-

Sergt Frank Chater, serving with the Nigerian Forces, writes: ” I have now been in the Cameroons some time. When I reached Africa I disembarked at Lagos, caught a train for there the same night, and after two nights and one day on the train, reached Minna. I rested there for a day, then did another day’s train journey to Baro, where I got on a steam boat and went up the River Niger to Lokaja. I stayed a coupe of days at Lokaja, then got on the River Benue and had a fourteen days’ run to Yola. The river journey is the reverse of pleasant, owing to the close proximity of the natives in a small boat. The smell from them and the engines combine to make a most uncomfortable time to be a white man. I remained three days in Yola, and then started on a fifteen days’ trek through the bush, to join the column at a place called Mora in the Cameroons. I rather fancy this is a record journey for a newcomer to the country. I turned out for action the same day that I reached the column, but nothing happened. On the following night we stormed the German position, which is on the top of a mountain. It was a terrible job, but after climbing all night up and over rocks, some of which seemed like the side of a house, we nearly reached the top by daybreak. The Germans gave us a warm reception, and we charged to try and take the fort. We were repulsed, though, and had to retire and take cover behind rocks, where we managed to hold on till dark, being neither able to advance or retire. However, under cover of darkness we managed to get away. I was fortunate to get off safely. One officer was killed and another wounded, and native soldiers were hit all round. We have now given up the idea of taking the place by assault, and are trying to starve them out. .. This scrapping in the Cameroons is not all honey by a long way. Here is a sample of my job. outpost duty in the bush, with 30 native soldiers, no one to talk to, and never knowing when you may run into German sniping parties, and the only water to be had from a filthy old well, which anyone at home would shudder to look at. Just now I am better off, being in charge of a small fort on a hill. We are, however, uncomfortably near to the German position, and they keep potting away if you try to move, so that the only chance of exercise is in the dark.

We are at the end of a range of mountains running down to the coast, and beyond the mountains is Lake Chad, only about three weeks’ trek from here. The people are all pagans, and the hill tribes are rather a poor type of native. All they wear is a goatskin round their loins. They will do anything for the white man, and appear to like the English, but we know that they supply the Germans with food and water so it is no good trusting them.

 

RUGBY FOOTBALL MATCH NEAR THE TRENCHES.

A Rugby football match between “ A ” and “ C ” Companies of the 1st/7th Warwicks was played near the trenches in France recently, which ” C ” Company won by a try. The teams were :—

“ C ” Company : R Edwards ; L Dewis, A Bale, P Hammond, Lance-corpl E Iliffe ; A Loave, Drummer W Newman ; W Arnold, S Cross, G Clarke, A Rose, W Salmons, W Gibbs, F Lombard, I Walden.

“ A ” Company : Lieut Field ; Faulkes, Sergt Atkinson, Redfern, S O Else ; West, Ralph ; Eyden, Corpl Caldicott, Corpl Goode, Prentice, Wykes, Adams, Dunn, A N Other.

MORE DAMAGE BY THE WIND.-On Saturday evening, during a recurrence of the gale, several trees on the Coventry Road between Dunchurch and the Station were blown down, and a great deal of damage was done to the telephone wires. In several places all of them were broken down. At Bilton Grange all the fancy work on the top of the vinery and glass houses for a length of between forty and fifty yards was torn away, doing great damage to the glass. Several trees also came down, and the household were very much alarmed. At Mr. Loverock’s Farm, between Dunchurch and Rugby, a wheat rick was blown over, and several sheaves of corn were carried the length of three fields away. The gale also did great damage to the roof of the wagon hovel.