6th Nov 1915. The Munitions Tribunal

THE MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL

There was a further sitting of the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Monday, thirteen cases being down for hearing, twelve informations being laid by employers for breach of regulations under the munitions Act. Mr F Tillyard presided, and the assessors present were Messrs A Lord for the employers and G Wainwright for the men.

WORKERS’ WASTE OF TIME.

Found smoking in the lavatory at the B.T.H Works (Coventry), H Clarke (18), of 110 Kingsway, Coventry, was summoned and fined 10s. He explained to the Court that he had no work to do, but the Foreman stated that there was work if he wanted it.

Against F J Moran, 55a Lower Ford Street, and Wm James Bolton, 68 East Street, Coventry, both capstan hands at the B.T.H, the information was that they wasted time in the lavatories and were found gambling. The youths, who were before the Tribunal a month ago, were each fined 15s for the present offence.

ABSENCE FROM WORK.

Alleging three days’ absence without reasonable excuse, Willans and Robinson’s, Rugby, brought proceedings against Robert Toothhill, a tool-fitter, of Rugby, who explained that he lost two days in paying a visit to his father, who was ill. Toothill, who was stated to have lost over 60 hours in the last six weeks, was fined £1.

DUNCHURCH ARTILLERYMEN HOME FROM THE FRONT.

Two Dunchurch artillerymen, Driver R Elkington, 117th Battery R.F.A, and Bombadier C Carter, 127th Battery R.F.A, who have been at the front since the commencement of the war, are at present on short leave of absence, which, after their arduous life during the past fifteen months, is proving very welcome. The two young men were schoolboys together, and have been friends all their lives, and, by a strange coincidence, their respective batteries were located in the same field for three months, during which time they were unaware of each other’s presence, and never met until they did so in Dunchurch. They both went through the retreat from Mons, La Gateau, Ligny, and the Battles of the Marne and the Aisne. Driver Elkington’s battery afterwards moved off to Ypres, and he took part in the first great fight for that much-contested town. In this battle—which was one of the hottest in which he was engaged—he was twice wounded (once in the head), and one of the other drivers was killed and one wounded, while two of the horses attached to the gun were killed. After a spell in hospital he was transferred to La Bassee, and afterwards to Ypres, where he participated in the severe fighting and the gas attack near there on Whit Monday. In this battle he experienced a very narrow escape. While near the famous Cloth Hall a shell burst in front of his gun, killing his horse, and he himself sustained injuries that necessitated his spending nine weeks in hospital. Driver Elkington feelingly added that he was one of the few men who were left in his battery of those who went out in August, 1914.

Bombardier Carter, who has two brothers (one of whom has been wounded) at the front with the Royal Warwicks, also went through the whole of the earlier fighting, and has had many thrilling and exciting experiences. He has brought home a number of interesting souvenirs picked up on the battlefield, including a great grey coat belonging to a dead Uhlan of the 9th Regiment.

Both men are agreed that the morale at the Allied troops is superior to that of the Germans, and that the British artillery has now secured a definite superiority. The British shells, too, are more effective than those fired by the Germans. The munitions were now coming up well, but they wanted still more and more men. Bombardier Carter is of opinion that, given the necessary amount of ammunition and a good supply of reserves, the Allies will soon be able to smash through the German defences and bring the war to a satisfactory conclusion, but to do this more men and munitions are required. He added that the British anti-aircraft guns are very effective in bringing down German aeroplanes. He had met the “ E ” Company and Rugby Howitzers while at the front, and they both seemed to be doing well.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has been received that Rifleman Lionel T Smith, K.R.R, known as “Tiger” Smith, of Rugby, who was posted as missing after the great British advance in September, is wounded and a prisoner in Germany.

The death has occurred in London of Lieut Robert Emmet, Life Guards, elder son of Major Robert Emmet, Warwickshire Yeomanry, whose home is at Moreton Paddox, Warwick. Lieut Emmet was formerly an officer of the Yeomanry, and was only recently transferred to the Life Guards. He had been ill for some weeks.

After a stay of some 14 months in Towcester, the 2nd/1st Northants Yeomanry left on Monday morning. The men during their stay in Towcester have behaved in an exemplary manner, and had become universally liked. The town generally has greatly benefited by having the troops billeted there, and they will be very much missed. The 3rd/1st Regiment is for the time being still at Towcester.

The Territorial Forces’ Record Office have communicated with the Coventry City Police, as they are anxious to trace the next-of-kin of Private E. J Barker, No 1557 Warwickshire Yeomanry. A letter concerning him, addressed to “Mrs G Barker, Buckland House, Coventry,” has been returned through the Post Office marked “ Not to be found ” The police will be glad if Mrs Barker would communicate with them.

AN OLD “ E ” COMPANY MAN KILLED.

To the list of local heroes who fell in the gallant charge by the Territorials on the German lines has to be added the name of Pte William Baines Harris (27), nephew of Mr and Mrs James Capell, of Featherbed Lane Farm, Bilton. Pte Harris came to Rugby in 1900, and worked on Mr J H Loverock’s farm for eight years, and afterwards for Mr J E Cox. When war broke out he was working as a shunter on the railway at Bescot, and joined the North Midland Territorial Division some six weeks after. He was a member of “ E ” Company (Rugby) for some years.

PROMOTION OF A RUGBY TERRITORIAL.

Farrier Quartermaster sergeant R C Snewing, elder son of Mr and Mrs Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been appointed to a second-lientenancy in his regiment the 2nd County of London Yeomanry (Westminster Dragoons), Second Lieut Snewing enlisted as a trooper in September, 1914, and subsequently received promotion to Lance-corporal in November. Lance-sergeant in March, Sergeant in April, and Farrier-major in August last. He served in the last year of the Volunteer Form with the old F Company of the 2nd V.B Royal Warwickshire Regt, and on the inauguration of the Territorial Force, entered the Rugby Howitzer Battery, attaining the rank of Corporal. On leaving Rugby, he transferred to the 4th Kent (Howitzer) Battery, with whom he served as Sergeant during the remainder of his term.

OLD MURRAYIAN GASSED.

Rifleman Chas Read, 2nd K.R.R, an old Murrayian, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges, says : “ I have been out at the front twelve months, and have been in every action of any consequence, but I came to a full stop on September 25th, the day we started the big advance. I was gassed with poisonous gas, but I am almost well now. My word, what a time it was a couple of days before the attack ! The shelling was terrible, but it gave me great pleasure to think that at last we were going to get them going, and so we did ; but I suppose this is stale news now. I am pleased to see that so many of the old Murray boys have answered the call. Many have paid the great sacrifice, but it cheers one up very much to know that the old boys of the Murray School have not been found wanting when our country’s call to arms sounded.

PTE MACE OF HILLMORTON A PRISONER.

Pte P Mace, 2nd Oxon and Bucks L.I, a son of Mr S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, who was reported last week to be missing, has written to his sister, stating that he is a prisoner in Prussia, and adding, “ I am sorry to say I was wounded, and could not get back to our lines. I think they have got me now for the duration of the war, and I shall be glad of anything you can I send me, especially cigarettes, as I am spun right out. I must thank God that I am alive, as I had a very narrow escape. I was wounded in the legs and face, and they very nearly cut my nose off.” In a postcard to his parents, Pte Mace states that he would be thankful for gifts of food or cigarettes. He adds that he is now doing well.

WITH THE RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

Driver Clifford Tomes of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, writes from somewhere in France” to his parents, who reside at 177 Cambridge Street :- “ There was an attack on our front yesterday, but it was repulsed by us. The 7th Warwicks are catching it pretty well. It amuses us chaps when a fellow comes back off leave and he says that people ask him if we have had any fighting yet ! I should not think they ever read the papers. It is because they never see any casualties mentioned, but that is because we have such extraordinary good luck. The gunners of our battery are everlastingly under fire, but my being a driver, I only get into it occasionally, and many a time when I have been up with the rations, the rifle and maxim fire has been terrific. We start the old rum issue next Sunday, and we are having sheep skins to keep us warm. We look like a lot of bears.; but I regard myself as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. Still I may have altered, for I think this life breaks anybody. We shall want plenty more men. Please post me an Advertiser every Friday night.

GRAMOPHONE FOR THE 1/7th WARWICKS

Miss Evans, of 13 James Street, who has a brother serving in the Rugby Company of the 1/7th Warwicks at the front, has recently collected between £5 and £6 with which she procured a gramophone and set of records, etc., from Mr J T E Brown. Albert Street, Rugby. The instrument was sent out to the C Company on the 3rd of October, and Miss Evans has received the following letter in acknowledgment :-

“ DEAR MISS EVANS,—I hardly know how to adequately thank you and all the people of Rugby for the handsome way in which you all think of us all out here. I need hardly say we all greatly appreciate your kindnesses which you are always showing to the Rugby contingent of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The latest contribution, the gramophone, will greatly cheer our periods of rest, and will always be a welcome and practically indispensable part of our sing-songs, which we hold whenever opportunity offers. I am requested to thank you for this trouble and time taken up in collecting for us, and also the subscribers for the generous way in which they responded.—Assuring you of our best thanks, yours sincerely, H. B. MASON, Capt.
1/7th R. War. R.”
October 90, 1915.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been less brisk at Rugby Drill Hall this week, but the recruiting authorities are anticipating a busy time next week, when the canvassing returns come in. The following have been accepted :—J W Oliver and P G Burton, R.W.R ; F F Walter and A Commons, Royal Flying Corps ; J V Sanders, C H Meacham, and A E V Meacham, R.G.A ; A C Lamb, Middlesex Regt ; T A White, H Cutler, J R Wildman, and G W C Pargetter, R.A.M.C ; W T Bridgman, A H Meadows, W O Watts, A H EASON, A W Isham, J W Gray, M J B Amey, R.F.A ; W T Hinks and R Herring, 220th Co R.E ; W H Hammond and L Sheasby, R.E (drivers); R E Clements and H Essex, A.S.C ; and C Prestidge, A.O.C.

A number of other men offered themselves, but were rejected. Recruits are still urgently required for the Infantry, and all regiments of this branch of the service are open.

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