Wingell, Archibald John. Died 31st Jul 1917

Archibald John WINGELL was born in about early 1879 in Leicester. He was the only son of Arthur Wingell, a book-keeper [born c.1855, in Guilsborough, Nothamptonshire], and his wife, Lucy Ann [Fanny], née Ireland, [b.c.1851, who was from Leicester]. Their marriage was registered in Leicester in Q2 1877.

In 1881, when Archibald was two, the family was living at 34 Chestnut Street, Leicester. By 1891 they had moved to Rugby and were living at 34 Bath Street.   Archibald was now 12 and he had a sister, Edith Minnie, who was eight and had been born in Aylestone, Leicestershire. Their father was now a Grocer.   On census night Archibald’s mother’s sister, Martha, a schoolmistress, and his grandmother, Hannah Ireland, were staying with them.

In 1901, the family were still in Rugby, but had moved to 11 Arnold Street. Archibald’s father, Arthur, was a ‘grocer’s clerk’ and Archibald was a ‘tailor’s cutter’.   His sister, Edith Minnie was working at home as a ‘milliner’.

It seems from papers in his effects, that Archibald had become – or perhaps was studying to become – a Mason, although nothing further is known.

It seems that Archibald moved to London and on 2 April 1911 the census noted that he was aged 30 and boarding at 37 Angles Road, Streatham, and still working as a ‘tailor’s cutter’.

Soon afterwards he married Agnes Anne Howse, then a ‘showroom assistant’ on 15 August 1911 at St James’ church, Ramsden, Oxfordshire. She was born in Ramsden in 1885 and her father was a blacksmith. In April 1911 she had been an assistant draper in the High Street, Banbury.

The Electoral Registers for 1914 and 1915 listed him in a ‘dwelling house’ at 78 Harborough Road, Streatham.

Archibald enlisted, aged 36 years and 11 months, on 9 December 1915. He was living at 78 ‘Harbour’ [Harborough] Road, Streatham, Surrey. He was 5ft 8inches tall and had a birth mark on the outside of his right thigh. He joined the Royal Garrison Artillery as a Gunner, No.101045. His Service Record survives, probably because his widow later received a pension and the Pension Records were not affected by the WWII fire.

He was on ‘Home Service’ from 21 June 1916 to 9 July 1917. He was promoted to ‘Lance Rank’ on 19 August 1916 and then to Acting Bombardier on 22 January 1917. He then went to join the British Expeditionary Force in France on 10 July, and on 17 July was posted from ‘base’ to the 23rd Heavy Battery, which had arrived in France, some two years earlier, on 15 September 1915.

Less than three weeks after going to France, he received gunshot wounds to his groin and back whilst he was ‘in action’ and was transferred to the 140th Field Ambulance, which was attached to the 41st Division in France where he died of his wounds on 31 July.

The 41st Division had been involved in the Battle of Messines in June 1917, before Archibald arrived in France. The Division was then involved in the initial action of the Battle of 3rd Ypres – the Battle of Pilckem Ridge which started on 31 July 1917, the day he died.

He was buried near the ‘Great Cross’ in Plot II. A. 3., in the La Clytte Military Cemetery. His gravestone includes the following words from his widow: ‘Adieu until we meet above’.

La Clytte Military Cemetery is located 8 kms west of Ieper [Ypres]. The hamlet of La Clytte was used as Brigade Headquarters, and burials were carried out by Infantry, Artillery and Engineer units (out of 600, 250 are those of Artillery personnel and 66 are those of Engineers).

After the war, his next of kin, his widow, Agnes Anne Wingell, was still living at their home, 78 Harborough Road, Streatham, S.W. 16. On 29 January 1918 she received Archibald’s effects, and it seems that there were a considerable number, probably reflecting that he was behind the lines with the artillery, where his effects could be recovered, rather than in the front line. His effects included:

‘Disc, Letters, (1 Registered open), Photos, small photo-case, Pocket book, Religious Book, 9ct Gold Ring, silver cigarette case, fountain pen & filler, Lodge rules, letter wallet, training card, Ribbon brooch, Cigarette holder, medal ribbons (3 pieces), sundry papers & cards, sundry Masonic papers, eyeglass, key, watch (broken), mirror, tobacco pouch, metal comb, penny stamp’.

The Register of Effects[1] confirms his rank, number and place and date of death. His back pay of £4-15-2d was paid to his widow and sole legatee, Agnes, on 12 January 1918, and his War Gratuity of £4-0-0d was paid to her on 3 December 1919.   Agnes was awarded a pension of 13/9d per week with effect from 18 February 1918.

Archibald John Wingell was awarded the British War and Victory Medals which were received by his widow on 6 October 1921. He is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

At the time of Archibald’s marriage in 1911, his father was a ‘Broker’s agent’, but he died in Rugby in 1913, aged 58. After the war, in 1919, his widowed mother, Lucy, was still living in Rugby, at 69 Manor Road. His sister had married in mid-1907 with Augustus Frank Lane, and was now Mrs Edith Lane and they were living at 6 Holbrook Avenue, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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This article on Archibald John WINGELLwas researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, July 2017.

[1]       UK, Army Registers of Soldiers’ Effects, 1901-1929.

Dexter, Percy John. Died 10th Jul 1917

Percy John Dexter was born in Birmingham in 1889. Son of William Herbert Dexter (b.1862 – d.1919) and Betsy Chinn (b.c1858 – d. 1890). Both of whom were of Coventry. Two older brothers, also born in Birmingham, were Herbert (b.1885 – d.1954) and Frederick William (b.1887 – d.1967). After the death of Percy’s mother Betsy, his father moved to Rugby in 1892 and married Sarah Ann Franklin of Dunchurch. There were at least a further seven siblings, all born in Rugby. Evelyn (b.c1894, Ethel Lilian (b.1896 – d.1962), Violet (b.1897), Grace Ellen (b.1898), Winifred (b.1901), Gladys (b.1902) and Edith Emily (b.1908). The first two brothers both returned to Coventry to live, work and die. His father – William H. – was joiner and carpenter throughout his life and freeman of the City of Coventry. He had worked for both the major building firms in Rugby, Parnell and Linnell, and was an active trades unionist and co-operator.

Percy’s trade was a painter and house decorator and before the start of the War he had joined with his father in a business partnership. He was secretary of the New Bilton Cricket Club and was also a well-known footballer. In 1911 Percy married in Rugby, Beatrice Louisa Ward, from Norfolk (b.1887 – d.1981). A son, Maurice William, was born 14 October, 1912, in Rugby, he died in 1993. At the time Percy died his wife lived at Lawford Road, New Bilton.

Percy attested under the ‘Derby’ scheme, and joined the Army in August 1916. He became a Gunner in the 219th Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery. The 219th S.B. arrived in France on 2 December, 1916. During the spring of 1917 it had moved from active duty in the Arras area (Bouvigny Wood, Noulette), then North to Bethune for rest (mid.May). By 12 June they arrived at St. Sylvestre Cappelle, moving to the Belgian coast at St. Idesbald three days later. On 21 June two of their four howizters were installed in the sand dunes at Nieuport, close to the front-line. Other Siege Batteries were in the area, including at Nieuport dunes, the 227th, 268th 2000m away at Ramscappelle and 330th at Dominion Farm (Naval Seige Gun H.Q.), and nearby during July included 325th, 133rd, 94th and several others.

There was a frequent bombardment of the enemy, besides the test firings to calibrate for range. Enemy targets include hostile batteries, machine gun emplacements, trench and wire entanglements disruption, road, houses, etc. Aeroplane registration of targets (by wireless) was a regular feature. All direction of fire was by reference to a standard grid system on local maps.

Percy J Dexter was killed in action on the 10 July, 1917. Two comrades died the same day, Gnr. Frederick William Mason Baker and Gnr. Wilfred James Slade. All were buried at Coxyde Military Cemetery. 117 men of the R.G.A. are buried in this cemetery. The majority died in July, August and September of 1917.

On 10 July, 1917, there were 867 Commonwealth deaths world-wide, 121 buried in France, 611 buried in Flanders.

On 31 July, 1917, began the third battle of Ypres. Total Commonwealth deaths in one day – over 6,000.

Coxyde is located adjacent to St. Idesbald, and is within 8000m of the areas mentioned. The cemetery was begun by French troops, but the area was defended by the British from June to December 1917, and now contains 1,507 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.

Percy John Dexter is remembered on the Rugby Town Memorial and New Bilton (Croop Hill Cemetery) Memorial.

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Canham, Archibold. Died 27th May 1917

Archibald ‘Arch’ Canham’s birth was registered in the first quarter of 1883 and he was baptised on 27 April 1883 at St. Andrew’s Church, Rugby. He was a son of John Canham, a groom from Hatfield, Hertfordshire and Alice née Kaye Canham who was born in Cobham, Surrey, and the couple married there on 20 September 1876. In 1883 the family lived at 5 James Street, Rugby.

Arch was one of six children. He had three sisters: two elder: Milly (1877-1926) who married Will Procter and lived in Grosvenor Road, Rugby; and Elizabeth (1879-1933) who never married; and one younger, Alice, who died aged eight, in 1892. He had an older brother John ‘Jack’ who was a storekeeper at BTH and a younger brother, Joe, who worked as an engineering machinist at Lodge Plugs. Joe married Mary Louisa Lloyd in 1925 and her brother Bert Lloyd opened and ran Clifton post office.

The photograph shows Arch and his wife, Laura, sitting on the fence. Milly is on the far right, and Elizabeth is pictured left. Joe is in the centre. The identity of the man next to Elizabeth is unknown.

In 1891, when Arch was eight, his family was living in London Road, Stretton upon Dunsmore. Arch and Jack went to school in Dunchurch. Jack’s daughter Betty later recalled: ‘Dad and uncle Arch were always the first to be allowed to go home if the weather got bad, or if it got very dark, because they had the furthest to go. They had to walk past a big avenue of firs, and it was quite scary, and they were always very glad that granny waited outside for them in a big white apron, so that they could see her.’

In 1901, aged 18, Arch was working as a house painter, and presumably working on a contract as he was living in Buxton, Derbyshire, and in lodgings together with several other painters.   Buxton was an expanding spa town (work was begun on Buxton Opera House in 1901, and it opened in 1903). It is just possible that Arch and the other painters also worked there.

His father, John Canham, died in October 1907 after he was kicked in the stomach by a horse. He was buried at St John’s, Hillmorton.

In 1911, Arch, aged 28, and still single, and living back at home with his widowed mother and his 16-year-old younger brother Joe in Hillmorton. At some time prior to WWI he must have started working for the local building firm J. Parnell and Son.

He married Laura Emily Knight on 25 March 1913 at the Church of the Holy Rood, Daglingworth, Gloucestershire.   Little is known of her, or how it was that they came to meet.

Their daughter Muriel Mary was born in Rugby on 30 December 1914, when the family was living at 19 Benn Street.

There was little information on his Medal Card, but fortunately his Service/Pension Record is one of the small number still available. He took the Attestation oath at Rugby on 10 December 1915 when he was a ‘painter and paper hanger’. He was then 33 years old; 5ft 6in in height; and had an ‘amputation terminal phalanx left index finger’, i.e. he had lost the top joint of that finger. He was still at 19 Benn Street. He was posted on 27 May 1916 and his papers noted he was ‘appointed’ to the Royal Garrison Artillery, the documents being stamped ‘Plymouth’ on 30 May 1916.

‘Arch’ joined up as No.86927 [on his Medal Card] and 86972 [on his initial CWGC grave registration record, but later corrected], in the Royal Garrison Artillery and was in the UK on ‘home service’ for nearly a year from 27 May 1916 until 17 May 1917. He was first posted to No.3 Depot RGA from 27 May 1916, then to 36 Company on 3 June 1916. On 13 January 1917 he was posted to the ‘Signalling School’ where he passed his ‘1st Class Signalling and Telephony’ course at Hepswell Camp – at Catterick, Yorkshire – on 24 January 1917, a mere ten days later! He was apparently posted near the end of this short course to the ‘A Depot Siege Artillery’ on 20 January 1917, and then to his unit, the 332nd Siege Battery on 15 February 1917.

His ‘overseas service’ in France commenced on 18 May 1917 when the Battery embarked at Southampton and disembarked the next day at Le Havre. They went out to the Western Front armed with four 6 inch howitzers. The unit first went into the line at Ploegstreet and Le Bizet [both in Belgium near the French border], before moving to Ypres.[1] However, a mere nine days after arriving in France, he was acting as a signaller and was involved fierce fighting at Pont-de-Nieppe. Nieppe is a French village four kilometres north-west of Armentieres on the road to Bailleul. The bridge at Pont-de-Nieppe had been seized by the 1st Hampshires on 16 October 1914 and the village then stayed in Allied hands until 11 April 1918.

Arch’s unit would probably have been mobilised and brought forward to assist in the preparations for the Battle of Messines on 7 June 1917. This was an attack on the Wyschaete-Messines Ridge, south of Ypres in the Vimy to Arras sector. There was a seven day preliminary artillery bombardment before the infantry assault and many of the infantry battalions had been billeted in Pont-de-Nieppe before going forward to the farms around the south and west of Ploegsteert Wood.

The Germans were aware that an attack was imminent and would no doubt have been trying to disrupt the build up and emplacement of artillery, as described in the published diaries[2] of two Australian gunners, Harrold ‘Hal’ Stevens and William ‘Billy’ O’Neil who described their time in Nieppe during the period leading up to, and indeed after, 27 May 1917.

Hal’s Diary – 24th May.
All guns taken away and placed in a line ‘shoulder to shoulder’ for what appears a big offensive. Guns of all calibres. We are on the eve of great things and I pray I may be spared to see it through although it will be a fearful experience. Still I would not miss it for any money.

Hal’s Diary – 27th May.
Another of our guns smashed to be taken to ordinance depot as a shell struck it today. We have no cover now. When will the strafe occur? Our positions were not occupied as fresh orders were to hand and great ‘goings-on’ forecast – there was to be a big offensive on a grand scale. The eighteen pounders were to be shoulder to shoulder for miles and miles and guns of all calibres were to be in support! It was the eve of great and far-reaching events! So the rumours circulated. … The battery had orders Heavy batteries were drawing big guns by motors, the naval pieces with their extremely long barrels, and in contrast the ‘hows’ thick and short, all assembling steadily for the big ‘stunt’. … The guns were in their new positions with heavy English guns on their left. The latter had been having a hectic time and had lost several men and an officer. Nearly every day the enemy was doing some execution and the strange part was that very little counter battery work was being done by the British. It was thought that the idea was to keep the location of the batteries a secret until the day of revenge. Anyhow, it was galling to be doing so little and receiving so much from the opposition. Several men were killed near by, but none of Billy’s companions were hurt, and they were moved to a flank as the shelling was severe all around them.

Billy O’Neil’s Diary – Sunday 27th May
Shelling woke us up – they were after dump behind us. ‘F’. Sub. put out of action and some Tommies on left killed.

Maybe it was Arch who was one of those ‘Tommies’ or among those ‘several men’ who were lost. It was during this period he was wounded, and he died ‘in the field’ from his wounds on 27 May 1917. He had served for 1 year and 167 days. A confirmatory copy Death Certificate was later issued.

Arch was buried in Plot: II. D. 8. in the Pont de Nieppe cemetery, Nieppe, in the Departement du Nord, France. His memorial stone has the added words from his widow, ‘Thanks be to God that such have been’.

Nieppe is a village 4 kilometres north-west of Armentieres on the road to Bailleul.   The village was in the Allied hands from mid-October 1914 until 11 April 1918. Pont-De-Nieppe Communal Cemetery was used by Commonwealth field ambulances and fighting units from October 1914 to March 1918.

Administration was granted in London to his widow, Laura Canham, on 19 June 1918. His Estate was valued at £267-6-10d. His address was given as the family home at 19 Benn Street, Rugby. After Arch’s death, his wife’s mother became ill.   Laura sold the house in Benn Street and before 13 October 1917 she had returned home to Grove Hill, Daglingworth, near Cirencester. Correspondence exists regarding Arch’s plaque and scroll and giving this address on 15 April 1919 and also when she acknowledged receipt of his ‘British War and Victory Medals’ on 2 May 1922.

A letter dated 12 December 1917 advised that Laura was awarded ‘… a pension of 18/9 a week for herself and one child with effect from 17/12/1917 …’.

Arch’s service papers also include details of his family and next of kin which were provided by his widow on 30 April 1919. She was still living at 19 Benn Street, Rugby, as was their daughter Muriel Emily Canham.   His mother was widowed and living at ‘Hillmorton, nr. Rugby’. His elder brother, John Canham was now 38 years old and living at 36 Caldecott Street, Rugby and his younger brother, Joe was 23 and also living in Hillmorton. His elder sister, now Mrs. Emily [Milly] Proctor, was 42 and at 110, Grosvenor Road, Rugby; and his other sister, Miss Elizabeth Canham, was 40 and at Bell Field, Peter’s Green, Luton.

Arch’s sister, Milly’s husband, Will Procter, died in the flu epidemic on 16 March 1920. Milly apparently never got over it and she died in 1926.   Their mother, Alice, died in August 1929, and her funeral service was at the Mission Hall, Hillmorton. His sister, Elizabeth died in 1933. His elder brother, Jack lived on until 1941, dying at the age of 60, and his youngest brother, Joe, died in 1975.   Both brothers had married and had children.

Parnell list of men in WWI

Archibald Canham is commemorated on the War Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby and also on the Hillmorton War Memorial.

He is listed as being Killed in Action on the J. Parnell and Son, Roll of Honour,[3] but has been recorded incorrectly as being in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

The original Parnell ‘Roll of Honour’ was produced in late 1916 and contained ‘…. the names of 22 men who have enlisted from the yard and shops. The ‘roll’, which was tastefully designed and executed by Mr. F. J. R. Cole, Rugby, with appropriate and patriotic embellishments, was framed in oak, and the names enrolled thereon …’.[4]

Nine further names were added to the Roll of Honour later, and Archibald Canham, who was still ‘serving’ at the date the Roll was first made, would be later marked as having been killed.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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This article on Archibald Canham was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, July 2014, and updated May 2017.

Many thanks are due to Elaine Canham of Rugby, whose husband is Arch’s great nephew. Her report on Archibald Canham and her family photograph have been incorporated into this study with her permission.

 

[1]       Information from: http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/index.php?/topic/114919-rga-332-siege-battery/.

[2]       Alison Miller (Editor), Death sat on a pale horse – The World War One diaries, letters & sketches of Harold Stephens and W. ‘Billy’ O’Neil, Midlands Heritage Press, Newstead, 2008. See: http://www.hudson-publishing.com/sitebuildercontent/sitebuilderfiles/alisonpagesample.pdf.

[3]       The Roll of Honour is held at the Warwick Modern Records Centre and reproduced with their permission.

[4]       Rugby Advertiser, 2 December 1916. The report contains a number of discrepancies especially in the initials .

Donald, Charles. Died 31st Dec 1916

Charles Donald was born in Brighton, Sussex, England to Joseph Donald born 1841 and Frances Beeby born 1839. Frances had been married previously to John Whelan.

John and Frances married in India and had 4 children. Joseph was a regular soldier and the family moved around. Charles’ elder brother was born in Lucknow, India in 1876 followed by Bertha in Aldershot in 1879. The family then moved to Brighton, and then on to Wrexham, Wales where in 1881, Joseph was a Serjeant-Major of the Denbighshire Yeomanry. In 1891 the family had moved to Denbigh, Wales and Joseph is now Troop Superintendent. He died in 1892.

By 1901 Charles had moved to Rugby and in the Census taken that year was living as a Boarder at 30, Arnold Street, Rugby with William and Sarah Daynes. William was one of the earliest photographers of Rugby.

Charles married Alice Wilson on the 2nd of November, 1902 at St. Mary, Far Cotton, Northampton. Alice was the youngest child of Edward and Mary Ann Wilson, both born in Brixworth, Northamptonshire. In 1891 they were living at Kingsthorpe, Northampton, Edward was a Labourer.

They went on to have 3 children, all born in Rugby, Alice, born 1904, who sadly died in 1905, she was followed in 1907 by Charles and in 1909, by Frances Ruth.

In the 1911 census Charles and family are living at 16, Wood Street, Rugby. He is a Compositor working for Overs a letterpress printing company, and had worked for the firm started by G E Over for 16 years.

He became a member of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Society. He also joined the Oddfellows and served as Grand Officer of the Loyal Addison Branch in Rugby.

He joined the Army on 1st of August 1916 as Bombardier in the 262nd Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery. Siege Batteries were a relatively new method of land warfare. They were based on the Coastal Batteries and each platoon deployed 4 6” Howitzers, which could each fire a 100lb weight shell over a maximum distance of 6,000 yards.

Each platoon comprised 5 Officers and 177 Other Ranks. The guns were pulled by horses, 6 draught, and 80 heavy draught with 6 riding horses. The guns were set on wagons: 3 off 2-horse and 10 off 4-horse. 3 Platoons formed one Siege Battery.

Headquarters (HQ) was staffed as follows: 7 Officers, 137 Other Ranks 21 Riding Horses 5 Draught and 72 Heavy Draught Horses.

Charles died at Aldershot on the last day of 1916. He is buried at Clifton Road Cemetery, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Hunter, Wilfred Cleaver. Died 29th Dec 1915

Wilfred Cleaver Hunter was born in Rugby in 1891. He was the third son of Thomas Hunter and his wife Emily Cleaver, who married in 1886. At the time of his birth the family were living at 94 Railway Terrace, Rugby and his father is listed as a Railway Wagon Builder (employer). His grandfather had founded the Thomas Hunter Wagon Works in Mill Road twenty years earlier.

In the 1911 census the family was living at Elmhurst, in Hillmorton Road. Wilfred was aged 20 and described as a Filament Maker, Electric lamp maker.

Wilfred Cleaver Hunter

A report in the  Rugby Advertiser of 8th Jan 1916 gives an account of his life and death:

Second Lieut Wilfred Hunter was 25 years of age, and was the third son of Alderman Hunter. He and three of his brothers enlisted on the outbreak of war, and all four obtained commissions. He was a very bright and promising young man, and many outside the family circle will be grieved to know of his death.

Second Lieut. Wilfred Hunter was educated at Rugby School, and afterwards entered commercial life as secretary to the Rugby Lamp Company, Ltd.

He first enlisted as a gunner in the 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, and after seven months’ service entered the Royal Military Academy at Woolwich.

On October 27th last year he was gazetted to the Royal Garrison Artillery, and left for France on December 10th, being killed in action 20 days later.

Lieut. Hunter spent some days at Havre before going to the front, so must have met with his death very soon after his arrival at the actual scene of the war.

Alderman and Mrs Hunter, of Elmhurst, Hillmorton Road, Rugby received the news of his death on New Year’s Day.

He was killed by a shell which burst in the courtyard of the farm where he was billeted. A fragment struck him in the throat and he died almost at once. He was buried at the Divisional Cemetery at West-Vlaanderen, near Ypres

He is also remembered at his parents grave in Clifton Road Cemetery:
Also of WILFRED the dearly loved son of THOMAS & EMILY HUNTER who was killed at Ypres Dec 29th 1915 aged 24 years.
“Come to me saith one and coming, be at rest.”

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Sources:
Rugby Advertiser
Lawrence Sheriff School and Two World Wars (Editor Davis Howe, published by Lawrence Sheriff School)

 

Davies, David Claud Graham. Died 15 May 1915

A lieutenant in the 1st siege battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery.

CWGC Information: Davies DCG, Lieutenant, Died 15/05/1915 aged 33 Royal Garrison Artillery ii G 15 Bethune town Cemetery. Born March quarter 1892 at Llanrwst, Denbighshire, son of Thomas John and Annie Louisa Davies of “Awelon”, 15 Holbrook Ave, Rugby

Medal Roll has David C Davies 1st Siege Batty RGA Rank is gunner No 11954.

Awarded Victory medal, British War Medal and 14 star qualified by joining before 17/09/1914

Brother applied for Medal from No 5 coy British Gendarmerie, Jerusalem, Palestine

Service Record WO339/30799. This has been severely weeded out and contains mainly papers on his estate and Rugby Solicitors Fredk Fuller who acted for Mrs Annie Louisa Davies, whose address is given as 29 Manor Road, Rugby.

David Claud Graham Davies 2nd Lieut 1st Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery died of wounds in the field hospital. He was buried in the Town Cemetery, Bethune. Also mentioned is a Mrs A L Zaloudek as the mother.

In the folder is an extract from the local French death registration

Free BMD has the birth of a David Claud G Davies in Llanrwst in March qtr 1892 vol 11b page 299

FreeBMD marriages has marriage between Annie Louisa Davies and Hynek Zaloudek in June quarter 1901 Chorlton vol 8c page 1576

The 1901 census for 25 Albert Road, South Manchester has Annie L Davies head, Widow, aged 45? Boardinghouse keeper, Birkenhead. Has 2 sons David CG aged 9 and James R aged 8 both born Llanrwst and a lodger Hynek Zaloudek

The 1911 census for 72 Mostyn St, Llandudno, N Wales gives Annie Louisa Zaloudek aged 45 married for 10 years with 2 children and also a stepson James Reginald Davies an engineering student aged 18 born in Llanrwst

Looking in Rugby directories Mrs A L Zaloudek appears at 29 Manor Road, Rugby from 1912 – 1915.

From 1916 – 1919 she appears as Mrs Davis of 29 Manor Road, Rugby

From 1920 –1921 she appears as Mrs A L Davies 15 Holbrook Avenue, Rugby

Rugby Advertiser 22 May 1915 “WELL KNOWN LOCAL ATHLETE DIES OF WOUNDS”

News was received on Sunday by Mrs Davies of 29 Manor Road, that her son Second-Lieutenant Claude Davies of the Royal Garrison Artillery forming part of the 1st Army had died of wounds

Appears in the BTH Roll of Honour. He was formerly in the Electrical Laboratory in Rugby

He has a brother also in the war but attached to a different regiment

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM