5th Oct 1918. Margarine Shortage at Rugby

MARGARINE SHORTAGE AT RUGBY.

The non-arrival of the weekly supply of margarine last week, owing to the railway strike, occasioned considerable inconvenience locally. The majority of the grocers were left without supplies before the end of the week, and many of the late customers were unable to secure their rations. We understand that the supply arrived on Tuesday last, six days late.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Tuesday, Mr William Flint, C.C, presided. Also present: Mrs Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, Mr R P Mason, Mr J W Walton, Mr E Pepper, Mr F A W Shirley, and Mr J R Barker, hon organising secretary.

Mr Barker said the support given to the Fund from all quarters showed a most gratifying increase. The cost of the food parcels, etc, during the month of September was the highest on record, the amount being £517 14s. Yet it had been possible to meet this charge out of current subscriptions and donations, there being a surplus on the month of £2 8s 2d.

As an example of the great growth of the Fund, Mr Barker said the accounts showed that the cost of the food parcels, &c. during the-past three months amounted to £1,349 10s 6d, but so well had the Fund been supported that nearly all this amount had been raised during the same period, the deficit on the past three months’ working being only £73 15s 6d. A substantial sum could, however, be expected as a result of the recent effort organised by the General Help Society, which would wipe out this deficit and leave a good sum to carry forward towards the October parcels, which would not be less than £350.

There were now 142 local men to whom food parcels were being despatched, but he expected to have the addresses of the prison camps of eight other men very soon. Four men had been recently repatriated, who were taken prisoners at the end of March last. He regretted that these men were all badly wounded, and in consequence of the Germans not giving them proper medical and surgical treatment, in addition to half starving them, they reached England in a very serious condition. There had, of course, been no time for them to receive the food parcels which had been despatched to them from England, as in each of these cases the men had been removed from their prison camps for repatriation just before the arrival of their first parcels.

The Chairman said the splendid support the public of Rugby and District had given to the Fund had enabled them, in spite of the huge increase month by month to meet the cost of the food parcels without having to call on the British Red Cross Society to contribute anything towards the cost. He was sure the people of Rugby and district would do all they could to see that this splendid position was maintained.—Mr Shirley said he would like to associate himself with the Chairman’s remarks. He knew the working men of the district especially the railway men, were contributing splendidly, but he would like to see more organised weekly efforts from other works in the town.—Mr Barker said he thought the figures he had given showed that everyone was alive to the importance of regular and continued support. The month’s revenue was not made up by a few individual amounts, but by a very considerable number of small donations, as well as Works collections and organised efforts, so that if people were not subscribing in one particular way, they were doing it in some form or another.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sapper S J J Hodges, R.E, and Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, both of Rugby, have been taken prisoners by the Germans.

Corpl W S Bosworth, Royal Engineers, son of Mr S Bosworth, Rowland Street, has been awarded the Croix de Guerre. He is an old St Matthew’s boy.

Lieut E M W Boughton, M.C. Royal Engineers, has received an immediate award of a bar to the Military Cross which he gained in the Cambrai offensive of last year.

As a result of an egg collection amongst the staff of Mr J J McKinnell’s establishment on Saturday 37 eggs were handed over to the Infirmary V.A.D for the wounded soldiers.

Lance-Corpl A Lester, Royal Engineers, 92 South Street, Rugby, was killed in action on August 17th. For upwards of 18 years he was employed as a platelayer in Rugby. He had served in France since February last.

Mr & Mrs S Mace, Lower Street, Hillmorton, have five sons in the Army. Four are still serving in France and one (Percy) was wounded and taken prisoner, and subsequently transferred to Switzerland. This is believed to be a record for the village.

Pte J J Hancocks, 1st Worcester Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Hancocks, Hillmorton Wharf, who was reported missing on November 22nd last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was employed at the Lodge Factory when he joined the Army on February 23, 1917, at the age of 21 years.

Pte W Lacey, R.W.R, son of Mrs F Holmes, 66 Rowland Street, has been wounded in the shoulder and neck. Pte Lacey, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, joined the Army in September, 1916. He was wounded in the following January. Fourteen months later he was invalided home with trench fever. He has an elder brother also serving in France.

Mrs G Cowley, late of Rugby, has recently received a letter from Major Eric Charles, commanding a battery of heavy gums in Italy, saying : “ Your son is one of the Subalterns in my battery. He has recently been responsible for a very brave act. The battery was being heavily shelled, a shell falling in the gun pit and setting alight to the camouflage, ammunition and the clothing of two of the wounded gun crew. Your son ran in and carried them out, thereby saving their lives.”

Lance-Corpl J A Maycock, M.M. Royal Warwicks, of Rokeby Cottage, Bennett Street, Rugby, was recently killed in a trench raid in Italy. He joined the Army three years ago, and was awarded the Military Medal for bringing in wounded men under heavy shell fire in November, 1917. He has also been twice mentioned in despatches. He was a member of Rugby Congregational Church, and also of the St John’s Ambulance Brigade. Prior to the War he was employed by Messrs Faulkner, St Matthew Street. He leaves a widow and two little children.

Recently the mother of the only child of the late Pte A W Bottrill received a cheque from his late father’s Captain, together with a letter, as follows :—Thank you so much for the photograph of the latest Coldstream recruit. He is very like his father, and I hope he will be as great a credit to it as his father was. I am sending these few pounds, which I hope you will put to the credit of your boy until the time when he joins the regiment. I hope your boy will be a great comfort to you and a worthy successor to his father. Pte Bottrill, who was killed in France on March 19th, was buried on his child’s third birthday. Lady Sybil Grant acted as godmother to the boy in consideration of the fact that his father was serving in the regiment at the time of the baby’s birth.

RUGBEIAN KILLED IN AUSTRALIA.—News has just been received of the death of Mr W Cox, late of 14 Market Street, Rugby, the result of a railway accident at Brighton, South Australia. Mr Cox emigrated to Australia nearly nine years ago. Two of his three sons have served for some time in the A.I.F. The eldest one at present in France, and the youngest had his discharge early this year after service in Egypt, the Dardanelles, and in France, where he was badly wounded.

HILL.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—News has come through from companions that Pte Henry Cockerill, of the M.G.C and of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of the late Mr T Cockerill and Mrs Cockerill, of Hill, was killed last week by a shell, which also very seriously injured a companion. After joining the Warwickshire Yeomanry, he went to Egypt three years ago, and was on the Seasowe Castle, which was torpedoed when the regiment returned to France.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—The sad news has reached the village that Lander Mann, formerly a choirboy in Stockton Church, has made the great sacrifice on the Western Front. The family, who now live at Rugby, have many friends in the parish, and great sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Mann in their sorrow. The lad was 19 years old.—Wheeler C Cleaver is home on leave from France. He belongs to the now historic Tank Corps, which is doing go much to make victory at the present time.

BRANDON.
ANOTHER SON WOUNDED.—Mr George Harris, who for some time has been in the employ of the L & N.-W Railway Company at Brandon Station, has received news that another of his sons has been wounded. Mr Harris had four sons, who willingly volunteered. One has already lost his life ; a second has just been released from hospital, after being there three years, half of which was spent in bed; the third son now lies in Bath Hospital. Two of his fingers have been amputated, and his left hand is badly damaged. Mr Harris’s fourth son is now with the Engineers in France. Much sympathy is felt for Mr Harris in his fresh trouble.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Several more of the village boys are reported wounded. Pte Harold Priest, Warwickshire Yeomanry, is suffering from a shrapnel wound through his left arm. He is not yet 19 years old, and has only lately gone to the front.—Pte Thos H Tandy, Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was at home less than a fortnight since, is also wounded, but it is hoped not seriously.—Pte Ernest Lane, R.W.R, whose brother Frank was lately reported missing, and whose brother Arthur has been killed, is also wounded, and cannot yet be located. He was formerly porter at Long Itchington Station. Mr & Mrs Joseph Lane, parents of the foregoing, have also received an intimation that their second son, Pte Fred Lane (another former L & N-W employee), is in hospital wounded in the right arm.—Pte Chas Biddle, Gloucester Regiment. is also in hospital suffering from a shrapnel wound in the left knee.—Pte Wm Hyde, South Staffs, is reported badly gassed, having lost his speech and sight, but it is hoped only temporarily.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains a list of 229 names of soldiers and sailors. Of these 27 have been killed in action, or have died on service, three are missing, four are prisoners of war, and 50 are known to have been wounded.

COVENTRY APPEAL TRIBUNAL .

Held on Wednesday. Present: Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and A Craig. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

In support of his appeal for exemption on domestic grounds, Joseph Hayes Davenport, brick setter, Brockhurst (45, B2) explained that he was recently ordered to take up work of national importance by the National Service Department and he accordingly obtained work as a labourer at the B.T.H.—Mr Meredith urged that bricklayers were in great need in the army.— Application refused, but given 21 days to settle up his affairs.

Bourton Page (33, Grade 1), butcher, Wolston, applied for a further exemption. Mr C A Kirby represented appellant, and said his client, who was formerly a C2 man. had now been placed in Grade 1.—Mr Meredith, however, said he did not think the question of age or grade entered into this case. It was a fact that between Coventry and Lawford on the one hand, and Brinklow and Wappenbury on the other, there was no other butcher.—The Chairman : There is very little meat to distribute, but what there is the people are entitled to share.—Mr Meredith : It seems that if one butcher is not left the people in this district will starve, or, rather, have to go without meat.—The Chairman agreed, and also reminded the Tribunal that a very satisfactory agreement had been entered into by appellant and another butcher whereby the latter joined up and was guaranteed financial assistance.—Four months conditional exemption, and excused the V.T.C.

Mr H Eaden represented Charles Francis Graham Hancox (36, Grade III, sedentary), accountant, who asked for a further exemption. He explained that his client had fulfilled the condition imposed by the Tribunal—i.e, that he should work thirty hours a week on the land. This work was proving too much, however, and in consequence Hancox was forced to remain in bed half a day each week. Mr Eaden accordingly asked that the hours should be reduced to twenty per week.—The Tribunal agreed to this, and a .National Utility order was granted subject to this condition.

Arthur James Haddon, butcher (B1), 38 Lawford Road, was exempted till January 15th, and excused the V.T.C.

The cases of four bakers—Wm Walter Perkins Cowley (34, Grade 1), Cambridge Street ; Austin William Harris (40), 37 Pennington Street ; Marcus Ophir Russell (36, Grade II) ; and Edgar Matthew Bates (35, general service), 106 Park Road—were down for hearing, but Mr Meredith asked for an adjournment for 14 days. A conference was to be held at Rugby that day with regard to the Food Trade of the town, and he hoped that after this conference they would be entirely agreed as to who was essential and who was not.—The application was granted.

Samuel Dowell, hay, corn, and coal merchant (40), Stretton-under-Fosse, who had lodged an appeal against the decision of the Monks Kirby Tribunal, wrote explaining that he wished to withdraw the appeal because he had a protection certificate.—Mr Meredith said he could never understand what the man had appealed for. The reason why he was refused exemption by the Lower Tribunal was that he already held a conditional protection certificate, and dual protection was not allowed. It was a most extraordinary case.

WAR WORK VOLUNTEER SCHEME.

It has been decided to extend offers of enrolment for the “ Z ” class of work under the above scheme until further notice. instead of until October 1st, 1918, only, as previously announced.

Offers of enrolment from men for the “ Z ” class of work under this scheme will continue to be open under certain conditions to Grade 3 men of any age ; to Grade 2 men of 35 or over on January 1st, 1918 ; and Grade 1 men of 43 or over on January 1st, 1918. Offers of enrolment from men for “ ordinary class ” war work volunteer vacancies are open, under certain conditions, to men of Grade 3 of any age to Grade 2 men of 45 or over on January 1st, 1918.

Men who are enrolled for either class of vacancy under the scheme will, as previously announced, be protected from military service so long as they continue in employment as war work volunteers, provided that they prove to be within the grades and ages named above and satisfy the other necessary conditions.

Opportunities for enrolment under this scheme are available at every Employment Exchange, where full particulars of the scheme can be obtained. There are at present many thousands of vacancies under the scheme.

DEATHS.

LESTER.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. ARTHUR (DICK), dearly beloved husband of Mrs. Lester, 92 South Street, killed in France on August 17, 1918.
“ God takes our loved ones from our home,
But never from our heart.”
— From his sorrowing Wife and little daughter.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. EDWARD, killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 20 years.
“ God knows how much we miss him,
More than loving words can tell ;
Not a day have we forgotten him
Since he bade us his farewell.
Daily in our minds we see him,
As we did in days of yore ;
But some day we hope to meet him
On that bright and golden shore.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Father in France, Brothers and Sisters.

WALTON.—In ever-loving memory of our dear grandson and nephew, Pte. EDWARD, Killed in France on August 8, 1918 ; aged 30 years.
“ We think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall ;
There is nothing left to answer but his photo on the wall.”
—Not forgotten by his loving Grandmothers and Grandfather, aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

HOUGHTON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action on October 4, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Wife and Child.

HOUGHTON.— In loving memory of our dear one, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7 R.W.R., who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on Oct. 4, 1917.
“ We pictured your sale returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LINDLEY.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. J. LINDLEY, who was killed in action on October 5, 1917.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
And heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For those he loved so well.
I think of him in silence.
And make no outward show ;
The heart that mourns most truly
Mourns silently and low.”
—From his loving Wife, Son and Daughter.

LUDFORD.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. C. H. LUDFORD (HARRY), who died of wounds in France on October 6, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love, honour, and remembrance live for ever.”
— Ever in the thoughts of Monica.

Mann, Lander George. Died 19th Sep 1918

Lander George Mann was the 2nd of eight children born to George Mann, a blacksmith, and Elizabeth Ann (nee Raven) who married in 1897, in Southam. He was born in 1899 in Long Itchington, Warwickshire and was baptised at the local church on 10th Sep 1899.  In the 1911 census the Mann family lived in Elm Row, Stockton, Warwickshire.

Lander enlisted at Rugby into the 3rd Royal Warwick Regiment as a private, no: 41717. It is not known when he joined up but according to the Medal Rolls he served abroad with the Royal Warwicks from 4th to 18th August 1918, then the 2/4th London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers, service number 85158 until 11th September, before moving to the 2/2nd battalion.

By early September 1918 the British advance had reached The Hindenburg Line. After the losses of the previous few months, 180,000 in the last six weeks, Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig was reluctant to order any offensives, but allow the men to rest. When he received news of the British Third Army’s success at the Battle of Havrincourt on 12th Sept, he changed his mind and approved the plan to clear German outpost positions on the high ground before the Hindenburg Line.

In order not to give warning of the attack, there was no preliminary bombardment and the guns would fire concentration shots at zero hour and then provide a creeping barrage to support the infantry. The attack started at 5.20 am on 18th September and comprised all three corps of the fourth army, with V Corps of the Third flank and the French First Army on the right.

The promised French assistance did not arrive, resulting in limited success for IX Corps on that flank. On the left flank, III Corps also found difficulty when attacking the fortifications erected at “the Knoll”, Quennemont and Guillemont farms, which were held determinedly by German troops, the village was however captured by the British 12th Eastern Division [7th Norfolk, 9th Essex and 1st Cambridge]. In the centre, General John Monash’s two Australian divisions achieved complete and dramatic success. The 1st Australian Division and the 4th Australian Division, had a strength of some 6,800 men and in the course of the day captured 4,243 prisoners, 76 guns, 300 machine-guns and thirty trench mortars. They took all their objectives and advanced to a distance of about 3 miles (4.8 km) on a 4 mile (6.4 km) front. The Australian casualties were 1,260 officers and men (265 killed, 1,057 wounded, 2 captured.)

The Battle of Epehy closed as an Allied victory, with 11,750 prisoners and 100 guns captured. Although not a total success, it signalled an unmistakable message that the Germans were weakening and it encouraged the Allies to take further action with haste (with the offensive continuing in the Battle of St. Quentin Canal), before the Germans could consolidate their positions.

It is not clear what part the 2nd battalion of the Royal Fusiliers took in the Battle of Epehy, but Lander George Mann died of wounds the following day, the 19th September and was buried in Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery, in plot number 1.G.19 a row away from Harold John Russell at 1.F.17 who had probably enrolled in Rugby on the same day

It was reported in an October 1918 edition of the Rugby Advertiser:
Stockton: Our Men – The sad news has reached the village that Lander Mann, formerly a choir boy in Stockton Church, has made the great sacrifice on the Western Front.  The family, who now live at Rugby, have many friends in the parish, the great sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Mann in their sorrow.  The lad was 19 years old.

Lander was awarded The Victory and British War Medals (ref: T P/104 B34 Page 4162)

The family were living at 22 Rowland Street, Rugby when the following words were engraved on his gravestone:
In the Midst of Life,
We are in Death

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

13th Apr 1918. The New Man Power Proposals

THE NEW MAN POWER PROPOSALS.

By the New Man Power Bill, introduced in the House of Commons on Tuesday by the Prime Minister, it is proposed to raise the age for military service to 50 ; and in certain cases, such as medical men, to 55. Men of 45 to 50 to be taken for home defence, and ministers of religion for non-combatant service.

All exemptions on occupational grounds to be cancelled, and restriction of right of appeal to the medical grounds only.

Substantial combing out from Civil Service, munition works, mines, and a number of occupations. Tribunals to be re-organised.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl T E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks L.I, who has been missing since August 16, 1917, is now reported a having been killed on that date. Prior to joining the Forces he was employed in the B.T.H Controller Factory.

Corpl A Ashmore, youngest son of Mr & Mrs Ashmore, 7 Oliver Street, Rugby, and formerly of Marton, 29th Machine Gun Corps, has been awarded the D.C.M for gallant conduct at Cambrai.

Gunner G H Mann, R.G.A, of 102 Oxford Street, has died in France of gunshot wounds in the right leg. Before he joined up two years ago, he was a painter in the employ of Mr J Young. He was 38 years of age, and leaves a wife and three children.

The news will be received with general regret in this neighbourhood that Capt T A Townsend, M.C, R.A.M.C, is reported as wounded and missing on March 21st. Capt Townsend returned to the Cambrai Sector on March 18th, after a fortnight’s leave. There is, of course, the possibility that he is a prisoner, but no further information is at present obtainable.

HILLMORTON BADLY HIT.

Wednesday was a sad day for Hillmorton, news being received that three soldiers belonging to the village had been killed in action, and another was posted as missing. Those killed are : Lieut Rathbone, Staffordshire Regiment, son of the late Mr W T Rathbone ; Sergt S Chambers and Pte Charles Chambers, sons of Mr W Chambers, farm bailiff. Lieut Rathbone was formerly employed in the London City and Midland Bank, and Sergt S Chambers was in the Rugby Co-operative Society’s Boot Department. Pte J Hart, son of Mr J Hart, Lower Street, is reported missing, and Pte T Griffiths son of Mr T Griffiths, Upper Street, has been gassed.

A SOUTH AFRICAN VETERAN KILLED.

Mrs Chant, 43 Union Street, Rugby, has received news that her husband, Driver George Chant, R.F.A, has been killed by a shell which fell among a group of officers, men, and horses standing near the Brigade Headquarters. In a kind letter conveying information, the Brigadier-General writes :—“ I feel deeply for you and your young family in your great loss. It is a great loss to me also, Chant had been with me since the early days of the War, and I had the greatest confidence in him. He looked after the horses splendidly, and when I was busy with other things I felt I never need worry about them, and that Chant would do everything that was required.” Driver Chant, who was 38 years of age, was employed at the B.T.H when the war broke out. He was the first to volunteer from those Works, and went out at once on August 15, 1914, so that he had been all through the fighting. He previously served in the South African War, and gained two medals.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.

WOUNDED.—On Wednesday morning a letter was received from France, stating that Sergt W Cleaver, of the Hussars, was wounded in both arms during the recent fighting. Sergt Cleaver has seen eight years’ service, and this is the second time he had been wounded.

WOLSTON.

THE LATE LIEUT O W W H MEREDITH, R.F.A.—When the news reached Wolston that this young officer had lost his life, very sincere regret was expressed on all sides. During the seven years that his father, the Venerable Archdeacon T Meredith, was Vicar of Wolston, Lieut Meredith made scores of friends. His bright and cheerful disposition was shown alike, not only to those in his own social position, but also to the poorest of the inhabitants, and none more than these regret that so fine a young life should have been cut short. The sympathy of the inhabitants is freely expressed for his poor widowed mother, especially as it follows closely upon the death of her husband. Lieut Meredith was educated at Harrow School and Cambridge University. He distinguished himself in all Mechanical Examinations in London and at the Aerodromes of Castle Bromwich and Dartford. He received his wings July, 1917, and went to France in October last. On November 20 he was taking part in the attack on Cambrai. He left the ground at 7 a.m. with others of his Flight to support the advance of the Infantry and Tanks. The work they were engaged on was of the utmost importance, and they succeeded in doing it. Lieut Meredith was last seen shooting at German infantry from low down some five miles the other side of the lines. Owing to the fog and low cloud, nearly all the machines—there were 15 others from the same Squadron alone—got separated. The Commanding Officer of the R.F.C writes : “ It was to a great extent owing to the co-operation of our low-flying aeroplanes that we scored a marked success on the initial day. Lieut Meredith, fully realising the risk, gave his life in helping what was very nearly the biggest victory of the war. He was a gallant officer, an excellent and fearless pilot, very popular, and died a death which cannot but be a source of pride to all who were connected with him.”

RUGBY AND DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE

SUGAR FOR DOMESTIC FRUIT PRESERVING.

OWING to delays in printing of forms application for sugar for home-made jam preserving, the last day for receiving these forms from the public has been extended to Saturday, April 13th. No forms of application can be accepted after that date.

MEAT RATIONING ORDER.

No person may keep any food or meat card which does not belong to him or to some other person for whom he is authorised to buy food. For instance, he must not keep a card belonging to a person who has left the country, or joined H.M. Forces, or died, or gone into hospital or other institution. Anyone who has in his possession a card belonging to person who is no longer entitled to use it as a member of the same household, must return it to the Local Food Office at once, or if the holder of the card is in any institution, must send it to the head of the institution. It is an offence to keep such a card ; it is obviously an offence to try to use it to get an extra ration.

A person may not lend his card to anyone else or sell or give the ration he has bought on it to anyone else. This does not affect the sharing of food by members of the same household or guests or by persons taking common meals.

Rationing covers every kind of meat, including bacon and ham, poultry, game, venison, edible offal, sausages, bones, and all cooked, canned, and preserved meat, etc.

It is an offence to break any of these rules. The buyer as well as the seller is liable to prosecution.

Coupons for the purchase of meat rations must in all cases only be detached by the seller. Coupons detached by the holder of the card are worthless. Butcher’s meat can only be bought from the butcher with whom you are registered.

SUPPLEMENTARY RATIONS for HEAVY WORKERS.

The work of classifying and grading is now proceeding, and due notice will be given of time and place where applicants may receive their cards.

SUPPLEMENTARY RATIONS for ADOLESCENT BOYS.

As from May 5th a supplementary meat ration will be allowed to boys who on March 1st, 1918, were not less than 13 nor more than 18 years of age—i.e., to boys born after February 28th, 1900, but before, March 1st, 1905—except they are already receiving supplementary meat rations as heavy workers. Forms of application may be obtained at the Local Food Office after April 14th.

LICENSING OF DEALERS IN FISH.

A person shall not deal in fish by wholesale either on his own account or on the account of any other person after the 10th of April, 1918, unless he has applied for a license as a wholesale dealer in fish ; or after the 1st of May, 1918, unless he is the holder of a license for the time being in force, granted by the Food Controller authorising him to deal in fish by wholesale. Every application for a license shall be made to the Secretary (Fish Supplies Branch) Ministry of Food, 14, Upper Grosvenor Street, W,1.

A person shall not after the 1st May, 1918, deal in fish by retail except in, about, or in connection with premises in respect of which he is the holder of a certificate of registration as a retail dealer in fish for the time being in force, granted by the Food Committee for the area in which the premises are situate, but this shall not prevent a dealer duly registered from selling from his cart in the ordinary course of business in the area in which such premises are situate.

Forms of application for registration may be obtained from the Local Food Office.

ENQUIRIES may be made at the Local Food Office between the hours of 9.30—12.30 p.m. and 2.15—4.30 p.m. Saturdays—9.30 to 12.30.p.m. Only.
F. M. BURTON, Executive Officer.

GENERAL RATIONING.

From the commencement of this week the country generally has been rationed, and no one will be able to buy meat or a meat meal without producing a card and depositing a coupon. It is desired by the Ministry of Food that people should be reminded that after May 5 bacon may only be bought at a shop where the buyer has previously registered his or her name, and that holders of meat cards who wish to use any coupon for the purpose of buying bacon after that date should immediately register their names at the shop of the retailer with whom they propose to deal. To-day (Sat.) is the last day for such action.

After May 5 only two coupons each person, instead of three per week, will be available for the purchase of butcher’s meat.

Any or all of the coupons will be available for the purchase of bacon or other meats. Increased supplies of bacon will be provided to meet the third coupon, which will no longer be available for butcher’s meat.

This arrangement is being made in order to utilise the additional supplies of bacon now being received from America, and at the same time diminish the call upon home-grown cattle during the months when their weight can be materially increased by fattening on grass.

Although it is too early yet to express an opinion as to the measure of success attending the Rationing Scheme which came into effect this week, the indications are that it is working smoothly. The butchers’ shops have presented almost a normal appearance, the blinds being raised so that the supplies of meat could be seen, and many householders are reaping the benefits of a more equitable distribution.

THE QUANTITY OF TEA ALLOWED PER COUPON.

In the summary of regulations under the new Rationing Scheme published in our last issue the weight of tea allowed for each person weekly was by a typographical error put at 1¼oz. It should have been 1½oz.

THE POTATO PUSH.
URGENT NEED FOR GREATER ACTIVITY.

British farmers as a body have responded admirably to the call of the Government for increased production, and the outlook for our corn crop is extremely encouraging. Unfortunately, the potato prospect is by no means so satisfactory. Up to the present it is doubtful whether as much land has been prepared for potatoes this season as last ; and it is hardly to be expected that the 1918 yield will be as large as that of the 1917 crop, which was well above the average.

The Prime Minister a few weeks ago appealed to farmers to grow more potatoes this year than last year, when, in response to his earlier appeal, the farmer beat all records of potato planting England and Wales. A certain number of large growers have been moved by the Premier’s recent message to arrange for the growing of more potatoes ; but this movement does not seem to be general.

As the Food Production Department points out, the situation is most serious. We need a million acres of potatoes in Great Britain this year to make the food situation safe, and only the farmers can give us this million acres. We want another million and a half tons of potatoes grown this year, apart from the allotment holder and gardeners’ crops and only the farmers can grow them. As things now look, there is reason to fear that we may be as much as 400,000 acres short of our probable requirements in potatoes during 1918. This must be prevented at any cost.

Many farmers have protested against the proposal that they should increase their 1918 acreage under potatoes because they have been unable to sell satisfactorily a large part their 1917 crop. The Ministry of Food has met them in this difficulty. On May 18, 1918, the Food Controller will purchase all sound ware potatoes in the United Kingdom for which the grower cannot otherwise find a market. The Food Controller will pay not less than £7 per ton for 4-ton lots free on rail.

These concessions in relation to the remainder of the 1917 crop should induce many hesitating farmers to increase their 1918 acreage of potatoes. The Ministry of Food has always guaranteed to buy at minimum prices of from £6 to £7 per ton all the crop grown on new land this year, and to pay a generous price for the remainder of the 1918 potato crop—prices for the latter being fixed by a Joint Commission of the Board of Agriculture and the Ministry of Food after visiting each area and taking evidence from the growers as to yields, cost of production, etc.

PERMITS TO PRESERVE EGGS.

In view of the possibility that the preserving of eggs not produced by householders’ own birds might be considered an offence under the Hoarding Order, the Food Controller has issued a general license authorising any person to acquire eggs for the purpose of preserving them for use in his own household, provided that notice of the number eggs to be acquired and preserved is sent to the Food Control Committee for the district in which the person usually resides, and that the number of eggs so acquired does not exceed the number of eggs stated in such notice, or, if objection is taken by the committee to the number stated, the number permitted by the committee. A Food Control Committee has power to reduce the number proposed if they think it necessary, after taking into consideration the size of the household and the quantity of supplies available in their district. Subject this reasonable limitation. Lord Rhondda wishes to encourage the preserving of eggs for use in the household during the winter months.

RESCUED FROM DROWNING.—On Wednesday in last week two Rugby boys—John Bull, son of John Overton, 7 New Street, and Alfred Pickering, of the same address—were playing near the river at Newton, when Bull fell into the water. A soldier belonging to the R.F.C was attracted to the spot by the shouts of Pickering, and he at once jumped into the river and brought Bull to the bank in an unconscious condition. Artificial respiration was successfully applied, and the boy was conveyed to his home in a float lent by Mr S Nicholas, of St Thomas’ Cross.

DEATHS.

BICKNELL.—LANCE-CORPL. A. BICKNELL, killed in action about April 2nd, son of Mr and Mrs Arthur Bicknell, of 123 Oxford, Rugby, aged 30 years.

CLEAVER.—April 9, 1918, CHARLES RICHARD CLEAVER, the beloved husband of Bertha Amy Cleave, of 27 Victoria Street, Bilton, Rugby.

ELSON.—Pte. ALFRED WILLIAM ELSON, 1st Hants. Regiment, died of wounds on April 6th in France, son of Mrs. Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, Bilton.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath a foreign sky,
Far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.
Some day we hope to meet him ;
We know not when.
We shall clasp his hands in the Better Land,
Never to part again.” R.I.P.
—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Wife, Brothers and Sisters.

HAY.—PRIVATE DOUGLAS HAY, of the 1/4th Yorks & Lancs. Regt. son of Mrs Hay, of Murray Rd., Rugby. Killed in action March 18th, 1918.

LINNELL.—On April 8th, 1918, at No. 9 General Hospital, Rouen, of tetanus from wounds received in action, WILLIAM HENRY LINNELL.

IN MEMORIAM.

BURTON.—In loving memory of MONTAGUE (MONT) BURTON, who killed in action on April 10, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Mother and Sister.

In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of Lance- Corpl G. B. COLEMAN, the dearly-beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Coles, Old Lodge Farm, Binley, who was shot by a sniper at France on April 11th, 1917, aged 23 years.
A loving son and faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother,
He bravely answered duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.
Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile,
But they little know the sorrow
Which is hid behind that smile.
He is gone, but not forgotten,
Oh, dear no, not one so dear ;
He is gone safe home to heaven,
And we hope to meet him there.
—From his ever-loving Mother and Father, Brothers and Sisters.

DALE.—In memory of Pte. HARLEY DALE, of the 11th Royal Warwickshire Regt., who was killed in action somewhere in France, April 11th, 1917.
God knows how we all miss him,
And He counts the tears we shed,
And whispers, “ Hush, he only sleeps.
Thy brother is not dead.”
—From his loving Mother and Sister and Brothers at Long Lawford.

HINCKS.—In proud and loving memory of Lance-Corpl. EDWARD WARNER HINKS, Middlesex Regiment, younger son of Mr. & Mrs. Marlow Hincks, The Holts, Southam, killed in action near Arras on April 12, 1917 ; aged 20.—From Father, Mother, Brother & Sisters.

MANSFIELD.—In memory of Lieut. H. Mansfield, 1st Cheshires, who died in France on April 12, 1916.—Not forgotten, “ M. W.”

PRESTIDGE.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOSEPH PRESTIDGE, Barby, aged 21 years ; killed in action in France, April 11, 1915.

PYWELL.—In loving memory of Sergt. F. W. PYWELL, who was killed in action on April 9, 1917.
“ He sleeps, not his native land,
But under foreign skies,
Far from his friends who loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father, Brother and Sisters.

Mann, George Henry. Died 3rd Apr 1918

George Henry MANN was born in about 1879 in Rugby. He was the son of Edward Thomas Mann, born in about 1852 in Boston, Lincolnshire, and Emma, née Hitchcox, Mann who was from Milverton, Warwickshire. It seems that Emma’s family had moved to Rugby in the later 1850s, and that Edward – who is missing from the 1871 census – was also in Rugby before 1875, when their marriage was registered in Rugby in Q4 1875. Their second son, George Henry, was baptised on 23 February 1879 at St Matthew’s church, Rugby.

In 1881 the family, including two year old George, his elder brother William Edward and the baby, Albert John, were all living at 11 Oxford Street, Rugby. Edward Thomas Mann was a 27 year old Engine Driver with the L&NW railway.

By 1891 there were three more young daughters in the family, and the family had moved to 120 Oxford Street. By 1901 they were living at 98 Oxford Street [possibly a post office renumbering], and there was another baby boy in the family. George was still living at home and working as a ‘painter and decorator’. By 1911 the rest of the family, including one of the sons who was now married and his wife, had moved to 142 Bath Street, Rugby. Most of the now adult ‘children’ were working at BTH or at the ‘Lamp Factory’.

George married Ellen Rainbow, née Hammond, Mann [1879-1957] at Ryton on Dunsmore, on 21 December 1903, after banns had been called for the third time on 29 November 1903. Their daughter Ivy Annie Mann, was born in Rugby on 21 December 1904.

By 1911, George with his wife and daughter had moved to 102 Oxford Street, Rugby. George and Ellen had now been married eight years, and at this date still had just the one child. Frank was aged 32 and a ‘House Painter & Journeyman’. He later described himself as a ‘Decorator & Paper Hanger’.

However, after a ten year gap, they were to have two more children, Jack Thomas Mann, born on 23 September 1913 and Gladys Florence Mann, born on 20 December 1915.   All three children are recorded on his later Pension/Service Record which has survived.

Thomas was attested at Rugby on 10 December 1915, aged 37, – although the paperwork was not ‘approved’ until the 7 July 1916 the document being signed at the Citadel, Plymouth. He joined up as a Gunner, No.98658, in the 262nd Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery.   His height was 5 foot 6¾ inches.   He remained on an ‘At home’ posting until 4 September 1916.

On 6 July 1916 he was revaccinated, at Plymouth where he was stationed from 6 July until 5 September 1916. Then on 5 September 1916, he was posted to Malta until 5 July 1917.

He was then posted back ‘Home British’ from 6 September 1917 until 8 January 1918, with a period at ?‘2 Dep’ from 14 July 1917 and ?’1 rev Sge’ from 24 July 1917. During this period he also spent time at the Instructional Battery at the Chapperton Down Artillery School at West Lavington. On 26 September 1917 he ‘overstayed his leave’ [probably after his Malta posting] from noon on 26 September until 7.45pm on 27 September. He was admonished and forfeited one day’s pay.

On 9 January 1918 he was posted to BEF France and then to the base depot, in the field, of the 262nd siege battery on 13 January 1918.

Whilst the front had been comparatively quiet, an attack was anticipated and on 21 March 1918, the Germans launched a major offensive, Operation Michael, against the British Fifth Army and the right wing of the British Third Army. The German artillery targeted command and communications; then, the destruction of artillery; and then the front-line infantry. The artillery bombardment began at 4.40am on 21 March 1918, and hit targets over an area of 150 square miles, the biggest barrage of the entire war. Over 1,100,000 shells were fired in five hours.

It was thought that it would have been during this preliminary shelling of the British artillery positions early on 21 March 1918 – and thereafter – that George was wounded. However, it seems that George may have received the ‘gunshot wound to the right leg’, sufficiently before this date, so that on 20 March 1918 he had already been evacuated to the 4th General Hospital, at ‘Dannes-Camiers’, just north of Etaples.[1] He was listed as ‘serious’ and his leg was amputated. Unfortunately this did not save his life and he ‘died of wounds’ at the hospital on 3 April 1918.

He was buried in the nearby Etaples Military Cemetery which was used by the hospitals in the area. His body was buried in grave ref: XXXIII, D, 31A. Later, when a permanent gravestone replaced the temporary cross, his family’s message, ‘Deeply Mourned by Sorrowing Wife & Children – Peace Perfect Peace’ would be engraved upon it.

The Etaples Military Cemetery is located on the former site of a large military hospital complex at Etaples, a town about 27 kilometres south of Boulogne.   The Military Cemetery is to the north of the town. The nearby hospitals, which included eleven general, one stationary, four Red Cross hospitals and a convalescent depot, could deal with 22,000 wounded or sick.

On about the day that he died, his wife received a telegram from the army stating that,
‘Regret to inform you Officer Commanding 4 General Hospital Camiers telegraphs 2 April your husband 98658 Gnr G H Mann 262 Siege Bty RGA dangerously ill. Regret permission to visit him cannot be given.’

George Henry MANN is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates. His Medal Card showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. His wife applied for these in about August 1921, ‘… as my little son, as I think he is entitled to them.’ They were received on 15 September 1921.

George’s widow was awarded a pension for herself and their three children.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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This article on George Henry MANN was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, January 2018.

[1]       No.4 General Hospital was at St. Nazaire in September 1914; Versailles, from September 1914 to January 1916; then at Camiers, just north of Etaples, from January 1916 to April 1919; and after the war at Dunkerque, from April to November 1919.