Patchett, William Ivens. Died 14th Nov 1917

William Ivens Patchett was born on 4th July 1880 at Clifton on Dunsmore, second son of Bethuel Patchett and his wife Sarah nee Ingram who were married in the June quarter 1877 in Rugby district. He was baptised on the 29th August 1880 at Mary’s Clifton and in the register it states his father as a farmer. In the 1881 census they lived on the Rugby Road in Clifton along with his older brother, his father’s occupation was a milk dealer. By 1891 they were living in Sharps Villa Clifton. He had five brothers and his Father was the assistant overseer of taxes. By 1901 they were still at Sharps Villa, William was a printer by this point still living with his family, his father was the collector of local taxes and he resided with seven siblings four brothers and three sisters.

William married Ellen Colton on June 13th 1904 at St Mary’s parish church Clifton, and in the 1911 census he is living at 7 Manor Rd, Rugby. It states they have been married for seven years and have two children, Nellie 6 and William C.H. 5 month

From the Rugby Advertiser dated November 24th 1917 it stated:
Mrs Patchett of 7 Manor Road has received official information that her husband, trooper W.I.Patchett of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, died of wounds received in the recent fighting on November 14th. He was the eldest son of Mr Bethuel Patchett, and was 38 years of age. A compositor by trade, he was apprenticed at the “Midland Times” office. For a time subsequently he was employed at the Rugby Advertiser Works; and when he enlisted in August 1915 he was employed by Messrs Frost & Sons. He is the tenth employee of this firm to be killed. He was a keen sportsman and played for the Rugby Onward Cricket Club and Clifton Cricket Club, of which he was captain for a time; and also for Rugby Football Club .He leaves a widow and two children.

There was also a notice in De-Ruvigny’s roll of Honour as follows:
Patchett William Ivens Trooper, No 3100976, 1st Warwickshire Yeomanry (T.F.) s. of Bethuel Patchett, of 36, Kimberley Road, Rugby, by his wife, Sarah, dau.of Charles Ingram; b Clifton, co.Warwick, 4th July, 1880; educ.St Matthew’s School, Rugby; was a Compositor by trade, and for a time captain of the Clifton Cricket Club; joined the Warwickshire Yeomanry 1st August 1915; served with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force in Palestine from 13 Feb. 1916, and died at Beersheba 14 Nov.1917 of wounds received in action there. Buried at Beersheba. He m. at Clifton, 13 June, 1904 Ellen (7, Manor Road, Rugby) dau.of Edwin Colton, and two children: William Charles Herbert, b, 26th Oct.1910, Nellie, b 8th Sept.1905.

His medal card form the National Archive has him receiving the Victory and the British medals, but has two regimental numbers one for the Warwick. Yeo as 3061, the second for C of Hrs. as 310976.

He is buried at Beersheba War Cemetery in Plot C29 and on his headstone is the following:
Patchett Pte. William Ivens   1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry 14th November   1917, Aged 38. Husband of Ellen Patchett 6, Rowland St, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

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Perry, Victor Charles. Died 31st Oct 1917

Victor Charles Perry was the sixth of the ten children of George and Sarah Perry, born in Aston, Birmingham in Sep Quarter 1897. His father was born in Dublin, his parents according to the 1911 census had been married for 27 years, probably in Ireland as their five eldest children were born in Co Waterford. The couple moved to Birmingham around 1893, between the births of their fifth and sixth children.

George seems to have been prosperous. In 1901 he was aged 41, living with his wife, nine children aged 9 months to 15 years, and three servants at Oakfield House, Yardley Road, Aston.   His occupation is given as the “director of a gin distillery and rectifier of British wines”.

In 1911 they are in Stechley, at “Home Lea”, Richmond, a very large house with 14 rooms. George was a self-employed wine merchant, assisted by his sons William and George. Victor was 14, but no occupation is given.

Victor’s connection with Rugby has not as yet been uncovered, but as he is remembered on the Old Laurentians Roll of Honour it seems he attended or had connections with the school after 1911. He did enlist at Warwick according to Soldiers Died in the Great War, and must have done so before September 1915 when his medal card records that he was sent to Egypt. He joined the 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry as Private 2530, but later became Trooper 310565 in the Corps of Hussars.

The Yeomanry fought at Gallipoli as unmounted troops in August 1915, and suffered heavy losses.   Victor maybe joined these forces after this as he arrived in Egypt in September, and the regiment was withdrawn in October. Perhaps he never reached Gallipoli but remained in Egypt.   The Warwickshire Yeomanry was assigned to the Australian Mounted Division in February 1917 where it served as cavalry in Palestine. It was part of the XXI Division, 5th Mounted Brigade of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force (EEF) led by General Allenby, to regain territory in Egypt (then a British Protectorate) and Palestine and drive back the Ottoman forces with the aim of capturing Jerusalem from the Turks. It saw action in the First and Second Battles of Gaza in the spring of 1917.

The EEF had already decided to invade Ottoman territory before the first battle of Gaza, on the basis of Britain’s three major war objectives: to maintain maritime supremacy in the Mediterranean, preserve the balance of power in Europe, and protect Egypt, India and the Persian Gulf. Despite the EEF’s defeats during the first two battles of Gaza (with about 10,000 casualties), Allenby planned an advance into Palestine and the capture of Jerusalem to secure the region and cut off the Ottoman forces in Mesopotamia from those in the Eastern Mediterranean and on the Arabian Peninsula. The capture of Gaza, which dominated the coastal route from Egypt to Jaffa, was a first step towards these aims.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Beersheba_(1917) – cite_note-27

The Battle of Beersheba, on the edge of the Negev Desert and some 75km from Jerusalem, took place on 31 October 1917, and it was here that Victor lost his life. It was a very intense attack, with much shelling and mortar fire, and close fighting to take the enemy trenches. The mounted divisions which included the Warwickshire Yeomanry suffered artillery and aeroplane attacks, causing a great deal of confusion among the men and horses.

The town was eventually taken by the Desert Mounted Corps.   There is a good account of the battle on wikipaedia.

Victor was buried in the Beersheba War Cemetery, established after the battle. His back pay of £8.10.5d and a War Gratuity of £13.10s were forwarded to his father George.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Cox, Frederick William. Died 20th Apr 1917

Frederick William COX, was born in late 1893 in Long Lawford, his birth being registered in Rugby.   He was the son of Joseph Edgar Cox J.P., C.C., a farmer, of Long Lawford, who was born in Newbold in about 1864, and his wife, Mary Elizabeth née Parriss Cox, who was born in Lamington, Warwickshire, also in about 1864. Joseph and Elizabeth’s marriage was registered in Rugby in mid-1891.

In 1901, the family were living in the ‘Farm House’ in Long Lawford – this was presumably Lodge Farm, where his father, Joseph, had lived with his family in 1891 and where Joseph Edgar Cox and his family would continue to live in 1911, when his own children included Joseph Parris Cox, 19; Frederick William Cox, 17 died; George Herbert Cox, 16; Ernest Edgar Cox, 14; Alfred Leslie Cox, 12; and Roland Lee Cox, 7.

Frederick William Cox attended Lawrence Sherriff School and joined up at the beginning of the war, as did his brother, George; they were both in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

Frederick was No: 2280 in the 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, and was later in the Corps of Hussars, as No: 310088. His Medal Card shows that he went to No.3 Theatre of War, Egypt on 20 April 1915. A report in the Rugby Advertiser[1] in December 1915 noted that Frederick and George ‘… have been at the Dardenelles for some time’.   ‘Trooper F W Cox has been suffering from dysentery, but is now better, and is at Cyprus, …’ at that same date it recounted that ‘… his brother, Trooper G H Cox, is ill with jaundice, at Lemnos.’

George Herbert Cox was No. 2281 in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, thus joining up his brother, and he also went into the Egypt theatre of war on 20 April 1915, presumably having been with his brother since enlisting with him. He later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps as No. 164511.

The eldest son, Joseph Parris Cox, and his younger brother, Ernest Edgar Cox,[2] both joined up in December 1915, under Lord Derby’s scheme.[3] Together with George Herbert Cox, these three of Frederick’s brothers would survive the war.[4]

To return to Frederick Cox’s service in the 1/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, they …

… mobilised in August 1914, and moved to Bury St Edmunds and then on 31 August 1914, moved to Newbury and in November 1914 to Sheringham in Norfolk, and on 17 December to Norwich.

On 11 April 1915 they sailed from Avonmouth for Egypt on ‘Wayfarer’, but were torpedoed when 60 miles NW of Scilly Isles. Although the ship did not sink, the horses had to be rescued and volunteers of the regiment saved 763 horses, receiving a Military Cross and twelve Meritorious Service Medals. They were towed to Queenstown (Ireland) and finally sailed for Egypt and arrived at Alexandria on 24 April.

They were moved to Gallipoli for service as dismounted infantry and on 18 August 1915, landed at Suvla Bay, Gallipoli. They took part in the attack on Chocolate Hill and Hill 112 [the Battle of Scimitar Hill] on 21 August. By early September 1915, severe sickness together with battle casualties resulted in temporary reorganisation, merging with 1/1st Gloucestershire and 1/1st Worcestershire Yeomanry to form 1st South Midland Regiment, 1st Composite Mounted Brigade. However, they continued in trench warfare activities in the line in the Green Hill and Chocolate Hill sectors until evacuated to Mudros on 31 October 1915.

By December 1915 they had withdrawn from Gallipoli and returned to Egypt, where in January 1916, the brigade became an independent command and was renamed as the 5th Mounted Brigade, and in February 1917, was assigned to the Imperial/Australian Mounted Division, and saw action at the First and Second Battles of Gaza, the Charge at Huj as well as the Battle of Mughar Ridge and the Battle of Jerusalem.[5]

At some date, Frederick was promoted to Lance Corporal in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

On 28 February 1917, the cavalry of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force [EEF] – including the 1/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry entered Khan Yunus, which was between the Egyptian border and Deir el Belah, causing the Turks to withdraw to Gaza and Beersheba. The railway was pushed forward to Deir el Belah, which became the railhead on 4 April 1917, and an aerodrome and camps were established there.

In April, the 5th Mounted Brigade (under Brigadier General E. A. Wiggin) comprising the Warwickshire Yeomanry together with the Royal Gloucestershire Hussars and the Worcestershire Yeomanry, were part of the Australian and New Zealand Mounted Division (under Major General Sir H.G. Chauvel).

The First Battle of Gaza had been fought by the mounted divisions during an ‘encounter battle’ when speed and surprise were emphasised. Then Gaza had been an outpost garrisoned by a strong detachment on the flank of a line stretching eastwards from the Mediterranean Sea.

During the three weeks between the First and Second Battles of Gaza, the town was quickly developed into the strongest point in a series of strongly entrenched positions … The Ottoman defenders not only increased the width and depth of their front lines, they developed mutually supporting strong redoubts on ideal defensive ground.

The construction of these defences changed the nature of the Second Battle of Gaza, fought from 17 to 19 April 1917, to an infantry frontal attack across open ground against well prepared entrenchments, with mounted troops in a supporting role. …

The strength of the Ottoman fortifications and the determination of their soldiers defeated the EEF. The EEF’s strength, which before the two battles for Gaza could have supported an advance into Palestine, was now decimated. Murray commanding the EEF and Dobell commanding Eastern Force were relieved of their commands and sent back to England.[6]

It was probably during the Second Battle of Gaza that Frederick William Cox sustained the wounds from which he died, aged 23, on 20 April 1917. He was buried at Deir el Belah Cemetery, Palestine in grave ref: A.128.

Deir El Belah is in Palestine about 16 kilometres east of the Egyptian border, and 20 kilometres south-west of Gaza. The cemetery was begun towards the end of March 1917 and remained in use until March 1919. Most of the burials were made either from field ambulances from March to June 1917, or from April 1917 from Casualty Clearing Stations, and the 69th General Hospital.

Frederick’s death was reported in the Rugby Advertiser, where a memorial notice was also later posted.[7] He was awarded the Victory and British medals and the 1915 Star. He is remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gate, and also on the Old Laurentians Memorial and the Newbold Memorial.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Frederick William COX was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, April 2017.

[1]       Rugby Advertiser, 11 December 1915.

[2]       Ernest Edgar Cox initially joined up in Rugby on 8 December 1915, and one record suggests a short time in the 3rd Bn., Gloucestershire Regiment on 16 January 1917, and soon after, on 5 April 1917, transferred to the 3rd Bn., Machine Gun Corps, No:97564 [?also No.32817]; he survived the war and his Service Records exist.   He went to France, Basrah, Suez and Port Said during his war service.

[3]       Rugby Advertiser, 11 December 1915.

[4]       Joseph Parris Cox and Ernest Edgar Cox were Executors of their father, Joseph’s Will in 1932.

[5]       Edited from http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-british-yeomanry-regiments-of-1914-1918/warwickshire-yeomanry/ and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warwickshire_Yeomanry.

[6]         https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinai_and_Palestine_Campaign#First_Battle_of_Gaza.2C_26_March

[7]       Rugby Advertiser, 28 April 1917 and 5 May 1917 respectively.

12th Aug 1916. Down With Diphtheria But Not Depressed

DOWN WITH DIPHTHERIA BUT NOT DEPRESSED.

A Rugbeian has this week received a letter from his brother, who is now in a hospital in France suffering from diphtheria :—

“. . . Many thanks for sending on the dictionary. I lost mine, and as my spelling deteriorated 50 per cent without a dictionary, a dictionary becomes a very important part of my equipment. I wanted a dictionary to find the meaning of the word ‘ scabies.’ It was not in the aforesaid—that’s the right word, isn’t it ?—book. I don’t think I need refer to the dictionary for that. Sit on a box of itch-he-coo powder, it will soon explain itself . . . As you remark, diphtheria is not to be treated lightly, but it’s not thought so serious as it used to be, thanks to the injection of an anti-toxin which consists of 4,000 germs which they inject in your chest. This little army proceeds in marching order and makes a rear attack on the enemy’s trenches. After repulsing a severe counter-attack, they succeeded in opening the lines of communication again, thus enabling me to talk to Nurse and also to partake in the jellies and custards, etc. A nice soft bed to lie on—the first bed for 15 months. I made a fuss of it, too, for eight or nine days. Sister daily takes your temperature, and feels your pulse, makes the bed, and tucks you up. Dear, dear. . . . who wouldn’t have diphtheria ? Now I am stage number two, making myself generally useful washing up pots and pans, laying tables, cutting bread-and-butter, etc. I have had one swab taken since being in hospital. They take a swab every week. If you get three negatives, you are free of the germ ; but if you have positive, you are a germ-carrier, and they keep you a bit longer. My first swab was a negative.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR A RUGBY HOWITZER MAN.

Battery Sergt-Major George Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, writing to Mr A Adnitt, as hon secretary of the Rugby Territorials Comforts Association to thank him for parcels of comforts received, adds :—

“ You will be pleased to know that one of our boys, Gunner Bosworth, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field on July 21st, going out under heavy fire several times to repair the telephone wire in order to keep up communication with the battery. He was also mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch for distinguished conduct in the field.

“ We have been in the thick of the fighting since July 1st, but have been very fortunate as regards casualties, as we have had only five wounded—Corpl Hipwell, Bombardiers Smith and Rixom, and Gunners Seaton and Packwood.

“ I dare say you read in the papers about our Division, together with the Anzacs, taking one of the most important points along the front on July 23rd. They were congratulated by the Commander-in-Chief and the Corps Commander on their performance.”

Gunner Bosworth is the son of Mr G Bosworth, who formerly worked as a painter for Messrs Linnell & Son, but has now removed to Essex. His grandfather resides at Lutterworth.

In a letter to his old schoolmaster, Gunner Bosworth, an Old Murrayian, says :- “ On the morning of the ‘ big push ‘ I was on duty at our observation station, and had occasion to go out on the line and repair breakages caused by the shelling. The O.C. was good enough to bring the incident to the notice of the General, and I have since heard the good news of being granted the above medal.”

HIGH PRAISE FOR THE HOWITZER BRIGADE.

The following letter from the Brigadier Commanding the Artillery Division to the O.C’s of the Batteries and Ammunition Columns, will be of much local interest :—

“ Will you please convey to all ranks my appreciation of the excellent work performed by the batteries and D.A.C during the last five weeks. The preparation of gun positions for the July offensive entailed continuous and very hard work on the batteries, but this labour was well repaid in the fewness of the casualties suffered at the guns. The Division subsequently taking over reported that they were the best positions they had yet seen.

“ The continual night firing has been particularly trying, but the shooting was consistently good, which reflects great credit on all ranks, and the successes gained by the Infantry were, in the words of the Divisional Commander, largely due to the effective support rendered by the Artillery. I hope during this week all ranks will be able to get the rest which they all deserve.

DEFEAT OF THE TURKS.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY DO WELL.

The Turks on Friday last week made another and disastrous attempt to reach the Suez Canal. The point chosen for the attack, which was made by 14,000 troops, was Romani, 18 miles east of Port Said. While holding the frontal attack the British, on the southern flank, retired until the enemy had become involved in the sand dunes. A counter attack was then made with all arms, which was completely successful, and at dawn on Saturday the enemy was in retreat, with our troops in vigorous pursuit. The Turks suffered heavily, and so far the British captures comprise 45 officers and 3,100 men, including some Germans, four mountain guns, and a number of machine guns. The British Commander-in-Chief pays warm tributes to the Anzac troops, the Territorials, the Royal Flying Corps, and the monitors, which, firing from the Bay of Tina, gave valuable assistance. During the day the temperature was 100 degrees in the shade.

“ The Times ” correspondent says :— “ The brunt of the fighting was borne by Anzac mounted troops. Of the British troops, the Scottish and Lancashire Territorials and the Warwickshire and Gloucester Yeomanry fought splendidly, and amply avenged the previous loss of comrades by taking over 300 prisoners and two camel guns, and inflicting very heavy casualties. From Territorials of average quality in peace times they have improved into a brigade of veterans. They left the railway at a place within sound of heavy rifle fire, and light-heartedly marched away to attack through ankle-deep sand, and thoroughly proud that their time had come. A little later, from a different spot, I saw Warwickshire and Gloucestershire Yeomanry marching over flatter country, with flankers advanced and rear guards and squadrons as well alined as on parade.”

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Sergt H Lee, R.W.R, until the War employed in the gardens of Dunsmore, and Pte H T Gardner, of the same regiment, whose home is at Clifton, have been reported wounded.

Mr W W College, 9 Church Street, Rugby, has received official intimation that his youngest son, Pte W F College, Royal Warwicks, was reported missing on July 19th. He only joined up in November last year, and had been out in France about three months.

LIEUT E A R SMITH, of CLIFTON.

News has been received that Lieut Eric Arthur Ray Smith, R.W.R, son of Mr A E Smith, of Enfield, was killed in action on July 22nd. Lieut Smith, who was 27 years of age, and was married, occupied the Manor Farm, Clifton, until he was given a commission in the R.W.R last year, and was well known locally.

PTE ARTHUR REYNOLDS MISSING.

Mr W A Reynolds, of 26 West Leyes, Rugby, has received news that his son Arthur, a private in one of the Territorial Battalions of the R.W.R, has been posted missing since July 19th. Pte Reynolds was 20 years of age, and joined the army 12 months ago. He has been in France about two months. Before joining the army he was employed in the tailoring department of the Co-operative Society.

LANCE-CORPL EDWARD HARVEY.

Information has been received by Mrs R Harvey, Windsor Street, Rugby, that her son, Lance-Corpl Edward Harvey, of the Hampshire Regiment, was killed in action on July 1st. Lance-Corpl Harvey enlisted at the beginning of the War, prior to which he worked at Newbold Cement Works. He had been in France 15 months. He was 35 years of age and a native of Rugby. Before the War he lived in Bridget Street, Rugby. He leaves a widow and four children. Mrs R Harvey has two other sons at the front.

SECOND-LIEUT P A MORSON WOUNDED.

Mr and Mrs A Morson, of The Chace, on Monday received news that their son, Second-Lieut P A Morson, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, had been wounded on August 1st. Lieut Morson joined the H.A.C as a private, and proceeded to France on July 1, 1915. He saw much of the fighting round Ypres and Hooge, and then in April of this year he received his commission. He went all through the recent big advance until wounded on August 1st, and he is now in the Second General Western Hospital at Manchester. He received six wounds in the left hip and thigh and one in the left shoulder. An operation has been successfully performed, and his friends will be pleased to hear that he is now going on well.

PTE M E CLEAVER REPORTED MISSING.

Mrs Cleaver, of 28 Plowman Street, has been notified by the War Office that her husband, Pte M E Cleaver, of the R.W.R (T.F), has been posted as missing after an engagement on July 19th. Pte Cleaver, who was a native of Rugby, lived in the town till a year or two ago, but at the time of enlistment he was residing at Banbury. He has four young children.

In the same platoon as Pte Cleaver was an old Rugby footballer, well known as “ Zooie ” Batchelor. He is now in hospital near Liverpool, suffering from shell shock, which has rendered him deaf and dumb.

LANCE-CORPL BROMWICH, of PAILTON PASTURES.

News has been received by Mrs Bromwich, of Pailton Pastures, that her son, Lance-Corpl E J H C Bromwich, of the Northants Regiment, was killed in action on July 18th. Her husband was killed in the Boer War, and Lance-Corpl Bromwich entered the Duke of York’s School for soldiers’ sons at the age of 14. Although he was only 20 years of age, he had, therefore, served six years in the Army. He was wounded last autumn, but recovered, and was drafted to the front again.

SECOND-LIEUT E A R SMITH.

Second-Lieut Eric Arthur Rae Smith, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who, as recorded in our last issue, was killed in action on July 22nd, was the youngest son of Mr Arthur K Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, and was 27 years of ago. For some years before the War he was in the H.A.C, and in April, 1915, obtained a commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, proceeding to the front last May. His Commanding officer writes : “ He was killed whilst leading with the utmost gallantry his platoon into action on the night of July 22-23. In him the Battalion has lost a truly gallant officer of great promise, who had already endeared himself to all ranks.” When Lieut Smith joined the Forces he was occupying the Manor Farm at Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

SERGT-MAJOR WILLIAM J BRYANT KILLED.

Considerable regret will be felt locally at the confirmation of the rumour, circulated in the town last week, that Sergt-Major William John Bryant, of the Rugby Infantry Company, had been killed in action. The news was conveyed to Mrs Bryant, the widow, who lives at 98 York Street, in a letter from the O.C of A Company to which Sergt-Major Bryant was attached on his promotion from the rank of sergeant. The writer says :— “ His death came as a great shock to us all. When such men as he go from us a sort of despair follows, and we feel one of our great supports has gone. He was for some time the quartermaster-sergeant of the company—a post which does not entail so much danger as that of sergeant-major. But as soon as his predeccessor (Sergt-Major Wood) was wounded he lost no time in stepping into his place, and I always remember how eager he was to be right up in the trenches, as close to the enemy as possible. His long service with the regiment, his good character and capacity for doing honest sound work, will ensure that his memory will always remain with those who have known the regiment. His loss is one that it will be hard to replace, and the sympathy of all of us goes out to you.” Sergt-Major Bryant, who was killed while leaving the trench on July 26th, was the second son of Mr Wm Bryant, of Rugby. He was 43 years of age, and leaves a widow and eight children, six of whom range from 15 to 4 years of age. He had been connected with the Rugby “ E ” Company for 25 years, and in 1914 he won one of the company challenge cups. He was a builder by trade, and was highly respected by all who knew him.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

On Wednesday last Mr and Mrs Neal received official intimation from the War Office that their son, Pte W H J Neal, of the Royal Berkshire Infantry Regiment, was killed in action on July 30th. Pte Neal was 19 years of age on the day he was killed. He only enlisted on the 13th of April last as a Driver in the Royal Field Artillery. He had been transferred about a week to the Royal Berkshire Infantry Regt and sent out to France, when he met with his sad end. On enlistment he was being employed by the Sparking Plug Co, but had previously worked at the Rugby Portland Cement Co at Newbold for a considerable time. He was a bright youth, and much sympathy is expressed with his parents in their sad bereavement.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

We regret to learn that Major Darnley is lying very ill in hospital in Malta.

Lieut-Col F F Johnstone is returning to the command of the 2nd Battalion the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Temporary Lieut W C Muriel, of the 9th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been promoted Captain as from the 1st of July.

Capt E R Hopewell, of the 7th Worcestershire Regt, who was wounded in the recent fighting in France, has been awarded the Military Cross. He is a son of Mr E W Hopewell, formerly of Rugby.

MOTOR LORRY FATALITY.

Attempting to board a motor lorry in motion, Corporal Edgar Percival Haddock, of the Royal Engineers, stationed at Welford, Rugby, fell and sustained severe internal injuries, from which he died soon after admission to Northampton Hospital, on Friday last week. At the inquest, held at the hospital on Saturday evening, a verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned. Corpl Haddock, who was 19 years of age, was a son of Mr Edgar Augustus Haddock, the director and principal of the Leeds College of Music and the director of the Mayfair School of Music. He was a motor engineer, and at the time of the accident was working with other members of his Company on the telegraph wires on the main road between Northampton and Rugby. He was located at Rugby for a time.

FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT NEAR RUGBY.

TWO OFFICERS KILLED.

As the result of a collision between two aeroplanes near Rugby on Thursday afternoon one of the machines crashed to the ground, and the occupants, Lieuts Rogers and de Frece, of the Royal Flying Corps, were killed instantly. The other machine made a safe descent, saw the occupants were uninjured.

In consequence of the accident a concert, which was to have been given on behalf of a Soldiers’ Comforts Fund, was postponed.

LETTERS FROM “ E ” COMPANY MEN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—As one of the old “ E ” Company Terriers, I am writing a few lines to let you know that some of us are still plodding along.

Since we came out to France some 17 months ago we have been practically under shell fire the whole of the time, with the exception of about a fortnight, when we were going to have a rest, but were recalled to have another spell in the trenches. Although up till the present time we have not been what we called “ over the top,” we have done some excellent work, for which we have been greatly praised by the various commanders. For one to say that he had not been away from the Battalion an hour during this long period of trench life hardly seems credible, but this is the case with the majority of us. All through the winter we had to keep pumps going, as the water was very often up to our thighs, and overflowed into the tops of gum boots, which we were provided with for winter trench work. Then, again, we had wiring to do at night. Doubtless, if our neighbour across the way could not find us sufficient work one way, he would do so by shelling our wire and trenches. During our tour we have experienced shell of all calibre. Among those we received there was one which we named “ Gommy Lizz ”— a most objectionable neighbour, for when it exploded it would throw pieces of metal with razor-like edges. The largest of these bombs weighed about 200lbs.

I must not forgot to tell you of the things that happen behind the lines in the way of amusements. There are three Pierrot troupes, who used to give us some splendid turns. Then, again, there is the cinematograph. This we must thank the B.S.A for. It is a splendid machine, and included engine and dynamo for lighting purposes.

Now we have the Divisional Band, which plays to our Battalion in turn. It is composed of all the best musicians in the Division. When hearing this it makes us wish we were in the Park at Rugby instead of this place.

I must now return to the trench life, as I think this is our most important work. We have been in the great offensive, for which we were highly praised, and I might also say we have been in the great advance, but am very sorry to say we lost some of our best pals. The work of our guns, both large and small, has been excellent at this point. I will now close, leaving us all in the best of spirits and health,—I remain, yours sincerely, A. V. A.

August 2, 1916.

A TREACHEROUS GERMAN.

DEAR —-— Just a few lines in haste to let you know I am all right. No doubt by now you will know we have been in for it. We have lost very nearly all of the Company. I am the only sergeant left. We have no officers ; they are all wounded or killed. We thought none of us would get through alive. We smashed them up with a seven hours’ bombardment, and then went for them. We got into their second line, and stopped there for about two hours. The slaughter was awful ; there were heaps of dead. Captain — was killed going over, two lieutenants were wounded, and the others we do not know anything about. We sent about 35 prisoners back from their front line to ours. I stood talking to the sergeant-major at the time, and one of the Germans asked for a drink of water. One of our men gave him one, and as soon as he had had a drink he snatched up a rifle that stood by the trench and shot our Company sergeant-major through both legs. I need not say what became of him. I am glad I am all right, thank God ; but their are a good many that have gone. Just fancy, it took two years to train the Battalion, and they were cut up in about two hours. But I will not say any more about it ; I want to try and forget it. GEORGE.

To Employers

Employers are reminded that it is an offence under the Munitions of War Acts 1915 and 1916, punishable by Fine not exceeding £50, for any person to Employ anyone who has been engaged in a Controlled Establishment within Six Weeks from the date of leaving unless he or she can produce a Leaving Certificate (Form M.T. 23), or a Certificate issued by the Chairman of a Munitions Tribunal.

The attention of Employers is directed to Statutory Rule No. 121 relating to Certificates, also to M.M. 14, being a Memorandum for the guidance of Employers in regard to Leaving Certificates which can be obtained upon application at any Labour Exchange.

The British Thomson-Houston Co. Ltd.
Willans & Robonson Limited.

PROSPETS OF DEARER BREAD.—There has recently been a substantial advance in the price of flour. Within three weeks it has risen by 8s a sack, and it is very possible that the effect will be that householders will have to pay more for their bread in the near future. Sugar continues to be scarce and dear, and the Sugar Commission has just issued posters urging economy in the use of this very essential article of food.

DEATHS.

HARVEY. Killed in France on July 1st, 1916, Lance-Corporal Harvey, 1st Hampshire Regiment, son of Mrs. R. Harvey, Windsor Street, Rugby, aged 35.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

LEACH.—In loving memory of our dear son, Percy John Leach, who was killed at Sulva Bay, Gallipoli, on August 6,1915.
“ A light is from our household gone,
A voice we loved is still;
A place is vacant in our hearts
The world can never fill.
He went away to a distant land,
And fought his country’s foes;
He there was kept by Death’s grim hand :
To return to his home no more.”
—From his FATHER & MOTHER, BROTHERS & SISTER.

ROWBOTTOM.—In loving memory of Corporal S. Rowbottom, Oxford and Bucks L.I., who died of wounds received in action at Ypres, August 12, 1915. Buried near Poperinghe.
“ There isn’t much we did not share since our school-days begun ;
The same old work, the same old play, the same old sport and fun,
The same old chance that laid you out, but winked and let us through,
The same old life, the same old death, ‘Good-bye’ and ‘God bless you.’ ”
—From FRANK and ALBERT (B.E.F.).

WORMLEIGHTON..—In loving memory of Frederick James Wormleighton, R.E., killed August 9th, 1915 (In France).
“ In the midst of life we are in death.”
—From his loving mother, brothers, and sisters.

Saul, William Jackson. Died 6th Aug 1916

William was born in Leamington, Warwickshire, in the summer of 1881 [1] and was christened there on 6th July.[2]

His parents were Joseph (24) a gardener, and Georgiana (28), both from Norfolk. In 1881 they lived at Launton Cottage, Leamington and William was their first child [3]. They went on to have 4 more children, 2 boys and 2 girls.

In the 1891 census the family are living in Draycott Hill farm, Bourton on Dunsmore [Recorded as Joseph Sane and family on Ancestry]. Joseph is now a farmer and he appears to have moved around, as his first 3 children were born in Leamington, daughter Ethel (4) was born in Birdingbury and his son Frank(1) was born in Bourton. William (9) is recorded as a scholar.

In the 1901 census, Joseph and family are living at 23 Cambridge Street, Rugby. His 17 year old son Ernest is working as a butcher’s assistant, as is his lodger, Major G Gibbs. [5]

William is absent from the census. He had moved to Norfolk where he was a lodger in Bacton Rd, North Walsham, working as a butcher.[5] In the third quarter of 1902 he married Lottie Worts (18) who was a draper’s assistant also living in North Walsham. [6]

The Rugby Almanack gives us more information about the period before the next census.

In the 1901-1903 Directory, J W Saul, fruiterer, is living at 49 Railway Terrace Rugby

In the 1904-1906 Directory Mrs Saul is living at 163 Cambridge Street.

In the 1906-1908 & the 1909-1911 Directories, William is recorded as living at 163 Cambridge Street as a shop manager [7]

The 1911 Census confirms that William and Lottie are living at 163 Cambridge St. He is a Butcher’s Manager, while his mother, father, brother’s Ernest and Frank and sister Lucy are living at 95 Bath Street. Joseph is a farmer and dealer and Ernest and Frank are both Home and Colonial Butchers. All three are employers. We don’t know if William worked in the family shop.[8]

William joined the 1st 1st Warwickshire Yeomanry. He was Private 2919.

In August 1914 they moved on mobilisation to Bury St Edmunds and the brigade came under command of 1st Mounted Division.

On 31 August 1914 they moved with the brigade to Newbury and transferred to 2nd Mounted Division.

In November 1914 they moved with the brigade to Norfolk, and the regiment moved to Sheringham and then on 17 December to Norwich.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry, a cavalry regiment containing over 20 Rugby men, sailed for the Middle East in April 1915. Off the Scilly Isles, their horse transport ship Wayfarer was torpedoed by a German U-boat, and limped back to Bristol. Five men were lost but 763 horses on board were saved. In August 1915 the Yeomanry eventually arrived at Gallipoli, suffering heavy losses fighting as dismounted infantry. [9]

William died on 6th August and is buried at Kantara Cemetery, Egypt.
[For details of the action in which he died see the Biography of Harold George Loverock, died 5th August.]

His medal rolls Index Card states that he entered the theatre of war on the 6th November 1915. He was awarded the Victory, British and Star medals [10]

A payment of £5 3s and 3 pence was made to his widow Lottie on 23/11/16 and a War Gratuity of £4 10s was also paid to Lottie on 16/09/19, by which time she had remarried and is recorded as Lottie Oakes [11], Lottie was then living in Coventry.

Williams parents had also moved to Coventry by the time of his death and were living at 87 Highfield Sr, Foleshill, Coventry. [12] In fact the City of Coventry Roll of the Fallen: The Great War 1914-1918 records him as living at this address [13]

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

[1] Ancestry England & Wales Free BMD Birth Index

[2] Ancestry England & Wales Christening index 1530-1980

[3] Ancestry 1881 Census

[4] Family Search 1891 census; Ancestry 1891 census

[5] Ancestry 1901 census

[6] Ancestry England & Wales, Free BMD Marriage Index, 1837-1915

[7] Rugby Alamanack, Rugby Library

[8] Ancestry 1911 census

[9] www.1914-1918.net/ The Long Long Trail: The British Army in the First World War

[10] British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index cards, 1914-1920

[11] Ancestry UK, Army Registers of Soldiers’ Effects, 1901-1929

[12] Ancestry, UK, Commonwealth War Graves, 1914-1921

[13] City of Coventry Roll of the Fallen: The Great War 1914-1918 by Charles Nowell

Loverock, Harold George. Died 5th Aug 1916

Harold George Loverock was the second son of Lewis and Edith Loverock (nee Bromwich) he was born on the 7th December 1890, and baptised on the 6th march 1891 in St Matthews church Rugby. Lewis Loverock was a draper and a justice of the peace. In 1911 he was living at Greylands 47 Hillmorton Road with his second wife Edith whom he married in the first quarter 1886 in Rugby, along with Hilda Mary 15, Phylis May 9 and Reginald 7,their other children being Violet 24, Edith 21, Harold 22, a draper’s assistant at 244 High Road Chiswick and Gerald 18 was a pupil farmer at Hillmorton Grounds Farm.

Sometime after the census of 1911 Harold left England for South Africa and on the outbreak of world war one joined the Natal Light Horse part of General Botha’s army.

“Before the surrender, German South West Africa fell for a short time in the hands of the enemy. There were about seventy prisoners taken but after a few hours the colonial troops started to shell the enemy position and the prisoners of war were advised to run for their lives which they did. Unfortunately some were wounded. Harold he discharged to a commission on Tuesday 15th June 1915 and obtained a passage home on a ship of the Union Castle mail steamship the Dover Castle upon which he landed in London on 3rd August 1915 . He came home and he is now endeavouring to obtain a commission in some branch of H.M Army ”
(Rugby Advertiser 21st Aug 1915 and County of Warwickshire Roll of Honour by Kenneth Fowler)

He obtained a commission in Warwickshire Yeomanry on the 2nd October1915 and after training was sent to Mudros (a military base on the island of Lesbos) on 6th November 1915, they were sent to Egypt.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry war diary it states the following :

August 4th Friday

Reveille 04:00 Breakfast 04:30 Regiment marched out 06:00 strength 15 officers 362 ordinary   ranks 361 horses 29 mules camels 130 carrying regimental stores ammunition nor rations. Arrived Giliban Sidings 08:30 watered and fed horses. Received orders from G.O.C.5th m Brigade to leave all stores at Giliban under dismounted party, remainder to be ready to march to Pelusium at 09:30. Arrived 2 miles short of Pelusium at 13:00.met brigade Major and received verbal orders to proceed W of Canterbury Hill with all possible speed to endeavour to connect up with Col Yorke and Composite Regiment who were holding two Battalions of the enemy at HOD-ABU-ADI

Advancing from HOD-EL –ENNA.Got in touch with Col Yorke after marching on bearing of 140 Degrees at 14:27 received a message from Col Yorke “Am advancing E.S.E.about 700 yards to Canterbury Hill“ to be forwarded to G.O.C. that we are in touch

14:45 Moved Regiment up in rear of Composite Position enemy being engaged all this time

15:18 General Wiggins .Major Findlay (Bth MAJ N.Z.& R.Bde ) to the front Composite Regiment working from front N.Warwicks to take up their position S of Hod –es _Seifaniya and leaving a strong post S to make direct attack on enemy flank N.E. this was done but owing to ridge running N.W.to S.E.from Hod –El –Edna being held by three machine guns and a few rifle men some delay was caused, at the commencement we were able to inflict some loss on the enemy. but Lieut Stafford and others were wounded .

Our machine guns bought into action against this position and 6,000 rounds   fired with considerable success, supported by 2 troops with rifle fire. 2 troops of “C “ squadron and 1 of “B” squadron were thus enabled to gallop round wire on the right flank and join up with COMPOSITE REGT. Our post on S in the meantime was heavily engaged. Lieut.LOVEROCK and S.S.MALINS were killed. Enemy now hurried up re-inforcements from S.E.whom we had to engage until dusk before we could retire on our three troops. Three Squadron then retired to Hod-nighilifali, the place of rende-vous. Recovered all wounded and marched at 21:15 to Pelusium watered and fed at 23:30.

In the county of Warwickshire Roll of Honour it states that Second Lieutenant Harold George Loverock 1st/1st Warwickshire Yeomanry 5th (Independent) Mounted Brigade Died of gunshot wounds and a fractured skull in the 1st /3rd East Lancashire Field Ambulance on Saturday 5th August 1916.

He received the 1914/15 star, the British war medal and the victory medal; he was buried in the Kantara War Memorial Cemetery Egypt.

Harold George Loverock is also remembered on the Lawrence Sheriff School Plaque and on the family grave in Clifton Road Cemetery.

Powles_pp.32-3RomaniDet

Battle area on the Sinai Peninsular of Egypt where Second Lieutenant Harold George Loverock was fatally wounded’

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

29th Apr 1916. Lord Denbigh & Conscientious Objectors

LORD DENBIGH & CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTORS.

To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

Newnham Paddox, 27/4/16,

SIR,-Since my return from a year’s service in Egypt a few weeks ago, I have been reading in your paper with shame and indignation of the various attempts made by ” conscientious objectors ” and others to evade their duty to their country and save their own skins.

If you have sufficient space, perhaps you will publish the enclosed copy of a letter which I have just sent to a rev gentleman in Lancashire.

I wish he and others like him could visit the front trenches and the ruined towns and villages in France and Belgium, and see what war means. I wish they had been with me the other day when I was able to go to the front trenches on my way back through France.

I was in what before the war was a prosperous, tidy, and well ordered mining village of excellent houses. It is now half in actual ruins and half deserted by the inhabitants, but with most of the houses more or less knocked about by shells, and unbroken panes of glass are rare.

You approach this spot by a long deep communication trench which is frequently shelled, and it goes down the main street where the gutters used to run ; it branches out in various directions and these branches run in tunnels under houses and through cellars until at last one arrives at the firing trench, cunningly worked in amongst ruined walls, made up with sandbags and the various protective traverses and dug-outs.

When I got back to the headquarters, where two shells had gone through the roof the night before, after staying a short while in a telephone exchange in a cellar, while an adjoining square where the field kitchens were was being shelled for half-hour or so in hopes of catching the men coming for their food—a shell had knocked out a party of men there the night before—I found a French soldier in uniform under an escort of two British.

He had been found wandering about the forward trenches, and his movements were rightly regarded as   suspicious, so he was arrested and brought along. His story was as follows :- He had lived and worked in this village before the war, and he gave the number of his house in a certain street, now only semi-existent. He left his wife and two children, also a sister and six children, there on the day of mobilisation. He had been twice wounded himself in Champagne last year, and since his departure twenty months before he had not heard one word of his relations, and he didn’t know where they were nor what happened to them. He had got five days’ leave from his regiment to come and endeavour to obtain news of them, and when arrested he had been trying to find where his home had been. His papers were quite in order, and I believe his story was quite correct, and it is just typical of what has happened to thousands of others in the war area.

This is war as it is known to-day and practised by the Germans. This is what we wish to protect our country from.

I, too, am a ” conscientious objector.” I conscientiously object to being murdered by a Hun, to seeing my house burnt and my family ill-treated, and probably murdered too, by brutal German officers and soldiers ; also to seeing these things happen to the inhabitants of my country, though I confess it would do some of these “objectors” and sham-exemption hunters good if they were made to suffer. I object to those who are for over trying to mislead the people of this country with wrong conceptions of what we are fighting for, and what we shall be reduced to if we do not win this war or if we make an inconclusive and premature peace.

I also object to one section of the population being obliged to go through the dangers and hardships of modern war whilst undue facilities are given to others to shirk and shelter themselves behind the former.— Faithfully yours,            DENBIGH.

[Copy].

To the Rev. Percy Stoll, M.A., B.D., Vicar of St. Peter’s, Halliwell, Bolton.

SIR,—I have received from you a circular addressed to Members of the House of Lords and to which you request a personal reply. Having a few minutes to spare, I have much pleasure in sending you one.

You apparently ask on behalf of your two sons, whom you say are destined for the Ministry, total exemption from all ” complicity in this war,” in which you rightly say England is ” standing forth as the protector of weak nations,” and you say you have ” stood for 25 years for duty to God, State, and Church.” As you truly say, ” War is admittedly a gigantic evil,” but I am not aware that Christ has ever taught that nations or individuals wrongfully attacked are not entitled to make as strenuous a defence as possible.

The matter, therefore, resolves itself thus: We are fighting to defend ourselves against a nation, which knows no creed but that of force and might, and if we are defeated it is well known that we shall be utterly crushed and ruined, as a nation, and that the enemy will strive by every means in his power to land in this country and treat us to exhibitions of ” frightfulness ” of which the horror perpetrated in Belgium and France may safely be regarded as mild samples. You say that you and your sons are so averse to ” harming anyone ” that you ” would not take the sword, even against enemies.”

Let me ask you, therefore, this question : Having regard to the brutalities against inoffensive civilians—especially women and children—which have disgraced the German army in Belgium and France, are you or are you not amongst those unnatural curs who have admitted that if they saw their wives and daughters being insulted by German soldiers, they would not take any violent action to save or rescue them, even if it was in their power to do so, either by themselves or in conjunction with others.

If, owing to your objection to “ taking a sword even against enemies,” you have to admit that you would take no steps for rescue or protection under the above circumstances, I hope the female members of your congregation will take note of the fact. As women generally admire courage in a man, they will probably express their opinion of you in plain terms.

But perhaps you will say you certainly would put up a fight to the best of your ability to protect the honour and the lives of your women folk. In this case, you are no genuine conscientious objector to using violence when you or yours are in danger, and I look upon you as humbugs and hypocrites in your refusal to have any “ complicity ” in this war, which is for the purpose of protecting these islands against the savagery of German invaders.

I take it you are against all ” complicity ” either as combatants or non-combatants. Parliament, in its wisdom, has arranged that those with genuine religious objections to combatant service shall be permitted to help their country as non-combatants, who, in limited numbers, have a useful field of work open to them.

I have some respect for those Quakers, for instance, who object to fight but are ready to perform the often very dangerous duties attaching in these days to stretcher-bearers on the battle-field. I, have no vocabulary capable of expressing my contempt for those who refuse to assist in any capacity or to share the dangers and hardships of those who are so bravely defending them from a hideous fate.

If your sons can show conscientious objections to fighting themselves and taking the lives “ even of their enemies,” they can no doubt be placed in a non-combatant corps.

In this guise, they can rescue and comfort the wounded, fix wire at night time in front of the forward parapets, dig trenches, dug-outs and latrines, and carry stores and sandbags into the trenches, and perform many other useful and innocuous but necessary duties, and so allow those who are fighting for them to obtain a well-earned rest.

Your sons will be all the better ministers for having been brought into close contact with Death, suffering, and manly courage in the trenches, and will, if they are spared—as I hope they may be—come back with perhaps loftier ideas than they now apparently have as to what constitutes their duty to “ God, the State, and the Church.”

Faithfully yours.

DENBIGH,

Colonel Commanding H.A.C.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In memory of Lieut R W Poulton Palmer, the famous Rugby footballer and captain of the English XV, who was killed in action about a year ago, a beautiful marble tablet has been placed in the Parish Church at St Helens, Isle of Wight. It bears the inscription : “ In memory of Ronald, Lieut R W P Palmer, B.A, Rugby and Balliol, 1/4th Royal Berks Regt (T.F), younger son of Edward and Emily Poulton. Killed in the trenches in Belgium, May 5, 1915. Age, 25 years. An athletic leader of rare distinction, he was endowed with even greater gifts of love and joy. ‘God is love.’ ”

P A MORSON WINS WELL-EARNED REWARD.

P A Morson, son of Mr Arthur Morson, the esteemed clerk to the Rugby Council, who has been serving as a private in the Honourable Artillery Company, has been granted a commission in the 11th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Second-Lieut P A Morson was educated at Rugby School, and was one of four chums who sailed from England the same day, the other three being Pepperday and the two brothers Bluemel. Two have laid down their lives for the country, and the second brother Bluemel has been seriously wounded. Lieut Morson went out with 150 volunteers on July 1st of last year. He has been through practically all of the strenuous fighting in which the British troops have been engaged since that date. Second-Lieut Morson came home on short leave on Easter Monday night, and returned to the front last night.

SERIOUS ACCIDENT TO AN OLD LAURENTIAN.

News has been received that Flight Sub-Lieut Warner H Peberdy, son of Mr W W Peberdy, of Albert Street, has been invalided home from the front as the result of a serious aeroplane accidont in Flanders. Sub-Lieut Peberdy is suffering from spinal concussion and severe shock to the nerve centres, and is now taking a rest cure in the South of Ireland under medical supervision, where he is making very favourable progress. He is one of the many Old Laurentians who have come back from far corners of the Empire to do their bit for the Old Country. He came from Canada with the first squadron of aviators. Formerly he was a student engineer in the early days of the B.T.H. at Rugby, and after completing his course there he went to the United States. When the war broke out he travelled in Canada to help to organise the Canadian Curtin Aviation School, at Toronto. He acted as manager during the first three months of the school’s rapid growth to the position of the largest civilian flying school in the Empire.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY IN ACTION.

After taking part in the Gallipoli campaign, the Warwickshire Yeomanry are now fighting in Egypt, and took part in the fighting at Katia on Easter Sunday. Our mounted troops, consisting of the Gloucestershire Hussars, the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and the Worcestershire Yeomanry, who were holding a position in and about the village of Katia, were attacked by a greatly superior Turkish force, before which they fell back, fighting a rearguard action, and inflicting heavy losses on the enemy.

An Objector Sentenced.—Pte Sydney Dodd, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, a conscientious objector to military service, has been sentenced to 21 days’ imprisonment for refusing to do all military duty. Dodd was first ordered by the local Tribunal to do non-combatant service, but as a result of his appeal to the County Tribunal about a month ago he was finally put down for combatant service.

A Rupert Brooke Memorial.—It has been decided to set in Rugby Chapel a memorial of Rupert Brooke. It will take the form of a portrait medallion in marble, based on a photograph by Sherril Schell, which appears as the frontispiece of the 1914 volume of poems. The medallion will be the work of Professor J Havard Thomas. No other memorial of Rupert Brooke is at present in contemplation.