21st Sep 1918. Suggested Memorial to Rugby Men

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

Several matters of more than ordinary intent, including a suggestion for Rugby a memorial to local soldiers killed and maimed in the War, was discussed at the monthly meeting of the Urban Council on Tuesday, when there were present : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), W Flint (vice-chairman), T A Wise, W H Linnell, R Walker, W A Stevenson, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, C J Newman, F E Hands, S Robbins, and H Yates.

WELCOME TO LIEUT NEWMAN.

Before proceeding to the formal business, the Chairman, on behalf of the Council, welcomed Lieut C J Newman on his return from active service, and also conveyed to him the sympathy of the Council in the death of his wife. The circumstances were peculiarly sad, and he wished Lieut Newman to realise how deeply his colleagues felt for him in his deep sorrow.—Mr Newman said he was pleased to be back again to do his duty for the public of Rugby, and especially the electors of the Central Ward.

SUGGESTED MEMORIAL TO RUGBY MEN.

An interesting discussion took place on the consideration of a letter from the Rugby Branch of the National Association of Discharged Sailors and Soldiers, asking the Council to assist them in providing an institute (where they could hold their meetings), a library, &c, for men discharged from the various forces.—The Chairman suggested that the letter be referred to the Estates Committee.—Mr Newman said he desired to raise the question of a war memorial to their local men. So far nothing had been done, except to arrange for a collection of photographs to be placed in the Library.—The Clerk (Mr A Morson, M.B.E) explained that other steps had been taken. Some time ago, at the suggestion of the Council, he invited the relatives of soldiers killed in the War to forward the names to him, and he now had a very long list.—Mr Newman contended that this was not going far enough. They should now consider the question of providing a fitting memorial to those who had been killed or maimed in the War, and a list of their names should be suitably preserved. Rugby did not lend itself to statuary ; and, after all, a statue was only a nine days’ wonder after it was unveiled. He therefore suggested that they should go further than this, and erect some houses, with all the modem conveniences and improvements for discharged soldiers who had been maimed in the War. In connection with this it might also be possible to erect an institute for the discharged soldiers.—The Chairman : It is a huge job.—Mr Robbins supported Mr Newman’s suggestion, and said if they did not aim at something big they would not get anything. Houses for discharged soldiers would be much more useful than a monument.—The Chairman suggested that they should deal with the subject matter of the letter first. If these discharged men had to wait until the Council had raised the money for providing an institute they would have to wait a long time. He proposed that the letter be referred to the Estates committee to see if that body could find suitable premises for them.—Mr Yates said he would like to have more information from the association as to what they had in mind. He had considered the question very carefully, and he was not in favour of providing any institute for setting these men apart from the rest of the civilian population. They wanted these men, when they returned to civil life, to take their part in the reconstruction of society with the rest of the community as far as possible, and they did not wish to set up any class feeling between those men who had been away and those who had not. If they only wanted a place to hold their meetings in it was the duty of the Council to find them one ; but he believed they were well provided for in that respect at present.—Mr Newman said he did not agree with these remarks. A discharged soldier had the right to ask for anything he liked, and why should he not be allowed to do as he liked ? When the War was over the discharged sailors and soldiers would be a force to be reckoned with, and they must do all they could to entertain them and provide them with decent surroundings, and not leave them in the streets to die like dogs, as they had done in the past. This was his sole idea in suggesting the provision of houses and an institute for these men.—The letter was referred to the Estates Committee.

The question of a war memorial was then considered, and the Chairman said he took it that they would desire it to be a Memorial to all who went out to fight for them, whether they came back from the War or not. He thought they would have to set up a special committee to deal with the matter, The first thing, however, was to get the money, and then they could decide what to do with it. He agreed with Mr Newman that Rugby did not lend itself to statuary, and he thought the suggestion that an institute should be provided was a very good one. However, if they had the money now they would not be able to spend it.—Mr Newman : There are ways and means for everything in this world.—The question was referred to the General Purposes Committee.

JAM MAKERS THANKED.

The Chairman said it would be within the knowledge of the members that since their last meeting a committee of local ladies had been very energetic in making jam for the military and the civil population. They had made 7,350lbs. and he believed that, with one exception, the whole of the work had been done voluntarily. He especially mentioned Mr W Barnett (chairman of the committee), Lady Rowena Patterson, and Mrs Nickalls in connection with this work, and a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the committee ; also to the gas Company for lending the premises for making the jam, and Mr Alfred Over for providing storage facilities.

FRANCE’S DAY.

The following message was read from the President of the French Republic in reply to the congratulatory telegram sent to him on the occasion of the celebration of France’s Day, July 14th :—

“ The President of the French Republic is very much affected by the congratulations and good wishes which you have sent on the occasion of France’s Day, and thanks you warmly in the name of the French people, who are closely united to the British people in the defence of right and liberty.—R POINCARE.”

It was decided to have this letter, together with several others, including one from Admiral Beatty, framed and hung in the Council Chamber.

SUGGESTED COLD STORAGE.

A letter was read from the Rugby Food Control Committee, asking the Council to take immediate steps to provide a cold storage for Rugby District—Mr Robbins : Who has got to pay for it ?—Mr Wise pointed out that at present they had nothing of this kind in the town. He thought such a building would be very useful, and it might even be a paying investment. It was a question as to whether they would get permission to erect such a building, even if they decided to do so ; but he thought at present it was important that perishable foods should be stored in the localities where they were needed, and it would be a great boon to the community at large if such a building could be erected.—Mr Yates moved that the letter be referred to the Markets Committee. He believed it was necessary that they should have a cold storage in the town, because one thing they had learned from the shortage of commodities was the sinfulness of waste : and even when they did get more food it would be necessary to have somewhere to store that portion which was not required for immediate consumption.—Mr Wise promised that the Food Committee would assist the Council with any figures they could obtain from traders likely to use the storage.—The Chairman : If the town grows, as it will do sooner or later, we are bound to have a cold storage.—Mr Stevenson suggested that the letter should be referred to a Joint Markets and Plans Committee, and this was agreed to.

THE BATHS.

The Baths Committee reported that in view of the great need for economy in coal and light during the winter, the committee propose to further consider the re-opening of the slipper baths at their next meeting, but their present proposal is to open the baths on Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays only, instead of the whole week.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt T C Vickers, Yeomanry, Rugby, has been officially reported drowned ; and Pte W Everton, Tank Corps, Rugby, has died of wounds.

Rifleman A V Pitham, Rifle Brigade, Rugby has been wounded and captured by the Germans ; and Pte H Lawley, RW.R, has also been reported a prisoner of war.

Capt J Oscar Muntz, youngest son of Mr F E Muntz, of Umberslade, died of wounds on September 4th at the age of 42.

W F W Satchell, son of Mr & Mrs W F J Satchell, 94 Park Road, Rugby, has been granted a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regt.

Pte Lewis Lewis, City of London Regiment, son of ex-P.C Lewis, 35 King Edward Road, was killed in France on August 8th. He was nearly 19 years of age, an old St Matthew’s boy, and an employee at Rugby Post Office. He joined the Army in October, 1917, and was drafted to France in April.

Mrs Hutt, 15 Bridget Street, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte J H Lines, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on August 27th. He of was 19 years of age, and before joining the Army in July 1917, he was employed at the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds. Another son of Mrs Hutt was killed in France last year.

Mr & Mrs N Austin, 3 Oliver Street, Rugby, have received official notice that their youngest son, Pte Cecil Austin, 1st R.W.R, was killed in action in France on August 30th. Pte Austin was only 19 years of age. He joined up on February 14, 1916, and went to France the following year. When he had only been there a few weeks he was invalided back with dysentery, and was in hospital five months. He only re-joined his regiment in July, and was sent to France for the second time the following week. His eldest brother, Wilfred Austin, has been serving in Egypt since January, 1915.

Intimation has been received by Mr H C Samson, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, that his son, Second Lieut O M Samson, died of wounds on the 17th inst. Lieut Samson was an assistant master at Rugby School (Army Class). He was an 0 for Blue at cricket, and also played for Somersetshire. At Rugby he was of great assistance to the Rugby Club, with which he frequently played. He also made one of a very successful Rugby hockey team captained by Mr F J Kittermaster for several years.

Corpl H Rogers, M.M, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regt., has recently been awarded the bar to the Military Medal for gallantry. The Major-General of his Division has also written congratulating him on his fine behaviour. Corpl Rogers, who is a native of Flore, Northants, and nephew of Mrs H Miller, 10 Alfred St, Rugby, has been twice wounded, and before the War was employed at Rugby L & N-W Railway Station.

Driver Jack Hillyard, A.S.C, son of Mr Charles Hillyard, 20 Frederick Street, Rugby, was killed on August 22nd. He was 24 years of age, and before joining up in October, 1914, he was employed as a vanman by Mr J J McKinnell. He served three years and three months in France, and only returned to the front a few weeks prior to his death. He was educated at New Bilton Council School. At one time Mr Hillyard had six sons in the Army ; two have been discharged, and three are still serving.

Mr and Mrs Southern, of 77 Windsor Street, have received a letter from the Commanding Officer of the Regiment notifying the death of their youngest son, Pte S Southern, in action on September 4th. His platoon went forward in the attack over a difficult piece of ground, and when it became inevitable that a message must be sent back he volunteered to carry it. He had very nearly got into safety when a bullet hit him in the head, causing instantaneous death. His loss to the Company (the officer adds) is a very real one. He was doing excellent work, was very popular, and they could ill spare him. Pte Southern was awarded the Military Medal on May 30, 1917. He joined up at the commencement of the War, previously being employed at the B.T.H Works. This is the second son of Mr & Mrs Southern who has fallen in the War.

Pte John James Brookes, R.W.R, eldest son of Mr John Brookes, 41 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was killed in action on August 30th. He was 22 years of age, and was a member of “ E ” Company when war broke out, and was mobilised with them. He had seen a good deal of heavy fighting, and had been wounded three times. Before the War he was a cleaner in the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds.

Mr William Fleet, 98 Lawford Road, Rugby, has received news that has youngest son, Pte Cyril William Fleet, 6th Dorsets, died of wounds on September 10th. He was 32 years of age, and before joining the Army at the commencement of the War he worked at the Cement Works. He was gassed a short time ago, and only returned to France a fortnight before his death.

Pte Albert Thomas Gibbs, London-Irish Rifles, eldest son of Mr & Mrs A B Gibbs, 14 Kimberley Road, Rugby, has died while a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte Gibbs was employed on the L & N-W Railway. He enlisted about twelve months ago, and had only been in France a short time when he was taken prisoner. He was 35 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children. His younger brother, Flight Cadet David Gibbs, was recently killed in an aeroplane accident.

News has been received at Coombe Abbey that Lord Uffington, the Earl of Craven’s heir, is lying seriously wounded in France, and has had a leg amputated above the knee.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
NEWS has been received that Corpl J Seymour, who in last week’s issue was reported wounded and suffering from enteric, has since died. He belonged to the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the outbreak of war, and has served with them since in France and Italy. He leaves a widow and two children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT WILFRED COLEMAN WINS THE MILITARY CROSS.—News has just reached Wolston that Lieut Wilfred Coleman has been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry on the banks of the Marne, He is the only son of Mr & Mrs T P Coleman, of Marston Hall. When war was declared he was a member of the 1st, Troop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry. In April, 1916, he went out to Egypt, and from there to Gallipoli where he was wounded. He was afterwards among the Yeomanry in Egypt when so many of them were killed or taken prisoners. He was subsequently sent into training at Cairo for a commission, and was then attached to the 5th Devons with whom he has gamed his present honour. He has now been transferred to the Royal Air Force.

DEATH OF TWO SONS.—Deep sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Robert Clarke, who heard in two days of the death of two of their sons. Pte William Clarke, of the Oxon and Bucks L.I, had been missing since March 21st ; but a friend—Pte Harrison—has written to say that he saw him killed. On the next day a notification was received from the War Office that their youngest son—Pte Joseph Clarke, of the Coldstream Guards—was killed on August 22nd. Both sons were respected employees of Messrs Bluemel, and were well known in the district They had been in France for a long time.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
KILLED.—Sergt J Major, son of Mr H Major, of Station Cottages, has been killed in action. He joined up at the outbreak of war, being the first recruit from the parish. A memorial service was held in the church on Sunday evening.

DUNCHURCH.
MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, learn that their son, Pte W Pearce, K.R.R, who was badly wounded and was a prisoner of war, has been repatriated, and is in London, where he has undergone an operation to his head.

ITCHINGTON.

HARRY COCKERELL KILLED.—On Saturday official intimation was received by Mr & Mrs H W Cockerell that their only son, Pte Harry Richard Cockerell, R.W.R, was killed in action on the 1st inst.  A sympathetic letter from the chaplain attached to the regiment states that Pte Cockerell fell fighting gallantly in one of the most important engagements of the War, and was killed instantaneously by a shell. The rev gentleman adds: “ He will be much mused.” Before he was called up Pte Cockerell had joined his father in his business as plumber and decorator. He had gained the respect of all, and was greatly beloved by many friends. Sincere sympathy is accorded to Mr & Mrs Cockerell and family in their sad loss.

HARRY COOKE GASSED.—Mr & Mrs John Cooke have been informed that their eldest son, Rifleman Harry Cooke, Rifle Brigade, is in hospital in France suffering, from gas poisoning. He was quite blind for three days after the occurrence, but is progressing favourably. His younger brother, Rifleman Reg Cooke, K.R.R, reported missing last May, has not since been heard of.

DR CLAGUE TO REMAIN.—When Dr Clague was medically examined at Coventry in June last he was passed for service in Grade 1. At the end of August he received his orders to join the Army in October. On the 3rd inst. Long Itchington people solemnly protested against being left without a resident doctor. On the 11th inst. Dr Clague underwent a second medical examination at Birmingham, and has now been totally rejected as unfit for military service. His services as a medical man will, therefore, be retained in the village.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—Cecil Wall has been wounded in the thigh, and is making satisfactory progress ; and Ernest Hall has been gassed, fortunately without very serious effects.

THURLASTON.
ON TUESDAY morning, Mr & Mrs W Hirons, Coventry Road, were notified that their fourth son, Pte G Hirons, R.W.R, had been killed. He was formerly in the employ of Mr J Johnson, J.P, Thurlaston, and was the finest young man in the village. He was 6ft in height and well-built, although only 19 years of age, and he was much respected by everybody in the parish. Mr & Mrs Hirons have another son—J Hirons—badly wounded in France. They had four sons in the Army till two of them were killed. The two remaining in the Army are members of the Warwickshire Police Force, one having been stationed at Sutton Coldfield, and the other at Shipston-on-Stour.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

THE SHORTAGE OF MILK.
A letter was read from a milk retailer complaining that she was unable to get a proper supply of milk, and pointing out that unless the committee could help her she would be unable to allow her customers the quantity to which they were entitled.—Mrs Shelley said this was a very hard case. The woman was a widow and an invalid, and was dependent upon her business for a livelihood ; whereas some of the other retailers were employed at the works, and were still keeping their businesses going.—Mr Cooke moved that the whole milk question be re-considered by the Rationing Committee. He believed that the town was threatened with a milk Monopoly, and that the situation was very serious.—Mr Humphrey drew attention to the fact that large quantities of milk were used daily in the canteens at the B.T.H and Willans & Robinson’s, and he suggested that they should use instead either dry milk or condensed milk in barrels. The fresh milk could then be distributed amongst the public.—In reply to Mr Gay, the Executive Officer said the committee had no power to commandeer milk ; but. if necessary, they could take over the whole milk supply of the town.—Mr Gay supported Mr Humphrey’s suggestion, and proposed that the two firms be approached on the matter. The Chairman : We do not want to be trouble with the workmen if we do this ?—Messrs Gay and Cooke replied in the negative.—The Chairman : We do not want it to be said that we wish to rob the workman of his milk.—Mr Gay : With the average workman his wife and children come first. They will be quite willing to forego fresh milk in the canteen in order that the children may have it.—It was decided that the executive Officer should approach the two firms on this question. and that the Rationing Committee should meet to consider the whole question of milk supply.—Mr Stevenson : Will they consider the retail price ?—The Executive Officer : The price will have to be revised at the end of September.

OTHER ITEMS.
A quantity of second grade bacon has now been received, and it was pointed out that the price of this was 1s 8d per lb straight from the case, and 1s 10d per lb washed and dried.—Both the Executive Officer and Mr Humphrey remarked that this bacon is very nice, almost as good, in fact, as the better quality bacon.—Mr Cripps : Do not praise it too much, or it will be 2s per lb next week.

DEATHS.

AUSTIN.—In loving memory of our darling boy, Pte. CECIL AUSTIN, 1st R.W.R., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Austin, 3 Oliver Street, Rugby, who was killed “ somewhere in France ” on August 30, 1918 ; aged 19 years. One of the very best.—From Dad and Mother.

FLEET.—Officially reported having died from gunshot wounds in France on September 10th, Pte. CYRIL WILLIAM FLEET, aged 32, youngest son of William Fleet, 98 Lawford Road, Rugby.

LINES.—In ever-loving, memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. J. H. LINES, of the Royal Berks., who was killed in action on August 27th “ somewhere in France ” ; aged 19 years.
“ We do not forget him, nor do we intend ;
We think of him daily, and will to the end.
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
“ In the midst of life we are in death.”
—Not forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France on July 29th, Pte CHARLES WHITE, 1st Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regt., second son of the late William White, formerly of Willoughby, and Ann White, Carterton, Clansfield, Oxon ; aged 33.

IN MEMORIAM.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. CHARLES CASHMORE, 5th Oxon 7 Bucks L.I.
“ Three years have passed,
No one knows
What was this gallant hero’s end
No wooden cross or mound to show
Where he fell fighting against the foe.”
—From his ever-loving Sister, Nell, Violet, and brother George.

CUFAUDE.—In loving memory of No. 40549 EDWARD HENRY CUFAUDE (Yelvertoft) who fell in action on Hill 70 on September 22. 1917.
“ May we in Thy sorrows share,
For Thy sake all peril dare,
Ever know Thy tender care.

GREEN.— In ever loving memory of EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who fell at the Battle of Loos, September 23-27, 1915.
—Sadly missed by his wife and children.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of LLEWELLYN GRIFFITH, who died of wounds on September 18, 1916.—“ Gone from sight, but to memory ever dear.”—From loving Brothers and Sisters—74 South Street.

HOPKINS.—In loving memory of FRANK, the youngest son of Henry Hopkins, late of Long Lawford, killed in action in France on September 18, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all ;
But thee unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but our aching hearts can know.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

NEAL.—In loving memory of Bombardier FRANK NEAL, R.F.A., who died of wounds on September 19, 1916.—Never forgotten by his loving sister Carrie.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of our dear brother LEVI, who was killed in action in France on September 23, 1917.—Not forgotten by his Brothers and Sisters, Will, Tom, Emma, Fanny.

 

Lewis, Lewis. Died 8th Aug 1918

Lewis Lewis was born in Rugby in 1899, and his birth was registered in Q3 1899.  He was the third son and fourth child of Frederick Lewis, who was born in about 1868 in Leamington, Warwickshire, and his wife Maggie, née Clarke, Lewis, who was born in about 1870, in Walsall, Staffordshire.    

Lewis Lewis was baptised on 26 November 1899 at St. Matthew’s Church, Rugby.  His father was a Police Constable and the family were then living at 14 Plowman Street, Rugby.

In both 1901 and 1911, the family were still living at 14 Plowman Street, and Lewis’s father, Frederick, was still a Police Constable.  By 1911, Lewis was eleven years old, and there were now seven children in the family.  Lewis attended St. Matthew’s School, Rugby, and later worked at Rugby Post Office.

Unfortunately no Service Record has survived for Lewis, but he joined up in Rugby[1] in October 1917.[2]  His Medal Card shows that he served initially as a Private, No:376041, in the 8th Battalion of the London Regiment, and then as a Private, No:368091, in the 7th (City of London) Battalion of the London Regiment.

His transfer to the 7th Battalion would have occurred when there was a ‘conjunction’ in early 1918 of the 1st/7th and 2nd/7th Battalions of the London Regiment.  After early training the 1/7th had joined the 4th London Brigade in the 2nd London Division.  After the 2nd London Division was brought up to strength, it entrained for Southampton, disembarking at Le Havre on 18 March 1915.  The Battalion fought in many of the major actions of WWI, well before Lewis would have been involved.

There is no date on his Medal Card for when Lewis went to France, indicating that this was after the end of 1915, but it would probably have been well after this date and some time after he joined up.  He was unlikely to have been sufficiently trained – or indeed old enough assuming he had declared his correct age – to serve overseas until at least mid 1917.  Indeed the note of his death stated that he was drafted to France in April 1918.[3]

During 1918, by which date Lewis was probably with the Battalion in France, they fought at Villers Bretonneux (24 to 25 April 1918).  This was during the period of consolidation after the turning point of the German advance of ‘Operation Michael’.  August saw the start of what developed into an Allied offensive and advance, which became known as the ‘Hundred Days Offensive’,[4] and pushed back the German Armies along an extended front until the Armistice was declared.

The combined 7th Battalion seems to have moved from the 2nd Division and its War Diary is within the records of the 174th Brigade in the 58th Division at The National Archives[5] – and on-line.  The events recorded in the Diary for August and for the last few days before Lewis was killed are summarised below.

1 August – ROUND WOOD – Kit & clothing inspection.

2 August – Move by bus to HALLOY-LES-PERNOIS.  Battn. in billets 2.30pm.

3 August – HALLOY – Squad and Company drill, Lewis gun, signalling and stretcher team class.

4 August – Battn. standing by, 1½ hours notice to move – moved by bus and march route to BONNAY – in position 4.30am, 5-8-18.

5 August – BONNAY – Proceeded to relieve the 11th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, 18th Division in reserve.

6 August – In Line – In reserve.

7 – 10 August – see Narrative attached.

11 August – BRAY-CORBIE ROAD – Battalion in reserve near CEMETERY COPSE.

12 August – Battalion moved back to ROUND WOOD.

The ‘Narrative’ for the period 7-10 August comprised four typed pages detailing the action and the advance of nearly two miles in two days.  Extracts (below) provide details of the action on 8 August when Lewis was killed, and some of the locations given are shown on the map[6] below.

‘At 10.20 p.m. on the 7th. The Bn. moved forward from Valley in J.22.c. … along COOTAMUNDRA street and CRUMP lane to their assembly position in K.25.a. … Bn. H.Q. was at LONE TREE CEMETERY J.24.6.2. … There was little counter preparation by the enemy … Shortly before 4 a.m. on the 8th. A heavy mist fell and by zero hour (4.20 a.m.) it was impossible to see more than 20 to 25 yards.

The ultimate objective of the Bn, was the line K.27.d.9.4. – K27.b.9.7.  ‘A’ and ‘B’ Coys, passing round to the N side of MALARD Wood supported by ‘C’ Coy, and ‘D’ Coy, containing the N.W. side of the Wood … 173rd Inf. Bde. were to pass through one hour later and take a further line beyond of the SOMME RIVER. …

The barrage opened punctually at 4.20 a.m. and was very good, … owing to the mist it was impossible to observe the progress of the operation but batches of wounded and prisoners soon began to arrive and … progress was satisfactory, at any rate as far as MALARD Wood.

I found two Coy. of the 2/2nd London Regt … arranged … to … advance through MALARD Wood.  I got them the assistance of a Tank … and they advanced to the East side of the wood.’

It was at some time during this advance that Lewis Lewis was ‘Killed in Action’.

‘On the afternoon of the 9th. the troops of the 8th London Regt. with me were withdrawn as further operations were contemplated. … I had no precise instructions as to the operation but I understood the American Troops were to attack GRESSAIRE WOOD from my left flank at 5.30 p.m. … At 6.30 p.m., I and my Adjt. with H.Q. Lewis Guns moved forward and from K.27.b.9.6. I was able to observe British and American troops establishing posts on the ridge S.E. but fighting still appeared to be going on to my right in the lower ground and also in GRESSAIRE Wood.

On the night of the 10th … the Bn. Was relieved by American Troops and moved back to MALARD WOOD.’

Various general points and recommendations were made in the report, which are of interest.

‘(a) In both assaults numerous T.M.s, Heavy and light machine guns were captured and many prisoners.  In each case the severest fighting and the most prisoners were in the enemy’s front line. In the second assault 4 field guns and 3 5.9 howitzers were captured the latter in GRESSAIRE WOOD, … A wagon of signaling stores was also captured … The heavy mist undoubtedly helped in assaulting the enemy forward defense on the 8th. inst, that was largely responsible for the failure of the second phase.

(b) Communication was lacking to start with … By 4 p.m. the line was run out … and was maintained throughout.  Two lines were laid into the ravine …  but it was found impossible to maintain them owing to shell fire.  The wire for these lines was collected by my signalers on the ground as their own supply was inadequate.

(c) Medical Arrangements.  On the 9th. inst. the supply of stretchers was wholly inadequate and supplies demanded were very slow in arriving.  Many wounded lying out in front at no great distance from the R.A.P. [Regimental Aid Post] could have been collected much earlier, were it possible to supply R.A.M.C. Bearers on this work.  At present M.O.s are forbidden to use them forward of the R.A.P, even when things are quiet.

(d) H.Q. Lewis Guns proved extremely useful in furnishing an intact and fresh reserve to be brought forward after the objective had been taken.  I recommend that each Bn. be supplied with a light German machine gun for instructional purposes as a knowledge of their use would be very useful to assaulting troops.

(e) Supply Tanks fulfilled their role well.  I recommend that a Q.M.Sgt. travel with them to remain in charge of the dump when formed, and to ensure the supplies reaching the troops for whom they are intended.  The Bn. received some S.A.A. [Small Arms Ammunition] from ‘plane.

(f) Casualties were unfortunately heavy on both days amounting to 12 officers and about 300 other Ranks.’

Lewis Lewis was only one of that great number (300 ‘O.R.s’) killed or injured during the two days of this advance.  He was among those ‘Killed in Action’ on 8 August 1918 and was 18 years old.

Lewis Lewis was originally buried, together with another soldier, W.C. Newton, also from the London Regiment, in a single grave, with their two names on the cross, in a small cemetery nearer to where they fell.  The ‘Concentration Record’[7] showed that they were both named on a single cross on a joint grave located at map reference: ‘62d.NE.K.25.b.1.4.’  This is just south of the trench, which was the route to the concentration point for the attack by the 7th Bn. London Regiment on 8 August 1918.  It is about a mile north of the village of Sailly-Laurette – in Map Square 25 and is shown on the map above.

The list of smaller cemeteries and burial grounds that were concentrated to Heath Cemetery, Harbonniers after the war, included the …
‘… Sailly-Laurette Military Cemetery, 800 metres due North of Sailly-Laurette village – in Map Square 31.  Here were buried 38 soldiers from the United Kingdom mainly of the 58th (London) Division and two from Australia, who fell in August 1918’. 

However, the map reference given in the ‘Concentration Report’ would seem to refer to a location another 1000 yards or so north of this cemetery location, so it seems that it was a smaller cemetery which is not listed in the CWGC list.

When smaller burial grounds and battlefield graves were later ‘concentrated’ – bodies were exhumed, moved and reburied in larger cemeteries, which could be better maintained.  The two soldiers from the London Regiment were both reburied in separate graves – Lewis Lewis was reburied in grave reference: VIII. G. 17.,[8] – and W. C. Newton in grave ref: 8. J. 11., at the Heath Cemetery, Harbonnieres, Somme [Map ref: ‘62d.SE.Q.29.d.5.4.’], some 5 miles south-east of  Sailly-Laurette.

Heath Cemetery is situated on the south side of road from Amiens to St Quentin.  Harbonnieres was … regained by the Australian Corps on 8 August 1918.  Heath Cemetery, so called from the wide expanse of open country on which it stands, was made after the Armistice.  Graves were brought into it from the battlefields between Bray and Harbonnieres and from many other burial grounds in the area.[9] … the list includes: ‘… Sailly-Laurette Military Cemetery, 800 metres due north of Sailly-Laurette village.  Here were buried 38 soldiers from the United Kingdom mainly of the 58th (London) Division and two from Australia, who fell in August 1918, …’.

His family had the inscription ‘All that he Hoped for, All he had he Gave’, added to his gravestone.

The Rugby Advertiser reported his death in September.
Pte Lewis Lewis, City of London Regiment, son of ex-P.C Lewis, 35 King Edward Road, was killed in France on August 8th.  He was nearly 19 years of age, an old St Matthew’s boy, and an employee at Rugby Post Office.  He joined the Army in October, 1917, and was drafted to France in April.[10]

The Coventry Evening Telegraph published a note on 9 October 1918,
THE ROLL OF HONOUR. Coventry and District Casualties. To-day’s list of casualties includes the following : Killed.  London Regiment. – Lewis, 368091, L., Rugby; .[11]

His Medal Card and the Medal Roll showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.  He is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gate.

The Army Registers of Soldiers’ Effects shows that Lewis’s outstanding pay of £6-16-11d, was paid to his father on 20 November 1918, and his War Gratuity of £3 on 28 November 1919.

The address for his parents given on the CWGC site suggests that by the early 1920s, Frederick and Maggie Lewis had moved to 35, King Edward Road, Rugby.

 

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Lewis Lewis was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, May 2018.

[1]      Info from: UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919

[2]      Rugby Advertiser, 21 September 1918, and also, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/09/21/21st-sep-1918-suggested-memorial-to-rugby-men/.

[3]      Rugby Advertiser, 21 September 1918, and also, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/09/21/21st-sep-1918-suggested-memorial-to-rugby-men/.

[4]      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Second_Battle_of_Bapaume.

[5]      The National Archives, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, London Regiment, 58th Division, Piece 3005/6, 1/7 Battalion London Regiment (1918 Feb – Nov).  See also on www.Ancestry.co.uk.

[6]      Adapted from https://maps.nls.uk/view/101465314.

[7]      Smaller burial grounds and battlefield graves were later ‘concentrated’ – the bodies were  exhumed, moved and reburied in larger cemeteries, which could be better maintained.

[8]      One of the Concentration Record Sheets states grave 18 not 17.

[9]      See list at https://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/62000/heath-cemetery,-harbonnieres/.

[10]     Rugby Advertiser, 21 September 1918, and also, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/09/21/21st-sep-1918-suggested-memorial-to-rugby-men/.

[11]     Coventry Evening Telegraph, Wednesday, 9 October 1918.

9th Sep 1916. Lady Dorothie Feilding Gains The Military Medal

LADY DOROTHIE FEILDING GAINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

DECORATED BY THE KING.

Lady Dorothie Feilding, the Earl of Denbigh’s youngest daughter, is first on the list of the British women military medallists. The honour is awarded for her gallant service with Dr Hector Munro’s Field Ambulance. For months she tended the sick and wounded in the cellar of a house close to the Belgian trenches. The situation became so dangerous the Lady Dorothie and her companions were at last persuaded to move, and ten minutes after they had removed their belongings a German shell crashed on the house and destroyed it. King Albert bestowed on Lady Dorothie Belgium’s highest military decoration, the Order of Leopold. She was also mentioned in a French brigade order for “ giving to all almost daily the finest example of contempt of danger and devotion to duty.” The official account of the present award states that Lady Dorothie “ attended the wounded for over a year with marked devotion to duty and contempt of danger.”

Lady Dorothie Feilding, accompanied by her father, Col. The Earl of Denbigh, was decorated by the King with the Military Medal at Windsor Castle on Wednesday last, and had the honour of lunching afterwards with their Majesties.

The Military Medal is one recently instituted by the King solely for acts of bravery in the field under fire and has as its sole inscription on the back of the medal “ For bravery in the field.”

Lady Dorothie is the first British woman to receive the decoration. She returned to her work with the Munro Ambulance Corps in Belgium yesterday (Friday).

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt P W Nickalls, Northants Yeomanry, has been gazetted temporary major.

Sergt Harry Beers, 1st King’s (Liverpool) Regt. reported missing on August 8th, has written to state that he is a prisoner of war at Dulmen, Germany. Sergt Beers is an old St Oswald’s boy (New Bilton).

Mrs T Douglas, 87 Cambridge Street, has received news that her eldest son, Pte Frank Belcher, is lying at St Pat’s Hospital, Malta, with malaria fever, contracted in Salonika. He joined the colours on September 2nd, 1914, and after going through several engagements in France was drafted out to Salonika in October, 1915. He is now on the high road to recovery.

A FIGHTING FAMILY.—Few families have a better war record than that of Mr and Mrs Dunkley, of l5 Chester Street, Rugby. There are five sons in the Army, including two who have been reported missing for some time past. William Albert, the eldest, is in the King’s Royal Rifles, and he has a son serving with him at Salonica. Walter Ernest has served his time with the Royal Warwicks, and has just re-joined the Army from Lutterworth, having been drafted into a different regiment. Harry, who joined the Royal Warwicks, has been missing since July 30th ; and Percy John, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, has been missing since July 25th. The fifth son, Arthur Rowland, is serving with the Labour Battalion. A sixth member of the same family (Alfred Thos Dunkley) has been discharged from the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry on medical grounds, and is now employed in a controlled factory. Mrs Dunkley has two brothers serving in France, and two of her nephews are in the Army.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Walter Wilkins, 2nd Battalion Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, who worked in the Illumination Department at the B.T.H, and was a member of the B.T.H hockey team, has been killed in action. He was only married a few months before the War broke out.

We learn that Transport Sergt F R Spencer, Royal Warwicks, was wounded on August 27th by a bullet which passed through his right leg. By a strange coincidence he was first attended when brought in by his own medical attendant, who is now at the front. Sergt Spencer is now in hospital at Lincoln, going on well. He had been out in France about 18 months.

ACCIDENT TO PTE J H HOLMES.

Pte J H Holmes, a member of the Rugby Advertiser staff, who joined the R.A.M.C in October last, has met with an accident in France, as a result of which he has broken his left leg in two places below the knee. In a letter to a friend he says : “ After spending a few days in three different hospitals in France, I arrived in Southampton from Boulogne on Friday. The thing which struck me most was the excellent arrangements for transporting the wounded. The hospitals, too, contain the most up-to-date instruments. The hospital I am in is a fine place, food and attention being perfect.”

TWO MORE ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOYS KILLED.

News has just come to hand that Lance-Corpl A Lewis, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks L.I. has been killed in action. He was the second son of P.C Lewis, of Rugby, and an old scholar of St Matthew’s School, where he was popular and much liked. Lance-Corpl Lewis joined the Army early in the war, and was several times wounded, on one occasion his life being saved by a cigarette case in his breast pocket, which deflected the bullet.

Pte W Goffin, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks L.I, another St Matthew’s old boy, whose home is at 35 Pennington Street, who was posted as missing after the battle, of Loos last year, is now reported as killed. Pte W Goffin’s brother, Pte H J Goffin, 7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has just been wounded for the second time. No less than sixteen near relatives in the Goffin family are now on active service.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

NEWS has been received from the War Office that Lance-Corpl John Nicholas, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, son of Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, Lime Kiln Farm, Stretton-on-Dunsmore. was wounded in action in Egypt on August 5th. His many friends will he pleased to hear his wound is not serious, the bullet having passed through the muscle of his left leg, and he is now progressing favourably in hospital at Romani. He joined at the commencement of the War, and has been in Egypt twelve months. His two youngest brothers, of the Royal Fusiliers, are also serving in France, thus making a total of three sons out of four serving with his Majesty’s Forces.

A DYING SOLDIER’S REGRET.—Our readers will doubtless remember that a few months ago a soldier billeted in the town was fined for being drunk and disorderly and disturbing an open air service of the Salvation Army. News has. now reached Rugby that this man has died from wounds. While he was being carried off the field he asked any member of the stretcher party if they visited Rugby to call at the Salvation Army Citadel and express his regret for the occurrence. The corporal of the stretcher party has since been wounded and sent to England, and on Sunday afternoon he called at the Citadel and gave the dying soldier’s message to the officer in charge.

DEATHS.

MASON.—On Sept. 1st, died of wounds, Sergt. Arthur T. Mason, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry.
“ Greater love than this no man hath, that a man lay down his life for his friends.”
—From his devoted and sorrowing wife.

WILKINS.—Killed in action on August 24th, Walter Wilkins, 2nd Oxford & Bucks L.I.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

SUCCESSFUL FLAG DAY.

The effort on Saturday on behalf of the fund to provide comforts for prisoners of war from Rugby and district was in all respects a great and gratifying success. Following to many Flag days for deserving objects, it may have been assumed that the public were getting rather tired of these appeals ; but the plight of prisoners captured by the Germans and incarcerated in detention camps is such that the well-organised scheme to provide them with regular supplies of comforts, such as that undertaken by the local committee, must commend itself to everybody. Certain it is that the endeavour to raise a substantial sum of money to send weekly parcels to prisoners from this locality met with very enthusiastic support. All previous records were easily broken, and the sale of flags, supplemented by donations, has resulted in approximately £500 being raised. The sale of flags in the town and village produced £211 14s 11d. It will be remembered that for the Alexandra Rose Day about £140 was raised, and this was the highest amount brought in before Saturday by “ flag day ” collections in Rugby.

Anticipating a large sale of flags, the committee secured no fewer than 35,000 for disposal in Rugby and the surrounding villages. The flags were specially made for this effort. On one side were the letters in white on blue ground, “ Rugby Prisoners of War Fund,” and on the reverse side was a picture representing three British soldiers behind a barbed wire barricade, and guarded by Germans, with the word’s, “ Help our men,” printed at the foot.

The Benn Buildings, kindly lent by the Urban District Council, formed the centre of operations, and about 300 people helped in the collection. Some of the flag sellers were astir quite early in the morning, and towards mid-day there seemed a likelihood of the supply of flags giving out, and accordingly small Union Jacks were procured and stamped with the green seal familiar to local shopkeepers ; but by carefully regulating the sales throughout the town it was not found necessary to utilise a great number of these.

Another popular feature was the sale of sprays of lavender, of which between 7,000 and 8,000 were distributed. This idea originated with Mrs Bernard Hopps, of Thurlaston, and so great was the demand that extra supplies were needed. These were provided from the gardens of Mrs Hopps, Mr W Fiint, Mrs Blagden, Mrs Dickinson, Mm Eckersley, and others.

During the day Mr W Flint, the chairman of the committee, drove round the town and through the district in his car with Mr J R Barker, the energetic secretary, and visited the various depots which had been established.

On Sunday evening a special concert in aid of the Prisoners of War Fund was given at the Empire, the promoter being Mr B Morris, the proprietor. Admission was by silver collection, taken by Mrs Cosford and Miss Kimber. Miss Phyllis Morris and the artistes at the Empire gave their services, and a special film was shown. The proceeds of this concert amounted to just under £10.

The whole of the arrangements were carried out by the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, who received considerable assistance in the clerical work from Miss C M Judd.

Mr Barker made full use of the local newspapers in his publicity arrangements, and took advantage of every opportunity to make the cause of the prisoners of war understood and realised by everyone, in Rugby and the surrounding villages ; and this, no doubt, helped largely to bring about such a satisfactory result.

LIGHTING OFFENCES.

Alfred G Cox, shop manager, Poplar Grove, Rugby ; Ada Teague, 13 Park Road, Rugby ; George A Towers, newsagent, 120 Cambridge Street, Rugby ; Thos Norcross, draughtsman, Lodge Road, Rugby ; and John Henry Lines, Queen’s Head Inn, West Street, Rugby, were summoned for not obscuring lights as required by the Lighting Order.

Mrs Lines appeared for her husband, who was unwell, and said there was only a small light burning for a few minutes while she opened the window to let in some fresh air.—P.S Percival said at 11.15 he saw a bright light shining from the Queen’s Head. The blinds were not drawn, but there was a shade on the wrong side of the light. When he knocked at the door the light went out, but no one answered.—Mrs Lines said the reason she did not answer the door was that she thought it was a drunken soldier, against whom she had previously locked the door.—Fined £1.

A G Cox was summoned in respect of a light at the Co-operative Society’s Furniture Stores. He admitted the offence.—P.S Percival said he saw a bright light shining through the window of the furniture shop.—Defendant said he went in at midnight for the purpose of stock-taking, and switched on the light without thinking to first draw down the blind.—Fined £1.

Mr Towers said the light was showing accidentally.—P.C Lovell said he saw a bright light shining from the bedroom. Defendant’s attention was drawn to it, and he said he was sorry it had occurred. He did all he could to comply with the regulations. Mr Towers said the window was thrown up and the blind was blown outwards by the wind.—Fined £1.

T Norcross also admitted the offence.—P.C Elkington said at 10.35 p.m he saw a bright incandescent light shining from the bedroom window on to the houses opposite. The blind was not drawn.—Defendant said he had only been in the house a week, and the blinds had not been fixed. That was the first time he had used the gas, and that was only for a minute, because he had no candle in the room.—Fined £1.

Mr W Davis, solicitor, Rugby, appeared for Mrs Teague, and pleaded guilty.—P.C Elkington stated that he saw a bright light shining from the back of Mrs Teague’s house. There were two naked lights down-stairs and one upstairs. No blinds were drawn.—Mr Davis stated that Mrs Teague, who took in boarders, had taken down the blinds that night to wash them, and had retired to bed. One of the boarders subsequently turned on the light, not knowing that the blinds had been taken down.—Fined £1.

POINTS FOR FARMERS.—The War Agricultural Committee have received official information of interest to farmers in the district on the following points :— Sulphate of ammonia can be bought during August and September for 15s per cwt nett cash on condition that it is removed from the seller’s works before September 30th. After that the price will be raised to 15s 6d per cwt. Labour Exchanges are still authorised to deal with applications for soldiers to assist with the harvest.

THE PARISH CHURCH CLOCK.—For the present the church clock will not strike the hours and quarters. In view of air raids, all clocks have to be silent at night, and the churchwardens found it too expensive for the strike to be detached every evening and connected again next morning.

Lewis, Gerald Stanley. Died 7th Jul 1916

Gerald Stanley Lewis’s is another soldier whose life story is virtually unknown. [He was born in New Zealand – see Comments. There is a picture of him here.] He was probably one of the many who migrated to Rugby to work in the engineering businesses, before the First War, and thus are not recorded in the town for the 1911 census. He is recorded on the Willans and Robinson Drawing Office Memorial Plaque and was no doubt working there before the war.

Whilst known as ‘Gerald Stanley’ on the Willans Memorial, he was ‘Gerald S’ on his Medal Card, and as ‘Gerald Sydney’ on the CWGC records. However, with matching army numbers, it appears that they are the one individual.

Gerald Lewis joined up and served as a Private, No.16365, in the 9th Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers. The activities of the Battalion are recorded below:[1]

 9th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) was raised at Hounslow on 21 August 1914 as part of Kitchener’s First New Army and joined 36th Brigade, 12th (Eastern) Division. 36th Brigade underwent training at Colchester then final training was undertaken near Aldershot from 20 February 1915, with the cavalry, motor machine gun battery, sanitary and veterinary sections joining. The Division proceeded to France between 29 May and 1 June 1915 landing at Boulogne, they concentrated near St Omer and by 6 June were in the Meteren-Steenwerck area with Divisional HQ being established at Nieppe.

Gerald S Lewis’s Medal Card shows that he was in France from 20 July 1915, so he crossed over to France some six weeks after his Battalion, possibly he was still under training, but could have arrived in time to take part in the Battle of Loos.

They [the Division] underwent instruction from the more experienced 49th (South Midland) Division and took over a section of the front line at Ploegsteert Wood on 23 June 1915. They were in action in the Battle of Loos from 30 September, taking over the sector from Gun Trench to Hulluch Quarries consolidating the position, under heavy artillery fire. On 9 October they repelled a heavy German infantry attack and on the 13 October took part in the Action of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, capturing Gun Trench and the south western face of the Hulluch Quarries. During this period at Loos, 117 officers and 3237 men of the Division were killed or wounded. By 21 October they moved to Fouquieres-les-Bethune for a short rest then returned to the front line at the Hohenzollern Redoubt until 15 November, when they went into reserve at Lillers. On 9 December, 9th Royal Fusiliers assisted in a round-up of spies and other suspicious characters in the streets of Bethune. On 10 December, the Division took over the front line north of La Bassee canal at Givenchy. On 19 January they began a period of training in Open Warfare at Busnes, then moved back into the front line at Loos on 12 February 1916. In June they moved to Flesselles and carried out a training exercise.

The Battalion was then involved in the Battle of the Somme.

They moved to Baizieux on 30 June and went into the reserve at Hencourt and Millencourt by mid morning on 1 July. They relieved the 9th Division at Ovillers-la-Boisselle that night and attacked at 3.15 the following morning with mixed success. On 7 July they attacked again and despite suffering heavy casualties in the area of Mash Valley, they succeeded in capturing and holding the first and second lines close to Ovillers. They were withdrawn to Contay on 9 July.[2]

It was presumably during the action in Mash Valley that Gerald was ‘Killed in Action’ on 7 July 1916 as recorded on his Medal Card. He is listed as ‘Gerald Sydney Lewis’ by the CWGC, as one of those killed or missing on 7 July 1916 and whose body was not found or identified. He is remembered on Pier and Face 8C, 9A and 16A, of the Thiepval Memorial.

The Thiepval Memorial, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November 1916. The memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, was built between 1928 and 1932 and unveiled by the Prince of Wales, in the presence of the President of France, on 1 August 1932.

He is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates, and on the Willans Drawing Office Metal Memorial Plaque.

Gerald Stanley Lewis was awarded the 1915 Star, the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Gerald Stanley Lewis was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, June 2016.

[1]         http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/allied/battalion.php?pid=6896

[2]       Edited from: http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/allied/battalion.php?pid=6896

2nd Oct 1915. Rugby Soldier’s life saved by a Cigarette Case

RUGBY SOLDIER’S LIFE SAVED BY A CIGARETTE CASE.

In the recent British advance, L-Corpl A Lewis (son of P.C Lewis, Rugby), had a narrow escape from death, his life being saved by a cigarette case. The plucky young fellow, who is at present in a hospital at Tunbridge, has written to his parents stating that he is wounded in the muscle of the left arm, and but for a cigarette-case, which deflected the bullet, he would have been shot through the heart. He states that his battalion lost rather heavily, and adds that it was terrible to hear the rapid firing of the artillery, which lasted for half-an-hour, and nothing could be heard but the hissing and banging of shells. This is the second time he has been wounded. Another son of P.C Lewis, Pte F Lewis, has been at the front since the commencement of the war, and has been wounded twice, and gassed slightly. He has now been transferred to the Cycle Corps.

WOUNDED BY SHRAPNEL.

News has been received that Pte George Victor Hewitt, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, whose home is at 58 Abbey Street, Rugby, has been wounded. He is in a base hospital, and in a letter recently sent to his parents states that he has been wounded in the head by a piece of shrapnel, but not seriously. He was out with a working party in front of the lines, when (as he puts it) they “ had a good reception,” five out of the party of ten being hit.

A brother of the wounded soldier, Ernest Hewitt, has also joined H.M Army, enlisting at Newcastle ; and being a good shot, he was not long before he was sent to the front. He formerly worked at the B.T.H, and has sent home a number of interesting letters.

PTE TOWERS, OF HARBOROUGH FIELDS, KILLED

On Monday evening Mr Thomas Towers, farmer, of Harborough Fields Farm, Churchover, received a telegram from the Record Office, Warwick, stating that his elder son, Pte Martin Victor Towers, had been dangerously wounded in the brain by a bullet, and that he was lying unconscious in the 3rd Canadian Hospital, Carmiers Etaples. Early the next morning a wire, announcing his death, was received. Pte Towers, who was 19 years of age, enlisted on August 28th, 1914, and had been at the front about four months. Before enlisting he assisted his father on the farm.

RUGBY BUILDER’S APPRENTICE REPORTED KILLED.

There is reason to fear that Pte Tom Shone, who was apprenticed to the carpentry at Messrs Foster & Dicksee’s, and enlisted in Kitchener’s Army in September last year, was killed in the general advance at Loos. The death has not been officially reported, but Bob Salmon, of the same regiment, in a letter to his father, Mr George Salmon, of 45 Lower Hillmorton Road, also a carpenter at Messrs Foster & Dicksee’s, mentions the occurrence, the belief being that he was killed by shell fire in the German lines. Bob Salmon states that they were in the charge, and took four of the enemy’s lines. Reference is made in the letter to casualties amongst other Rugby chums—Bert Snutch and Tom Reeve-but the writer says that Abbott, Butler, and himself came through all right, and that Keyte was not in the charge, but left behind. The last he saw of Tom Shone was two minutes before the attack, when he had just been made the captain’s orderly. “ We were afterwards told by one of the officers that the work we did in attaining the objective was excellent.” He adds: “ I was jolly thankful to get out of the trenches that night.”

ANOTHER EMPLOYEE OF MESSRS. FROST & SONS KILLED.

News has been received that Rifleman E Negus, of the 12th Battalion Rifle Brigade, who at the time he enlisted in September last year was a machine-minder in the employ of Messrs Frost & Sons, has been killed in action. He went out to France in July and, as will be seen by the following letter from the machine-gun officer to his father, he lost his life on September 21st, through the bursting of a shell near him :—

“ Dear Mr Negus,-I am sorry to inform you that your son was killed in action this afternoon. A shell burst quite near him and killed him instantaneously. He could not have known anything about it, and of that I am glad. Your son is a great loss to his friends and to myself, I could not wish for a more cheery lad or a more willing worker. His place in his gun team will be hard to fill. Please accept my deepest sympathy in your sorrow. He will be buried tomorrow morning at 10 a.m, quite near the firing-line.—Yours sincerely, R C S STEVENSON, machine-gun officer.

“ September 21st.”

When he joined the army deceased had only been in Messrs Frost & Sons’ employ about three months, but he was very much liked by his fellow-workmen, and had qualities that made him deservedly popular. His father’s home is in Tottenham, London.

FRANKTON.

PRIVATE HERBERT HOLLIS, eldest son of Mr Amos Hollis, of Frankton, late of Harbury, who enlisted on September 7th, 1914, in the 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action oa August 10th last at the Dardanelles.

BRAUNSTON.

PTE CLIFFORD HAYNES, 1st Batt Northants Regiment, of this village, who was seriously wounded in the retreat from Moms, was again sent out to the front in March, being then convalescent. He was again seriously wounded with fire pieces of shrapnel in July. Having barely recovered from his wounds, he has been home for a few days’ furlough, before going out to the Dardanelles. What do the shirkers say to this ?

CORPL JACK FORTNAM, Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was seriously wounded in the left arm while engaged in the charge of yeomanry on Hill 70, Gallipoli new landing, is progressing slowly but favourably at Netley Hospital.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Isham, of Churchover, has received a field card from his son. Rifleman W Isham, of the Rifle Brigade, stating that he has been wounded and is in hospital.

In a letter to his old Schoolmaster, Pte Wm Padley, R.A.M.C, an old Murrayian, states that he as now on duty at a large hospital at Ras-el-Tin, Alexandria, and for six weeks he was engaged on a hospital ship, fetching sick and wounded from the Dardanelles.

The friends of Corpl Frank Davis of 38A Bridget Street, Rugby, have received intimation that he was wounded with shrapnel in the charge, and is now in hospital in England. He Worked at the B.T.H before his enlistment in September last year, and went out with his regiment in May.

CASUALTIES TO WARWICKSHIRE MEN.

The following further casualties in the Warwickshire Yeomanry at the Dardanalles are reported :-

KILLED.-Pte W Hartley, Pte A Allbright, Pte W J Beech.

DIED OF WOUNDS.-Corpl Whittall, Sergt E J Cox, and Pte D E Powell.

WOUNDED.—Lce-Corpl Barnard, Pte G Curran (not missing as previously reported), Pte F H Gould, Pte J Boven.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry is evidently a very popular branch of the service. The first line is doing splendid service in the Dardanelles, and has been strengthened by drafts from the second line, which is still in this country. The third, line is attracting very large numbers of recruits of a very fine type, and has also sent a hundred to fill up the ranks of the second line, caused by over a hundred being sent to take part in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. The county has, in fact, great reason to be proud of its Yeomanry regiment.

THE SEVENTH WARWICKS.

One of the “ Pals,” writing to us from the Front, says “ A Leamington Sergeant who has just returned from leave assures me that several Leamingtonians could not credit the fact that the 1/7th Warwicks had ever held front-line trenches. He was asked ‘ What Regulars did you have in front of you ?’ I should like to assure you that the 1/7th R.W.R have been holding front-line trenches on and off ever since the first fortnight after we came abroad. The value of Territorials as reliable troop for trench warfare was at one time doubted, but this doubt was quickly removed, and I think you will agree with me when I say that the Territorial Force has ‘made good.’”

7TH WARWICKSHIRE MEN WOUNDED.

The following members of the 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion are reported wounded :- Lce-Corpl T Booth, Lce-Corpl E Reading, and Pte F Cotton.

DEATHS.

CLEAVER.—Killed in action in the Dardanelles on August 10th, Pte. James Cleaver, 9th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, only son of the late James Cleaver, of Frankton, and dearly-beloved brother of Mrs. Doyle, 71 Victoria Street, New Bilton, Rugby, aged 28 years. Duty done.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following recruits have been attested at Rugby Drill Hall this week :—A Bates, 220th Fortress Co, R.E ; R H Cowley (driver), R.E ; R Williams and A Burton, K.R.R ; J A Spear, 14th Gloucester Bantams ; J H White, R.F.A ; H Edmans, Yorks and Lancs ; S L Howard, R.A.M.C ; and T Gamble, Coldstream Guards. All branches of the army, with the exception of the cavalry, are now open for recruits. There are good openings for drivers in the R.E, recruits 5ft and upwards in height, being accepted up to 45 years.

THE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The Local Prisoners of War Help Committee have this week despatched 28 parcels to British prisoners in Germany. Each parcel contained a large tin of beef, cheese, biscuits, cafe au lait, cocoa, soup tablets, and pickles. Each parcel which cost 3s. also contained either a pair of socks or a flannel shirt, these articles having been sent by generous donors to the Rectory.

During the coming winter the committee will be grateful for any gifts of suitable warm under-clothing in a decent state of repair for despatch with the weekly parcels.

That the work of the committee is appreciated by the brave fellows who receive parcels is proved by the many postcards and letters of thanks which are being continually received acknowledging the receipt of parcels.

CRICK RIFLEMAN’S EXPERIENCE IN THE FIRING LINE.

Rifleman Harry Fretter, of the Rifle Brigade, whose home is at Crick, and who was formerly employed there, in a letter to a Rugby friend, gives his first experiences of trench warfare as follows :—“ We are holding a part in the firing-line which is well advanced, so we have steered clear of bayonet charges ; but we have seen enough to give us a good idea of what real fighting is like, We have to be careful or else we get a few German snipers after us, who try very hard to hit as. They are very good shots, and, of course, if they play the game too bad, we just put our machine-gun on them, which is far superior to the German’ machine-gun. Then we get a little excitement watching our artillery blow the German trenches up. It is lovely to see the sand-bags and dirt go up in the air. As for Germans, we have not seen any yet. We can hear them at night, and that is our share at present, but when the time comes our boys will just show them what they are made of.”