18th May 1918. Fatal Flying Accidents near Rugby

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENTS NEAR RUGBY.
TWO YOUNG PILOTS KILLED.

On Monday two inquests were held by Mr E F Hadow at Rugby on the bodies of Second-Lieut James Donald McRae Reid (21) and Second-Lieut Roderick Oliver Sherar, who were killed in aeroplane accident during the latter end of last week.

With regard to Lieut Reid, of Vancouver, a member of the Canadian R.F.C, it was stated that on Thursday morning last week he started on a flight in a machine, the rigging and engine of which were in good order. An eye-witness, Second-Lieut Gerald Gold, stated that when he was about 2,000ft up Lieut Reid started a vertical dive, and while he was trying to straighten out again the aeroplane collapsed. Deceased dived from 1,200ft to 1,500ft, and he believed that the accident was due to deceased trying to straighten out too quickly. He was apparently diving without the engine going.

Capt Henry Pick Dean thought that the aeroplane fell about 800ft out of control. Deceased was diving at a rate of 180 or 200 miles an hour, and tried to straighten out too quickly, and witness believed this caused the aeroplane to crock up. It was not common for ‘planes to break in the middle as this did unless subjected to very great strain.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that death was instantaneous, deceased’s head being smashed in and a large number of bones broken.

In the case of Second-Lieut Sherar, it was stated that he was an Australian, and had served in France with the Infantry. He was gazetted from a cadetship a fortnight ago. On Saturday, at 12 o’clock, deceased was ordered by Capt Pick Dean to take up the machine, the engine and rigging of which had been certified previously as in good order. Deceased was a very fine flyer, and Capt Dean watched him looping and ” rolling ” —a corkscrew evolution which all pilots were taught—for about ten minutes. He then flew out of sight, and the accident occurred shortly afterwards. Capt Dean’s opinion was that Lieut Sherar, who was 2,000ft up when he began his evolutions, was losing height without realising it. Probably when at a height of 1,500ft, but thinking it was higher up, the officer began a spin without sufficient depth to save himself. Had there been another 50ft below him he could have got out all right. It was clearly a case of misjudging the altitude.—This was confirmed by Second-Lieut Charles T Robinson, who witnessed the accident, and who said the machine struck the ground after coming out of a voluntary spin.—The injuries were described by Surgeon-Major Chester Collins, who said death must have been instantaneous, as deceased’s neck was broken.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned in each case.

RUGBY’S PATRIOTISM IMPUGNED.
Capt King, the officer commanding, mentioned that he had wished to give one of the officers a military funeral at Rugby ; but as he was not a Rugby man, the local authorities wished to charge £11 for the ground alone. He did not consider it very patriotic of Rugby people when a young man gave his life for his country, to refuse him a decent burial in their town.

The jury endorsed Capt King’s remarks and expressed the hope that the question would be brought to the notice of the Council.—The Foreman : They would not treat you like that at Clifton.—Capt King: No we are going to have him buried there.—The jury asked the Coroner to write to the Clerk to the Council on the matter, and the Foreman also promised to approach a member of the Council.

The attention of Mr Arthur Morson, the clerk to the Urban District Council, having been drawn to this question, he informs us that the regulations governing internments in the cemetery were very explicit on this point, and the Council have no power to allow a stranger to Rugby to be interred in the cemetery without the payment of double fees. This rule is necessary for the preservation of the burial ground for Rugbeians, and if it was not strictly observed there is a possibility that the cemetery would soon be filled with people from outside.

FUNERALS OF THE VICTIMS.
It was hoped to have given both of the deceased an imposing military funeral at Rugby ; but as the price of the ground space in Rugby Cemetery was too prohibitive, the funerals took place at Clifton with full military honours, whilst the villagers showed their respect by attending in large numbers.

Lieut Reid was buried on Monday, and in attendance were six officers, who acted as bearers,and 30 men, the whole being under the charge of Capt King. A sister of the deceased, who is serving with the Canadian Red Cross, attended. A firing party fired volleys, and the ” Last Post” was sounded. The school children, it might be added, lined the churchyard path, and a hymn was sung, accompanied on the organ. The Rev Cyril Morton (Vicar) officiated, and was assisted by Captain McGuinness (Presbyterian Chaplain).

The funeral of Second-Lieut Sherar took place at Clifton on Tuesday. Thirty officers (six of whom acted as bearers), thirty N.C.O’s and men, and a firing party attended, under Major Forbes. In church the hymn, ” On the Resurrection Morning,” was sung, and appropriate organ music was rendered. Cousins of the deceased were present as chief mourners. A representative was present from the Strand headquarters. Lieut Wood was in charge of the arrangements.

In both cases wreaths were sent by brother officers.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—I can hardly believe that the loyalty of Rugby— which is proverbial—should have failed on such an occasion in the provision of some 6ft. of ground (except at the cost of £11) to be the last resting-place of one of our youngest and bravest Allies.

Lieut Reid was a magnificent flyer, and his machine— OUR manufacture—literally broke in two with him when in mid-air, and if any man gave his life for our country he did.

I can only say we here at Clifton were proud to have him, as well as a young Australian, at rest in our little village burial ground.

T S TOWNSEND. May 16, 1918.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte F Rouse, A.S.C, of 8 Stephen Street, Rugby, has been wounded. He had an operation in France, and is now in Newcastle-on-Tyne.

Mrs Webb, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, has received from her husband. Sergt J Webb, 1st Warwicks, a letter from the Major-General of the 4th Division,stating that Sergt Webb’s gallant conduct had been reported to him, and congratulating him on his fine behaviour. Sergt Webb enlisted in September, 1914.

New has been received by Mrs McKie, 33 Albert Street, Rugby, that her son, Pte Horace Horsley, of the Manchesters, has been missing since March 21st. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H, and is 21 years of age. He joined up in May last year, and went out in November and took part in the big battle.

Lieut A J Dukes, 15th Battalion the Welsh Regiment, son of Mr A J Dukes, Rugby, has been wounded in action, and is now in hospital in Birmingham.

Lance-Corpl A Blundy, 2nd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action on April 28, 1918. Prior to joining up he was employed in the B.T.H Generator Department. He was an old St Matthew’s boy.

Information has been received that R.S.M W J Barford, 4th Lincolnshire Regiment, died on April 30, 1918, from wounds received in action. Prior to joining his Majesty’s Forces, Pte Barford was a member of the Supply Department staff of the BTH.

Mrs F C Worrall has received news that her husband, Sergt F C Worrall, has been wounded. He is the eldest son of Mr C Worrall, Farm Cottage, Albert Street, and has been in France two years.

Lieut Evan Harries Jones, M.C, 87th Brigade, R.F.A, second son of Mr & Mrs J Jones, of Cosford, who was killed in action on April 25, 1918, was 22 years of age, and educated at the Rugby Lower School. In a letter received by his parents from the Commanding Officer of the Brigade, the latter states that he had known the late Lieut Jones for many months, and that they had had many hard and trying times together. His example was always a keen stimulant to those under his command, For gallantry and conduct he received the M.C some time ago. The writer adds:—“ On the date on which he lost his life we were together in a very hot and extremely difficult position ; his conduct then, as it had been at all times, was cool and beyond praise. He was killed by a German bullet, and his death was instantaneous. In the great loss to you, so it is to us, his brother officers and his battery. He will always be remembered as one of the finest officers who have laid down their lives for their King and country. I have the pleasure to state that he has again been mentioned for gallantry and splendid conduct to the proper quarter, and I feel sure that a bar to his M.C will be awarded. I wish you to know how much his brother officers sympathise with you in your great loss.”

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
SOLDIER MISSING.—News has been received by Mrs Hancox that her son, Pte J F Hancox, has been missing since April 14th. The War Office states that he may not be killed ; he may have been taken prisoner or temporarily separated from his regiment.

BRANDON.
PTE HORACE WATTS.—Mr & Mrs G Watts, who had not received news of their son, Pte Horace Watts, since March 21st, have just heard from him that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He was wounded in two places in the leg in 1916 and invalided home. He joined up in August, 1914, and has been on the Western front for upwards of three years, during which time he has seen much fighting with his regiment, the West Kents. He was one of the number who, in Trones Wood, was surrounded by the Germans, and successfully held them at bay for two days, eventually being successful in withdrawing from the difficult situation. He is again wounded. Before answering his country’s call he was a footman to the Earl of Amherst, and previous to that he held a similar position to Col R J Beech at Brandon Hall. His father, Mr G Watts, has been head gamekeeper for Col Beech for 26 years.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS P GRANT, Mill Street, Dunchurch, received the news from her husband on Tuesday morning that he has been wounded in the right leg, and has undergone an operation, which was successful.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
CASUALTIES.—Mrs Edwd Ayres has now received through the Red Cross evidence that her eldest son, Pte Edwd Ayres, R.W.R, previously reported missing, was seen lying dead in a disused trench on October 9th last. Much sympathy is felt with Mrs Ayres, whose only other son has just been called up. She is a widow, and works hard for her living at Messrs Kaye’s Lime and Cement Works.—News is also to hand that Pte Sidney Linnett, Army Cyclist Corps, is missing. The chaplain writes that he went into action on April 18th last, and has not since been heard of. He was one of our early enlistments into the Royal Warwicks. Pte Linnett is the adopted son of Mr and the late Mrs W Gaskins, of the Model Village.—Pte George Hart, R.W.R, has been wounded in the face and thigh, and though at first blinded, has now recovered his sight. He writes that he expects soon to be convalescent and again in the fighting line. He has three other brothers in the Army, all of whom have seen considerable service. They are the gallant sons of Mr & Mrs Wm Hart.—Gunner Arthur J Worrall, R.F.A, who for the past six months has been an inmate of the Middlesex War Hospital at Maksbury, is now convalescent.—Sapper J Gamage, R.E, eldest son of Mr & Mrs W Gamage, has met with a serious injury to his hand while on duty in France.

NAPTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—The parishioners regret to hear of the loss of two Napton lads—Pte Clement Fell Batchelor and Pte Sidney Lines. Mr & Mrs James Hands have also had official notification that their second son, Pte Frank Hands, was missing from April 1st. Mr & Mrs Hands’ eldest son was killed in action in June, 1916.

AN APPEAL TO RUGBY YOUNG MEN.

From one of the propaganda vans war pictures were exhibited on Thursday evening to a large crowd gathered near the Clock Tower. Speeches were delivered by Mr McKinnell, two representatives with the van, and Colonel Johnstone. In a stirring appeal, Col Johnstone said : “ Young men of Rugby, I have appealed to you before, and I appeal to you again with greater force, because the necessity for men is very much greater. Do you want to see your country devastated and your homes ruined ? If not, follow the example of those noble and brave men whom you see walking about the town in blue. Those fellows have done their duty. They had fought for their country and for you and me. Come forward and follow their example. I know some of you are working in munitions, and I also know that you have only to hand in your certificate, and then you can voluntarily enlist. Do not make a mistake about that. Other men will be found to do your work. I think it is a shame, and to me it is very degrading, that older men of 45 or so should be called out to the Colours when there are so many young men quite able to join the Colours who ought to do so, instead of letting their fathers do so. Col Johnstone concluded by an appeal to the men who could not join the Army to join the Volunteers. That would be helping their country. The Rugby Company had got a very good name. Col Johnstone referred to the test mobilisation at Warwick Park, when 886 men were on parade. These men could render a very good account of themselves in the case of emergency, and they did not know how soon this emergency would arise. At present there was a need for boys of 17 years to 17 years 9 months to come forward as carpenters.”

MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF EXEMPTED MEN.
APPEAL TRIBUNAL CHAIRMAN’S WARNING.

A warning as to the probable fate of applicants for exemption, or exempted men called up for review, who postpone their application for medical examination until they appear before the Tribunal, was given by the Chairman (Mr H W Wale) at the Coventry Appeal Tribunal on Friday in last week.—The question arose, on the application of George Evelyn Clarke, sub-postmaster and carrier, Newbold-on-Avon, for a fresh examination.—In support of the application, Mr H W Worthington said the man had been down to the Drill Hall to try to get re-examined, but had been told that it could not be got through in time. He had a medical certificate showing the state of the man’s health, and he did not think he would now be placed in the same category as before, viz, B1.—The Chairman pointed out that the Tribunal had sat three times that week ; they were busy men, and did not want repetition. One day one of these appeals would be dismissed as a warning to other people of what would happen if they did not take advantage of their rights. Every man now had the right to a re-examination, and every man should exercise that right, and not put people who were doing a tremendous amount of public work to unnecessary trouble.— Applicant: I tried to get re-graded as soon as I received my papers.—Mr Meredith (National Service representative): You were passed Grade 2 in August last.—The Chairman : We might say that you are satisfied with your grading by the mere fact that you have let things go on so long, but we will grant the application in this case, and adjourn the matter till next Wednesday.

AGRICULTURE AND RECRUITING : IMPORTANT DECISION.

The Board of Agriculture announce that an arrangement has been made with the Ministry of National Service and the War Office for a definite number of 30,000 Grade 1 men to be made available from agriculture for military service not later than June 30th.

It is hoped that the large majority of these men will be recruited under the Proclamation of April 19, 1918, calling up men born in the years 1895-99, but if the full number of men born is not obtained under this Proclamation it will be necessary to obtain the remainder from men up to 31 years of age.

It is expected that additional labour, including a large number of prisoners of war, will be made available for agriculture to take the place of the men urgently required for immediate military service.

ENCOURAGING PIG-KEEPING.

A new regulation under the Defence of the Realm Act permits the keeping of pigs in any locality, premises, or place where they do not cause nuisance or injury to health. The restriction limiting pig-keeping within a specified distance of any street or public place is removed, providing permission is given by the local authority. Local authorities are also permitted to erect or provide and maintain piggeries and to purchase, keep, or sell pigs. This regulation is extended to Scotland and Ireland.

MEAT COUPONS TO HAVE NEW VALUES.

The Food Ministry has issued an order amending coupon values and dealing with the exemption of certain classes of offal from the necessity for the surrender of coupons.

The following kinds of edible offal, whether cooked or uncooked, may be purchased without coupons:—Tripe, chitterlings, lights, sheeps’ heads, calves’ heads and feet, ox heels, cow heels, and pigs’ and sheep’s trotters, as well as the following articles if containing no meat except edible offal of the kinds mentioned:—Cooked or prepared sausages, polonies, brawn, canned or potted goods, horseflesh (thin flank and forequarters except foreribs), meat of goats and kids, white pudding and meat pastes, containing not more than 33% per cent. of meat.

Food Control Committees are empowered under the Order to authorise the sale without coupons of meat pies not exceeding 6ozs in weight, cooked, of a kind usually sold in their districts, provided the total weight of cooked meat in the pie does not exceed 20 per cent. of the whole. Such authority will only be given to retailers who have customarily sold meat pies of this class.

Any coupon attached to an ordinary or supplementary ration card will be available during the period of its validity for the purchase of suet, edible offal, bones, and sausages. While a general butcher may sell suet, tongue, kidneys, and skirt to his registered customers only, he may sell other edible offal, hones, and sausages to any purchaser, detaching coupons in all cases where this is required.

PRESERVING BUTTER.

With the object of encouraging conservation for winter use, the Food Controller has issued an authorisation permitting the acquisition of farmers’ butter for home preservation under the following conditions:—The amount obtained by any person must not exceed the quantity authorised by the Food Control Committee of his district. The conditions mentioned in the authority must be complied with. A certificate in a form prescribed by the Food Controller must be given by the purchaser to the supplier. The butter must be properly salted or preserved, and it must be consumed only at such time and subject to such conditions as may be authorised by the Food Controller. Farmers’ butter may be supplied up to the amount permitted on the production of the necessary authority and of the certificate mentioned when required by a Food Committee.

STATE ROAD TRANSPORT.
POWER TO SEIZE HORSES AND VEHICLES.

New powers for “ maintaining an efficient system for the transport of goods by road ” are conferred on the Board of Trade by a Defence of the Realm Regulation which is published in the “ London Gazette ” of Tuesday night.

The Board may regulate the use of horses and vehicles, and may place restrictions on the sale of them. It may take possession of any horse or vehicle “ either absolutely or by way of hire,” but compensation will be paid. If the amount of compensation is not agreed upon between the Board and the owner, then it is to be determined by a single arbitrator, who “ shall not be bound to have regard to the market price . . . .or to the rate of hire prevailing in the district.”

An order may be made by the Board requiring owners to give notice to it before they dispose of their horses and vehicles. The carriage of “ goods of any class ” by road may be prohibited, and the Board may prescribe the radius or distance within which goods may be carried.

It may also “ regulate the priority in which goods are to be carried by road,” and may lay down the rates at which horses and vehicles may be hired and goods carried.

The powers conferred by the regulation are not to be exercised in the case of horses and vehicles which are used wholly or mainly in agriculture, “ except in connection with a preconcerted scheme to be put in operation in case of invasion or special military emergency.

 

DRASTIC TRAIN CHANGES.— Sir Albert Stanley, president of the Board of Trade, announced in the House of Commons that it had been decided to reduce steam train passenger traffic by 40 per cent. This will entail drastic changes.

SUGAR AT WHITSUNTIDE.—Persons who intend spending Whitsuntide in holiday resorts are advised by the Ministry of Food to take their sugar supplies with them. All visitors should take their butter and meat cards with them when on a holiday. The Ministry of Food cannot, however, guarantee that extra supplies will be available to provide for visitors to any particular district.

DEATHS.

JONES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. F. J. JONES, 1/9th London Regiment, who was killed in action on April 25, 1918, “ somewhere in France ” ; aged 40 years.
“ He sleeps besides his comrades,
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.”
—From his sorrowing Wife and Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

PERRY.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. ALFRED JOHN PERRY, Royal Marine L.I., who died of wounds in France on May 22, 1917.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in thy foreign grave ;
Your life for your country you so nobly grave.
No friends stood near to say ‘ Good-bye,’
Safe in God’s keeping now you lie.”
— From Mother, Brother and Sister (Kilsby).

MASON.—In loving remembrance of ARTHUR ALEC MASON, of Long Buckby and Braunston, who was lost in the Dardanelles on H.M.S. Goliath, May 13, 1915.
— “ Until the day breaks.”

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12th Jan 1918. Rugby Hero Decorated

RUGBY HERO DECORATED.

A pleasing ceremony was perfumed, in the Lower School field on Sunday morning, when, in the presence of several thousand people, including the members of the Discharged Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Association, Lance-Corpl Enticott, Oxon and Bucks L.I, son of Mr J Enticott, of 60 Union Street, was decorated by Lieut-Col F F Johnstone with the Military Medal and bar and the D.C.M.

Before making the presentation Lieut-Col Johnstone said it gave him very great pleasure to be amongst soldiers again, and more especially to be amongst men who had served their country and taken their part in this terrible War. Many of those on parade had been wounded, and they would all be very pleased to see those decorations conferred upon a man who had behaved most gallantly in the War. He noticed that several present had also distinguished themselves, and had been awarded the D.C.M, and no one would accord greater praise to Lance-Corpl Enticott than those men who had also conducted themselves well. Lance-Corpl Enticott had most conspicuously distinguished himself on several occasions, and had won the Military Medal for “ conspicuous bravery on the field and dressing the wounded and heavy shell fire on September 15, 1916, on the Somme.” He was awarded a bar to this medal for “ conspicuous conduct on May 3, 1916, in the Battle of Warnecourt, for dressing the wounded and getting them away under heavy shell fire.” He was also warded the D.C.M for, on August 23rd, at Hooge, going through two barrages—our own and the German—into a wood to fetch out the wounded and getting them away under heavy fire on August 24, 1917. Having pinned the decorations on Lance-Corpl Enticott’s breast, Lieut-Col Johnstone reminded them that nn man could have greater love than he who was willing to risk his life or give it up for his friend ; and although he was glad to say that Lance-Corpl Enticott had not given up his life, he had risked it a number of times. They were glad to see the return of such a noble soldier ; they trusted that he would have good luck in the future and a happy life ; and as he had to go back to the front, they also hoped that he would be protected and brought back safely to Rugby.

Lance-Corpl Enticott, in a brief, soldierly speech, returned thanks for his warm reception. He hoped soon to be living amongst them again, and that the War would finish during the coming year.

Hearty cheers were then given for Lance-Corpl Enticott, after which the company dispersed.

Lance-Corpl Enticott is an old St Matthew’s boy and a former member of the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade, and his old Captain, Mr W F Wood, was present during the ceremony.

LIEUT. NEVILLE HANDS AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS.

The latest list of recipients of the Military Cross contains the name of Lieut Neville Hands, R.W.R, second son of Mr & Mrs F E Hands, Sheep Street. Lieut Hands, who is an Old Laurentian, enlisted in the 7th R.W.R as a private, and after a period of active service he was given a commission in March, 1916. He returned to France in the following September, and after taking part in the fighting on the Somme, he was appointed sniping and intelligence officer. He is now in charge of a Sniping Corps in Italy.

D.C.M FOR ANOTHER ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY.

The last list of awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal for gallantry in the field includes the name of Corpl W E Stay, Royal Garrison Artillery, son of Mr F Stay, 99 Grosvenor Road, Rugby. Corpl Stay is a former scholar of Matthew’s School, and the fourth old boy of that school to obtain this honour, previous recipients being the late Sergt W Bale, Lance-Corpl J Enticott, and Pte A Norman.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut W S Stebbing, R.W.R, has been recently mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatches for gallantry on the Western Front.

Bombardier A C Dandridge, son of Mr & Mrs C Dandridge. Railway Terrace, has been mentioned in despatches for distinguished service in the field. Before joining the Colours he was employed by the Urban District Council. He is an “ old boy ” of the St Matthew’s School.

The death occurred at Genoa Hospital, Italy, on Christmas Day, of Pte William Murphy, 3rd Royal Warwicks, eldest son of Mr and Mrs Wm Murphy, of 101 South Street, Rugby, The deceased, who was 19 years of age, enlisted eighteen months ago on attaining the age of 18. He served in France, from whence he was invalided for a time, but returned to France, and thence to Italy.

Pte A W Kinzett, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs E Kinzett, Wolverton Fields, Stratford-on-Avon, died of wound received in action on December 2nd. He was a native of Dunchurch, and was educated at the Village School. Formerly employed at the Daimler Works, Coventry, he joined the Royal Warwicks in June, 1915. He went to France in the following April, and was invalided home in December, He was subsequently transferred to the M.G.C. and returned to France last April.

BILTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Referring in the Parish Magazine to the death of Pte Chris Eccles, Royal Warwicks, at the front, the Rector Writes :— “ The memory of him will live on. A Bilton man, a familiar figure, a kindly disposition, and a generous heart made him well known to all in the village, while he was no less well known in the Parish Church, where he fulfilled the duties of a sidesman with diligence and affection. We miss him greatly.
Pte Ernest Cox is now reported missing.

MARTON.
OUR SOLDIERS.—Pte G Johnson, who was severely wounded in the arm and thigh and has been in hospital in France for some months, passed away on Friday last week. He was 35 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

We recently announced that Lance-Corpl Harwood F Hancox had been transferred from his prison camp in Germany to Switzerland, and this week Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, has received the following letter from him, dated December 28, 1917, in which he says : —“ I now take the pleasure of answering your kind letter, hoping you had a happy Christmas, as I can assure I and my comrades in Interlaken enjoyed ours. We had a good dinner and supper. After supper a concert was given, which was very good, our artistes being British soldiers, Canadians, and Australians. In the interval was the distribution of her Majesty Queen Mary’s gifts, also cigarettes from the English colony at Geneva. We had three quarters of an hour for dancing, which, after three years behind barbed wire, was a great treat to us. I think from the time your committee was first formed for the Rugby district I received your parcels fairly regularly. Of course, sometimes I might miss a week, and then got two sent on the next week, as I went from Soltau Lager to Lichtenhorst Lager in March, 1915, and all our parcels had to be addressed to Soltau for some time, as that was the headquarter camp. Afterwards we got them addressed direct to Lichtenhorst, where I remained till March, 1916, when I was sent on a farm with five more, but we always had our parcels sent through every week, and they were mostly in a good condition. I do not think I had more than four or five damaged. I am still getting the parcels sent on from Germany to me. I must thank you, the Rugby Committee, and all helpers for the great kindness the prisoners have received. If it had not been for the help in food and clothing there would not be many alive to tell the tale. You would not believe the number of Russians that have died through starvation. I was never with any Rugby men after I left Munster Lager. We had about 150 men join us here to-day from Germany, and they looked as if they had seen very hard times. I now close with best wishes to you and your committee. Wishing all ‘ A Happy New Year.’”

MORE WAR PRISONERS.

Corpl F Evans, 11th Rifle Brigade, whose home is at 13 James Street, Rugby, has written home to say he is a prisoner of war and interned at Wahn, but will shortly be removed to another camp.

Corpl S T Smith, K.R.R.C, is a prisoner of war in Germany, inturned at Dulmen. Corpl Smith’s home is at Barby, where he worked for Mr Thomas Pittom, and was also in the choir of Barby Church.

Sergt R G Elkington, K.R.R.C, son of Mrs W Elkington, Long Lawford, is a prisoner of war prisoner of war in Germany, inturned at Dulmen. He worked at Rugby Gas Works. He joined up in September, 1914, had been in France 2½ years. In April last he was awarded the Military Medal for great courage and personal bravery in the storming of the village of Metz.

Corpl J C Barclay, North Staffs Regt, who was recently reported prisoner of war, has now been transferred from Wahn to Dulmen.

These men have all been handed over to the care of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J R Barker, is arranging for the dispatch of standard food parcels and bread to them.

In addition to Bandsman Rowe and L-Corpl Harwood, F Hancox, Pte P Gamble Davis, of Dunchurch, and Pte P Mace, of Hillmorton, have also been transferred to Switzerland, where they will be well cared for.

Pte C Bragg, Royal Warwicks, whose home is at Brinklow, has succeeded in escaping from his internment camp in Germany, and has arrived in England.

Pte Bert Holmes, Royal Warwicks, son of Mrs Everington, 47 Wood Street, Rugby, has been reported missing since November 20th. Apprenticed at Willans & Robinson’s, he joined up immediately on the outbreak of war, and had been in France since November, 1914. He was last seen wounded and lying in a shell hole. A search party sent out failed to find him, and it is believed he is a prisoner of war. Holmes was an old Murray School boy.

The number of men now on the Rugby list who still have to be provided for is 77, the cost being £213 13s 6d every four weeks.

BRITISH HEROES OF THE AIR.

Of our airmen on the Western Front the names of two who have met with remarkable success recur constantly in conversation among flying men in France, at home, and even overseas. One is Capt J Byford McCudden, M.C., of London. So far he has brought down 34 German machines.

The other man is Capt Philip Fletcher Fullard, D.S.O, M.C. He is a fine, upstanding young fellow, who loves every form of sport. Next to flying, football is his favourite recreation and in a game in which he took part in France a few weeks ago he sustained a fractured leg. The accident necessitated a stay in a London hospital from which he has just been discharged, and checked his record of air triumphs.

Capt Fullard went fresh from school into an Officers’ Training Corps. He has flown in France for about six months, and during that time has brought down 42 enemy machines and three balloons. In a single day he brought down four German aeroplanes—his record day’s “ bag.” On another occasion he and another airman brought down seven enemy machines before breakfast, Fullard accounting for three of them. Up to the middle of October the squadron to which he belongs had brought down 200 enemy machines, and their number now stands at about 250. The outstanding feature of Capt Fullard’s record is the few casualties his “ flight ” has suffered. For three months he worked with the same flight of six pilots without a casualty among them, and in that time they brought down more enemy machines than any other flight in France. He has a narrow escape when fighting a German two-seater, his goggles being shot away from his eyes. The Very lights in his machine caught fire and set the woodwork of the aeroplane alight, but he managed to get his burning machine back to the British lines. Capt Fullard respects the fighting capacity of the Boche airman, and considers they are good in a tight corner.

Capt Fullard, is the son of the late Mr Thomas Fletcher Fullard, of Hatfied, and Mrs Fullard, who now lives at Rugby. He was educated at Norwich Grammar School, and in 1915 joined the Inns of Court Officers’ Training Corps. Passing high in his examination, he was offered a commission in the Royal Irish Fusiliers, but was selected as suitable for flying work, and joined the Royal Flying Corps. He went to Upavon, and was given a post as instructor there. In April, 1917, he was sent to the front. He has gained the D.S.O and the Military Cross, with a bar.

FOOD CONTROL.

RUGBY AND CRICK RURAL DISTRICT.

At the first meeting of the Rugby and Crick Joint Committee on the 22nd ult, there were present : Mrs Anderson, Mrs Draper, Mrs Neilson, Mrs Peet, Mrs Townsend, Rev R S Mitchison, and Messrs A Appleby, J Cripps, J C Harrison, H Tarbox, A T Watson, and W Woodward.

H Tarbox was unanimously appointed Chairman of the Joint Committee, and Mr F Fellows Executive Officer and Enforcement Officer for the joint district.

A circular was received giving details of the Milk Priority Scheme which the Government propose should be adopted in the districts where there is a shortage of milk, and consideration of this matter was adjourned so that each member might receive a print. A Finance Committee was appointed, consisting of the Chairman and Messrs A Appleby and J Cripps.

Applications were received from bakers in the district for a supply of potatoes (for use in bread) and as the applications were from a very small proportion of bakers, it was resolved that the Commissioner for the district to be asked whether there was any likelihood of the use of potatoes in bread being made compulsory upon the bakers in this area. It was pointed out that this is a fairly large potato-growing district, and a good proportion were of varieties that would not keep, and it would be better for the potatoes to be used in this way rather than they should be allowed to bad and waste. The Executive Officer was directed to arrange for supplies of potatoes to the bakers who applied for them.

A number of certificates were granted to retailers of meat, and the Executive Officer pointed out that apparently these applications were from shopkeepers who sold sausages.

A number of letters were received from the Secretary of Food Economy Sub-committee in the district asking for leaflets and for arrangements to be made for speakers to address meetings, and for cookery demonstrations. The Executive Officer promised to send leaflets, and to ask Mr W E Lovsey, of Birmingham, the Assistant Divisional Commissioner, if he would come into this area and address meetings.

The question of the distribution in the Rural area of margarine commandeered in the Urban District was fully discussed, and the Committee is taking up this matter with the Urban authorities.

THE MEAT SHORTAGE.

BUTCHERS’ SUPPLIES TO BE CUT DOWN BY HALF.

A meeting of butchers of the town and district to consider a new order concerning the supplies of meat was held at the Benn Buildings on Tuesday morning. Mr H Tarbox presided, and there was a good attendance.

A memorandum from the Divisional Commissioner was read to the effect that in future all meat retailers will only be allowed to receive 50 per cent. of the quantity sold by them in October last, and pointing out that particulars of the weekly meat supplies required by butchers in the district should be forwarded to the Auctioneer-Chairman of the Cattle Purchase Committee, but any serious complaints or difficulties should be reported to the Live Stocks Sub-Commissioner for the County, Mr H F Knightley, Sheep Street, Stratford-on-Avon. Dead meat, either home-killed or frozen, hitherto purchased from wholesalers, must continue to be obtained through the same channel as far as possible. “ It seems probable,” the Commissioner continued, “ that Local Food Control Committees will be required to take an active part in meat distribution, and if the matter is one that affects your area to any great extent I suggest that you make arrangements accordingly.”

A copy of the form which each retailer has to fill up weekly was also produced.

Mr Reeve drew attention to the fact that the dead cattle did not yield the percentage of meat that it should do, and instead of paying 1s 2½d per lb for their meat, they were really paying 1s 4¼d ; but the Chairman pointed out that the new regulations were to ensure that they obtained a supply of meat. It had nothing to do with the price.—Mr Reeve : But there is no use for us to stop in our shops to sell meat at a loss, as we are doing at present. It is hard to think that we have got to cut meat at a loss to feed the public. Sheep are 2s per lb ; and how are we to get a living at that price ? He pointed out that some butchers only had one small beast per week ; and if, in consequence of this supply being cut down by half they had to close their shops, would other butchers be allowed more meat to supply his customers ?—Mr Burton replied in the affirmative.—In reply to Mr Waite, the Chairman said if the butchers neglected to make their returns they would probably find themselves without any meat.—The butchers present, however, expressed themselves as willing to do all they could in the matter ; and two committees to assist the Executive Officers were appointed, viz : Urban District, Messrs H V Wait and C W Clayson ; Rural District, Messrs Wooley (Dunchurch) and B Page (Wolston). Mr A H Reeve was nominated to receive beasts consigned to the Rugby butchers by the Authorities.

SOLDIER’S WONDERFUL ESCAPE.—An Army Sergeant travelling on the Euston to Scotland express on Friday evening in last week had a wonderful escape from death. When the train, which was travelling at about seventy miles an hour, was near Stow tunnel, a few miles south of Weedon, the man accidentally fell out. The accident was reported by some comrades on arriving at Rugby, and Night Stationmaster Walton immediately left with a search train and an ambulance party. In the meantime the soldier had regained consciousness and had walked to the Heyford signal-box. He was conveyed to Rugby and taken to the Hospital of St Cross, where his injuries, which consisted mainly of severe cuts on the head, were attended to.

SAVE THE MEN !
THE Chemico BODY SHIELD is BULLET-PROOF.
SEND ONE TO YOUR MAN AT THE FRONT.
Call and see the many testimonials of lives saved
SOLE AGENT: CHAS. T. TEW, TAILOR, 7 Regent Street, Rugby.

DEATHS.

MURPHY.—In loving memory of WILLIAM, the eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Wm. Murphy, of 101 South Street, Rugby, who died in Genoa Hospital, Italy, at the early age of 19, on December 25, 1917.
“ Oh ! how sadly we shall miss him ;
There will a vacant place.
We shall never forget his footsteps,
Or his dear, familiar face.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Sister & Brothers.

Hancox, George Hugh. Died 27th Aug 1916

George Hugh Hancox was born at Rock, Bewdley, Worcester, and his birth is registered in the September Quarter 1885 under the Cleobury M. Registration District. His parents were Henry and Emma Hancox, née Savage. George’s father was a bricklayer and George was their first child, born at Rock, Worcestershire. His parents other children were Edgar followed by Hugh, Mabel, Florence and Harold.   On the 1891 census, when George is 5 years old, the family are living at Sutton Common Kidderminster. By 1901 the family are all at 2 Whispering Street, Wribbenhall, Kidderminster, Worcestershire, and George is a Greengrocers Assistant. On the 1911 census George is in Rugby and is living at 79 York Street with the Rogers family and he is Greengrocers Assistant. He was a member of St. Matthews & Brotherhood Choirs and a member of the Early Closes Football Club and was well known and popular the town. George enlisted at Rugby and was with the 6th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He had been in France about 6 weeks and was at the Battle of the Somme when he received his fatal wounds and died 27th August 1916 and was buried at Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery. Mr. E. C. Badham gave notice to The Rugby Advertiser of his death. George had been employed by Mr. Badham for between 8 to 9 years and said that George had his home at Kidderminster. Mr Badham was a Greengrocer and Fruiterer at 31a High Street, Rugby. George Hugh Hancox is remembered on the World War 1 memorial at Wribbenhall All Saints Church and appears in the Worcester/Worcestershire Roll of Honour Book for army casualties located in Worcester Cathedral under Wribbenhall casualties with the information: 20274 The Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Under Army Soldiers Effects 5th December 1916 George’s parents received £4 9s 3d and later received a war gratuity for £3 0s 0d sent June 1919

In the Probate Calendar it reads

George Hugh Hancox of Florentine Terrace Wribbenhall Worcestershire Private 7th battalion Royal Warwickshire died 27th August 1916 on active service in France. Probate Worcester 7th November to Emma Hancox (wife of Henry Hancox) and the said Henry Hancox bricklayer.   Effects:- £365 10s 8d.
George received posthumously The Victory Medal and the British Medal.

Private George Hugh Hancox

Service Number 20732

Royal Warwickshire Regiment

1/6 Battalion-Territorial

Buried Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery

Grave/Memorial Reference:- ll. A. 1.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

15th Jan 1916. Christmas Gifts for Local Territorials

CHRISTMAS GIFTS FOR LOCAL TERRITORIALS.

Mr A Adnitt, Hon Sec of the committee for sending comforts and Christmas gifts to local Territorials on service, has received a number of letters of acknowledgment and thanks. Among them are the following :—

DEAR MR ADNITT,—Will you please convey to the “ Rugby Comforts Committee ” our very hearty thinks for the splendid gift of puddings, socks, and dainties which we have received this Christmas.

We received two parcels of socks, and these were greatly appreciated, as we have had very wet weather lately, and it has been impossible to keep dry feet. We also received the box of books and dainties. The puddings arrived Christmas Day, so we had them for dinner on Sunday and Monday, and greatly enjoyed them.

We are very grateful to our many friends, who have done so much for our comfort, and we had as enjoyable a time as was possible under existing conditions. We should also like to express to the Committee our keen appreciation of the tremendous amount of hard work which they are doing for our welfare and comfort. With best wishes for the coming year, I beg to remain,

Yours sincerely,
G. Hopewell., B.S.M,
(Rugby Howitzer Battery).

Quartermaster A C Tomlinson, of the Rugby Infantry, writes from France, under date Dec 29, 1915 :-

I am pleased to tell you that the puddings arrived safely on Christmas night, disappointing us by one day. However, they were just as fully enjoyed the following day. All the Rugby boys wish me to express their grateful thanks to the Territorial Comforts Committee and donors of puddings for their kindness. It will perhaps be pleasing for them to know that the puddings were the only reminder of Christmas that we had. Other than that, the day was the same as any other. It could not be otherwise. We were on trench duties, consequently nothing could be relaxed. The day passed quietly on our front, except for artillery fire ; this was about as active as usual, intensifying towards evening.

One of our platoons—many of them Rugby men—had the pleasure of mingling with a gun team of the Rugby Howitzer Battery.

Your letter of the 21st overwhelms one with a sense of what the T.C.C. is doing for our comfort, and it is difficult for me to sufficiently express our thanks. The articles you mention will be most useful and very welcome. I will let you know when they arrive, and will do my best to distribute them so that no one is missed. Of course, I cannot reach men who are in hospital or on detached work away from our near neighbourhood.

I cannot close without asking you to express our thanks to Mrs West for her good wishes and interest—not only to ourselves, but to our friends at home.

In a subsequent letter dated the 10th inst. Q.M.S. Tomlinson acknowledges the receipt of the four bales of “ Tommies ” cookers, shirts, socks, sponges, etc, which had been distributed. He adds: “ Everybody is delighted with the cookers and sponges. Both are most useful. Capt Payton, who is in command of our company, was particularly struck with them, and will shortly convey his thanks to the T.C.C. On behalf of my comrades of the old E Company I cannot sufficiently thank the T.C.C. and our good friends of Rugby. I can but say how deeply we appreciate their kindness.”

MOUTH ORGANS AND OTHER INSTRUMENTS WANTED.

DEAR EDITOR,—Just a line or two from a few of the Rugby boys who are doing their bit in France. Although our battalion is not a local regiment, there are a good many boys here from Rugby with us, so you can imagine your paper is well known here. . . . We are having a very rough time of it in the trenches just now, and are experiencing a little of what some of the boys went through last winter. Up to the knees in water and sludge is now getting a common occurrence, but the spirit of the lads in these hard times is wonderful. Small things of this kind cannot help but put a feeling of confidence in one’s mind and foreshadow an optimistic view of what this unconquerable spirit will do when the time for bigger operations comes. However, it is when we are out of the trenches that we need something to take the place of the excitement which we leave behind. The chief thing that appeals to us is, as yon may imagine, music, and never are we so happy as when we are murdering the chorus of some popular song. But what we want most is a few mouth organs, for many of us can play them ; and we should esteem it a favour if you could find room to publish this letter in the good old R.A., in the hope that it will catch the eyes of some kind-hearted readers, who will do their best for us. I am sure that if the good people at home could only see the pleasure that is derived from these generous gifts, they would only be too pleased to grant us this small request,-—Yours truly, Bandsman J GUBBINS, 170, A Co 10th Batt R.B, British Expeditionary Force, France.

OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOYS ON SERVICE.

The following are extracts from typical letters received from “ old boys ” of St Matthew’s School, by Mr R H Myers, headmaster :—

Writing from Egypt, Lce-Corporal P Labraham, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, says : “ I dropped across Alfred Baker at Christmas. He had been out on a frontier fight, and had just returned. Our Christmas dinner was reminiscent of old England, consisting of turkey, beef, fruit, etc. Baker and I drank a toast to the memory of our schooldays during the evening. The Museum here is very fine, and redolent of almost everything connected with ancient Egyptian life. There are mummified cats, birds, babies, cows’ heads, and, of course, an infinite number of the ordinary kind. The old Egyptians took an enormous amount of trouble to preserve their dead, some being placed in five coffins, the last of great size, and ornamented with splendid specimens of Egyptian inlaid work. The jewels here are alone worth a day to examine—golden finger-stalls from some mummies, crowns, ear-rings, bracelets, stones, and charms.”

Pte G Favell, 6th Leicestershire Regiment, writes : “ I spent Christmas Day and New Year’s Day in the trenches, and shall never forget the experience. It was pouring with rain, and we were hard at work shovelling mud out of the trenches. There was no kind of truce this year at Christmas. We always remember that the Germans are enemies, and must be treated as such. They have asked for trouble with a capital T, and they will get more than they bargained for before the ‘lads in khaki’ have finished with them. We opened the year. 1916 by presenting them with a few souvenirs in the shape of leaden pills, which may be all right to look at, but are very indigestible. There is no doubt that we have now got the upper hand in . the West, and we are looking forward to the end of the war in the near future.”

P E .Hughes, Leading Seaman, on one of his Majesty’s ships with the Grand Fleet, writes : “ We are getting it pretty rough at present somewhere in the North Sea, but it does not seem to trouble the boys, who are merry and bright as usual, and still waiting for the Huns. I am afraid there will be nothing doing, as they are getting enough from the boys in the Baltic, who are luckier than we are, though we hope to have the pleasure of meeting them yet.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut-Colonel F Dugdale, C.V.O., from the Warwickshire Yeomanry, is gazetted lieutenant-colonel in the Territorial Force Reserve.—Mr D L Hutchison has been given a commission in the Yeomanry.

The New Year honours include the conferring of the K.C.B. on Vice-Admiral R H S Bacon, C.V.O., D.S.O.

An artillery officer writes to a friend in Rugby that his battery is peculiarly well off with respect to lighting accommodation. The battery is stationed near a coal mine somewhere in France, and, by tapping a wire which supplies current to work a fan in a mine shaft, electric light is obtained in the dug-out.

Mr C J Bowen Cooke, the chief mechanical engineer for the London, and North-Western Railway, who has been gazetted major in the Engineer and Railway Staff Corps, has been connected with the L. and N.-W. R. for forty years, commencing as an apprentice in the Crewe Works, and he is the author of several works on British locomotives.

Messrs H and R S Sitwell, sons of Mrs Sitwell, of the Manor House, Leamington Hastings, and the late Canon Sitwell, were gazetted to lieutenancies in the Derbyshire Yeomanry. At the outbreak of the war both were farming in South Africa, and they at once left their farms in the care of others and joined the force which conquered German West Africa. The former has also had experience with the Germans as a prisoner, as, a few days before the surrender, while carrying despatches he got behind the German lines. Fortunately the captive period was very short, the surrender bringing his release.

“ A CERTAIN LIVELINESS.”

Mr Charles Barnwell, of 56 Manor Road, recently received a letter from his son, who is in the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the front, in which he says :- “ Two mines under the German trenches in — were successfully exploded. Rifle, machine gun, and also artillery fire was opened on the German trenches immediately the explosion took place ; the mountain gun swept the ground behind the crater at a range of 150 to 200 yards. For some time after the explosion nothing could be observed owing to the heavy cloud of dust and smoke. When the atmosphere had cleared it was seen that the corner of the parapet for quite thirty yards was completely demolished. The firing of the Howitzers was particularly effective. They obtained six direct hits on the enemy’s rear parapet, and placed the remaining rounds into the —. Almost immediately after the explosion the enemy replied with rifle grenades from their trenches, and at 10.25 a.m. their guns opened fire upon the edge of a wood, and the paths and roads leading up to our front

LAST CHANCE FOR THE SINGLE MEN.

ADVICE TO RECRUITS.

The following notice, issued by the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee, was posted throughout the country on Saturday :—

GROUP SYSTEM.

Enlistment in groups will reopen on Monday, January 10, and proceed until further notice. All men between 18 and 41, both single and married, who have not attested should do so at once at the nearest recruiting office.

The month’s notice to men whose groups have been called up will commence from the day of their attestation.

Attention is called to the fact that a great deal of labour and inconvenience will be saved to the recruiting authorities if men desiring to attest will, wherever possible, do so in the area in which they have been registered under the National Registration Act. The right to attest in any area is not withdrawn, and attestation will still be accepted in any district irrespective of the area of registration ; but such men as can possibly attest in their own area are asked to assist the recruiting authorities by so doing.

The conscientious objector has already made his appearance. A tall, robust young man walked into the inquiry office at the recruiting headquarters in London on Saturday. “ I have a conscientious objection to fighting,” he began ; “ will you direct me to the proper channel for the utilisation of my services as a non-combatant ?” The young man was passed on so that his request should receive full consideration.

Outside the naval recruiting offices in the Strand chalked on a board is the warning, “ No conscientious objectors need apply.” – on the other side is an exhortation : “ Now then, you single men, don’t let grandpa join first.”

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

ANOTHER LONG LIST OF CASES.

There was a further big batch of cases to be heard before the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Monday afternoon. Professor F Tillyard presided, and the assessors present were Messrs W C Macartney (employers) and J Roberts (men), together with Messrs P E Wilks (clerk) and D G Bolland (assistant clerk).

Willans and Robinson, Rugby, complained that Frank Hancox, press tool setter, Rugby, had absented himself without leave. Defendant said he was unfit for work, and it was stated that he had not gone back to work yet. Hancox said he was 29 years old, and earned 30s a week. The Chairman : Tool setters seem to be cheap in Rugby.—Defendant: They are.—The Chairman said that, taking into consideration that his wages were not high, defendant would be fined 10s.

Nearly all the others were Coventry cases.

PAPER FAMINE PROBABLE.

DIFFICULTY OF OBTAINING RAW MATERIALS.

Many industries have been hampered by reason of the war, but it is doubtful whether any trade has faced more difficulties than the paper industry. The outlook is stated to be so serious that if the present condition of affairs continues for long there must be a paper famine in this country. Paper is made principally from three classes of materials—namely, rags, esparto (a strong fibrous grass grown in North Africa and on the shores of the Mediterranean Sea), and wood pulp. Rags are used in the manufacture of the best class of hand-made paper, but that material does not play an important part in the trade difficulties now experienced. Esparto is an important ingredient, and before the war large quantities were imported into Scotland. There is now a great difficulty in obtaining supplies, and this is one cause of the present shortage of paper and the consequent high prices. Shipping freights have increased enormously. The present rate is between 30s and 40s a ton, as compared with the pre-war rate of 2s 6d to 5s. The Scottish manufacturers of paper are considerably handicapped because of the shortage of railway trucks to carry the raw material from the ports of entry to the. districts where the paper mills are situated, while, in addition, there is a great shortage of labour at the manufactories.

Chemical dyes for colouring paper are practically unobtainable. The limited supply available is sold at a very high price ; in some cases the cost is 40s to 50s a pound, as compared with 2s before the war. Bleaching powder is largely used by manufacturers, but the bulk of this material has been commandeered by the Government. Wood pulp is mainly imported from Scandinavia. As the Germans are unable to obtain an adequate supply of cotton for the manufacture of explosives they are large buyers of wood pulp, which is said to be a good substitute for cotton. Consequently the imports of wood pulp to this country are much below the normal ; while, as in the case of other commodities, the price is very high. With the exception of rags, there are no raw materials in this country with which to make paper, and the present shortage of all kinds of paper is due to this fact. “ I have been to Scotland on three recent occasions,” said a Birmingham paper manufacturer to a newspaper representative, “ and I find the word ‘famine’ is in the mouths of all the manufacturers there. Some of the mills are standing idle because supplies of raw material cannot be obtained, and also because of the scarcity of labour.”

Germany used to send considerable quantities of paper to this country, principally vegetable parchment. That supply ceased on the out-break of war. The supply of flint paper from Belgium has also ceased, while grease-proof paper from Scandinavia is sent over in very limited quantities. It may be found necessary shortly to abandon the use of coloured paper for wrapping purposes, and shopkeepers are advised to exercise the greatest economy in the use of paper bags. Thin bank paper and super-calendered papers are very scarce.

THE NEW LIGHTING ORDER.

THE EFFECT IN RUGBY.

In Rugby on Monday night, the inhabitants both in the business and residential parts of the town, showed a general disposition to comply with the new regulations, which require a more drastic reduction of external and internal than hitherto.

The publication of the regulations in the columns of the Rugby Advertiser enabled householders to get a definite idea of the extent to which illumination must be reduced, but the methods by which results entirely satisfactory to the authorities could be obtained, were not so easy to devise. While in some cases lights were not completely shaded and a good deal of illumination found its way on to the roadway, in the main there was little to complain of, and perhaps in many instances people went to the other extreme, and the “ dull and subdued light ” permitted by the regulations was eclipsed altogether.

Many tradesmen, especially in the centre of the town, closed their places of business altogether at six o’clock, being under the impression that the streets would be so dark that customers would not venture out. But the public lamps were lighted as usual almost without modification, and the illumination they gave, combined with the light from the new moon, was sufficient to enable people to walk or ride through the streets with little or no danger of collision.

With regard to street lamps, we understand there are to be further modifications. Superintendent Clarke has commenced a tour of the town, and is ordering the extinction of lamps except at points where he considers, them to be absolutely necessary for the safety of the public, and in a few days the town will probably wear a much more sombre aspect at night than it did on Monday.

In some instances, where shopkeepers had not gone far enough to suit the requirements, further restrictions were ordered.

Speaking generally, there has been an honest attempt on the part of tradespeople to meet the requirements of the Order, but the results on Tuesday night, when police officers made an inspection of some of the principal streets, showed that quite a number of shopkeepers had not shaded their lights sufficiently. When this was pointed out to them they displayed a willingness to meet the wishes of those responsible for the carrying out of the new Order. Isolated cases of obstinacy may have been found, but these proved the exception to the rule, and suggestions to further reduce the light were in nearly every case promptly acted upon. These consisted of advice to extinguish altogether certain lamps, to close doors, to entirely draw down the blinds, or to change the colour of the shading material from red to dark green or blue.

In some: cases electric globes of the required colour have been adopted with good effect.

 

10th Jul 1915. News from the front – Missing and Killed

REPORTED MISSING.

News has been received that Pte G W Coleman, of the 5th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr Walter Coleman, a carpenter in the employ of Messrs Foster & Dicksee, living at New Bilton, is missing. The message came from a friend of Pte Coleman, who writing to his own father, asked that Mr Coleman should be informed that his son did not answer to the roll call when the Company left the trenches on a recent date. This is corroborated by another correspondent, who states that when coming out of the trenches Pte Coleman was killed. The young fellow was one of the many who enlisted from the B.T.H Works and had only been at the front a few weeks.

OFFICER FEARS HE IS KILLED.

Writing to the parents, on July 1st, Captain Webb, the officer commanding the Company, states:—“ I very much grieve to say that your son, Pte W G Coleman, is missing since a charge we made on the night of the 22nd. While in the cases of one or two missing men, they have been found wounded in various hospitals which they reached from the battlefield, I think it would not be wise or just to yourself to build on the hope that such is the case of your son. I fear he is killed, and I am more than deeply sorry for you. It is a terrible thing, and the suspense is awful. We made a charge and were driven back. Countless deeds of bravery were done, and all the wounded were brought in and some of the dead. Still, several men are missing, one an officer, and I’m afraid we must give them up for dead. Perhaps, when we again advance we shall be able to clear the matter up, and I will at once let you know if I am spared. The officers and men offer you their deepest and sincerest sympathy, and will do all in their power to put an end to your suspense.”

Mr Coleman has also received a communication from the Infantry Record Office at Warwick, dated July 5th, stating that a report had been received from the War Office to the effect that Pte W G Coleman was posted as “missing ” after the engagement in France on June 22nd.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

ANOTHER NEWBOLD MAN MISSING.

Mr and Mrs Williams, Newbold, have received a communication from the War Office that their son, John Williams, a private in the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, is missing, nothing having been heard of him since the 10th of May. Rifleman Williams joined the army at the commencement of the war, and was drafted to the front about twelve weeks ago. He was 20 years of age, and previous to joining the army was employed at the Newbold Works of the Rugby Portland Cement Company.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another young man, the third from the village, has given his life for his country. News was received by the parents of Charles Hancox, of the London Road, some days ago that he was dangerously wounded, and was lying in the base hospital in France. This was soon followed by news of his death. He was a good-natured lad, and was much liked by his companions. Great sympathy is felt for his parents in their trouble. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Sunday last, at which there was a full congregation. Suitable hymns were sung, and a touching, inspiring address was given by the Vicar.

RUGBY SOLDIER WOUNDED BY SHRAPNEL.

Pte Ernest Tomlinson, son of Mr and Mrs E Tomlinson, of 20 James Street, Rugby, is lying in Norwich Hospital suffering from a scalp wound, caused at the front by shrapnel. He was employed as a fitter at the B.T.H Works, and enlisted on September 2nd in the King’s Royal Rifles. He was sent to France in May, and within three weeks, whilst trench digging, was rather badly injured by a shrapnel shell. He has lost, for the time being at all events, his speech, and the use of his right hand, so that the news received by his parents has come through other sources, a soldier in an adjoining bed having sent particulars. It is gratifying to learn that Pte Tomlinson is improving, and hopes are entertained that in time his speech will be restored. He is understood to be suffering from shock as well as from wounds. Mr and Mrs Tomlinson have a younger son, William, serving his country at the front, also in the King’s Royal Rifles, but attached to a different battalion. He has been in the fighting line for some weeks now, and his last letter, received on Monday, stated that he was quite well.

FORMER MEMBER OF THE BOYS’ BRIGADE WOUNDED.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs Hayward, of 43 Lodge Road, that their son, Pte George Hayward, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded and having been in hospital for some time is now at a convalescent home at Hampton-in-Arden. Pte Hayward was for 11 years a member of the 1st Rugby Company the Boys’ Brigade, and when he enlisted in August was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinsons Works. He was shot in the fighting in Flanders, one bullet entering his cheek, injuring his jaw and affecting his eyesight, and another lodging in his hip, after passing through the water-bottle that formed part of his equipment.

MEMBER OF RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY ACCIDENTALLY SHOT.

A BROTHER’S PAINFUL EXPERIENCE.

The painful task of travelling from the front to break the news of his brother’s death this week befell Gunner George Sutton (Newton), of the Rugby Howitzer Battery. From what we can gather, the Howitzer Battery recently returned to a rest camp, and on Sunday evening it was reported that a man had been shot. Gunner Sutton, proceeded to the spot to see who was the victim, and was horrified to find his younger brother, William, a driver in the Ammunition Column, lying dead. As the result of an enquiry it was established that death was due to accident, and Gunner Sutton was graded several days’ leave of absence to convey the sad tidings to his parents. The circumstances were detailed in a letter from Capt Saunders, of the Ammunition Column, which Gunner Sutton brought home :-“ It is with much regret that I have to inform you that your son, William Sutton, was found shot at about 10 p.m on the 4th of this month. A Court of officers enquired into the circumstances very carefully, and from the evidence decided that death was due to accident, and that there was no question at all of foul play. The funeral was conducted by an Army Chaplain of the Roman Catholic Church, and a cross is being provided with an inscription suitably worded. The N.C.O’s and men of the Ammunition Column are ordering a wreath and the grave will be well cared for. It has been arranged for your other son to proceed home on leave to-day, and I hope this will help to comfort you in your loss. Please accept the sympathy of officers of the Ammunition Column, in which your son was serving.”

Driver Sutton, who was the second son of Mr Wm. Sutton, was 21 years of age, and had been a member of the Battery about two years. Previous to the war he was employed by Mr Scott Howkins, and was very popular, and highly respected by all who knew him.

NEW BILTON RECRUIT DIES OF SEPTIC FEVER.

Sympathy will be felt with Mr and Mrs Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, in the death, on Thursday, from septic fever, at Felixstowe Military Hospital, of their son Harold, the youngest of three who had responded to their country’s call. Deceased was a printer’s apprentice, in the employ of Mr George Over, and about two months ago enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment He was only 19 years of age, and expressed a liking for the military life so far as he had become conversant with it. He was very popular with the men in Mr Over’s printing office, and all have signed a letter of sympathy with Mr and Mrs Pegg in their sad bereavement.

RUGBY HOWITZERS COMPLIMENTED.

Driver C W Packwood, of the Rugby Howitzers, now serving in France, son of Mr C J Packwood, of St Matthew Street, in a recent letter home states that after three months in the firing line the section of which he belongs is now in a rest camp, the change being appreciated, especially the privilege of sleeping once again in a bed. Driver Packwood also says that the Rugby Battery has been very highly complimented on their accurate firing by the officers they have come in contact with, and the word of praise has naturally had a cheering effect upon the men.

VOLUNTEERS FOR THE FRONT.

L J D Pepperday, son of Mr J H Pepperday, of High Street ; P Morson, son of Mr Arthur Morson, of Newbold Road ; and Neville and Roland Bluemel, sons of Mr C Bluemel, of Moultrie Road, were included in a draft of 150 who volunteered for the front to fill up gaps in the 1st Battalion of the Hon Artillery Company. The draft left for France on Thursday last week.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY IN EGYPT.

Trooper E Amos, youngest son of Mr W Amos, farmer, Dunchurch, writing home from Alexandria, says :- We go out for bugle practice every morning at 6, mounted. This gives us a good chance to have a look round. We see the corn crops growing, chiefly maise, all in bloom now (middle of June) and six feet high, any amount of tomato fields, and the plants seem loaded ; then you see the fig trees and the banana trees. We also see a tremendous lot of cotton coming down the Nile in barges, pulled by men instead of horses. We have had a job this last week unloading wounded off the ships from the Dardanelles. There are thousands of them, mostly Australians, but there are a lot of soldiers who were billeted in and around Rugby. There are a lot of fine hospitals here, and that is why they keep bringing so many wounded.

PLUCKY RESCUE BY A RUGBY ATHLETE.

The “ Yorkshire Observer ” records a plucky act recently performed by Lance-Corpl Arthur Gibson, now in training with the Royal Engineers at Salisbury Plain, who was until he enlisted on the staff at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Works, being employed in the drawing office. It appears that Lance-Corpl Gibson was on a visit to a sister at Morecambe, when he noticed that a boy, who was bathing, was in difficulties. Promptly divesting himself of his tunic, he plunged into the water ; and although the tide was running strongly, he brought the lad safely to shore. He was complimented on his bravery at the time, but quickly disappeared, and it was not until some time later that his identity was established.

It will be remembered that whilst Mr Gibson was at Rugby he assisted the Football Club as a wing three-quarter. He also took part in Association six aside matches played on Willans’ Athletic Ground, being included in the team that represented the Drawing Office, and assisted Messrs Willans & Robinson’s side in their inter-firm football with the B.T.H representatives. Mr Gibson’s old comrades at Rugby will be interested to learn of his plucky rescue, and glad it has not been allowed to escape public attention altogether.

AIR RAIDS.

RUGBY FIRE BRIGADE.

A preliminary drill took place on Wednesday last, Messrs Baker, Highton, Robbins, and the Central Garage Company lending cars, and a number of Boy Scouts attended. Everything worked smoothly, and it is hoped that fires (if any) caused by a raid will be speedily extinguished.

It is desirable to have motor-cars, because those already engaged may not be available at the moment.

The Chief Officer hopes that at least four more cars will be offered for a preliminary drill on Thursday 22nd inst., at 8 p.m. More scouts are also required, and only one drill is necessary.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Drill Hall, Park Road, during the past week :—W J Hirons and H W Appleton, 220th (Rugby) Fortress Company, R.E ; C A Davis, R.W.R ; G J Smith, Cheshire Regiment ; H J Ford, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; T W Ingram, Royal Inniskilling Fusliers ; F Hawkins, Seaforth Highlanders ; W J Holliday, Royal Berks ; R W Cave, Army Veterinary Corps ; D A Leist, A.S.C ; A Townsend, Military Mounted Police ; J P Betts, Royal Engineers.

 

22nd May 1915. Casualties of the War

ANOTHER RUGBY MAN MISSING.

Mr and Mrs J Wood, of 85 Oxford Street, have received news from the front that their son, Rifleman Leslie Wood, of the Rifle Brigade, is missing. His regiment was engaged in severe fighting in the neighbourhood of Hill 60 on Sunday, May 9th, and after the battle he failed to respond to the roll call, and his fate is, at present, uncertain. Rifleman Wood joined the army in August last, and was drafted to the front about ten weeks ago. He was 21 years of age, and previous to joining the army was employed, in the Controller Factory of the B.T.H. He was a former member of the Holy Trinity Church Choir, and was also a member of the Church Troop of Boy Scouts, in which organization he took a great interest. He is a nephew of Mr W E Robotham, vice-chairman of the Rugby Board of Guardians.

PAILTON.

KILLED IN ACTION.-Much sympathy is felt with the Rev W E and Mrs Jackson, who received the news on Friday last week of the loss of their second son, Second-lieut E P Jackson, 3rd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, but attached to the 1st Battalion South Wales Borderers, killed in action. Lieut Jackson was a young man of great promise and very highly spoken of by his brother officers. Before joining the Army he was pursuing his legal studies, and after he had graduated at his college he intended to take up law as his profession. He seemed to have a peculiar aptitude for legal decisions. His College authorities, as well as his military authorities, speak in the highest terms of his work. All will regret that a young life of such promise should be out off after just having attained his majority.

HILLMORTON.

SERGEANT H. H. HANCOCKS KILLED AT HILL 60.

Mr and Mrs J Hancocks, of Hillmorton Locks, have received the sad mews that their third son, Sergt Herbert Harold Hancocks, of the 3rd Battalion King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action at Hill 60 on April 26th. Sergt Hancocks, who was 25 years of age, had been in the Army eight years, seven, of which had been spent abroad in Crete, Malta, and latterly India. He was present when the dastardly attempt to assassinate the Viceroy, Lord Hardinge, was made, and some of the scraps of metal from the bomb were embedded in his helmet. He also assisted in lifting Lord Hardinge from the elephant, and was present at the great Durbar. He finished his term as a soldier in July last, but owing to the outbreak of war was unable to return home. His regiment landed in England in November, and proceeded to the front a few days before Christmas. Before leaving for France he spent a few days with his family at Hillmorton. He was one of the best shots in the corps, for which he was awarded at modal. He was also a first-class signaller, and acted as instructor in this branch. An enthusiastic follower of local football, Sergt Hancocks informed his patents that he always looked out for the Rugby Advertiser reports of local matches. The accompanying photograph is reproduced from a group taken in India. Another son of Mr and Mrs Hancocks is serving in Kitchener’s Army.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr J C Brown, son of Mr J Brown, of North Street, Rugby, has received a commission as surgeon probationer in the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserves.

Lieut-Col and Hon Col H Hanbury has been gazetted lieutenant-colonel of the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Mr Percy Read, of 86 York Street, who is a compositor at Messrs Frost & Sons, is leaving his work to join the Army. Mr Read was married about two years ago, and as an old Volunteer has been so impressed with the necessities of the military situation that he is giving up his employment and disposing of his home in order to do his “ little bit” for his country. We hope that his patriotic example will be imitated.

Some Royal Engineers were waiting at a railway crossing near Bletchley on Monday when a trainload of German prisoners captured in the Hill 60 fighting passed through. The latter, seeing the British soldiers, spat at them from the carriage windows and made insulting remarks. The Engineers disregarded the jeers, and remained standing at attention.

RUGBY MAN BADLEY WOUNDED.

Corpl F M Staines, 2nd Rifle Brigade, a son of Second Officer Staines, of the Rugby Fire Brigade, has been rather badly wounded. In a letter he states that on Sunday, May 9th, after a bombardment, they made a charge, and after they had captured three German trenches he was wounded in the left hip. He got back somehow, but while he was doing so he received another wound through the right thigh. This was at 6 a.m. on Sunday, and he had to lie where he was until 4 a.m on Tuesday before they could carry him in. He is now in hospital at Boulogne, where he states that he is receiving every attention, and where all are most kind. He concludes his letter with a request for the Rugby Advertiser.- A lady writing from the hospital states that Corpl Staines has undergone an operation, and that he is very plucky in bearing his wounds.

KINGS NEWNHAM.

It was with very great regret the news was received of the death at the battle of Ypres, on April 25th, of Pte Charles Hancox, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He was one of first from this village to enlist, and the first to fall in the service of his country. He was of a quiet, unassuming character, and was well liked by everyone. Charlie was a native of Long Lawford, and losing both his parents when he was quite a boy, he and his younger brother were taken to and brought up by the late Mrs Clark, of Kings Newnham, with whom they lived till her death two years ago. He proved himself deserving of all her kindness and care.

Before enlisting he worked for Mr W Dunn as a farm labourer. He went into the trenches on February 22nd. On Sunday evening, after the usual service, the Rector (Rev G W Jenkins) invited those who cared to stay to at memorial service in the Parish Church, where he was a most regular worshipper. Part of the Burial Service was read by the Rector, and the hymn, ” On the Resurrection morning,” was sung. The whole congregation remained to pay their last respect to this young soldier. He was 24 years of age. He had a very deep sense of his duty to his King and country. In a letter received from him, written shortly before his death, his concluding words were : ” Don’t worry about me; God knows best, and that is my hope.”

RUGBY FORTRESS COMPANY.

SIR,  – Lord Kitchener has told me that he needs 360,000 more men.

The War Office has asked the town of Rugby to raise a (Fortress) Company Royal Engineers, and a reply has been sent to the Secretary of the War Office to say that Rugby will raise this company.

The members of the recruiting committee, the leaders of the trades and labour organisations, and many others have done everything they can to put full information before the men. We are still short of about 60 men, especially bricklayers, blacksmiths, carpenters, and masons.

There are plenty of suitable men in Rugby who can join, and I ask them to do so at once in order that the training of the company may go on without any delay.

If man has good reasons for not coming himself, he ought to feel justified in asking others to join. If he does not feel justified in asking others to join, then I ask him again to consider the possibility of coming himself.-I am, sir, yours faithfully.

E W E KEMPSON (LIEUT).

0.C 22th Fortress Company, R.E.

During the past week the recruits have been drilling at the Howitzer Battery headquarters, and by their smartness and general aptitude for their work have surprised and delighted the experienced non-commissioned officers who are training them. It is hoped that the first batch will receive their uniform in the course of a few days.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have enlisted during the past week at the Rugby Drill Hall :- E J Baker, A V Herbert, G E Manser, W V Ingram, W F Bloomfield, T H Lang, W T Boyce, W C Carrick, F G Turner, Rugby Fortress Company; T Holman, Staffords; A J Brett, R.A.M.C ;G J T Collier, Hants Regiment ; C A Bird, Leicestershires ; W H Hallam, Lincolnshire Regiment; E Harris, R.W.R ; J Dorman, L J Turner, and G Facer, Mechanical Transport. A.S.C.

THE WHITE FEATHER POSTCARD.

SIR,-I received a postcard through the post this morning with a white leather on and the following words: “ Stop playing with little boys ! Be a man ; play the game ; think it over.” It is generally a wise rule to pay no attention to anonymous letters ; but I think, perhaps, that the sender may be sincere, if ignorant, and I therefore propose to answer it.

Firstly, let me say that I spent four years with the Rugby Boy Scouts – years which cost me all my spare time and a considerable amount of money. I fail to see that I am to be condemned for doing voluntary work.

The following facts may possibly enlighten those who concern themselves with other people’s affairs :-

My business was founded by myself twelve years ago on a capital of £10, and has grown steadily owing to personal effort, until to-day we are handling about £17,000 a year in premiums. A year and a half ago a move was made to larger premises, and consequently heavier expenses were incurred. Six months later war broke out. During these eleven years I never had a salary, but have depended entirely on commission. There have been many anxious moments throughout that time, and the future is naturally very uncertain. Nevertheless, I immediately volunteered for active service in the Royal Flying Corps, armoured car section, or elsewhere, stipulating that I should be given the option of leaving the service at the end of six months. This was refused by the authorities. This insurance business is a personal one and dependent on me, and I see no reason I should be driven into bankruptcy, with the consequent dismissal of my staff and the failure of heavy obligation to some of my relatives.

The idea of sending me a white feather marks the sender as a fool. No one knows until he faces the great crisis whether he is coward or not. So far, any rate in the minor adventures of life, my nerve has not troubled me.

Finally, let me express my disgust at the action of a Rugby inhabitant who is capable of sending such an epistle through the post on a card. My only reason for dealing with the matter at all is to save the feelings of others to whom, no doubt, similar documents may be sent, I am not ashamed of my reasons, hence this letter, which I shall be glad to explain further if the sender has the courage to call at my office or write to me under his or her correct name.

I B HART-DAVIES.

3 Albert Street, Rugby, May 17th.

[Note: Lieutenant Hart Davies of the Royal Flying Corps was killed on 27 July 1917]