Hanwell, George Charles. Died 12th Aug 1917

George Charles HANWELL’s birth was registered in Q2 1881 in Rugby.   He was the son of William Hanwell, a railway fireman, and Sarah Maria née Wills. In 1882 they were living in Rugby where George had been born.

George was baptised at Crick on 3 September 1882, when his father was also recorded as a ‘fireman’. By 1891 the family were living at 15 Cambridge Street, Rugby.

In 1901, George was enumerated back in Crick, living with his grandfather, a retired plumber. His uncle was a ‘plumber and painter’ and George was listed similarly.   It seems he was learning the trade, and by 1911 he was enumerated as a house painter.

His marriage with Georgina Worthington, was registered in Rugby in Q3 1906, and by census night 1911 they were living at 1 Caldecott Street, Rugby with their son Henry W who was 7 months old – his birth was registered in Q3 1910. They later had a son, Jesse, whose birth was registered in Q1 1915, but who died very soon afterwards and whose death was registered in Q2 1915.

George enlisted at Rugby and joined up initially as Private No.267297 in the 1/5th Bn. Royal Warwickshire Rifles (RWR) and later at an unknown date was transferred as Private, No.235001 to the 1st Bn. Worcestershire Regiment.

The 1/5th Battalion of the RWR were formed in August 1914 in Thorp Street, Birmingham as part of Warwickshire Brigade, South Midland Division.   They landed at Le Havre on 22 March 1915 and on 13 May 1915 joined the 143rd Brigade, of the 48th (South Midland) Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including in 1916: The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre; and in 1917, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, and The Battle of Poelcapelle.

The 1st Battalion had been stationed in Cairo, Egypt at the outbreak of war, but by 16 October 1914 had returned to England from Alexandria and arrived at Liverpool to join the 24th Brigade of the 8th Division and moved to Hursley Park, Winchester. They landed at Le Havre in November 1914 for service on the Western Front. The 1st Battalion placed an important role at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle in March 1915 but by December it had lost half its strength due to frostbite as much as combat casualties as well as the commanding officer, Lieutenant-Colonel E. C. F. Wodehouse, who was killed-in-action.

It is unknown when George joined up or transferred to the 1st Bn., which having fought in the Battle of Aubers Ridge in May 1916, transferred with the 24th Brigade to the 23rd Division on 18 October 1915. During 1916 the Brigade helped to relieve the French 17th Division in the Carency sector and the attack on Contalmaison, and on 15 July 1916 transferred back to the 8th Division, with the Battalion taking over trenches at Cuinchy and then moving back to the front at Somme. During 1917 they were involved with the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Pilkem, The Battle of Langemarck, and the Third Battle of Ypres.

It was presumably during the first action of the Third Battle of Ypres that George was wounded.

The War Diary of the 1st Battalion Worcestershire Regiment provides information on their positions and actions in July and August 1917. Prior to George’s death on 12 August, the Battalion was in reserve and under training so it seems likely that he was wounded before August.

This would have been during the Battle of Pilckem Ridge, 31 July – 2 August 1917, which was the opening attack of the Third Battle of Ypres. On 31 July, the Anglo-French armies captured Pilckem Ridge and areas either side, the French attack being a great success. However, heavy rain fell during the afternoon of 31 July, just as German regiments from specialist counter-attack Eingreif divisions intervened. The reserve brigades were forced back and the German counter-attack was stopped by massed artillery and small-arms fire.

The Diary noted that they had made an extensive advance on 31 July near Hooge and onto the Bellewarde Ridge, toward Westhoek, in which action tanks were also used. However, in the later part of the action on 31 July, they experienced heavy shell fire and also machine gun and sniper fire. The description of the day in the War Diary runs to some four pages and although the Battalion captured 70 Germans, as well as inflicting losses on the enemy, they had three officers and 22 other ranks killed and five officers and 157 other ranks wounded, and one officer and 49 other ranks missing.

It is assumed that George Hanwell was among the 157 wounded and he was presumably taken back to an advanced dressing station or a casualty clearing station before being evacuated to one of the hospitals well behind the lines at Rouen, where he later died of his wounds on 12 August 1917.

George was buried in Plot P. II. D. 14B, in the St. Sever Cemetery Extension, Rouen. His headstone reads ‘God grant him eternal life’.

The St. Sever Cemetery Extension is located within a large communal cemetery situated on the eastern edge of the southern Rouen suburbs. During the First World War, Commonwealth camps and hospitals were stationed on the southern outskirts of Rouen. Most of the hospitals at Rouen remained there for the whole of the war. They included eight general, five stationary, one British Red Cross and one labour hospital, and No.2 Convalescent Depot. The great majority of the dead were taken to the city cemetery of St. Sever. In September 1916, it was found necessary to begin an extension, where the last burial took place in April 1920.

The Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects, recorded a payment on 22 November 1917, to his widow, Georgina, of £3-1-5d and then a payment of a war gratuity of £4-0-0d on 10 November 1919.

George’s Medal Card and the Medal Roll entry showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. There was no 1914-1915 Star, which suggests that he did not go to France until at least 1916.

George Hanwell is commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

George’s son Henry Hanwell’s marriage with Phyllis A Mansfield was registered in Rugby in Q2 1936. They had a son, John H Hanwell whose birth was registered in Q2 1936.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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This article on George Charles HANWELL was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, June 2017.

11th Nov 1916. Inspection of Warwickshire Volunteers by Lord French

INSPECTION OF WARWICKSHIRE VOLUNTEERS BY LORD FRENCH.

At 8.45 on Sunday last the members of the Rugby Volunteer Corps fell in at the Drill Hall under Mr C H Fuller, the Commanding Officer of No 2 Company (comprising Rugby, Nuneaton, and Atherstone) of the 2nd Battalion of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment, to take their part in the inspection of the Warwickshire Regiment by the Field-Marshal, Lord French, at Calthorpe Park, Birmingham.

In due course the Battalion reached their allotted position, forming, together with the 1st, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Battalions, and a Company of Engineers, a Regiment some 3,000 in strength, under command of Col D F Lewis, C.B, Lieut-Col F F Johnstone (Commander of the 2nd Battalion) acting as Parade Commander.

Shortly after the Lord-Lieutenant of the County—the Earl of Craven—had arrived, Lord French, who had been met at the Station and accompanied by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, entered the Park with his Staff, and was received with a General Salute. Without loss of time Lord French proceeded to inspect thoroughly each Battalion and Company of the Regiment, and afterwards in a clear strong voice addressed the Volunteers in terms which left no shadow of doubt in the minds of his hearers that they had won the appreciation of that gallant soldier and of the Authorities, and that they would be called upon to fill a role in the national defence which would release the more active soldier for services abroad. The discomforts of the pouring rain and the depressing weather were forgotten when words of praise for the soldierly bearing of the whole Regiment fell from the Field-Marshal’s lips ; words backed by his very emphatic statement, “ I mean what I say.”

Immediately after the inspection, and before addressing the Regiment, Lord French sent a special message to the 2nd Battalion, saying how pleased he was with them, and that from the way they stood they might have been soldiers all their lives. To the Rugby men this message was particularly gratifying, for they formed almost one complete Company of the Battalion to whom that message was sent.

The Rugby Corps arrived back in Rugby about 6.31 p.m, every man feeling that he had taken part in an historic event, marking one of the milestones on the road which Volunteers have set out to traverse- the road which shall lead them to be of service to their country whenever she may require it.

Notwithstanding the extremely bad weather, the conduct and general bearing of the men throughout the day was splendid.

The success of the inspection, and the keenness shown by the Rugby men, ought to have the effect of bringing new recruits, and enable the Rugby Corps to form itself into a complete Company.

THE POSSIBILITY OF AN INVASION.

On the same day Lord French inspected Volunteer at Bletchley, Oxford, and Wolverhampton.

In his address following the inspection at Birmingham, Lord French said the more men be saw of the Volunteer regiments the more he realised their enormous value to the country. Unless he had seen it himself, he never would have believed of the existence in this country to-day of such an extraordinary residue of latent military strength.

At Wolverhampton he said that whenever they heard of naval engagements near our coasts, and there was one in the Channel only the other day-it was always possible that behind the enemy ships of war transports might be bringing troops to land in this country at some unoccupied point. The whole history of war taught us that what happened was something that we did not expect. Therefore he wanted them to remember that invasion was possible. He did not say it was probable or imminent, or menacing ; but it was possible. Hence the great importance of the Volunteer movement.

“ OUR OWN DAY.”

£150 RAISED FOR RED CROSS.

All previous Flag Day records in Rugby were eclipsed on Saturday, when £150 8s 8d was collected on behalf of the new auxiliary hospital for wounded soldiers, which is to consist of eighty beds, and is to be located at the Institution Infirmary. About 130 ladies, including 30 Red Cross Nurses, sold flags in the streets, and upwards of 20,000 of these small tokens were disposed of. The arrangements, as usual, were entrusted to Mr J R Barker, and although he had only ten days in which to carry through the effort, his organisation was so complete that everything passed off smoothly, and a good deal of the credit for the success of the effort was due to his experience in these matters. He received valuable assistance from Miss D E Wood, who acted as Hon Secretary, and from members of the Boys’ Brigade, who delivered supplies of flags, etc, to the various sellers, all of whom received their flags on Friday evening. Mr R P Mason, London City and Midland Bank, was the Hon Treasurer, and he was assisted in the counting of the money, which took place at the supply depot, the Benn Buildings (kindly lent by the Urban District Council), by Messrs J Ferry, W G Mitchell, J R Barker, and Miss Dickinson. Throughout the morning Mr Barker visited the various districts, and so complete were the arrangements that it was almost impossible for anyone to escape buying a flag. The efforts organised by Mr Barker during the past sixteen months have produced over £2,000, and we believe few towns of the size of Rugby can show such a result.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, of Clifton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

There are 200 conscientious objectors in Warwick prison.

Pte A Godwin (South Staffordshires), who, when in Rugby, was engaged at Mr A Dicken’s, hairdresser, Clifton Road, is now a prisoner of war at Dülmen, Germany. He was a member of the Conservative Club.

THE RUGBY FARMERS’ MOTOR AMBULANCE.

An officer belonging to Rugby, now at the front, was recently returning from the firing line when he met a motor ambulance, and on it he saw with pleasurable surprise the inscription, “ Presented by the Rugby and District Farmers’ Association.” The officer is probably the only Rugby man in that locality.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

MR G F HOWKINS LOSES ANOTHER SON.

Sincere sympathy will be felt with Mr G F Howkins, of Crick, in the fact that his youngest son, Mr Sidney Howkins, has been killed in France. The young soldier, who was about 25 years of age, was formerly employed in the Northamptonshire Union Bank, and when war broke out he joined the Northamptonshire Yeomanry, Going with them to the front in the following November, he was killed on October 30. This is the second son Mr Howkins has lost owing to the war.

WOUNDED.—Pte H Lee, R.W.R, Clarence Road, New Bilton, gun shot in left leg ; Pte A Parkinson, Worcesters, Ringrose Court, gun shot wound and severe fracture of right leg.

PTE W STRATFORD, OF HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

Mrs Davenport, of Harborough Magna, has received official news that her brother, Pte W Stratford, of the R.W.R, died of wounds on October 29th. Pte Stratford, who was a native of Badby, and about 32 years of age, enlisted at the commencement of the war, and had been in France eighteen months.

SUDDEN DEATH OF AN OLD SOLDIER.

An inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner, Dr Day, at the Rugby Police Court on Monday, touching the death of Q.M.S William Henry Jones, Observer Co, which took place suddenly at his lodgings, 4 Frederick Street, on Friday morning. The deceased, who was 45 years of age, was, before he enlisted in September, 1914, a schoolmaster at Birkenhead. He was married shortly afterwards. For some years he had suffered very badly from rheumatism, but had not had rheumatic fever, although on one occasion he kept his bed for two months. He was not allowed to proceed to the front on account of his heart being weak. Since he had been at Rugby he had suffered a good deal from indigestion. His wife stated that at eight o’clock on Friday morning he went to the bathroom and locked the door. She afterwards heard him groaning, and called the landlady, Mrs Louch. A man was also summoned, a panel of the door was smashed, and they found deceased lying on the ground with his head towards the door.

Dr Patrick, who made a post-mortem examination, said the heart was very much enlarged, and one of the valves was diseased. In his opinion death was due to syncope.—Lieut Fergusson, of the Observer Co, said deceased was an old soldier, and went through the South Afrian War. His work was only of a sedentary nature.—A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony, and the jury expressed sympathy with the widow.

The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon, when, despite a heavy downpour of rain, there was a large number of spectators. The coffin was preceded by a firing party from Budbrooke Barracks, and the deceased’s comrades, of the Observer Company, under Lieut Fergusson, followed after the mourners. The first part of the service was conducted by the Rev C M, Blagden, Rector, and was held in the Parish Church. The coffin, which was covered with the Union Jack, and deceased’s belt and hat, was borne to the grave by his fellow N.C.O’s. After the service three volleys were fired, and the “ Last Post ” was sounded. Beautiful floral tributes were sent by his wife, his mother, and sister; Major B D Corbet and Lieut Fergusson ; from the headquarter staff, No 6 Observer Company, with a card attached, “ Mourning deeply a true and faithful comrade ” ; Mr and Mrs C F Louch ; Howard W Clayton, 11th King’s Regiment ; Harold and Tom ; Sergt-Major Rowland, R.F.C ; a few civilian friends ; Mrs D Barnwell ; J H Lane, Miss Bull, and Mrs F Solomon; and Mrs A Thomas.

RUGBY SOLDIER HONOURED.-Pte J Enticott, Oxford and Bucks L.I, has been awarded the military Medal for bravery shown on September 15th by attending wounded single handed under heavy shell fire. He is the youngest son of Mr A Enticott, of Union Street, and was formerly employed at the B.T.H. Works.

ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court on Friday morning, before T Hunter, Esq, George Henry Smith, of Rugby, was charged with being an absentee from the R.W.R, and was remanded to await an escort

THE PARCELS sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : tea, condensed milk, baked beans, 1lb sugar, grape nuts, fish paste, herrings in tomato sauce, margarine, cocoa, and 2lbs biscuits.

THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. — A SPECIAL ATTRACTION AT THE EMPIRE.—For six days commencing November 20th, a film giving pictures of the Battle of the Somme — Official War Pictures of the British Army in France, taken by permission of the War Office, 5,000 feet in five reels to be shown at The Empire, Rugby.

EPIDEMIC OF BIGAMY IN WARWICKSHIRE. — At the Warwickshire Assizes on Monday, Mr Justice Bailhache commented on the fact that four out of the seven prisoners for trial were charged with bigamy. He said there seemed to be an epidemic of bigamy in Warwickshire.

IN MEMORIAM

CLARKE.—In ever loving memory of Walter, younger son of the late E. T. Clarke, and of Mrs. Clarke, 19 Temple Street, Rugby, who was killed in action. November 15th, 1915.
“ Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.”
—Never forgotten by his Mother, Brother, and Sisters

Pedley, Bernard. Died 4th Jun 1916

Bernard Pedley was born in Crick, Northants and baptised there on 26th August 1894. His father was Alfred Pedley the village schoolmaster. He and his wife Harriet (nee Smith) had married in Birmingham in 1873 shortly before moving to Crick. Bernard was the youngest of their eleven children. In May 1899 Bernard Pedley died, at the age of 50. The family continued living in Crick for a few years, Bernard attended Lawrence Sheriff School in 1905 -1906, before they moved to Leicester. By 1911 Bernard was a sixteen year old bank clerk, living with his widowed mother at 45 Glenfield Road.

It is not known when Bernard enlisted, but comparison with similar numbers in the Worcestershire Regiment suggest it was in December 1915. He would have joined the 4th Battalion in France in March 1916 after their return from Gallipoli. The battalion moved into an area of trenches called “White City” near Auchonvilliers in the Somme. They spent time in the firing line, working on constructing covers for the trenches and placing gas alarms. Artillery was active on both sides.

The war diary for 1916 reads:

Firing line (White City) June 3rd

Erection of overhead cover carried on in all trenches. A raid was carried out by the 86th Brigade on that part of German trenches called “The Hawthorne Redoubt”. Artillery bombarded enemy’s trenches from 12 Midnight to 12.30 A.M., then lifted to 2nd line. Raiding party discharged Bangalore Torpedoes thus cutting the wire. At 12.45 A.M. the party entered the German trenches & found them empty, they did not penetrate into the 2nd line. A few boards were brought back which gave the information that the 119th Reserve Regt were holding the trenches in front of us. At 12.15 A.M. the German artillery replied to our bombardment; & very heavily shelled the White City. Two huts were hit. Casualties 11 killed, 2nd Lt New & 27 other Ranks wounded. Raiding party returned at 1 A.M. Artillery ceased firing 1.30 A.M. Quite an exciting night.

June 4th

At 6 A.M. the eleven bodies were got out from beneath the debris, and taken down for burial to Auchon-Villiers cemetery. 1 Officer and 9 men returned from leave.

Bernard Pedley would have been one of those eleven bodies.

Lance Corporal Bernard Pedley, 25296, 4th Bn, Worcestershire Regiment is remembered at Auchonvilliers Military Cemetery and also on the Lawrence Sheriff School Plaque.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

2nd Oct 1915. Rugby Soldier’s life saved by a Cigarette Case

RUGBY SOLDIER’S LIFE SAVED BY A CIGARETTE CASE.

In the recent British advance, L-Corpl A Lewis (son of P.C Lewis, Rugby), had a narrow escape from death, his life being saved by a cigarette case. The plucky young fellow, who is at present in a hospital at Tunbridge, has written to his parents stating that he is wounded in the muscle of the left arm, and but for a cigarette-case, which deflected the bullet, he would have been shot through the heart. He states that his battalion lost rather heavily, and adds that it was terrible to hear the rapid firing of the artillery, which lasted for half-an-hour, and nothing could be heard but the hissing and banging of shells. This is the second time he has been wounded. Another son of P.C Lewis, Pte F Lewis, has been at the front since the commencement of the war, and has been wounded twice, and gassed slightly. He has now been transferred to the Cycle Corps.

WOUNDED BY SHRAPNEL.

News has been received that Pte George Victor Hewitt, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, whose home is at 58 Abbey Street, Rugby, has been wounded. He is in a base hospital, and in a letter recently sent to his parents states that he has been wounded in the head by a piece of shrapnel, but not seriously. He was out with a working party in front of the lines, when (as he puts it) they “ had a good reception,” five out of the party of ten being hit.

A brother of the wounded soldier, Ernest Hewitt, has also joined H.M Army, enlisting at Newcastle ; and being a good shot, he was not long before he was sent to the front. He formerly worked at the B.T.H, and has sent home a number of interesting letters.

PTE TOWERS, OF HARBOROUGH FIELDS, KILLED

On Monday evening Mr Thomas Towers, farmer, of Harborough Fields Farm, Churchover, received a telegram from the Record Office, Warwick, stating that his elder son, Pte Martin Victor Towers, had been dangerously wounded in the brain by a bullet, and that he was lying unconscious in the 3rd Canadian Hospital, Carmiers Etaples. Early the next morning a wire, announcing his death, was received. Pte Towers, who was 19 years of age, enlisted on August 28th, 1914, and had been at the front about four months. Before enlisting he assisted his father on the farm.

RUGBY BUILDER’S APPRENTICE REPORTED KILLED.

There is reason to fear that Pte Tom Shone, who was apprenticed to the carpentry at Messrs Foster & Dicksee’s, and enlisted in Kitchener’s Army in September last year, was killed in the general advance at Loos. The death has not been officially reported, but Bob Salmon, of the same regiment, in a letter to his father, Mr George Salmon, of 45 Lower Hillmorton Road, also a carpenter at Messrs Foster & Dicksee’s, mentions the occurrence, the belief being that he was killed by shell fire in the German lines. Bob Salmon states that they were in the charge, and took four of the enemy’s lines. Reference is made in the letter to casualties amongst other Rugby chums—Bert Snutch and Tom Reeve-but the writer says that Abbott, Butler, and himself came through all right, and that Keyte was not in the charge, but left behind. The last he saw of Tom Shone was two minutes before the attack, when he had just been made the captain’s orderly. “ We were afterwards told by one of the officers that the work we did in attaining the objective was excellent.” He adds: “ I was jolly thankful to get out of the trenches that night.”

ANOTHER EMPLOYEE OF MESSRS. FROST & SONS KILLED.

News has been received that Rifleman E Negus, of the 12th Battalion Rifle Brigade, who at the time he enlisted in September last year was a machine-minder in the employ of Messrs Frost & Sons, has been killed in action. He went out to France in July and, as will be seen by the following letter from the machine-gun officer to his father, he lost his life on September 21st, through the bursting of a shell near him :—

“ Dear Mr Negus,-I am sorry to inform you that your son was killed in action this afternoon. A shell burst quite near him and killed him instantaneously. He could not have known anything about it, and of that I am glad. Your son is a great loss to his friends and to myself, I could not wish for a more cheery lad or a more willing worker. His place in his gun team will be hard to fill. Please accept my deepest sympathy in your sorrow. He will be buried tomorrow morning at 10 a.m, quite near the firing-line.—Yours sincerely, R C S STEVENSON, machine-gun officer.

“ September 21st.”

When he joined the army deceased had only been in Messrs Frost & Sons’ employ about three months, but he was very much liked by his fellow-workmen, and had qualities that made him deservedly popular. His father’s home is in Tottenham, London.

FRANKTON.

PRIVATE HERBERT HOLLIS, eldest son of Mr Amos Hollis, of Frankton, late of Harbury, who enlisted on September 7th, 1914, in the 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed in action oa August 10th last at the Dardanelles.

BRAUNSTON.

PTE CLIFFORD HAYNES, 1st Batt Northants Regiment, of this village, who was seriously wounded in the retreat from Moms, was again sent out to the front in March, being then convalescent. He was again seriously wounded with fire pieces of shrapnel in July. Having barely recovered from his wounds, he has been home for a few days’ furlough, before going out to the Dardanelles. What do the shirkers say to this ?

CORPL JACK FORTNAM, Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was seriously wounded in the left arm while engaged in the charge of yeomanry on Hill 70, Gallipoli new landing, is progressing slowly but favourably at Netley Hospital.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Isham, of Churchover, has received a field card from his son. Rifleman W Isham, of the Rifle Brigade, stating that he has been wounded and is in hospital.

In a letter to his old Schoolmaster, Pte Wm Padley, R.A.M.C, an old Murrayian, states that he as now on duty at a large hospital at Ras-el-Tin, Alexandria, and for six weeks he was engaged on a hospital ship, fetching sick and wounded from the Dardanelles.

The friends of Corpl Frank Davis of 38A Bridget Street, Rugby, have received intimation that he was wounded with shrapnel in the charge, and is now in hospital in England. He Worked at the B.T.H before his enlistment in September last year, and went out with his regiment in May.

CASUALTIES TO WARWICKSHIRE MEN.

The following further casualties in the Warwickshire Yeomanry at the Dardanalles are reported :-

KILLED.-Pte W Hartley, Pte A Allbright, Pte W J Beech.

DIED OF WOUNDS.-Corpl Whittall, Sergt E J Cox, and Pte D E Powell.

WOUNDED.—Lce-Corpl Barnard, Pte G Curran (not missing as previously reported), Pte F H Gould, Pte J Boven.

The Warwickshire Yeomanry is evidently a very popular branch of the service. The first line is doing splendid service in the Dardanelles, and has been strengthened by drafts from the second line, which is still in this country. The third, line is attracting very large numbers of recruits of a very fine type, and has also sent a hundred to fill up the ranks of the second line, caused by over a hundred being sent to take part in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. The county has, in fact, great reason to be proud of its Yeomanry regiment.

THE SEVENTH WARWICKS.

One of the “ Pals,” writing to us from the Front, says “ A Leamington Sergeant who has just returned from leave assures me that several Leamingtonians could not credit the fact that the 1/7th Warwicks had ever held front-line trenches. He was asked ‘ What Regulars did you have in front of you ?’ I should like to assure you that the 1/7th R.W.R have been holding front-line trenches on and off ever since the first fortnight after we came abroad. The value of Territorials as reliable troop for trench warfare was at one time doubted, but this doubt was quickly removed, and I think you will agree with me when I say that the Territorial Force has ‘made good.’”

7TH WARWICKSHIRE MEN WOUNDED.

The following members of the 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion are reported wounded :- Lce-Corpl T Booth, Lce-Corpl E Reading, and Pte F Cotton.

DEATHS.

CLEAVER.—Killed in action in the Dardanelles on August 10th, Pte. James Cleaver, 9th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, only son of the late James Cleaver, of Frankton, and dearly-beloved brother of Mrs. Doyle, 71 Victoria Street, New Bilton, Rugby, aged 28 years. Duty done.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following recruits have been attested at Rugby Drill Hall this week :—A Bates, 220th Fortress Co, R.E ; R H Cowley (driver), R.E ; R Williams and A Burton, K.R.R ; J A Spear, 14th Gloucester Bantams ; J H White, R.F.A ; H Edmans, Yorks and Lancs ; S L Howard, R.A.M.C ; and T Gamble, Coldstream Guards. All branches of the army, with the exception of the cavalry, are now open for recruits. There are good openings for drivers in the R.E, recruits 5ft and upwards in height, being accepted up to 45 years.

THE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The Local Prisoners of War Help Committee have this week despatched 28 parcels to British prisoners in Germany. Each parcel contained a large tin of beef, cheese, biscuits, cafe au lait, cocoa, soup tablets, and pickles. Each parcel which cost 3s. also contained either a pair of socks or a flannel shirt, these articles having been sent by generous donors to the Rectory.

During the coming winter the committee will be grateful for any gifts of suitable warm under-clothing in a decent state of repair for despatch with the weekly parcels.

That the work of the committee is appreciated by the brave fellows who receive parcels is proved by the many postcards and letters of thanks which are being continually received acknowledging the receipt of parcels.

CRICK RIFLEMAN’S EXPERIENCE IN THE FIRING LINE.

Rifleman Harry Fretter, of the Rifle Brigade, whose home is at Crick, and who was formerly employed there, in a letter to a Rugby friend, gives his first experiences of trench warfare as follows :—“ We are holding a part in the firing-line which is well advanced, so we have steered clear of bayonet charges ; but we have seen enough to give us a good idea of what real fighting is like, We have to be careful or else we get a few German snipers after us, who try very hard to hit as. They are very good shots, and, of course, if they play the game too bad, we just put our machine-gun on them, which is far superior to the German’ machine-gun. Then we get a little excitement watching our artillery blow the German trenches up. It is lovely to see the sand-bags and dirt go up in the air. As for Germans, we have not seen any yet. We can hear them at night, and that is our share at present, but when the time comes our boys will just show them what they are made of.”