23rd Jun 1917. Heavy Thunderstorm, Soldier killed at Ryton-on-Dunsmore

HEAVY THUNDERSTORM.
REMARKABLE HAILSTONES.

The brilliant and summer-like weather which prevailed last week culminated on Saturday in a shade temperature of 87 degrees. In the evening a thunderstorm passed over the district, accompanied by a moderate but welcome rainfall. On Sunday the temperature was 2 or 3 degrees lower, but the atmosphere was still more oppressive. During the morning heavy peals of thunder were heard at a distance, and a little after three o’clock in the afternoon there was a recurrence of these, and the discharges continued without intermission till about eight o’clock. The thunder clouds seemed to be circling round the country north and west of Rugby, and the storm was raging with great violence in the direction of Coventry. At length between five and six o’clock—it took a course over Rugby and the immediate neighbourhood, and rain fell more or less heavily till shortly before eight o’clock, when the climax came in a remarkable bombardment from above. People were startled by a sudden rattling on roofs, windows, and glass-houses-the noise amounting almost to a roar—and hailstones of abnormal size were seen to be crashing down from the clouds. This lasted about five minutes, is which time the ground was well covered with the icy missiles.

The full force of the storm was experienced at Bourton. Some of the hailstones that fell there weighed between 2 and 3ozs, and considerable damage was done to property and growing crops. At Bourton Hall, the residence of Mr F J Shaw, several hundred panes of glass were smashed, and the windows of numerous other houses were broken. The large hailstones tore off the young shoots of fruit trees, strawberries, cucumbers, and kidney beans, and flattened out a large quantity of mowing grass. A great many hailstones were as large as walnuts, and some measured more than 2ins. across. For a short time the wind blew with great force, and an umbrella in the hands of a pedestrian was quickly torn to ribbons. Windows at Draycote Chapel were broken.

At Dunchurch considerable damage was done to crops and glass. No less than 120 panes of glass in windows and greenhouses were broken on Mr Mallam’s School premises. At Dunchurch Lodge and Bilton Grange the glass also suffered badly, some 400 broken panes being counted at the latter place. Windows at the church were broken, and a large piece of lead was torn from the roof. Some of the masses of hail that fell here measured from 2 to 2¼ inches in diameter, and weighed nearly 3ozs.

At Bilton measurements of hailstones taken about ten minutes after the cessation of the storm were from three-quarters of an inch to an inch and a quarter diameter. A fine oak tree on the main road between Bilton and Cawston was struck by lightning and badly seamed.

At Newbold-on-Avon a chimney stack at the Vicarage was split by the lightning, but, unfortunately, the debris instead of penetrating the roof, lodged against another chimney. The electricity passing along the bell-wires fused some of them, and also caused damage to the wall paper in several rooms. Several trees in the neighbourhood were struck.

At Marton a lot of damage was done by the enormous hailstones to windows and greenhouses, and potato tops on many plots were badly cut about. Some hailstones measured six inches in circumference. A thunderbolt was seen to fall in a field belonging to Mr Steane near the church.

The gable end of the Chequers Inn at Lilbourne, occupied by Mrs Rouse, was struck and a number of slates were displaced.

A SOLDIER KILLED AT RYTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

A sad fatality occurred at Ryton-on-Dunsmore during the storm on Sunday evening to Pte J Stephens, of the Devonshire Regiment, a farm hand who had been working for Mr T Pearman as a substitute. At the inquest on Tuesday Mr E Bagshaw was foreman of the jury.—Pte J James, also of the Devonshire Regiment who had been working with deceased for a fortnight, said he went to evening service at Wolston Church, and on returning to meet Stephens as arranged, found him lying dead under a tree by the roadside.—Laura Mead, of Ryton, who was cycling with a friend, said she went under an elm tree for shelter. Stephens was also there and he advised them to “ hop to Ryton Vicarage, or they would get very wet.” They acted upon his advise, but did not know why he stayed himself. Witness heard afterwards that he had been killed.—Amy Redhouse, also of Ryton, stated that she was cycling home from Wolston with a friend after the storm, and just before reaching the London Road, about 8.15 p.m, saw deceased lying under a tree. By the appearances, she concluded that he had been struck by lightning, and at once rode to inform P.C Jenson at Stretton. This officer described exactly the position in which he found the body feet towards the road and body and head towards the elm tree-and said deceased had evidently fallen exactly where he stood. His hat was split right round the brim and the stiffening wire was torn out. The hair at the back of the head was singed, but there were no other traces of burning. Several nails had been driven out of his boots. About 4½ft. from the tree the road was torn up in the shape of a V to a depth of 1½Ft to 2½ ft, and there were also marks on the tree. Witness was complimented by the Coroner for the excellent description he had given, and also thanked Miss Mead for the trouble she took. He remarked that it was curious that deceased warned the ladies, but did not move away himself. He was evidently willing to take a risk. A verdict of “ Death through being struck by lightning ” was returned.-The jury expressed their sympathy with the widow, and returned their fees for her. A Ryton resident added 5s, and the Coroner said he was also pleased to subscribe.

Deceased was a strong, healthy man, and Mr Pearman found him quite satisfactory as a substitute in all respects. His home was at 28 Gloucester Street, Cirencester. He had served 12 years in the Army before war broke out, and being then nearly 45 years of age, was kept on home service. He was a married man with three children at the time of his death, but since the sad occurrence his wife has given birth to a fourth child.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Welch, of 35 Union Street, has received official intimation that her husband, Pte Ernest Edward Welch, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action in France on April 28th.

The death took place in Rugby Infirmary, on the 10th Inst, of Pioneer Wm Barrows, late 11th Hants Regiment, youngest son of David Barrows, 51 James Street. Before the War he was driver of a Diesel engine at the local Waterworks. He joined up in September, 1914, and saw much service in France at Loos, Ginchy, &c. He was discharged on May 23, 1917, medically unfit, suffering from cancer of the tongue.

Pte Harry Rogers, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and the eldest son of Mr & Mrs H Rogers, of Flore, Northants, and nephew of Mr & Mrs H Miller, 10 Alfred Street, Lawford Road, Rugby, has recently been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and skill on patrol work. Crawling near to the enemy lines under a heavy shell fire, and after being buried three times under debris, he succeeded in obtaining valuable information. Pte Rogers has been twice wounded, and before the War was employed at Rugby Station (L & N-W Railway).

Captain Edward Ernest Wynne, Leicestershire Regiment, who was killed on June 8th, the day following his 22nd birthday, was the eldest son of the Rev E H & Mrs Wynne, of Guestling Rectory, Sussex, formerly curate of St Matthew’s, Rugby. Educated at Uppingham, he became captain of cricket and fives, and was also a member of the football XV and the hockey XI. After war broke out he quickly obtained a commission in the Leicestershire Regiment, having previously joined the Public Schools Brigade. He had seen close on two years’ service at the front, and fell leading his company in the face of a very heavy fire with the object of taking an enemy machine gun by which they were being delayed.

Mr & Mrs Parkinson, of the Old Bank House, Southam, and formerly of Rugby, has been informed that their son, Second-Lieut Horace J A Parkinson, of the 4th Leicestershire Regiment, was seriously wounded in France on the 8th inst. He was educated at the Lower School, Rugby, and before joining the Army was in Parrs Bank, Leicester, and formerly at the Lutterworth Branch. He is making satisfactory progress.

Lieut H L Satchell, R.W.R, attached to the R.F.C, son of Mr J G Satchell, Dunchurch Road, has been promoted flight commander and temporary captain.

Between £9 and £10, realised by some sports at Tyntesfield School will be divided between the Red Cross Hospitals and the Hospital of St Cross.

THE ACCIDENT TO A FLYING CORPS OFFICER.

The funeral of the late Lieut Fitzroy Porter, R.F.C, whose death from a machine gunshot accident was reported in our last issue, took place on Monday, the 11th inst., at Sefton, Liverpool, near the residence of his father, Blundelsands, amid manifestations of great sorrow and sympathy for the young officer’s tragic death. Several of the officers of the R.F.C Squadron at Lilbourne attended the funeral of their lamented comrade.

In our report of the accident it should have been stated that the deceased officer was detained at the R.F.C Camp Hospital for some time after the accident under the care of Surgeon-Major Charles Collins, M.D, R.F.C, before being removed in the squadron ambulance to the Brookfield Nursing Home of Rugby Hospital for further treatment, where he subsequently died.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.—There have been three additions to the Rugby list of prisoners of war this week vis :— Pte P Gamble Davis, Lincolnshire Regiment (interned at Doeberitz), and whose home is at Dunchurch, formerly Church Lawford ; Sergt H Beers, King’s Liverpool Regiment (interned at Minden), formerly New Bilton ; and Pte Peddlesdon, East Surrey Regiment (interned at Dulmen), of Rugby. With regard to the last-named man considerable enquiries had to be made before he could be traced to his prison camp. Arrangements have been made for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to these men on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee.

NAPTON.

MR J LINE has received information that his son Walter Lines, of the Buffs, was wounded on May 3rd, and is a prisoner in Germany.

BRAUNSTON.

MR A TURNER has received official news that his son, Lance-Corpl Horace W Turner, Royal West Surrey Regiment, was wounded on May 16th. He enlisted in Kitchener’s Army about a month after the outbreak of war.

DUNCHURCH.

MILITARY FUNERAL.-The late Col-Sergt-Major Mulcaster was buried with military honours at Dunchurch on Saturday, last. The coffin was draped with the Union Jack, on which were placed the cap and belt of the deceased, was borne shoulder high to the church by six sergeants of the Manchester Regiment. The path from the churchyard gates to the church door was lined on each side by the boys of Dunchurch Hall School (at which the deceased was gymnastics instructor for twelve years) and the firing party sent down by the Regiment. The Burial Service was read by the Rev B B Carter, military chaplain of the Indian Government and priest-in-charge at Dunchurch. Mrs E R Gilling presided at the organ, and the psalms and hymns were nicely sung by the boys of the choir. The funeral procession left the church to the strains of the Dead March in Saul. Among the mourners were the wife and children of the deceased, Mr Wm Mulcaster (brother), Lieut & Mrs Bullivant (brother-in-law and sister-in-law), Mrs Long (sister-in-law), Mr & Mrs Wolley, Nurse Butcher, Col-Sergt Sutton, Col-Sergt-Major Grognett, Col-Sergt-Major Wilcox, Com-Sergt-Major Pomfret, Com-Sergt-Major Casey, Com-Sergt-Major Smith, Reg-Sergt-Major Prosser (all of the Manchester Regiment), M C G Mallam, Mr More, Mr Oakley, Dr Powell, Mr J H Dew, Mr J H Abbott, M E Iliff, Mr G White, Mr J Loydall, Mr T Haynes, Mr P Heap, Mr T Whiteman, Mr J Nias, and Mr S Whiteman. A number of ladies were present in church, including three of the Dunchurch nurses of the Bilton V.A.D. Hospital. A very large number of people assembled in the churchyard, and quietly and reverently watched the funeral. At the close of the service three volleys were fired over the grave by sixteen men of the Manchester Regiment, and the “ Last Post ” was then blown by two of the same regiment. Floral tributes were laid on the grave from : Wife and Children ; Mr & Mrs Bullivant ; Mr & Mrs Long ; Mr & Mrs Mallam, Joyce, Brenda, John, Monica, and Stephen Mallam ; “ His Boys at Dunchurch Hall ” ; Miss Hume ; Mr Oakley and Mr Mort ; the indoor and outdoor servants at Dunchurch Hall ; Major & Mrs Neilson and Lieut H Holdsworth ; Rev B B & Mrs Carter, Mr P P Rodocanachi ; Mr & Mrs Dew ; Mr & Mrs Wolley ; Mr & Mrs H V Tait ; Mr & Mrs Taylor ; Mrs Weston and family ; “ His Brothers-in-Arms ” ; Teddie Dowling ; the members of the Dunchurch Social Club ; the boys of Dunchurch ; Boughton Endowed School ; and the children of the Dunchurch Girls’ and Infants’ Schools.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS’ ENTERTAINED.—On Saturday afternoon the soldiers from Pailton House Hospital were entertained to tea at Harborough Magna School. After tea, which was provided with the money left over from the May festival, and with the help of a few friends, each soldier was presented with a packet of cigarettes by Mrs Bird. During the evening the May-day ceremony was repeated.

BREAD SUBSTITUTES.

An impression has got abroad that war bread is not nourishing. This is erroneous. War bread is made of the most nourishing portions of wheat, barley, maise and rice, and should be found quite as sustaining and nourishing as white bread. A good deal of the imaginary difficulties with war bread would entirely disappear were everyone to make it a practice to thoroughly masticate the bread before swallowing, along the lines of the article which appeared in our columns last week.

There appears to be some confusion on the question of substitutes, and there is no doubt that the question of substitutes has troubled many people. In the early days of the Food Campaign a great deal too much was made of the importance of using substitutes. At the present time rice, barley, maize, oats, rye, &c, cannot be regarded as substitutes, as they form part of the whole bulk of cereals from which flour is obtained for incorporation in our bread. The Food Controller has stated that oatmeal may be used for porridge and rice for puddings outside the limits of the voluntary ration, but the use of other cereals should be kept within limits of the ration. It is also, of course, desirable that oatmeal and rice for porridge and puddings should be used sparingly, as pressure of demand upon these must inevitably tend to produce scarcity in these articles also.

It is clear that those engaged in heavy, manual labour, who have not the money to buy articles of food to take the place of bread, cannot get down to the 4-lb limit ; but they can, to some extent, reduce their consumption of cereals, provided they make a genuine, honest endeavour to do this. It should be borne in mind by everyone, however, that in order to prevent the necessity for compulsory rationing, each one must eat something less of the cereals, so that voluntary rationing can be allowed to continue.

DEATHS.

BARROWS.—On the 10th inst., at the Rugby Infirmary, the beloved son of David and Mrs. Barrows (late 12271, 11th Hants. Regiment) ; aged 45 years.—“ He answered his country’s call.”

TERRY.—On June 7th (died of wounds received in action in Mesopotamia), AMBROSE JOSEPH TERRY, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, the dearly beloved only son of A. & M. A. Terry, of Crick ; aged 24 years.

WELCH.—April 28th, in France, ERNEST EDWARD WELCH, beloved husband of Bertha Welch, 35 Union Street.—“ Gone, but not forgotten.”

WELCH.—Killed in action on April 29th, ERNEST EDWARD WELCH, only son of the late Edward and Mrs. Welch, Union Street, Rugby.
“ Nobly he answered duty’s call,
And for his country gave his all.
Until the day breaks, dear Ern—good-bye.”
-Sadly missed and in silence mourned by his loving MOTHER and SISTERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

GREER.—In loving memory of Private R. GREER, 1st Royal Inniskillings, who was killed in action at the Dardaneles on June 18, 1915.—Never forgotten by his friends at 12 Argyle Street.

HUGHES.—In ever-loving memory of JACK, who was killed in France on June 18, 1915.—“ Though lost to sight, to memory ever dear.”—From MAUD.

HUGHES.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, JACK, who was killed in action in France on June 18, 1915.
“ Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, hut gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving PARENTS, SISTER EDIE, BROTHERS, and KITTY and DICK.

16th Jun 1917. Doctors and the War – Appeal to the Public

Doctors and The War.

APPEAL TO THE PUBLIC.

THE ARMY needs all the Doctors of military age who can be spared and this district has answered the appeal to best of its ability.

This means that the Doctors who are left must work much harder than usual, and they can only give the medical service that is really necessary if the Public help them.

YOU can help in following ways :-

If your Doctor has regular consulting hours never send for him to come to your house if the patient can go to the Doctor. This saves much time in visiting.

Never go to the Doctor’s house except during his proper surgery hours, except in great urgency.

Always send your messages for visits before he leaves home in the morning, except in urgent and sudden cases of illness.

Never send through the night except in urgent or sudden cases.

SPECIAL REQUEST.

Be loyal to your own Doctor if he is on Service. Tell any Doctor you may go to while he is away that your own Doctor is away on Service. You will then be attended FOR HIM, and when he comes back both you and the Doctor who has been acting for him will have the satisfaction of knowing that you did your duty by him while he was doing his duty by the Country.

Issued by the Central Medical War Committee, 429, Strand, London.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Rifleman Leonard Thompson, Rifle Brigade, whose parents live at 12 Union Street, has been reported missing since May 4th. He was 20 years of age, and was an old St Matthew’s boy. He joined the army two years ago.

Mr and Mrs Boyes, of Railway Terrace, Rugby, have received information that nothing further has been heard of their son, Pte F H Boyes, Royal Berkshire Regt, who was reported missing on July 1st, 1916, and it must be presumed he has been killed. Pte Boyes was a drummer in the 1st Rugby Boys’ Brigade before enlisting in March, 1915, when only 16 years of age. He was in France before attaining his 17th birthday. Another son, Pte F E Boyes, Oxon & Bucks L.I., has been twice wounded ; whilst a third son, Pte W J Boyes, 7th Warwicks, has also served.

The Misses Kathleen and Erica Cooke, daughters of Mr C J B Cooke, of Crewe, and formerly of Rugby, are doing war work in Paris—driving ambulances for the Red Cross.

The following have been reported wounded :- Pte Spooner (O & B), Rugby ; Pte F Burton (R.G.A), Dunchurch ; and Pte F Knight (Oxford & Bucks), Dunchurch, second time.

Mr Bernard Ellis, chairman of the well-known firm of Joseph Ellis & Sons, Ltd, has now received information which leaves little doubt that his second son, who as reported missing on May 20th, was killed in an encounter with German aeroplanes over the German lines He was not yet 19. Mr Bernard Ellis’s eldest son is recovering from very serious wounds received at the front during an attack last April.

BOMBARDIER BOSWORTH AGAIN HONOURED.

Bombardier F Bosworth, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been awarded the Medialle Militaire for the same action that gained for him the bar to his Military Medal.

A NEW BILTON MAN ESCAPES from GERMANY

On Saturday morning Mr & Mrs W J Wiltshire, of 18 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, received the welcome intelligence that their son, Pte W J Wiltshire, of the 1st Wilts Regiment, who was captured by the Germans at the Battle of the Marne, had escaped from Germany, and this was followed up by a telegram on Sunday to the effect that Pte Wiltshire had arrived in England, and was quite well. During the greater part of his imprisonment Pte Wiltshire, who was an old soldier and was called up as a reservist at the beginning the War, was interned in Hanover.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

PRIVATE THOMAS SPRAGGETT, Royal Warwicks, returned from the front for a short furlough. He has been in France since 22nd October, 1915, and has seen much fighting. On Saturday last he was married at Leamington to Miss F M Smith, of Emscote. The happy couple are spending their short honeymoon among their friends. Pte Spraggett is the son of Mr and Mrs Thos Spraggett of this village.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
FLAG DAY RESULT.

The total sum raised as a result of the special effort for local prisoners of war on Saturday, June 2nd, was £752 9s 3d, and a number of donations have been promised, but have not yet been received. This sum does not include the proceeds of the prize competition which has been organised on behalf of the fund by the Rugby Trades and Labour Council, and which is expected to produce a very handsome addition. The donations amounted to £512 5s 2d, and the sale of flags to £138 9s 2d in Rugby and £101 11s 11d the country.

SALVATION ARMY WAR FLAG DAY.—A Tommy has said : “ You cannot get away from the Salvation Army in France,” and such was the case last Saturday in Rugby, when helpers of the Salvation Army were very energetic in collecting for the war work of that denomination, which includes refreshment and recreation huts, hostels, and naval and military homes[?], motor ambulance, food parcels and clothing for prisoners of war, etc. Nearly 10,000 flags were sold, and the proceeds amounted to £51. The work was organised by Commandant J Walker. During the afternoon the Senior and Junior Bands paraded the town and collected £8. Those who collected were : Mr and Mrs Burton, Messrs Robert Neale, Arthur Reade, and =Robbins ; Misses Phyllis Dodd, Edith Giddens, Kate Mays, Ada Wild, Rosina Allen, Doris Fiddler, Mary Linley, Elsie Clifton, Esther Keen, F and M Robotham, and L Kirtland. Mrs Handford and family collected in Lutterworth, and Mrs Paget in Bourton.

A BEER FAMINE exists in many parts of Warwickshire, especially the country districts. Some houses have been temporarily closed because of the uncertainty of obtaining supplies, and it a common thing to see in the window of a public-house “ No draught beer on sale.”

THE WEATHER & THE CROPS.

The present spell of dry weather has given ample opportunity for the destruction of the heavy crop of weeds, both on the farm and in the gardens. Quite a number of women have been employed in terminating the unusual growth of thistles, &c, among the corn. A few copious showers would now be very acceptable. The rain is especially needful for the planting in the garden and as a refresher for early peas. The growth of the potatoes exhibits, as a rule, great irregularity, but in a few cases may be seen of exceptional promise. Wheat has decidedly improved lately and oats and barley look well. Beans too, will probably turn out better than was at one time expected. There is a good-show of grass, and hay-making will, doubtless, soon be in full swing.

RUGBY MEAT TRADE.

The London Central Meat Company asked for a renewal of exemption for their local manager, George Robinson, 40, married, B1, 142 Murray Road. Lieut Wratislaw explained that in view of the Tribunal’s contention that there should be no preferential treatment in the foreign meat trade the representatives of the three foreign meat companies held a conference with the Advisory Committee, and one of the firms offered to send a man to this shop, which could be managed by a female, to cut up the meat, but this offer was refused by the company. The firm’s representative explained that prior to the War there were 13 foreign meat shops in the town, but now there were only four, and three of these were selling English meat. The Central Meat Company was the only shop selling solely foreign meat. At the meeting with the Advisory Committee they pointed out that the scheme suggested was unworkable because all the meal arrived at the same time, and when the man was required by the Central Meat Company he would be busy at his own shop. The firm who made the offer had since agreed that the scheme could not be worked.—In reply to the Chairman, Lieut Wratislaw said he did not think any English butchers in the town had had to close down. The Chairman expressed the opinion that some re-adjustment was necessary in the meat trade. The present plan was absolutely restricting competition and in view of the facts elucidated, the Tribunal did not think it was the public interest that the man should taken into the Army. Three months’ conditional exemption.

AIR RAID ON LONDON.

A raid made by 15 aeroplanes on London on Wednesday resulted in 104 persons being killed and upwards of 400 injured. Ten children were killed and 50 injured in a school in the East-end, upon which a bomb fell. As far as is known only one enemy aeroplane brought down.

DEATHS.

CANHAM.—On May 28th, while on duty as a signaller, after only one week in France, ARCHIBALD, the second son of Mrs. Canham, Hillmorton, and dearly-beloved husband of Laura Canham, late of 19 Benn Street, Rugby, aged 36 years.

HIPWELL.-Died from wounds June 7th, “somewhere in France,” Gunner EDWARD WALLACE HIPWELL, second son of George Hipwell, Clifton-on-Dunsmore (late of Brinklow Station), aged 25 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

HANCOX.-In affectionate remembrance of our dear and only son and brother, CHARLES HANCOX, who died of wounds at Stationary Hospital, St. Omar, France, June 20th, 1915.
“ Somewhere in France ” there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave,
One of the rank and file-he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, and Sisters.

9th Jun 1917. Local War Notes

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut L G Colbeck, R.F.A, the Medborough[?], Cambridge University, and Middlesex cricketer, has been awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in command of his battery. Second-Lieut Colbeck was a master at Rugby School for several years, and his mother still resides in Rugby.

Mrs Cleaver, Drill Hall Cottage, Rugby, has received a letter from a friend of Sergt-Major T Cleaver, giving details of how her husband met his death. Three Officers and the Sergeant-Major were talking together while they were waiting to be relieved. A shell burst near them, the three officers being killed, and Sergt-Major Cleaver severely wounded in the back and legs. He succumbed to his injuries the following day.

The “ Leamington Courier ” is given to understand that the Military Authority propose to transfer the Leamington recruiting staff to Rugby. The ostensible reason is a desire to economise, but is very doubtful (our contemporary remarks) whether that object will be achieved, for many questions arise in regard to recruiting which necessitate consultation with the Recruiting Officer himself, and a railway journey to Rugby is not now the simple matter that it used to be. It is much to be hoped that the Military Authorities will see the wisdom of altering the decision in the matter.

Mrs Welch, 35 Union Street, Rugby, has received information from the War Office that her husband, Lance-Corpl Ernest Welch, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action on April 29th. A later message reports him as missing since April 28th, so naturally his friends are anxious as to his fate.

Mrs Ogburn, 40 Chapel Street, has now received official information that her husband, Pte H Ogburn, was killed on July 30, 1916, when reported missing.

MAJOR HARMAN, D.S.O.

The recent list of recipients of the D.S.O contained the name of Major H A A F Harman, South Staffs Regiment, who is well known to many of our readers as a member of the Murray School teaching staff. At the outbreak of the War Major Harman held the position head of the head of the Training Institution at Acera Gold Coast, and he served under General Smuts in his African campaign, and was wounded.

PTE A J PERRY.

Pte A J Perry, of the Royal Marines, who was killed in action about three weeks ago, was for some time employed in the Stationmaster’s office at Rugby L & N-W Railway Station. He was only 20 years of age, and joined the Army a week before Christmas. His home is at Kilsby.

SECOND-LIEUT N R DE POMEROY.

Definite news has now been received that Second-Lieut Norman R De Pomeroy, of the Royal Flying Corps, who has been missing since October 20, 1916, was killed in action on that date. Prior to the War Second-Lieut De Pomeroy was a member of the B.T.H Test Department.

A marriage is arranged between Capt Charles Moore, Irish Guards, son of the late Mr Arthur Moore, of Mooresfort, co. Tipperary, and Lady Dorothie Feilding, second daughter of the Earl and Countess of Denbigh. Lady Dorothie returned on Thursday for a short time to the Munro Ambulance Corps in Belgium, where she has been since September, 1914, and the wedding will take place very quietly at an early date at Newnham Paddox.

DEATHS.

INWOOD.—On Whit-Sunday, May 27th, 1917, from wounds received in action, CORPL STANLEY, the only dearly-beloved child of Mrs. Inwood, Lodge Road, Rugby, aged 20.
“ Lost awhile, our treasured love,
Gained for ever safe above.”

PERRY.—Died of wounds in France on May 22nd, Pte, ALFRED J. PERRY, dearly beloved son of Mrs. A Perry, of Kilsby, aged 20 years-“ Greater love hath no man than this.”

2nd Jun 1917. Cooking Demonstration at Rugby

COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS AT RUGBY.

In connection with the local Food Economy Campaign, cooking demonstration rooms have been opened at a shop in High Street, where many valuable culinary hints are being imparted to visitors by Miss Foster and Mrs Yeomans, the instructors attached to the local cookery centre.

The opening ceremony was performed by Mrs A A David on Monday afternoon, when, despite the glorious weather which have tempted people to spend their time out-of-doors, there was a good attendance of ladies.

Before calling upon Mrs David to open the rooms, Dr David said the time had not yet come for them to express their thanks ; but he could not help recommending to their gratitude Mr J T Clarke and his committee, who had made the arrangements, and whose energy had been quite splendid in brining the scheme to what, at any rate, was a successful beginning. In the second place, he wanted to thank the cookery staff teachers, who were giving up their holidays in such glorious weather to take part in that work. He knew that they had quite sufficient reward in being aware that they were helping on a great, good and urgent cause ; lest they ought to feel particularly grateful to them this week. He was sure there were hundreds of good cooks in Rugby, but he hoped none of them were too proud to take a hint in such matters, especially now, when new, sudden and extra demands were made upon their skill. He hoped the ladies of Rugby would show their gratitude to the staff teachers by coming to learn what they could.

Mrs David then declared the demonstration open, and said she hoped all would try to make it a success by getting their friends to attend.

The instructors afterwards gave demonstrations in making barley bread, oatcakes, maize meal scones, buns without flour, and oatmeal pudding.

MAGISTERIAL.
—At Rugby Police Court on Thursday (before A E Donkin, Esq), Fredk Blythman, no fixed abode, was charged with stealing 12 eggs, the property of some person unknown.—P.C Anderton stated that, in consequence of prisoner’s suspicious behaviour in the Market Place the previous evening, he followed him to Smith’s lodging-house in Gas Street, and heard him offer some eggs for sale. Witness enquired where he got the eggs from, and he replied that he bought them ten miles the other side of Coventry, but he subsequently admitted that he stole them from a nest between Coventry and Birmingham. Prisoner was wearing two gold stripes similar to those issued to wounded soldiers, but he had no discharge papers and no documents to connect him with the Army.—Prisoner now stated that he took the eggs from a hedge near the roadside at Yardley. He was 23 years of age, and had lost several fingers as the result of a wound. He was also wounded in the head and leg, and was consequently discharged. His pension paper had been worn out by constant examination by the police, and his discharge paper was torn up by a lunatic at the London County Asylum, where he was for a time employed as attendant.—As the owner of the eggs could not be traced, prisoner was discharged.-A corporal from the Drill Hall attended the Court, and asked prisoner questions bearing on his military history. He said he was discharged through a nervous breakdown, and was awarded a pension of 5s 3d week. He was at present walking to London to get another “ ring paper.”—He was ordered to be detained pending enquiries.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut H N Salter, 4th Leicestershire Regiment, was one of those mentioned in a list of despatches published on Tuesday.

Sergt George Pegg, Oxford and Bucks L.I, son of Mr C Pegg, New Bilton, has been mentioned by Sir Douglas Haig in one of his recent despatches.

Mr & Mrs Read, of 46 Rokeby Street, Rugby, have received intimation that their eldest son, Rifleman C G Read, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action on December 15, 1916. Deceased, who was an old Murray School boy, was a member of the Church Troop of Boy Scouts, and before joining the Army in January, 1915, was working at the B.T.H Works, and previous to that he was in an office on the L & N-W Railway.

News has been received by Mrs Reeve, of Bourton, near Rugby, that her son, Pte John Vincent Reeve, of the Worcestershire Regiment, was wounded by shrapnel in the wrist and hand on April 30th, and is now in a hospital in France.

Corpl J Hirons, R.F.A, son of Mr James Hirons, 14 Duke Street, Rugby, has been wounded a second time, and on this occasion severely. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. After fighting at Sulva Bay in 1915, he went to France, where he received his first wound. He is now in hospital at Crediton, Devon.

Pte E H Peddlesden, 1st Battalion East Surrey Regiment, who for ten years was an assistant of Mr G A Dean, High Street, has been unofficially reported a prisoner of war in Germany. These facts have been communicated to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, and he has instituted enquiries into Peddlesden’s whereabouts.

Rifleman J Humphries, Rifle Brigade, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges, described some of the outrages perpetuated by the Germans during their retreat, and says : “ I don’t know what we should do if England was served like this . . . and yet we get men who shield themselves behind religion. It is my firm opinion that they are nothing more than a lot of cowards, and if Germany ever won and forced their militarism upon us they would be among the very first to knuckle down to them.”

HOWITZER BATTERY MAN HONOURED.

Bombardier F Bosworth, the R.F.A, has written to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, informing him that he has been awarded a bar to his Military Medal for bravery on the night of April 16th. Another bombardier was awarded the Military Medal for the same deed. He adds that, having been mentioned in despatches and awarded the Military Medal and a bar to same, he so far carries the honours of the Battery.

DR POPE REPORTED MISSING.

Capt Charles Alfred Whiting Pope, Royal Army Medical Corps (officially reported missing, believed drowned, on May 4th), son of Mr Alfred Pope, of Dorchester. For a time he practised in Rugby, his residence being on Clifton Road, and he left the town a year or two ago. He was educated at Charterhouse School, and was a graduate of Trinity College, Cambridge. He took the M.B degree at Cambridge in 1907, and he was an M.R.C.S England and L.R.C.P London, 1903. After graduating at Cambridge, he studied at St Bartholomew’s Hospital, and before practising at St Leonards-on-Sea he held appointments in South Africa and at Plymouth. Capt Pope, who was 39 years of age, married Marion Ruth, daughter of the late Capt J J A Gravener, R.N.

MOTOR ACCIDENT.-Late on Thursday night last week, as a party of Royal Flying   Corps officers were proceeding from Rugby to Lilbourne by motor-car, the car skidded near the Watling Street Road and collided with a tree. The occupants—Capt Foster, Lieut Daniels, and Lieut Campbell—sustained severe bruises and cuts on the head and body. The car was also badly damaged.

SHUCKBURGH.

THE LATE CORPL JONES.—Mr J Jones has received a letter from the Captain of the Company of the Essex Regiment, in which his son, Corpl Jones, was serving when he was killed. He says it is impossible to speak too highly of the deceased, and he was absolutely all that one could wish for and expect from the soldier and brave man that he was. He was always cheerful, smart, and thoroughly reliable. The platoon officer was proceeding to make a reconnaissance, and Corpl Jones volunteered to accompany him. They had competed their work, and were returning across a road in full view of the enemy, when Corpl Jones was hit on the arm. Subsequently, when trying to reach the trench from which they started, and when they had almost accomplished this, he was shot through the heart, and died instantly. He had already been recommended for promotion, and if he had lived would have been farther recommended for gallantry and devotion to duty on the field.

Army Service Corps.
URGENTLY WANTED.
MEN Between the ages of 41 and 60 with experience of Horses are required for Enlistment into Army Service Corps for duty with Remount Depots.
Jockeys, Hunt Servants, Coachmen, Grooms, Strappers & Carters are specially suitable.
For full particulars apply:
Recruiting Office, RUGBY.
F. F. Johnstone, Lt.-Colonel, Sub-Area Commander.
May 25th, 1917.

DEATHS.

BROMWICH.-Killed in action May 8th, somewhere in France, PTE. FREDERICK BROMWICH, aged 37 years.—From his sorrowing wife and children. “ Till the day breaks.”

LINE.—Killed in France May 20th, SIGNALLER ROBERT L. LINE, beloved eldest son of James B. and Lelia H. Line, of Goulbourne, Canada, and grandson of the late William Robert Line, Ivy House, Bilton.

IN MEMORIAM.

CONOPO.-In affectionate remembrance of W. CONOPO, of Kilsby, who lost his life on H.M.S. Queen Mary on May 11, 1916.
“ No anthem-peal flows sweet and loud,
No tablet marks his grave ;
But he soundly sleeps in a coral shroud
To the dirge of the rolling wave.”—R.I.P.
—From his ever-loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS.

GODDARD.—In loving memory of our dear son, CEPHAS GODDARD, of H.M.S. Fortune, killed in battle of Jutland, May 31st, 1916, and beloved husband of Jesse Goddard, of Southsea.-“ Until the day breaks.”—From FATHER, MOTHER, and JESSE.

GOUGH.—In loving memory of JAMES CLEETON GOUGH, killed in action on June 2, 1916.

MASKELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. G. Maskell, who was killed in France May 30th, 1916, age 20.
Where is our soldier boy to-night
Laid in a soldier’s grave ;
Far, far away in a foreign land,
He died like a soldier brave.
Oh, may we meet our boy again,
Far up in that Home above,
Where war and strife will be no more,
But all will be peace and love. R.I.P.

READ.—Sacred to the memory of CHARLES GEORGE READ, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on Dec. 15, 1916, aged 22 years.
We miss the hand-clasp, miss the loving smile.
Our hearts are broken, but a little smile.
And we shall pass within the golden gate.
God will comfort us, God will help us while we wait.

26th May 1917. Rugby & District War Prisoners’ Flag Day

PRISONERS OF WAR.—Owing to the greatly increased cost of the food parcels to the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, the committee are faced with the almost exhaustion of their funds, and to put them on a sound financial basis to meet the expenses of the coming months a special effort is being made on similar to last year. An appeal for donations has been issued, and a flag day will be held throughout the town and all the adjoining villages on Saturday next, June 2nd. It is interesting to note that a similar effort last year resulted in £50 being raised, and the committee are anxious that this year’s effort shall not fall short of that sum, especially as the expenses now, after allowing for guarantees, are no less than £100 per month. The whole of the organisation and arrangements for this effort have been entrusted to the indefatigable secretary, Mr J R Barker, who informs us that there has already been a very gratifying response to the appeal for donations, but a big effort must yet be made by the general public on June 2nd to enable the committee to secure the funds necessary to carry on their work during the next few months. We therefore appeal to the public to give generously when they buy their flags on War Prisoners’ Day.

WAR PRISONERS’ GRATITUDE.

The following are extracts from a few of the many messages received by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee from Rugby and district men interned in prison camps in Germany :-

PTE P J JESSETT (Old Bilton). Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Schneidemuhl. “ I am writing to thank you and the committee and all my kind friends in and around Rugby for the great kindness they have done in sending me food, for which I send my deepest thanks. I am pleased to say I am getting six good parcels a month of very nice eatables.”

PTE W F COLLEDGE (Rugby), Royal Regiment. Interned Dulmen. “ I am receiving your weekly in good condition, which are most acceptable

PTE W BRUCE (Easenhall), South Staffs Regiment. Interned Friedrichsfeld. “ I am receiving your parcels quite safely and in good condition. Thanks for same.”

PTE P J COLLOP (Monks Kirby), Suffolk Regiment. Interned at Friedrichsfeld. “ Just a line to say I am receiving the parcels from you all right, for which I am very grateful, as they are a great benefit.”

CORPL. T McDONAGH, South Staffs Regiment. Interned at Langenaalra. “ I am receiving your parcels safely and in good condition, for which I thank you very much.”

GUNNER T OWEN (Rugby), R.F.A. Interned at Wittenberg. “ I am pleased to say I am receiving parcels in good condition, and the contents quite satisfactory. Thanking you and all concerned for same.”

PTE R IRELAND, Northants Regiment. Interned Merneburg. “ I am writing thanking yourself and subscribers for parcels, which I have received regularly for the last eighteen months from Rugby.”

SERGT W KEMPTON (Rugby), 1st Rifle Brigade. Interned at Dulmen. “ I am receiving your parcels under the new scheme quite good in contents and condition.”

RIFLEMAN L J SMITH (Rugby), Rifle Brigade. Interned at Friedrichafeld. Writes saying he is receiving all parcels, and saying the only change to requires in the contents of the parcels is to send tobacco instead of cigarettes. A further card received from him on May 1st acknowledges receipt of a special tobacco parcel sent from Rugby on November 25th, which he received on 18th March. Over five months elapsed before acknowledgment of the receipt of this particular parcel reached the committee—a frequent occurrence, but a sure proof that no matter what delays there may be the parcels eventually get to the men.”

RIFLEMAN L WOOD (Rugby), Rifle Brigade. Interned at Friedrichafeld. “ I acknowledge receipt of your parcels of provisions, also underclothing, with best thanks.”

PTE W LINES (Bishops Itchington), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Sennelager. “ I wish to express my best thanks to you for the parcels, which I receive quite safely. Yours gratefully.” SERGT B G HITCHCOX (Rugby), Canadians. Interned at Soltan. “ This note is to let you know that the parcels are arriving safely through the Red Cross.”

PTE S C BEARD (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Munster. “ Just a line to let you know I am receiving parcels correct, and to thank one and all very kindly for same.”

SERGT A PHELPS (Rugby), 1st Rifle Brigade. Interned at Zerlist. “ Just a line to say I am getting the parcels for which you are contributing quite all right, and for the same I tender sincere thanks.”

PTE P MACK (Hilmorton), Oxford and Bucks L.I. Interned at Wahn. “ Very pleased to say I am receiving your parcels through the Regimental Care Committee in the best of condition.”

PTE J T GRANT (Napton), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Schneidemuhl. “ Many thanks for your parcels which I am receiving regularly and in good condition.”

PTE A KING (Hillmorton), Royal Scots. Interned at Minden. “ I am getting your parcels through all right and in good condition. Have also received a parcel of clothing.”

LANCE-CORPL A COWLEY (Bishops Itchington), Coldstream Guards. Interned at Dolmen. “ Thank you so much for the nice parcels you have sent to me. I cannot thank you and the other kind people enough for the nice things which I have received.”

GUNNER H CROFTS (Crick), R.F.A. Interned at Friedrichsfeld. “ Many thanks for parcels of food and clothing which I continue to receive from your fund, all in good condition. Give my thanks to all at Rugby.”

PTE M E CLEAVER (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Interned at Munster. “ I am pleased to say that I receive the parcels regularly and in good condition. The contents are very well assorted.”

These letters and many hundreds more may be seen at the Hon Secretary’s Office, 9 Regent Street, Rugby.

They show that the food parcels are absolutely essential, and that they get to the men safely.

The Rugby Committer are making a special effort to raise further funds to enable them to meet the increased cost of the parcels, and it is hoped a very generous response will be made by the general public on War Prisoners’ Flag Day, Saturday, June 2nd.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The Local Government Board have considered the question of the release for military service of Dr Gibbons Ward, deputy medical officer of health for the Mid-Warwickshire combined district, as well as medical officer of health for Leamington, and in view of all the offices now held by Dr Ward the Board have told the Central Medical War Committee that he cannot be spared at present.

Corpl W T Merrick, son of Mr T Merrick, Browsover, was wounded in Salonica on April 25th in the neck and left shoulder.

Mr & Mrs Deacon, of Newbold-on-Avon, received official intimation on Thursday that their son, Pte J Deacon, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was wounded in Salonica on May 10th. He is 21 years of age, and was employed at Mr Hunter’s Carriage Works prior to the War.

Mr T H Loveland, monotype mechanic, employed by the “ Advertiser ” Company, has this week joined the Colours. Mr Loveland is a Past Chief Ranger of the Loyal Stephenson A.O.F, and Thursday, before leaving, Mr W J Torrance, on behalf of the officials and members of the Court, presented him with a useful wrist watch as a mark of esteem and appreciation of his services in all the offices has passed through.

A queer experience recently befel Pte W Liggins, of the Army Veterinary Corps, who spent final leave in Rugby this week. One day, when entered the stable at the depot, he recognised one of the horses as one which was commandeered from his mother, Mrs Liggins, of James Street, and when he called the animal by its name it showed unmistakable signs of recognition.

The name of Co-Sergt-Major A C Tomlinson, Rugby, of the old “ E ” Company, R.W.R. was included in the list of officers and men mentioned for distinguished service in Field-Marshal Sir Douglas Haig’s recent despatch. Sergt-Major Tomlinson has now left the Army, but has made application for a commission.

The death has occurred of Pte Colledge, of a Canadian Regiment, son of Mrs Cleaver, and stepson of Mr T Cleaver, signalman, Benn Street, Rugby. Deceased was born at Long Lawford, but came to live at Rugby in his early years. When a young man, he was a prominent Rugby forward, a member of the Rugby Old Boys, and also a member of New Bilton St Oswald’s Football Team. He was also a member of the Britannia Band. Before emigrating to Canada about five years ago, he was employed at the B.T.H as a moulder, and he came back from Canada with a draft of soldiers some little time ago. In a letter from his Commanding officer to the Rev C T Aston, of Rugby, says : “ One of our stretcher-bearers informed me that Colledge went out to dress a friend who was wounded, and lying in the open, and evidently was instantly killed while engaged in this task. He was buried near where fell he fell on the battlefield, and when it is possible a cross will be erected to his memory. A letter of sympathy from the Commanding Officer has also been sent to Mrs Colledge. He leaves widow in Canada.

DISTRICTS APPEAL TRIBUNAL.
Held at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, on Friday last week. Present : Messrs K Rotherham (who presided), W Johnson, jun, G A Loveitt, and A Craig. Military representative : Lieut M E T Wratislaw. Agricultural representative : Mr J E Cox.

APPEAL FROM GRANDBOROUGH.
Mr Gilk, of Grandborough, appealed for Harry Rabin (26), carter and shepherd, passed for general service, stating that Rabin was the only man employed on a farm of 295 acres. He said he could not manage with a substitute who knew nothing about the work.—The Chairman : We all have to have substitutes and have to teach them.—Lieut Wratialaw said a substitute had been sent, but Mr Gilks would not take the man until he knew the result of that appeal.—Mr Cox said that, according to the recommendation given the substitute by two farmers, Mr Gilks should give the man a trial.-The Chairman : You have not taken the trouble to try the man. The appeal must certainly be dismissed.

A LONELY SPOT.
Coming to the case of Wm Cox, wagoner, The Ford, Churchover, Lieut Wratislaw said the employer—Mr Towers—had accepted a substitute.—Cox said he had got three children, one of whom was a cripple, and they had to be nearly 1½miles for bread and groceries.—Lieut Wratislaw said there was no obligation on Mrs Cox to remain in her present cottage, but Mr Towers was quite willing for her to stay there so that when the husband returned he would find his family in the cottage, and would be able to resume his employment.—The Chairman told Cox they had many cases which were even harder than his, and it was impossible for the Tribunal to do anything for him.—The appeal of the Military would be allowed, but the Tribunal would ask them to give 28 days, so that some arrangement could be made for the wife and family.

SCAVENGING CONTRACTORS TO JOIN UP.
The Rugby Rural Tribunal had exempted till next Michaelmas Samuel Upton, 30 New Street, New Bilton, on the ground that, with his brother George, he held a scavenging contract under the Rugby Rural District Council.-Lieut Wratislaw said in Upton’s family there were five people on about 35 acres of land, not one of whom was serving.—Mr Worthington said the man and his brother did the scavenging at Hillmorton and Clifton, which took them four days a week. The brothers held 35 acres of land, and the father an additional 37 acres.-Mr J E Cox said if the scavenging took four days a week it was evident the brothers could not devote very much time to the land. If Mr Geo Upton could get someone to assist him with the scavenging it looked as if his brother could be released.—The Chairman : That is the view of the Tribunal.—Mr Cox said if the scavenging could be dropped in one village, it could be dropped in another.—Mr Worthington : I don’t know : there is a good deal of disease in the village.—Mr Cox : There will probably be less if they don’t it.—The Chairman said the Tribunal were unanimously of the opinion that the appeal should be upheld.

MASTER BUTCHER’S MISLEADING STATEMENT.
Being of opinion that the slaughterers Rugby had been reduced to a minimum, the Rugby Urban Tribunal had refused to withdraw the conditional exemption granted to Fredk Wm Burbery (37), master butcher, 123 Abbey Street. Hence the Military appeal.—Lieut Wratislaw said in his original application Burbery stated : “ I have lost my assistant, and do my own killing, dressing, and selling.” He should call evidence to show that the “ assistant ” was only a boy who ran errands, and that at the time the application was filed a man named Robinson was doing the slaughtering.

Mr Highton, Military representative for Rugby, gave evidence of what transpired at the local Tribunal on April 26th, when Burbery stated that he killed a beast, seven sheep, two pigs, and one calf a week.—Mr Harold Eaden : He did not represent that he himself killed the beast ?—Mr Highton : I say most emphatically that he did.—Mr Eaden : Do you know from your knowledge that one man cannot kill a beast by himself ?—A : I know there are certain men called slaughterers, who are always supposed to do the killing.

John Henry Robinson said he was a slaughterman in the employ of Mr Dodwell. About two years ago he started killing for Burbery, who was then a foreign meat butcher, and he had an arrangement with him whereby he was paid 2s 6d for each beast and 2d for each sheep killed. He went into Burbery’s employ in April, 1915, and from that time until the 30th of April this year for him. During that time Burbery killed nothing himself to his knowledge. He was not what might be called a slaughterman. On April 30th, when in the ordinary way he went across to do Burbery’s slaughtering, he found the place shut up and the work done.

Mr Eaden : You felt rather aggrieved ?—A : Yes. Q : Your feelings towards Burbery are not the best ?-A : It was not a nice trick to serve me.—Q : You are of military age and a general service man ?—A : Yes.—It is necessary under this arrangement between the Rugby Butchers’ Association and the Tribunal that you should do a certain amount of slaughtering ? Yes.—Not only for Mr Dodwell and others, but formerly for Mr Burbery ? Yes.—In consideration doing all that slaughtering, you are allowed to remain in civil employment ? Yes.—Mr Eaden : If you lost Mr Burbery’s slaughtering it rather imperils your position ?

The Chairman : That is rather for the Military to say.—Mr Eaden : It shows the attitude.—The Chairman : I don’t think you can say so at all.

Mr Eaden : A man who has been in the butchery trade for years, and has a knowledge of meat, might pick it up in two years ?—Witness : He might pick a certain amount up, but I could not say he would pick it all up.—Q : Would you agree he is a second-class slaughterman ?7 —A : No.—Q : You don’t call him slaughterman at all ? : No, sir.—Q : Although he helped you for two years ?—A : Yes.—The Chairman said there did not seem to be a shortage of slaughtermen at Rugby. A butcher seemed able get rid of one slaughterman to get another in.—Mr Eaden said Burbery was passed in B(2)—labour abroad.—The Chairman (to Burbery) : The trouble seems to have been that you said you were killing your own animals, which you were not doing.—Mr Eaden asked Burbery how many sheep he had killed this year without assistance ? and he replied 50 or 60. He had dressed them himself, and got them ready for the shop.

The Chairman thought the man might be used as a substitute.

Lieut Wratislaw said, subject to Mr Reeve passing him as a slaughterman (which he doubted), they might use Burbery as a substitute for a single man.—Military appeal allowed. Substitution order made, the man to report within seven days.

A GUINEA A MINUTE FOR A SUBSTITUTE.
“ told Mr Pearson (the manager of the Labour Exchange) that I would pay a guinea a minute if he would get me a substitute,” said Mr Sam Robbins, who appealed on behalf of William Law, cabinet maker and undertaker, 11 Hunter Street, Rugby.—Lieut Wratislaw said the Military felt that to act as an undertaker did not justify the retention of a category A man.—Mr Worthington said that at the outbreak of war the firm employed between 110 and 120 men, and now they had only seven left. He thought the Tribunal would agree that few firms had been more patriotic.—The Chairman asked how many of the men had gone into the Army ? Mr Robbins replied that the majority had done so, and about 10 per cent. had gone into munitions.—Mr Worthington said Mr Robbins never appealed for a man unless he was the last man left in department. This was the only cabinet-maker now left, whereas prior to the war the firm employed between 20 and 30 cabinet-makers. The Chairman said they quite felt that Mr Robbins had got a difficult job, and had been depleted most tremendously, but that was not what they were there for.—Mr Worthington : The man is 36 years age.—Lieut Wratislaw : And they are going to take up to 50. The only thing against this man is—he is a general service man, and a cabinet-maker is not of such high importance at the present time.—The Chairman said they wanted to help Robbins as much as they could. The Military appeal should be upheld, but they would give till August 8th, and no further application could made without leave, which meant that before the date named Mr Robbins must do all he could to get somebody else.

SEEDSMAN’S EXEMPTION OPPOSED.
Conditional exemption whilst in his present occupation as a seedsman, &c, had been granted to Albert Edwd Townsend, 229 Regent Street ; but the Military appealed against this.—Lieut Wratislaw stated that Mr Townsend was 34 years of age, and had been passed for general service. They said it was a useful business, but it was not in the national interest that a man passed for general service should remain in it. Mr Townsend wife and assistant could manage the shop during his absence.—Mr Eaden argued that the business in seeds carried on by Mr Townsend was at the present time of high national importance. Ninety per cent. of Townsend’s turnover was for vegetable and farm seeds.—Final exemption to July 8th granted.

CONCERT.-An excellent concert was given at the Infirmary V.A.D Hospital on Thursday evening last week. All the artists, who displayed remarkable talent, are at present patients in the hospital, and the programme was highly appreciated by their fellow patients and the hospital staff. Songs were rendered by Ptes Head, Orange, Pinnell, Astridge, Heath, and Ord. Several of the wounded boys gave monologues and turns during the second half of the entertainment. They included Pte Green, ventriloquist ; Rifleman Pinnell, who was very funny as a Cockney girl at the theatre ; and two knockabout comedians, Whitwell and Wilson, both of whom deserve a wider range of popularity.

SALE OF WASTE PAPER CONTROLLED.

Under an Order issued by the Minister of Munitions no person shall offer to purchase or take delivery of any waste paper except under and in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the Royal Commission on paper, and no person shall offer to sell, supply, or deliver any waste paper except to the holders of such licences, and in accordance with the terms of such permits to purchase or take delivery as aforesaid.

Every holder of a permit under this Order shall furnish such return as to his purchases, sales, and deliveries of waste paper as shall be required by the Royal Commission on Paper.

Mr J R Barker, who is taking the paper collected by the Rugby Waste Paper Committee, sorting and baling same, and sending to the paper mills to re-pulped, has been granted the necessary permit.

PRIVILEGED NO LONGER.-The rooks which have for generations built their nests and reared their young in the topmost boughs of the stately elms in the School Close have always enjoyed a privilege extended to very few others of their species. The hand of the destroyer may have been set against rooks in the countryside, but so long as the fledglings of the School Close remained within the sacred precincts of their elms seater[?] they belonged to a race apart from the ordinary rook, and no shot gun or rook rifle has ever been aimed at them. But with the need to conserve our food supply comes also the need to protect it from the ravages of voracious rooks, and so during the last week, on quiet evenings when the birds have been taking an airing on the side of their nests or on the boughs in the immediate vicinity, a gentleman with a steady eye and trusty rook rifle has been taking heavy toll of them.

DEATHS.

BROWN.—In loving memory of Pte WILIE BROWN, King’s Own Scottish Borderers, son of Mrs. Brown, 15 Sandradice Street, Dundee. At rest.
—SAM and DORIS.

HARRATT.—On April 23rd (killed in action in Mesopotamia), Corpl. T. HARRATT. Also on May 3rd (killed in action in France), Pte. JOSEPH HARRATT, both late Monks Kirby.

JONES.—On April 29th, Corpl. DAVID JOHN JONES (Jack), Essex Regiment, who was killed in France, the beloved third son of John and Mary Jones, the Red House, Shuckburgh ; aged 28.
“ We love him—oh ! no tongue can tell
How much we love him and how well ;
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldier’s grave.”

LEESON.—Killed in action on March 20th, ALBERT WILFRED (BERT). Sergeant in Northampton Regiment, dearly beloved third son of Mr. and Mrs. Leeson, Leicester, and dearly beloved grandson and nephew of Mr. and Mrs Leeson, Newbold-on-Avon ; aged 21 years and 11 months.
“ Not gone from memory.
Not gone from love ;
But waiting for with his brother
In our Father’s home above.”

IN MEMORIAM.

HUNT.—In loving memory husband, ALBERT JOHN HUNT, Warrant Officer of the 15th Brigade, R.H.A., of the immortal 29th Division, killed in action in Gallipoli on May 27, 1916.
“ They whom Thy love hath guarded long.
They whom Thy care hath rendered strong.
In love and faith.
Their heart strings round Thy heart entwine.
They are and ever will be Thine :
In life, in death.”

19th May 1917. A Rugby Lady Honoured

A RUGBY LADY HONOURED.

For good work at Caterham and other places, the Royal Red Cross has been bestowed by the King upon Miss E C Ellis, who for several years before the War commenced had been living in Horton Crescent, Rugby. Miss Ellis went up for investiture last week, and was received by the King and Queen at Buckingham Palace, and subsequently by Queen Alexandra at Marlborough House.

OLD ST MATTHEW BOY HONOURED.—P.C Herbert Archer, of the Metropolitan Police Force, son of Mr T Archer, of 41 York Street, has recently received the King’s Medal in recognition of bravery he displayed in March last year, when he rescued a boy from drowning in a caisson chamber at Rosyth Dockyard. The depth of the water was 40ft, and the constable showed conspicuous heroism in effecting the rescue. It was dark at the time, and he incurred great personal risk in entering the water. He has been presented already with the Royal Humane Society’s Medal and honoured by the Carnegie Hero Fund Trustees. The King’s Police Medal is usually handed to the recipient by his Majesty in person ; but owing to the War the presentation ceremony took place at the Dockyard, and the medal was handed to P.C Archer by the Rear Admiral Superintendent, who pointed out that this medal was not easily gained, but was only bestowed in cases of exceptional gallantry. P.C Archer, who was an old St Matthew’s boy and played in the first team from that school to win the Rugby School Shield in 1904-5, suitably replied.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The name of Sec.Lt. M H House (Rifle Brigade) is amongst the latest published list of officer casualties. At Rugby School he was in Mr G F Bradby’s house and was a prominent member of the 1916 Cricket XI.

Capt and Adjt R M Gotch, Sherwood Foresters, wounded and missing on July 1, 1916, now believed killed, gained his football cap at Rugby School, and during the 1913-14 season played forward for the Harlequin.

Sergt P G Miles, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, for several years a constable in the County Police Force, has been wounded in France. Miles was formerly in the Rugby and Stratford-on-Avon Division.

Capt Percy H Hollick, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is the fifth Coventry solicitor who has died at the front. A son of the late Mr Alfred Hollick, an Allesley farmer, the young officer was articled to his profession in Coventry, and early in the War joined the Honourable Artillery Co., and subsequently obtained his commission. He was wounded more than once.

NEW BILTON MAN KILLED.
Mr J Young, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has received information that his only son, Pte W C Young, of the Worcester Regiment, was killed in action on April 24th. Pte Young, who was about 23 yearn of age, was employed at the B.T H Lamp Factory, and enlisted in March, 1916.

DEATH OF A FORMER B.T.H PUPIL IN FRANCE.
Members of the Rugby Men’s Adult School learnt with sincere regret on Sunday morning of the death of Mr Kenneth Smith, who until the War broke out was actively associated with the school, and was working as a student apprentice at the B.T.H Works. It was decided to ask Mr Herbert Edmundson, the school president, to send a communication to the bereaved relatives, indicating the sense of the loss sustained by the school, and expressing appreciation of the high character of the late Mr Smith.

SERGT-MAJOR CLEAVER DIES OF WOUNDS.
Company-Sergt-Major Cleaver, Royal Warwicks, was wounded in action on May 8th, and died the following day. He was a native of Stockton, and had served upwards of 21 years in the Army, during which period he saw much foreign service. He went all through the South African campaign, and gained the Queen’s Medal and six bars. He was also mentioned in despatches on September 4th, 1901. He had a medal for 19 years’ long service and good conduct. After a serious operation, he was appointed drill instructor to the 7th (T) Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and was two years at Coventry and five years with “ E ” Company at Rugby, residing at the Drill Hall Cottage. He was mobilised with the battalion on the outbreak of War ; and in June, 1915, was promoted warrant officer. Deceased who was 42 years of age, leaves a widow and five children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

Major Claude Seabroke, in a sympathetic letter to the widow, said the news came as a great blow to him, for he felt that he had lost one of his greatest and truest friends. It was difficult to realise all at once all that the regiment owed to her late husband ; but, without doubt, during all those years of devoted and loyal service he gave of this very best ungrudgingly. To all the members of “ E ” Company, whom he had trained and helped, he had left a memory of a splendid example of a zealous soldier, who had passed gloriously, as he would have wished. He was an example to them all of unflagging industry and of the highest integrity, and in all that he did ‘Honour was his guiding star.’

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary, Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Regent Street, Rugby, who will gratefully acknowledge same.

RUGBY AND RUSSIA.

In connection with the recent Russian Flag Day, held in Rugby, the hon organiser, Mr J Reginald Barker, has received the following letter, dated May 11th :-

“ DEAR SIR,—May I, on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Russian Flag Day, express our deep gratitude for your invaluable aid to our Red Cross work ? We feel we owe a deep debt to everyone who has assisted us, to the local authorities for their patronage, to the organisers for their brilliant ability, to the sellers for their generous self-sacrifice, and to the residents for their warm-hearted support. I can assure you that we shall not forget, nor will Russia, what has been done, and in time to some we hope that your efforts will remain a pleasant and gratifying memory to yourselves, so it will be a sources of permanent indebtedness on our part.—Yours faithfully, CHARLES WATNEY, Hon Secretary, the Russian Flag Day.”

THE FOOD PROBLEM IN RUGBY.

There can no longer be any doubt that the food position in this country is serious. If scarcity, amounting to real want, is to be avoided, every class must practice the strictest economy in the consumption of all bread-stuffs. The German submarine campaign, coupled with a short wheat harvest last season throughout the world, has brought our surplus stocks of corn to danger point.

It should be clearly understood that the officials of the Food Ministry are watching carefully from day to day the danger-line below which the stocks of cereals in this country cannot be allowed to fall ; and although preparations are in progress to establish rationing machinery when the point of danger has been reached, it is hoped that the success of the voluntary campaign may avert the necessity for compulsion. The issue really rests with the people.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

WAR CHARITIES ACT.
The Rugby Waste Paper Committee was registered under the above Act.—The Chairman said it would be very interesting to Council to learn that Mr Barker had already collected something like 3 tons of waste paper.—Mr Evers congratulated the General Purposes on the arrangements made.—The Chairman : No thanks are due to the committee. The arrangements were made by Mr Barker and Mrs Blagden.—Mr Yates : Then congratulations are due to the committee for not stopping these people in any way (laughter).

THANKS FROM THE V.T.C.
A letter was read from Captain Fuller, thanking the Council for their kindly recognition of the V.T.C and the promise of financial support voted at the last meet of the Council. He assured them that their help and expression of goodwill would be of great assistance to them. The A and B men of the Battalion had been selected with similar men from one of the other battalions in the regiment to into the front line in the event of any invasion emergency arising, and they looked upon this as a compliment, and hoped it would be the means of more men joining the Corps, whose past excuse had been that them was no use for the force. He hoped the Local Government Board would raise no difficulty to the amount voted being handed over for purpose of Rugby Corps, and he added that he had noticed lately that where similar grant was made by a council the money was refunded by the Territorial Force Association to the Corps in consequence of the intention of the gift being expressed to be for the benefit solely of particular a corps. With reference to the last paragraph, the Council agreed with the Chairman that it was their wish that the grant should be applied solely for the use of the Rugby Corps.—Mr Wise said he was sorry that so few members of the general public were present at the inspection on Sunday. Anyone who was there must have been struck by the smart appearance the Corps made and the wonderfully efficient way in which they did their drill.

IN MEMORIAM.

PORTER.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, GEORGE RUPERT PORTER ; aged 21 years. Killed in action at St. Elia on May 8, 1915.

ROBINSON.-In ever-loving memory of FRED, who gave his life for his country on May 11, 1915.-“ Lost but never forgotten.”-BEATIE.

YOUNG.-In loving memory of PTE WILLIAM COTTERILL YOUNG, who was killed in action with the Forces in Salonika, on April 25th, 1917, the 25th year of his age. Deeply mourned.
Somewhere there is a nameless grave
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.
—From his FATHER and MOTHER and SISTERS, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Rugby.

 

 

12th May 1917. Food Economy Campaign

FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN.—In connection with the Food Economy Campaign in Rugby a series of cookery demonstrations has been arranged. A central establishment will be opened very shortly in High Street, where demonstrations will be given during the afternoons and evenings. This will probably be followed by local demonstrations in other parts of the town. A scheme for the establishment of communal kitchens for Rugby is also well in hand.

AN ALLOTMENT HOLDERS’ ASSOCIATION for Rugby is in course of formation (see advt).

THE KING’S PROCLAMATION urging the necessity of economising in food consumption was read at various places of worship at Rugby on Sunday last.

NEW BILTON.

A COMMUNAL KITCHEN.—The War Economy Food Committee having applied for the use of the Wesleyan. Schoolroom at New Bilton as a communal kitchen, the trustees met on Monday night to consider the matter, and unanimously decided to place the school at the disposal of the committee, subject to certain details to be arranged by the stewards.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut E Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mrs Wilson, of Bridget Street, is in hospital at Rouen suffering from a broken leg.

Second-Lieut H H H Lister, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, only son of Mr and Mrs H L Lister, Clifton Road, Rugby, is reported missing on May 4, 1917.

Pte Longney, writing from France, says :—“ By a curious coincidence, it was my pleasure, when passing down the street of the town where I am stationed, to see the Red Cross ambulance car presented by the Rugby and District Farmers’ Association. It is doing a splendid did work, and looks in good condition.”

Mr R George Hudson, son of Mr R S Hudson, York Street, who has been with the Artists’ Rifles in France for the past twelve months, has been given commission, and posted to a Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. News has since been received that Second-Lieut. Hudson, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, has been severely wounded.

Rifleman J C Smith, K.R.R, the eldest son of Mr J C Smith, has been admitted to hospital with gun-shot wounds in the right shoulder.

Capt T Marriott, son of the late Mr J Marriott, of Stanford-on-Avon, who was recently awarded the Military Cross, has been promoted to the rank of Major. He is an “ old boy ” and former member of the staff of St Matthew’s Boys’ School.

The relatives of Pte F H Watts, of 21 Cross Street, Rugby, have received intimation that he was wounded on April 25th for the third time. On this occasion he received injuries in the thigh, arm, and chest through an accident. He is now in the General Hospital, Birmingham, and is making favourable progress.

Official news has been received by Mr T H Cleaver, late of the Horse and Jockey Inn that his son Joseph V Cleaver has been killed in action in France on April 11th. Before the war he was employed by the Leamington Brewery Company. He was one of the first to join up under Lord Derby’s Group System. This is the second son Mr Cleaver has lost in action, and two more, George and Austin, were wounded earlier in the War.

Evan P Biddles, gunner in the R.F.A, youngest son of the late Mrs John Biddles, Newton, Rugby, and of Estancia Loma-Pora, Villa Concepeion, Republic del Paraguay, South America, has died from wounds in France. Less than a year ago he returned to England to enlist after giving up an important post as Majordomo for the Paraguay Land and Cattle Company, and in December last crossed to France, and has practically been in action ever since. His age was 22.

News has just been received by Mr and Mrs Bull, 49 Manor Road, Rugby (late of Lower Shuckburgh, near Daventry), that their only son, Bombardier Bull, was killed in action on the night of May 3rd. At the age of 16 he joined the Warwickshire R.H.A in November, 1915, and went to France in the following May, where he has been in the fighting line ever since. A letter was received on Wednesday morning from his Officer, who writes :-“ Your son, Bombardier Bull, was gallantly doing his duty under heavy shell-fire, and a 4.2 shell just caught him and another man, Fitzgerald. You can be perfectly certain that his death was quite instantaneous and completely without pain. I have known your son since he was under me in the 3rd Warwick Battery, nearly two years ago. He showed signs of being a very fine soldier then, and has since very fully redeemed that early promise. I cannot say how deeply your son is regretted both by officers and men.”

NEWS FROM A RUGBY OFFICER REPORTED KILLED.

Capt S E Jones, of the 10th Yorkshire Regiment, formerly a bank manager at Rugby, who was officially reported killed on February 27th, is evidently a prisoner of war in Saxony. Mr Mason, his successor at Rugby, has just received a card from him stating that his eyes are getting better (so that he was apparently wounded in the face), and adding: “ Do send us food and clothing.”

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary,
Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER,
9 Regent Street, Rugby,
who will gratefully acknowledge same.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Parr at the Three Horse Shoes, Newbold, has received official information that her husband, Private F Parr, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in France, and is in hospital at Rouen.—Mrs T Harris of Newbold learns that her husband, Pte Thos Harris, belonging to a Northampton Regiment, had been wounded in the head and right arm on April 23rd in Egypt, and was lying in hospital seriously ill.—Mr and Mrs West of Rugby (late of Newbold) have also received intimation that their son, Pte C West, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in France.

LONG LAWFORD.

Mr and Mrs Elkington, Long Lawford have received the following official note concerting their son :- “ The Major-General, 20th (Light) Division, has received a report of the gallant conduct of R G Elkington, K.R.R.C, on April 4, 1917, in courage and personal bravery in the storming of the village of Métz, and he wishes to congratulate him on his fine behaviour.” This is the second occasion that Sergt Elkington has been mentioned for his conduct in the field, the last time during a night attack, on August 23, 1916, at Guillemont. His parents have been pleaded to learn that he has received the ribbon for the Military Medal from the General Commanding.

BRANDON.

MAJOR D C M BEECH.—The many friends of Mr Douglas Beech, the only surviving son of Colonel R J Beech, J.P, D.L, will be pleased to hear that he has been acting as Brigadier Major and is on Foreign Service.

RUSSIAN FLAG DAY AT RUGBY.
A SPLENDID RESULT.

Rugby’s effort on behalf of the Russian wounded on Saturday last was crowned with success ; and, despite the fact that this time the appeal was made only in Rugby and New Bilton, upwards of 25,000 flags were sold, realising £110 16s 6d—the highest sum ever obtained by a flag day restricted to the town. The effort was held under the auspices of the Rugby Urban District Council, and the organisation was again ably carried out by Mr J R Barker, who, at the special request of the Chairman of the Council, has consented to organise all official flag days in Rugby. He was assisted by a willing band of 150 fair vendors, and by means of a system of relays sellers were to be found in the streets all day. The Council placed the Benn Buildings at the disposal of Mr Barker for a depot ; and here Mrs B B Dickinson and Mrs J R Barker rendered yeoman service in handing out fresh supplies and receiving the collecting tins as they were retained. Mr R P Mason, manager of the London City and Midland Bank, again undertook the duties of treasurer, and supervised the counting of the money, in which he was assisted by Mr J Ferry and the Hon Organiser. The £110.16s 6d was made up as under :- Coppers, £76 19s (the largest sum, received in coppers on a flag day) ; silver, £32 17s 6d ; and one Treasury note for £1, .which was placed in the box of Mr Barker’s daughter. The highest amount (£2 15s) was collected by Miss G Woods in the B.T.H district, and she was closely followed by Miss Sparkes (£2 14s 2d), of the same district.

DEATHS.

BIDDLES.—Died of gas poisoning just behind the lines in France, April 22nd, from wounds received in action same day, EVAN P. BIDDLES, gunner in the R.F.A., youngest son of the late Mrs. John Biddles, Newton, Rugby, and Estancia Lomapora, Villa Concepcion, Republic del Paraguay, S. America ; aged 22 years.

BULL.—Killed in action, on May 3rd, in France, THOMAS HENRY BULL, late of Shuckburgh ; aged 18.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.
—From FATHER, MOTHER, and SISTERS.

HINCKS.—Lance-Corpl. E. W. HINCKS, Middlesex Regiment, youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Marlow Hincks, Southam Holts, officially reported killed in action in France on 12th April ; aged 20.—Deeply mourned.

ROBINSON.—In loving memory of OWEN, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Robinson, Catthorpe, who died from wounds received in action on March 28th. Laid to rest in the British Military Cemetery, near Arras,-“ Loyal to duty even onto death.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MASON.—In loving remembrance of ARTHUR ALEC MASON, of Long Buckby, who was lost on H.M.S. Goliath in the Dardanelles on May 13, 1915.—“ Till the day breaks and the shadows flee away.”

SMITH.—In loving memory of Trooper WILLIAM SMITH, son of James and Elizabeth Smith, of Lutterworth, reported missing May 13, 1915,—“ Greater love hath no man than this.”