7th Dec 1918. Balance of Prisoners of War Fund – Proposed Endowment of a Hospital Bed.

BALANCE OF PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
PROPOSED ENDOWMENT OF A HOSPITAL BED.

A meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Monday, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, presiding in the absence through illness of Mr Wm Flint, C.C. There were also present : Messrs R P Mason, G W Walton, C J Newman, A W Shirley, T Clarke, and J Reginald Barker (hon organising secretary).

Sergt Arthur Scott (Rifle Brigade), of Rugby, attended the meeting to thank the committee for all they had done for him during the two and a-half years he was a prisoner of war in Germany. He said his food parcels arrived very regularly, and he assured the committee that without them he and the other prisoners could not have existed.-Mr Barker reported that the Central Prisoners of War Committee felt that the balance in hand (over £800) would be better applied in Rugby.

After some discussion, the committee agreed that a definite proposal should be submitted to a meeting of subscribers for approval.-Mr Barker said he felt very strongly that the balance could not be allocated in any better way than in endowing a bed in the Hospital of St Cross in memory of prisoners of war who had died in captivity. He had mentioned the scheme to Mr F R Davenport, a member of the committee, and to Canon Blagden, and they both approved of it. The cost to endow a bed was £1,000. Mr Barker said he did not anticipate any difficulty in raising the £200 necessary to complete the sum.-Mr Walton said that, knowing the struggle the hospital had to meet the great increase in costs, and also that there was no doubt the Prisoners of War Fund had been the means of diverting funds from the hospital, he would second the resolution.-The resolution was unanimously carried, the Chairman remarking that it was very appropriate that, as Mr Barker had been mainly instrumental in raising the funds, his proposition should be carried. Anything he had done in the past had always carried great weight with the committee, and he did not think anyone could take the slightest objection to his scheme.

It was decided to call a meeting of subscribers to the fund early in January, when the resolution would be submitted for their approval.

DISCHARGED SAILORS & SOLDIERS.-The local branch of Discharged Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Association is now making rapid strides, and the membership numbers several hundreds. During the past week they have taken over club-rooms at the Eagle Hotel, and as the membership increases they hope to transfer this into a fine institute.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Major E K Sanders, D Battery, 211 Brigade, F.R.A, has been awarded the Italian Bronze Medal for valour. Before the War he was Lieutenant in the Rugby Howitzer Brigade, and was on the staff of Messrs Willans & Robinson.

Lieut G H I Cowley (O.R), of Coventry, solicitor (formerly of Rugby), and now serving in Italy with the Heavy Artillery, has been appointed Education Officer under the Army Scheme of Pre-Demobilisation Education. Mr Cowley has also been detailed to give to the troops a series of lectures on Topical and Educational subjects.

Pte C Rollins, King’s Liverpool Regiment (Rugby), and Rifleman H J Kedge, K.R.R (Rugby), have been reported wounded.

Mrs Keates, 29 New Street, New Bilton, has recently received information that her son, Pte B Keates, 1st Wilts Regiment, died from wounds in Oise le Veiger Field Hospital on March 26th.

Lance-Corpl A C Cox, M.G Corps, Transport Section, has been awarded the Military Medal for volunteering to go down under heavy shell fire for rations and for attempting to salve a machine gun out of the Sanbre Canal under heavy shell fire on November 3rd. He is the youngest son of Mr & Mrs Frank Cox, of 38 York Street, Rugby, and prior to the outbreak of war worked for his father. He has served over four years in the Army, and has been in France most of this time.

REFRESHMENTS FOR TRAVELLING SOLDIERS.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,-During the months of February and March, 1916, a correspondence was carried on through the local Press upon the question of a Soldiers’ Rest at Rugby Station, and also the providing of refreshments for soldiers passing through the station, or waiting connections, and possibly stranded for the night. The Soldiers’ Rest was not proceeded with owing to lack of funds. It was, however, pointed out that refreshments were being provided to necessitous cases by the station staff from the funds of the Rugby Station War Relief Fund, and your readers may be pleased to know this was carried on, and is still being continued, and increasingly just now, as many repatriated prisoners of war are passing through the station following the signing of the armistice. The fund is not in need of financial assistance at present, but it is as well that the town should know that the station staff are not unmindful of our heroes, and that they are doing in a limited way what the townspeople take upon themselves at other railway junctions.-Yours, &c,
H WINTERBURN, Hon Secretary,
Rugby Station War Relief Fund.

OFFICIAL NOTICES TO FARMERS.

Return of Soldiers to their own County.
If the employer of a soldier engaged in farm work in another county, who was formerly in Warwickshire, desired to get the man back again he should communicate at once with the Labour Officer, 12 Northgate Street, Warwick. A form of application for the man will then be sent to him.

Soldier Labour.
About 20 skilled ploughmen will shortly be available for two months’ agricultural work in Warwickshire. Application for them should be made at once to the Labour Officer, 12 Northgate Street, Warwick.

Demobilisation.
Farmers should apply to the nearest Employment Exchange for postcard ED40G, and return it with the full military or naval description and address of any man for whom there is a vacancy. The man applied for will then obtain priority of release when demobilisation commences.

AT the Rugby Cattle Market on Monday Messrs Howkins & Sons conducted a sale of surplus Army horses. There was a good company, and trade was sharp for the best and younger animals, prices ranging from 20 to 67 guineas.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

OUR SOLDIER BOYS.-Quite a number of local soldiers have been able to pay flying visits home since the armistice was signed. The following recent casualty cases have been invalided home :-Pte Austin Smith (Royal Irish Fusiliers), Gunner Sidney Webb (R.G.A), and Pte Albert Priest (Rifle Brigade).

MRS MOORE has received official intelligence that her eldest son, Pte Wm Moore, who is with the Royal Warwicks in Russia, was wounded on October 18th. He served in the Boar War, and has been all through the prevent struggle. This is the second time he has been wounded.

BRANDON.
The influenza epidemic is now subsiding, and many families have been attacked. The schools, which have been closed for three weeks by the Medical Officer, will re-open on Monday.

DEATHS.

BROMWICH.-Pte J. H. BROMWICH, 10th Queen’s R.W.S., died November 5, 1918 ; aged 18 years and 9 months, at hospital at Outrean, France.
“ He bravely answered him counties call ;
He gave his young life for one and all.
If I could have raised his dying head,
And heard his last farewell,
The blow would not have been so hard
To part with him we loved so well.”
-Sadly missed by his Uncle, Aunt, and Ivy.

KEATES.-In loving memory of Pte. BERNARD KEATES, 29 New Street, New Bilton, who died of wounds on March 26, 1918.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
-From his loving Mother, Brother, Sisters, Will, Jack, May, Dinah, and Grandma.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Sergt S. J. BATCHELOR (SID), 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment. who died of wounds in France on December 1, 1917.
“ Father in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our dear son sleeping.”
-From his loving Father, Mother and Sisters.

EDMANS.-In loving memory of FRANK, the dearly beloved son of W. & B. Edmans, of New Bilton, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
-Sadly missed and silently mourned by his Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

GLENN.-In ever-loving memory of Pte. JOHN GLENN, who died in France, Dec. 8th, 1916.-From his loving wife and children.

MAYES.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, 5th Oxford & Bucks LI., who died in Bristol Military Hospital from wounds received in action on December 6, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ The midnight star shine o’er the grave
Of a dear son and brother, a soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in that Better Land.
Oh, brother dear, ’tis hard to part
With one so good and kind in heart.
When others return we’ll miss you more,
The realisation will make our hearts sore.”
-Sadly missed by his loving Mother, Dad, and Family, also Lizzie.

 

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30th Nov 1918. Demobilisation Proceeding

DEMOBILISATION PROCEEDING.

The Ministers chiefly concerned are understood to be most busily engaged in perfecting the plans for demobilisation. It is to be remembered by the impatient that, though the armistice has brought about a cessation of hostilities, the War is not yet at an end. There is a possibility of the preliminary peace treaty (remarks the London correspondent of the “Birmingham Daily Post ”) being signed towards the end of February, but in authoritative quarters the impression is that it would be well not to expect the peace celebration until March. Until peace is absolutely assured it will be necessary to keep up a very large force, while an army of occupation in a portion of Germany may be rendered a necessity by her internal condition. In these circumstances complete demobilisation is bound to be a slow process.

EMPLOYMENT IN THE LOCAL ENGINEERING TRADES.

We are informed that the cessation of hostilities and the suspension of munition work will cause very little (if any) dislocation in local employment, and already the absorption of labour for civil work has removed the possibility of the spectre of unemployment coming out to mar what everyone hopes will be a bright and happy Christmas in Rugby. As a matter of fact, the supply of labour is not equal to the demand, as will be gathered from an advertisement on page 2 of this issue.

Amongst the reconstruction schemes which the Government have under consideration is one covering an extensive programme of large central electricity supply stations for the manufacture of electricity in bulk, so that it can be supplied at low rates to the commuter. The engineering shops of Willans & Robinson and the B.T.H Company are admirably laid out to take care of this class of apparatus required for this scheme, and should secure their share of the contracts resulting from this programme being carried through by the Government.

It is common knowledge that the B.T.H Company are in need of first-class machinists and mechanics of all descriptions, as well as a large number of unskilled labourers. Those Rugby craftsmen who temporarily obtained work away from Rugby should seek employment in Rugby now that there is a slackening of demand for labour in purely munition plants.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte J E Grimsley, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regiment, whose home is at Harborough Magna, was killed in action by a machine gun bullet on November 1st. In a letter to his wife an officer states : “ He was one of my best men ; in fact, had he come out alive, Capt Chamberlain was recommending him for a decoration. In several fights I always admired his conduct and his pluck.”

The “ Gazette ” announces that Second-Lieut G A T Vials, West Riding Regiment, the Northants County cricketer, relinquishes his commission on account of ill-health, and is granted the hon rank of lieutenant.—His father, Mr G Vials, formerly practised as a solicitor in Rugby.

Pte E P Burden, R.M.L.I., late of 24 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, died in hospital in France on November 23rd from influenza. Before joining the Colours he was employed by Messrs Willans & Robinson.

Pte A Badger, 9th Battery, R.F.A (Napton), died at Fargo Military Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on Saturday, from pneumonia. He was 25 years of age.

Bombardier Arthur Russell, R.G.A, husband of Mrs Esther Russell, of 6 Benn Street, Rugby, and son of Mr & Mrs W K Russell, died on Tuesday last at Cattrick Bridge Camp. Bombardier Russell, who was a postman at the Rugby Office, had seen two years’ service in France, had been wounded and gassed, and was just convalescent from a broken ankle, sustained by accident while in the lines.

Temp Major C D Miller, the polo player and organiser, is gazetted Acting Lieut-Colonel while commanding a Base Remount Depot.

DEATH OF ROLAND WILSON BROWNE.—Mr & Mrs Browne, of the Book Shop, Station Road, whose three sons have been doing their part in the great War, have received news of the death of their second son Roland, who was killed in action in France on November 4th. He was an Old Murrayian, and on leaving school was apprenticed in the Drawing Office of the B.T.H, where he remained until the time of his joining the 2nd Manchester. Regiment, He was very popular with and held in the highest esteem by his fellow-draughtsmen, and, apart from being quick and clever at his work, he showed great ability in his love and knowledge of art and art subjects. He was a pupil of John Hassell, B.A, and turned out some clever black and white sketches. In water colour he also displayed talent, but seemed especially to excel in oil colour painting. Touching references were made at the Congregational Church services on Sunday last. He was 23 years of age. and had been in the Army less than five months when he met with his untimely end.

INFLUENZA.—The number of deaths from influenza in Rugby district during the past week was six, a decrease of 10 on the preceding week. Since the 14th October no less than 130 deaths from either influenza or pneumonia have been registered locally.

BRITISH CASUALTIES IN THE WAR.
The figures of British casualties during the war are officially given for each theatre of war, and show a total of 3,049,991. They are made up as follows :—Killed and died, 37,876 officers ; 620,828 other ranks ; wounded, 92,664 officers ; 1,939,478 other ranks ; missing (including prisoners), 12,094 officers ; 347,051 other ranks.

POST-PRESENTATION OF A MILITARY CROSS.
At Birmingham on Friday, last week a number of decorations were presented to men who had won them, or their relatives, by Major-General Sir Hy Schlater. Among the recipients was the mother of Colour-Sergt-Major G H Hayes, R.W.R, who was wounded at Neuve Chapelle on October 4th, 1917, and died a few days afterwards. The act for which the Cross was awarded was officially described thus :—

“ The advance was held up by a strong enemy machine gun position, and all the officers became casualties. He took command and crawled under direct fire to a position from which he killed several of the enemy. He then led his men in an attack on the post, which he captured with ten prisoners and a machine gun. He showed splendid courage and initiative.”

Colour-Sergt-Major Hayes was for some time employed at the Great Central Station as a drayman, and afterwards at the B.T.H as a shunter, where he was working when called up. He had been in the “ E ” Co. (Rugby) Volunteers for 16 years. He was also a well-known local footballer, having played with the Penlee, Star, Old Boys and other clubs, by the members of which and his many friends he was much respected.

FOR WAR SERVICE.

The under-mentioned, have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War by the Chairman of the Joint War Committee of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St John of Jerusalem in England for valuable services rendered in connection with the War :— Miss L Court, Kineton Hospital, Warwick ; Miss B Lewis, Clifton Court Hospital, Rugby ; and Miss A O Tiley, Kineton Hospital Warwick.

DUNCHURCH.
RETURN OF A PRISONER OF WAR.—R Burton. son of Mr & Mrs James Burton, Daventry Road, has arrived home from Germany, where he has been a prisoner of war. He went out to France with polo ponies, and was soon in the fighting and was taken prisoner. It is needless to say he received a hearty welcome, and all his old friends were glad to see him looking fairly well.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PARISH COUNCIL.—At a special meeting on Tuesday evening there were present : Messrs C E W Boughton-Leigh (chairman), J Martin, W Allen, and F Fellows (clerk):—The question of a parish war memorial was raised, and the members were unanimously of opinion that some steps in this direction should be taken as soon as possible.—The Chairman said personally he favoured the erection of a parish hall and reading room, similar to that at Clifton and other villages, provided that they could raise sufficient funds. This would fill a growing need in the parish, and if such a memorial was erected they could have the names of all who had offered their service to the country inscribed on the walls.—On the motion of Mr Martin, who said he agreed with the suggestion of the Chairman, the question was deferred until the next meeting.

CHURCH LAWFORD.
GUN WEEK.—Houses were gaily decorated with flags when the gun visited this village. The quota necessary for Church Lawford and Kings Newnham to obtain a large shell was £1,200, but this sum was exceeded by £250. This result was the more creditable because at the recent estate sale most of the farmers and some of the other residents bought their respective homes and farms.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
DIED IN FRANCE.—A telegram was received by his mother at Broadwell, on Monday afternoon, conveying the sad information that Pte Mark Abbott, of the 7th Dragoon Guards, had died of double pneumonia while with the Forces in France. The deceased had completed his period of service in the Regular Army, having served a good portion of his time in India, from whence he came with the first Indian Forces to France. He was of a genial disposition and popular in the village.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

WALTER HART’S DEATH.—A letter has been received from the Commanding Officer of his Battalion, stating that Corpl Walter Hart was killed by a shell on the 6th ult, near Le Catelet. The writer adds that Corpl Hart had done good work for him since he came to his Company, and that he entertained the highest opinion of him.

SERGT F RUSSELL DECORATED.—Sergt F Russell (Duke of Wellington’s West Riding Regiment), who has been spending a few days at home, has received notification that he has been awarded the Military Medal for his gallant conduct on the 14th ult, when heading his men info action. Sergt Russell is fast recovering from his wound received on that occasion, and returned to Halifax on Monday. Besides his new decoration, he already holds the Queen Victoria and King Edward VII Medals for the South African War, and the Long Service Medal.

WOUNDED.—During the last hours of the war Rifleman E G T STEEL (N.Z Rifle Brigade), only son of Mr & Mrs Geo Steel, of this village, was wounded. His company had just taken their objective, and after witnessing the loss of several of his comrades, Rifleman Steele was hit with a bullet in the right arm. He is progressing well. Pte H Windsor (R.W.R) has also been wounded in the forearm.

RETURN OF A PRISONER OF WAR.—On Friday evening last week Pte Sidney Linnett (A.S.C), who has for over six months been a prisoner of war with the Germans, was welcomed home with great rejoicing. Pte Linnett, who is the adopted son of Mr and the late Mrs W Gaskins, of the Model Village, enlisted in September, 1914, at the age of 18, in the Royal Warwicks, and was eventually transferred to the A.S.C. He had seen much service all through the War, and on April 10th last was reported missing, and afterwards found to be a prisoner of war. He was located with others in the zone of danger behind the German lines, and not only worked under these conditions, but also experienced great cruelty from his captors. On the signing of the armistice he was set at liberty, and he and his comrades had to make their way back to the British lines with no food except turnips obtained from the fields. He arrived at Dover on the 19th, and reached Marton Station on the evening of the 22nd. Being unable to walk the two miles to his home, he was driven up. He states that many of his comrades lost their lives by being made to work within range of the British guns. Pte Linnett has grown much thinner during his captivity, and is still suffering from the shock of his experiences ; but the bare mention of the word “ home ” never fails to bring back his former sunny smile.

BRETFORD.
PTE BONEHAM DISCHARGED.—Pte Francis Wm Boneham, son of Mr T & Mrs Boneham, of Bretford, has now returned home. He joined the 3rd Warwicks in 1916, and saw much service in France. He has received a bad fracture of the right knee-cap, and is permanently disabled. He was also badly gassed, from the effects of which he is now suffering. Before joining up he was a respected employee of Messrs Bluemel’s Ltd.

WOLSTON.

Sapper H Smith. R.E.—News has reached Miss Dorothy Smith that her brother, Sapper Harry Smith, of the Royal Engineers, has died of influenza in Italy. He was one of the earliest Wolston recruits, joining up in August, 1914. Before the War he was in the employ of Mr A J Lord as a carpenter. He went through many battles in France, and was wounded on five different occasions, besides being once gassed. His father—the late Mr G Smith—was for many years employed as a signalman at Brandon and Wolston Station. Another brother, who has been in the Marines for 12 years, fought in the Battle of Jutland, and was on the destroyer, Champion Leader. He had also been previously wrecked.

MILITARY MEDAL.—The medal won by the late Joseph Edmans was presented to his father—Mr J Edmans, of Wolston—by Major-General Slater, of the Midland Command. The brave deed for which the medal was awarded was for picking up a live bomb and hurling it out of danger, and thus saving many lives. He, with one of his brothers, went through the Battle of Mons, and so the Mons Star is also due to the deceased hero. Mr Edmans is proud of the Army record of his family, six sons having fought for their country. Two have paid the extreme penalty, and several of the others have been badly wounded, including Sergt Percy Edmans, who received his discharge.

PRISONER’S RETURN.—Lance-Corpl Reader, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany, returned to his home at the beginning of the week. He met with a very hearty welcome from the inhabitants. Lance-Corpl Reader has not fared so badly as many of the prisoners. Thanks to the parcels he received from the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, he had done fairly well, and is very thankful for them. Mr Reader, who is agent for Mr Udal, is well known and respected, and the inhabitants are delighted to think that he has safely returned to his wife and children.

KINETON
THE FUNERAL OF CORPL HORACE LEE THOMAS, who met with a fatal accident at the Kineton Hospital, took place at Tooting Cemetery on Monday, and was an impressive military ceremony, witnessed by a large concourse of people. The H. A.C provided a firing party, and the coffin was covered with the Union Jack. Over 30 beautiful floral tributes were sent, including several from Kineton. The relatives were deeply grateful for the kindness shown at Kineton.

PEACE.

PEACE, longed-for and fought-for, has at last arrived.

But the plenty of pre-war days will not return yet awhile. Rationing must remain in force for some time.

The International Stores ask their customers, therefore, to accept cheerfully for a little longer those restrictions which the War made necessary.

It will be their earnest endeavour, whatever conditions the future may bring, to maintain the reputation they have built up for High Quality, Low Prices, and Efficient Service.

They are confident that when normal times are restored, their old customers will continue their patronage.

International Stores

THE BIGGEST GROCERS IN THE WORLD

DEATHS.

BADGER.—In ever-loving memory of Bombardier A. BADGER, 235869, A Battery R.F.A., who passed away peacefully from pneumonia, at Fargo Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on November 23rd, aged 25.
“ A light is from our household gone,
The voice we loved is still ;
A place is vacant in our hearts
Which never can be filled.”
—Sadly missed by Mary, Sis, Jim, Fanny, Mr. & Mrs. Cockerill and Family.

BURDEN.—In loving memory of my dear brother, Pte. E. P. BURDEN, R.M.L.I., who died of influenza in hospital in France on November 23, 1918.

BROWNE.—On November 4th, killed in action in France, ROLAND WILSON, second and dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. J. W. Browne, Railway Terrace, Rugby; aged 23 years.

FLETCHER.—On November 8th, at Boulogne, of pneumonia, Driver G. FLETCHER, R.F.A., aged 19 years and 10 months, the dearly beloved son of George and Lettie Fletcher, who passed peacefully away after great suffering, most patiently home.
“ The evening star shines on his grave :
The one we could not save ;
’Tis sad, but ’tis true, we cannot tell why,
The best are the first that are called on to die.”
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

GRIMSLEY.—Killed in action on November 1st, 1918, in France, JOHN EDWARD, the dearly beloved husband of Edith Ellen Grimsley, of Harborough Magna, near Rugby.
“ A day of remembrance, sad to recall,
The loss of our dear one, loved by us all.
We think of him in silence, and his name we oft recall ;
But there is nothing left but his photo on the wall.
Fondly we loved him, he is as dear to us still.
But in grief we must bend to God’s Holy Will.
If we could have raised his dying head, or heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard for us that loved him well.”
—Too dearly loved to ever be forgotten by his loving Wife, Mother, Father, Sisters and brother Will.

SMITH.—On November 7th, in Italy, of pneumonia following influenza, Sapper HARRY SMITH, Royal Engineers, youngest son of the late George Smith, of Wolston, aged 25 years.—“ Until the day breaks and the shadows flee away.”

WILLIAMS.—On October 30th, killed in action in France, WILLIAM, the dearly beloved husband of Emily Williams, 14 Lawford Road, New Bilton.

WILSON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY WILSON, killed in action in France on November 1, 1918.
“ The midnight stars are shining
On a grave I cannot see,
Amid where storms of battle raged
Lies one most dear to me.”
—From his loving Wife.

WILSON.—Killed in action in France on November 1st, 1918, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY WILSON, aged 24 years ; eldest and beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Wilson, of Bilton.
“There is a link Death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Sister and Brothers.

IN MEMORIAM.

COX.—In proud and loving memory of Rifleman E. J. COX (ERN), K.R.R., Bilton, who was killed at Cambrai on November 30, 1917.—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Father, Sisters, Brothers, and Nellie.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance live for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

RICHARDSON.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt LEONARD RICHARDSON, of the K.R.R. Corps, who was killed in France on November 30th, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Sisters, Brother, Grandmother and Nell, The Banks, Dunchurch.

WALL.—In loving memory of Corpl. LOUIS HAROLD WALL, M.M., King’s Royal Rifles, reported missing November 30, 1917.—From his loving Father and Mother, Eva and Jan.

 

23rd Nov 1918. Return of Repatriated Prisoners.

RETURN OF REPATRIATED PRISONERS.

Several Warwickshire and Northamptonshire prisoners of war, who have been repatriated under the terms of the Armistice, have returned to their homes during the past week.

We understand that one of the men was captured near La Bassee on August 9th. With a number of comrades he was taken to a camp six miles behind the lines, when they remained for several days, subsisting on a daily diet of a quarter of a loaf, a small portion of black sausage, and water. After refusing to give any information to the German Intelligence Officer, they were removed to Fort Macdonald at Lille, where they were kept in close confinement for six weeks, their sole exercise being a daily visit to the canteen to draw their nauseating rations. No tobacco was provided, and there were no facilities for washing—in fact, our informant was only allowed to wash once during the three months of his captivity. The Germans behaved with the uttermost brutality to the unfortunate men, and orders were in many cases quickly followed by blows with the butt-end of a rifle. Several of the prisoners died as a result of the scanty food and revolting conditions under which they were kept. When the German retirement began, the prisoners, numbering about 400, were ordered to “ man-handle ” the horse transport from Lillie to Tournai, and on arrival at this place they were placed in a camp near the Railway Station, which at that time was receiving constant attention from the Allied airmen. Unfortunately, a number of the prisoners were killed in some of the raids. At Tournai the midday meal consisted of boiled red cabbage, and the men considered themselves lucky if they were allowed a small portion of bread for tea. This diet, however, was little inferior to that served out to the German troops. The next move was to St Reneld, fifteen miles from Brussels, and while they were at that place they were thrilled with the news of the signing of the armistice. Apparently the news was motived as enthusiastically by the Germans as by their unfortunate victims, for the enemy troops immediately gave themselves over to orgies of drinking and pillaging, many of them also selling machine guns and other military equipment to the Belgium civilians. The day after the armistice was signed, the prisoners were ordered to pull the transports Brussels, but on the way they met a party of released British prisoners, whereupon they pulled the transports into a field and returned to the camp, where they were released and sent on their journey back to the British lines without any ration. On the way they subsisted on field turnips and food given to them by the Belgian civilians, and after walking for fifteen miles they fell in with a detachment of the British Army, by whom they were enthusiastically received. “ They only gave us ordinary army fare,” our informant added, “ but after the unappetising food we had been served so long, it seems quite a banquet.”

As an illustration of the callous nature of the Germans, it is sufficient to add that shortly before he was captured our informant was wounded by shrapnel in the leg and face ; these wounds were unattended by his captor—were simply left to heal naturally.

Two of the men, Gunner Harry Maule, R.G.A (captured during the Battle of Cambrai in November, 1917), Pte Francis Bailey, R.W.R, hail from Long Lawford.

During the next few weeks the remaining prisoners of war will probably be repatriated, and we shall be pleased if relatives and friends of any local prisoners will inform us of their return, together with any further particulars which may be of interest to our readers.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

A special meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at the Benn Buildings on Monday last, Mr William Flint, C.C, presiding. There were also present : Mrs Wilson, Mrs Anderson, Mr A E Donkin, J.P, Mr F R Davenport. C.C, Mr R P Mason, Mr G W Walton, Mr C J Newman, Mr A W Shirley, and Mr J Reginald Barker (hon organising secretary).

Mr Barker said that the immediate repatriation of our prisoners of war being made one of the terms of the armistice, the committee would welcome the news that it no longer necessary to send individual parcels of food to our prisoners in Germany. It would, of course, be several weeks before all the men returned to England, and in the meantime the Central Prisoners of War Committee were despatching food in bulk for distribution, as opportunity occurred, through the British Red Cross Society Depot at Rotterdam. The work the Rugby Committee had undertaken during the past 3½ years had thus reached the end, and there was now no need to appeal for further subscriptions and donations, because the money they had in hand would provide for any outstanding liabilities with Regimental Care Committees and leave a substantial balance. The armistice news had resulted in an almost complete falling-off in financial support. During the first week of the current month over £100 was received, but the last nine days had produced only £11. The committee had provided all parcels necessary up to the end of November, and there was a deficit of £350 on the month, but it was fortunate they had sufficient funds in hand to meet this. Mr Barker gave the committee some interesting figures. He said they had raised nearly £7,000, not including a sum of more than £1,000 remitted direct to Care Committees by adopters of individual prisoners of war, which helped to relieve the strain on the local fund. Nearly £4,000 of this amount had been raised in the past twelve months, so that with the growth in the number of prisoners there had been an equal growth in the revenue. Twelve months ago there were 61 men on the Rugby list, costing £125 per month, and they concluded their efforts, with a list of 149 men, costing over £500 per month.

On the proposition of Mr Newman, seconded by Mr Walton, it was resolved that the committee postpone their final meeting for a few days to enable the Hon Secretary to have the accounts completed and present the balance-sheet to a public meeting of subscribers to the fund.

The Chairman said he could not let the committee depart without thanking them for the good work they had done and also to voice the thanks of the committee to the people of Rugby and district for the very loyal support they had given over a long period. He also paid a special tribute to the Hon Secretary for the very efficient manner in which he had organised and managed the whole of the affairs of the committee (applause).—Mr Donkin said he envied Mr Barker the success he had attained in his efforts on behalf of our prisoners in Germany. He felt Mr Barker would always be proud of his work and rewarded by the knowledge that the prisoners were grateful to him for all he had done.

Mr Walton proposed a vote of thanks to the Chairman for the courteous and generous manner in which he had conducted the meetings, remarking that he was always in his place, even on occasions when he was far from well.—Mr Donkin seconded, and the resolution was enthusiastically carried.

Mr Barker thanked the committee for their kind expressions. He had had their whole-hearted support all through, and had received much encouragement from the Chairman. He valued the many letters he had received from the men in their prison camps and the knowledge that the parcels were of such vital importance to the prisoners had determined him to continue to the end the work he had undertaken. Now that the end had come no one was more thankful in the knowledge that the men were now being released from their sufferings, and that the food sent had helped largely to relieve their distress.

LOCAL ENGINEERS AND THE CRUEL TREATMENT OF BRITISH PRISONERS.

The following communication baa been sent to the Prime Minister :—
“ SIR,—I have the honour to confirm a telegram sent you this evening, and which correctly represents the feeling amongst the engineering community employed at the different works at Rugby, reading as follows :—
“ The whole of the engineering community employed on munitions of war at Rugby is much concerned to learn the harrowing details of the manner British prisoners are endeavouring to reach our lines, and demand that some adequate and drastic measures be taken immediately to feed, clothe, and transport these men, irrespective of any difficulties or restrictions imposed by the armistice or the German authorities.
“ I have the honour to be, yours obediently,
“ (Signed) J P GREGORY.
“ c/o The British Thomson-Houston Co, Rugby.
“ November 20, 1918.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut J H Clark, R.A.F, who before joining the Army was employed on the outside construction staff at the B.T.H, died on November 4th as the result of an aeroplane accident.

Mr J M Skinner, of 83 Abbey Street, received a message of sympathy from the King and Queen on November 6th on the loss of his son, Pte R J Skinner, of the West Yorkshire Regiment, who was officially reported to have been killed in action. However, Mr Skinner last week received a letter from his son, in which he says he is in good health and anxious to have a “ peep,” into Germany.

Trooper Frederick Farndon. of the Prince of Wales Inn, Rugby, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for distinguished and gallant services rendered on the occasion of destruction or damage by enemy action to transports.

Mr C E and Mr Clements, 33 Winfield Street, have lost their son, Gunner E E Clements, R.F.A, from pneumonia, under sad circumstances, after seeing a lot of service in France. He worked as a fitter in the L & N-W Railway Sheds, and when war broke out he answered the first call, and joined Kitchener’s Army in August, 1914. He served three years in France, and was twice badly wounded. During the big German offensive in May this year he was gassed. On recovering he returned to his regiment, when he was called out of the ranks and told that he would have his discharge in two days’ time after good service. On the following day he was struck down with influenza, which developed into pneumonia, to which he succumbed on the 14th inst. The funeral took place at Rugby Cemetery on Saturday last. He was borne to the grave by six of his former workmates, and a large number of flowers testified to the esteem in which he was held.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.

The influenza epidemic still shows signs of abating, although the death-rate continues alarmingly high. During the last week 16 deaths from this cause were registered locally, making a total of over 120 since October 14th. There is still a considerable amount of illness in the town and district, but fortunately in the majority of cases it is not of so virulent a nature as that experienced at the beginning of the epidemic.

DUNCHURCH

A SAD RECORD.- During the past week three military funerals have taken place – a record that has never been experienced previously in the parish. The deceased soldiers were: Pte L Howkins (6th Devons), Pte G Hughes (Oxford and Bucks L.I.), and Pte W Evans (Royal Warwicks), all of whom died from pneumonia. There have been four other deaths and a great deal of illness in the parish.

MR T BRAIN, postman, Mill Street, Dunchurch, has received official news that his son, Pte G Brain, R. W. R, was killed in action on November lst. Pte Brain, who had only been in the Army eight months, played three quarter back for the Dunchurch Football Club, and was also a member of the Dunchurch Brass Band and a ringer at the Parish Church.

BILTON PARISH COUNCIL.

THE NEW BILTON MORTUARY.

Several matters of more than usual importance from a parochial point of view were considered at a meeting of the Bilton Parish Council, held at New Bilton on Monday, when there were preset : Messrs J H Veasey, vice-chairman (who presided), F M Burton, J J Cripps, A J Askew, J H Lambert, R Lovegrove, A T Watson, F J Smith, F W Hunt, and F Fellows (clerk).

THE INFLUENZA MORTALITY.

The New Bilton Ward Committee reported that, whereas the yearly average of interments in the cemetery was only 40, no less than 20 funerals had taken place during the past month. . . . .

THE WAR MEMORIAL.

A letter was read from Capt M E T Wratislaw (chairman of the Council), in which, after apologising for his absence owing to military duties, he said : “ As regards the War Memorial, I have not been able to give the matter any lengthy consideration, as, of course, the armistice has only just been signed, and peace is not yet declared, so that I think a public meeting is a little premature. I hope New Bilton will not be forgotten. Any form of memorial should be, if possible, in both wards. The first thing would be to perpetuate the names of all fallen by a tablet in both wards. If a museum or reading room is built I have a nucleus in the Potter Bar Zeppelin frame and some shell noses for the former. I do not like the institution of a club for discharged men only. We still have the invested balance of King George’s Coronation Fund, and a drinking fountain might be erected in both wards, with the addition of the roll of all fallen men and a tablet of the Coronation. Again, the provision of open spaces in both wards would have my strongest support.”—Mr Lovegrove suggested that the Council build public baths or a free library. They had the power to do this by adopting certain Acts.—The Chairman, however, expressed the opinion that any memorial should be provided by voluntary subscriptions. Moreover, if they adopted Mr Lovegrove’s suggestion, it would mean higher rates in future for maintenance, and many of the smaller property owners in the parish were already hard put to it to raise the present rates.—After discussion, the further consideration of the question was referred to the respective Ward Committees, who will report to a subsequent meeting of the Council.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

DANCE—After the cessation of hostilities a dance was got up at the Schools to celebrate the happy event, and also to assist the Soldiers’ Christmas Parcels Fund. It proved very successful, and by its means £3 8s 6d has been netted for the fund. The Excelsior Band (leader, Mr W Priest) volunteered their services, and the refreshments were kindly provided by Mrs Henry Powell. The arrangements were made by Mrs G Wright, Misses O Powell, M Whitehead, A Whitehead, C Spraggett, M Spraggett, and N Lane, assisted by Mr H T Wright (late of R.W.R) and Pte Alex Askew (N.Z Medical Corps).

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—The Long Itchington roll of honour contains 230 names. Of these 29 have given their lives for their country, five are missing, four are prisoners of war, eight have been decorated, one has been mentioned in despatches, 16 have been honourably discharged, and upwards of 50 are known to have been wounded.

FEEDING THE GUN.—In connection with the campaign to raise the money of War Bonds in this district, the gun arrived here at 10 o’clock on Tuesday morning, and remained until 1 p.m. The children welcomed it with cheers and waving flags, and a goodly number of people assembled round it when it was unlimbered on the village green. The demonstrations given by the genial corporal gunner in charge were much appreciated, and the shrapnel scars on the carriage were examined with a pathetic interest.

A VETERAN NATIVE.—The arrival here last week of Gunner Wm Salt, R.F.A, from Mesopotamia on a visit created no small interest, and he received a hearty welcome not only from his own family, but from many old friends. He enlisted 17 years ago, and it is now some 13 years since he last came home. He was located in India when the War broke out, and eventually proceeded to Mesopotamia, where he has for some time past been attached to General Maude’s staff.

BRANDON.

MILITARY CROSS FOR CAPT D C M BEECH.—News has reached Brandon that Capt D C M Beech has been awarded the Military Cross Captain Beech is the Second son of Colonel R J and Mrs Beech of Brandon Hall. He received his military training at Sandhurst, and before the war broke out was connected with the 20th Hussars. He was early in the fighting, and at the very beginning saw much service in France. He was afterwards sent to Egypt. Here he acted as Brigadier-Major (temporary), and did fine service. Capt Beech lost his elder brother at Ypres, and is now the sole surviving son of Colonel Beech. The news caused much pleasure amongst the residents at Brandon. His father, Colonel Beech, has also been much service in France, but recently has been very ill. The hard work in France told upon his constitution, but we are pleased to say that, although still confined to the house, his health is improving.

SCHOOL CLOSURE.—Brandon School has been closed by the Medical Officer of Health. Fifty per cent of the scholars were absent, through illness, on the last day of opening. The whole of several families are in bed through influenza.

SOUTHAM

FUNERALS.—The funeral took place in Southam churchyard on Monday . . . of a German prisoner, who died after a short illness at one of the local prison camps, in which many of the men have suffered from the prevailing epidemic. The coffin. covered with the German flag, was borne to the grave by deceased’s fellow prisoners, many others following. The English guard of four formed the firing party. Lieut Crawford was the officer in charge. The service was conducted by the local Roman Catholic priest.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
TUESDAY.—Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), and Messrs A E Donkin and T A Wise.

SEQUEL TO NEW BILTON TRAGEDY.—On behalf of the Rugby Board of Guardians, Mr H Lupton Reddish applied for an order to be made committing a boy named Jack Ernest Hill, aged 13, to an Industrial School. He said the boy was an illegitimate child, and his mother committed suicide on November 4th while distracted with grief at the death of her husband, which took place the same evening from pneumonia. On November 6th the boy was taken to the Workhouse, and on the 10th inst he ran away. He was fetched back the same day, and subsequently was taken before the Guardians, when he promised Canon Mitchison to behave better in future. An hour later he ran away again, and was brought back at nine o’clock by his aunt. He was then seen by Mr Robotham (the vice-chairman of the Board), and after giving a further promise of amendment, he was cautioned that a repetition of the offence might result in him having to appear before the Justices. Early in the afternoon he ran away again, and was brought back by his aunt. Three years ago the boy was brought before the Bench on a charge of stealing apples.—In reply to the Chairman, Mr Reddish said the boy was not a suitable subject for a lunatic asylum, and there was as yet no means of dealing with him under the Mental Deficiency Act.—Continuing, Mr Reddish said in August last the boy had a sunstroke, and he suffered from partial paralysis of the left side. He was backward in his education, and it was thought that if he was sent to an Industrial School he would be under supervision and discipline, and would also be taught a trade. It was impossible for the officials of the Workhouse to keep a watch on him, and the Guardians could only punish him to a certain extent by locking him up—a procedure which was not advisable in a case of this kind.—The boy was sent to an Industrial School for three years. . . . .

DEATHS.

CHEESE.—On November 7th, in France, of pneumonia, following influenza, the Rev. WILLIAM GERARD CHEESE, M.A., Chaplain to the Forces, Vicar of Duddington, Northants., aged 35, youngest son of the late Rev. J. A. Cheese, Vicar of New Bilton, Rugby.

CLEMENTS.—On the 12th inst., at Horton War Hospital, Epsom, EUSTACE EDWIN, the dearly beloved eldest son of C. E. & M. F. Clements, Gunner, R.F.A., of “ flu ” and pneumonia ; aged 25 years.—Deeply mourned.

COLING.—In ever loving memory of Corpl. ARTHUR TOMPKINS, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France,” November 8th, aged 21 years.
“ We pictured his safe returning.
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better land.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Parents, Brother, Sister, and Dorothy.

DAVENPORT.—At Queen Alexandra Military Hospital, Millbank, London, Pte. C. W. DAVENPORT, Coldstream Guards, the dear and only son of Charles and Maria Davenport, of Harborough Magna, died November 14, 1918 ; aged 24 years.—“ His end was peace.”
“ A light is from our household gone,
A voice we loved is still.”

HUGHES.—In loving memory of Pte. JAMES AMOS HUGHES, who passed away on November 11th at the Military Hospital, Dover, after a short illness, aged 22 years.
“ Father, in Thy gracious keeping,
Leave Thee now Thy servant sleeping.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters and Brother, also Brother in France.

WEBSTER.—Killed in action in France on September 28th, ARTHUR, the dearly beloved grandson of Thomas Webster, of 71 Abbey Street, Rugby, aged 19 years.
“ A day of remembrance, sad to recall,
The loss of our dear one, loved by us all.
We think of him in silence, and his name we oft recall ;
But there is nothing left but his photo on the wall.
Fondly we loved him. he is as dear to us still,
But in grief we must bend to God’s Holy Will.
If we could have raised his dying head, or heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard for us that loved him well.”
—Too dearly loved to be forgotten by His loving Grandad, Aunt & Uncle, & cousins Eveline & Frances.

WILDMAN.—On November 2nd, in hospital in France, died from wounds received in action, JOSEPH WALTER WILDMAN.

16th Nov 1918. The Signing of the Armistice

THE SIGNING OF THE ARMISTICE.

In the early hours of Monday morning—at five o’clock, to be precise—the plenipotentiaries sent by the German Government to Martin Foch to negotiate an armistice signified their acceptance of the terms which that great General had given to them to think over ; and, in accordance with the initial clause of those terms, the cruellest and most terrible war that has ever scourged mankind virtually came to an end six hours later, viz, at 11 o’clock on the 11th day of the 11th month of the year. The people of the British Empire had been waiting with feverish anxiety over the week-end the decision of the German Government, and when it was made known that the sword had given away to the pen, and that the armistice was an accomplished fact, the pent-up feelings of suspense and uncertainty changed to expressions of intense joy and gratification. As far as the British Nation was concerned, this joyfulness was not manifested because our bitterest enemy lay at our feet, and that it was in our power to take revenge for the wrongs it had inflicted on humanity ; but because there was an end to the further slaughter and suffering of our sailors and soldiers, and because the agony of the past four years had at last borne fruit and brought into view that prospect of peace and a warless future, for which the whole civilised world was yearning and was earnestly appealing to a Higher Power.

LOCAL CELEBRATIONS.

The news that the Germans had signed the armistice was received with great jubilation in Rugby and district on Monday morning. Shortly after ten o’clock telephone messages, conveying the glad tidings were received at the Advertiser Office and in the town, but it was fully an hour before official confirmation was forthcoming. Many people at once left work before the pre-arranged intimation was conveyed by four blasts on the B.T.H blower. The signal was sounded just about noon, and was taken up by engine men on the railway who used their whistles vigorously. The employees poured out of the various works and joined those who had already left the smaller workshops and business establishments in the town. The streets were quickly filled with people joyously exchanging congratulations, and manifesting their feelings of relief and gratification in a variety of ways ; while frequently could be heard the emotional exclamation from delighted wives and mothers : “ Thank God, I shall soon have my boy home again.

Groups of soldiers on leave, wounded soldiers, young men who were just approaching the military age, and munition workers, carrying miniature flags or national colours, paraded the streets singing patriotic songs and making any noise that they thought would indicate the extent of their jubilation. Flags were run out at almost every window, and all the streets in the town were be-flagged in an incredibly short space of time.

Motor-cars, decked with flags driving hither and thither, added to the excitement gaiety of the scenes. The drapery establishments and other shops dealing in flags and bunting were eagerly besieged by purchasers, and limited stocks on hand were quickly disposed of. Joyous peals were also rung on the bells in both towers of the Parish Church and St Marie’s and neighbouring village churches. Most of the shops in the town closed for the remainder of the day.

In expectation of a favourable outcome of the armistice negotiations, a special meeting of the Urban District Council was held on Sunday afternoon to consider what form the celebrations should take, and it was decided to hold a united thanksgiving service in the Recreation Ground.

UNITED SERVICE IN RECREATION GROUND.

The principal feature of the celebration on Monday was of course, the united thanksgiving service in the Recreation Ground at 3 o’clcock in the afternoon, which was attended by several thousand persons. The service was held at the band stand, and amongst those present on the stand were : Rev C M Blagden (rector), Rev Canon Mitchison, Revs G H Roper, C Davis, T H Perry, S R Hart, A W Bunnett and Arnold Penman (Wesleyan), J H Lees (Baptist), W Vaughan (Primitive Methodist), A S Le Mare and Adjutant B Carter (Salvation Army). The Rev D J Griffiths (Congregational) was away from the town, fulfilling a preaching engagement. Members of the Urban District Council present were : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), W Flint (vice-chairman), Lieut C J Newman, Messrs T A Wise, W H Linnell, F E HANDS, T Ringrose, H Yates, W A Stevenson, and A Morson, M.B.E (clerk).

Just before the time fixed for the service a squadron of aeroplanes, at a low altitude, came into view through the misty atmosphere of a typical November afternoon, and as they passed over the Recreation Ground the vast crowd gave vent to their appreciation of what the R.A.F had done towards securing the victory by enthusiastic cheering and the waving of countless flags and bunting.

The service commenced with the singing of the Old Hundredth, “ All People that on Earth do Dwell,” after which a lesson taken from the 2nd chapter of Joel and the 126th Psalm was read by the Rev J H Lees, and prayers of thanks to God for the great mercies He had shown to us during the past few day were recited by the Rector.

After the hymn, “ O God our help in ages past ” had been sung,

Mr J J McKinnell, J.P, C.C, addressed the gathering, and said : “ Fellow citizens, men and women of this our dear old town of Rugby, this our day (applause). The day has come, and we are filled with a very deep sense of thankfulness to Almighty God. That is the feeling that is uppermost in our hearts this day. The British nation has again fought against tyranny and oppression, not for the first or the second time in the history of the world, and has won the day (applause). Twice at least in the history of Europe did this country maintain the flag of liberty when other countries were in a very bad way. Take your minds back to the glorious times of Queen Elizabeth. Think what world have happened if the English Fleet had not brought about the destruction of the Spanish Armada. The tyranny of Spain would have engulfed the whole of Europe. Then, again, what nation was it that stuck up to Napoleon ? What nation was it that did not know when she was beaten, as Napoleon admitted ? It was the British Nation. And, again—I do not want to be vain—glorious—what nation is it to-day which has brought about this great victory ? Where would poor France have been if Great Britain had not gone to help her ? We were not immediately menaced ourselves. We simply went into the War because it was the only decent and right thing to do. Thank God we did go in, and now we have gone through with it, and we are all very, very happy. Now there is just one thing in our hearts to-day, and that is our feeling of sympathy with those among us who have lost their dearest and their best. Many, many homes in this good old town have been very hard hit, and I am quite sure that in everybody’s mind to-day is a strong feeling of sympathy for them and the hope that God will, in His great goodness, help them. This is no time for speech-making, but I want to thank you, my fellow citizens, for helping us through these four years. I think Rugby has been absolutely splendid ; from start to finish we have been steady and good, and when the recruiting was on we were the best in England at one time. I thank you from the bottom of my heart.

The National Anthem was then sung, and the gathering dispersed after three rousing cheers had been given for King George.

The singing was led by the Salvation Army Band, under the direction of Bandmaster Burton ; and the service, which was marked by earnestness and reverence was deeply impressive.

After the service the B.T.H Band, followed by a large crowd, marched through the centre of the town playing patriotic and popular airs.

THANKSGIVING SERVICE AT THE PARISH CHURCH.

In conformity with the expressed wish of the Archbishop of Canterbury, a service of thanksgiving was held in the Parish Church in the evening. The members and officials of the Urban District Council attended, and the church was filled to its utmost capacity. The service commenced with the hymn, “ God of Mercy, God of Grace,” and this was followed by a confession of sin ; Psalm 121, “ I will lift up mine eyes into the hills,” and the lesson, Isaiah xl 1-11, “ For ye, My people.” Special prayers of thanksgiving for the signing of the armistice, the victory of the Allies, and the endurance and courage of our country were said, and after the hymn, “ Jesus shall reign,” the Rector (Rev C M Blagden) gave an address. He pointed out that the uppermost thought in their minds that day was that bought out by the special service in the Recreation Ground. They saw that, though God had used them as His agents, and they were proud to have been able to serve Him, yet the results which they had achieved all came from Him. It was not their word which had helped them, but God Who had saved them from destruction. So their thanksgiving ought to be sober and solemn. A great task lay before the Empire—a task greater than many which they had yet undertaken. This would consist of solving the problems both at home and abroad which would arise when peace was finally restored ; for then they would need all the unity, forbearance, and brotherly love which they had been displaying during the past four years. There must be no exultation over the fallen enemy. Stern and just they must be, but revengeful never. On a day like that one must not forget those who had given their own lives and those who had lost the lives of their dear ones in the service of their country. These lives had been given that others might live, and the good seed which they had sown must yield an abundant harvest.

The congregation then stood up, and together made certain acts of thanksgiving ; and after reciting the Lord’s prayer, sang the hymn, “ Lights abode, celestial Salem.” The service concluded with the Blessing and National Anthem.

The Baptists held a thanksgiving service on Monday evening, conducted by the Pastor (the Rev J H Lees). Thanksgiving prayers were offered by deacons and members of the congregation, and the choir sang the hymn, “ Lest we forget.”

THE SCENES AT NIGHT.

As the day advanced the spirits of the people became more exuberant, and it is some years since the streets of Rugby presented such an animated appearance as they did on Monday night. The Market Place and the streets in the centre of the town were thronged with happy merry-makers of both sexes and all classes, and until a late hour the joyful sounds were continued, and occasionally fireworks were discharged.

A patriotic concert was given by the Salvation Army Band in the Market Place, and this was listened to with appreciation by a large crowd.

The official intimation of the modification of the lighting restrictions was not received early enough to allow many householders to arrange for illuminated decorations. In several instances, however, such decorations were essayed, and the front garden of Mr W H Linnell’s house in Clifton Road was prettily arranged with fairy lamps, and the passers-by were asked to contribute towards Lord Roberta’s Memorial Workshops for Disabled Soldiers.

The satisfactory sum of £8 8s 7d was realised, and the little collectors (Joan, Hugh, and Lawrence Peddell) wish to thank those who contributed.

CELEBRATION ON TUESDAY.
GRAND PROCESSION AND SALUTING THE FLAG.

At a special meeting of Urban District Council on Monday afternoon it was decided to continue the celebration on Tuesday, and that this should take the form of a grand procession round the town, followed by the saluting of the Union Jack in the Recreation Ground. The arrangements were referred to a small committee, consisting of the Chairman (Mr J J McKinnell), Lieut C J Newman, and Messrs Linnell and F Hands ; and, despite the shortness of time at their disposal, the details were so carefully mapped out that everything passed off without a hitch. The various bodies taking part in the parade assembled at the Recreation Ground, and a few minutes after two o’clock—the pre-arranged hour—the procession moved off, preceded by a section of the Police Force, under Supt Clarke. The Band of Rugby School Officers’ Training Corps led the way, followed by Lieut-Col F F Johnstone and the O.T.C, under Capt C P Evers and other officers. A contingent of wounded soldiers from the V.A.D Hospitals, some marching and others in brakes and motor-cars, together with the V.A.D nurses, come next. The land girls made a brave show, and they were followed by a considerable body of discharged soldiers (including Bombardier Joe Norman, the old Crimean veteran) and Lieut C J Newman. Then came the Salvation Army Band, the Town Volunteer Corps under Capt C H Fuller, members and officials of the Urban District Council and other public bodies, the Headmaster and staff of Rugby School in their scholastic robes ; Rugby Town Volunteer Fire Brigade, with the steamer and manual ; Willans & Robinson’s Brigade and the B.T.H Brigade, with their respective steamer drawn by motor lorries. The B.T.H Band was followed by four clowns, after which came the St John’s Ambulance Brigade, the Divisional Boy Scouts with their colours, and a motor lorry full of khaki-clad lasses belonging to the Women’s Royal Air Force. The rear of the procession consisted of a contingent of school children in improvised military accoutrements, carrying flags and patriotic colours. These were headed by a clown as attendant-in-chief to a realistic Guy Fawkes, borne on a small box truck.

The route taken by the procession, which was lined with thousands of people, was Whitehall Road, Clifton Road, Oxford Street, Craven Road, Manor Road, Lancaster Road, Newbold Road, Market Place, Chapel Street, Warwick Street, School Street, and Hillmorton Road to the Recreation Ground.

In front of the band stand a flag staff had been erected. Around this the representative bodies assembled, and the military units were drawn up in line in front of it ; the crowd, which numbered several thousands, forming the other three sides of the square. After the Salvation Army Band had played “ Rule Britannia,” the Union Jack was run up on the staff by Clr W H Linnell, marshall and was greeted with hearty cheering and the waving of flags. The School O.T.C then fired a feu de joie, and between each of the rippling rounds the band played a few bars of the National Anthems of the Allies. The flag was then saluted, Col Johnstone receiving the. salute at the saluting base. The various contingents marched past, the wounded soldiers and the nurses receiving a great ovation from the crowd. Cheers were then given for the King, and also, at the invitation of Mr J J McKinnell, for his Majesty’s Forces on land, sea, and in the air. During the whole of this ceremony several aeroplanes, decked with flags of the Allied States, flew over the ground and gave a thrilling and daring exhibition of “ stunt ” dying, which to many, particularly the younger element, proved even more interesting than the actual ceremony.

At the conclusion of the ceremony, and after the crowd had left the ground, Lieut-Colonel F F Johnstone addressed the wounded soldiers, the discharged soldiers and nurses thanking them in turn for what they had done for the country. He expressed the hope that the wounded and discharged soldiers would be soon be restored to health. No doubt many of them would take the marks of their injuries to the grave, but they would have the satisfaction of knowing that they had done their duty to their country. To the nurses he expressed his thanks for their kind and gentle help in nursing the soldiers back to health. He did not know what England would have done without them.

Major J L Baird, M.P, C.M.G, D.S.O, was unable to attend the ceremony, owing to pressure of work at the Air Ministry, and in connection with the Demobilisation Scheme.

The Weather on Tuesday was less like that of a November day—the air was keen and crisp, and the sun shone brilliantly the whole of the day. The respective Works still being closed, the streets were again crowded with people till long after nightfall.

For the first time since the lighting restrictions came into force the clock of the Jubilee Tower was illuminated and allowed to strike the hours, and a number of additional street lamps were also lighted.

A concert, arranged by Mr J Paton was given by the Rugby Male Voice Choir in the Market Place. Mr J Cooper was the conductor, and the programme consisted of unaccompanied part songs, most of which were of a very appropriate character, and was much appreciated by a large crowd.

Nowhere was the news more joyously welcomed than among the wounded soldiers, and on Monday evening dances, to which each patient was allowed to invite a friend, were held at the Infirmary and Te Hira V.A D Hospitals. At Fitzjohn’s Hospital an impromptu concert and dance was held on Monday, and this was followed by a whist drive on Tuesday.

AT RUGBY POLICE COURT.

Before proceeding to the business of the Court at Rugby Petty Sessions on Tuesday, Dr Clement Dukes (chairman) said : “ the occasions on which I have a word to say from the Bench are usually painful, but to-day they are words of rejoicing. Yesterday we passed through one of the greatest crises we, as a nation, have yet experienced, and we come out, once again, free men of this renowned and glorious country, instead of the slaves of that arch-fiend, the fugitive Kaiser, who is condemned by the whole world, including his own people. To-day we stand as a race sorely stricken in our hearts and in our lives, but full of pride at the greatness of our sons. What we have to do now is not only to rejoice in the peace we have gained, but to show our courage in peace as well as we have shown it in war in order to wipe out the effects of the War as speedily as possible.”

Throughout the celebrations the people behaved with commendable restraint, and there was an utter absence of the regrettable incidents which so often mar occasions of national rejoicing.

Work was generally resumed on Wednesday morning, and the town returned to its normal conditions.

In all the villages around the inhabitants put out flags, etc, as soon as they heard the good news, and at the thanksgiving services, held in most instance, at the Parish Church in the evening, there were crowded and devout congregations.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte F Garratt (36), R.W.R, 97 Bridget Street, Rugby, has been killed in action. Previous to joining the Army he was employed at the B.T.H.

AUSTRALIAN SOLDIER’S SAD DEATH.

An exceptionally sad death of a young Australian soldier, Sergt Frank N Knight, son of Mr Isaac and Mrs M O Knight, Castlemaine, Victoria, Australia, has occurred from pneumonia following influenza. The deceased soldier, who was 23 years of age, “ joined up” in Australia in March, 1916. He was in France for the greater part of 1917, and had been at the front since March, 1918. On November 2nd he crossed over to England on 16 days’ leave, which he was spending with his uncle at Leicester. On the evening of his arrival he collapsed on reaching his uncle’s house, and, despite the best of medical and nursing attention, passed away as stated. Sergt Knight was of a Leicestershire family. His father was engaged by T Fielding Johnson, spinners, Leicester, and Nuneaton. Afterwards Mr & Mrs Knight removed to the Crown Hotel, Rugby, and seven years ago went to Australia. During their residence at Rugby the deceased was educated at the Lower School. Afterwards he took up engineering, and had a promising career before him.

ANOTHER OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs F Webb, of 16 Alexandra Road, who received news on Sunday of the death of their only son, Pte Arthur Edward Webb, of the 1st Leicestershire Regt. The sad event has been conveyed to the lad’s parents by the chaplain of his battalion in a sympathetic letter. Pte Webb, who was 22 years of age, was educated at the Murray School, where he was most popular with his schoolmates. He served an apprenticeship at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s as a turner and fitter. Prior to joining up, early in May, he was employed at Leicester. He had been in France just over a fortnight. His chum, Pte Percy Tyers of Leicester (who was apprenticed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s) was killed a week previously.

Mrs McFie, 33 Albert Street, Rugby, has now received official intimation that her son, Pte Horace Horsley, of the Manchesters, who was reported missing on March 21st, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was 21 years of age. At the time he joined up, in May, 1917, he was an apprentice at the B.T.H. He went to France in November of the same year, and was in the big fighting during the following March, when he lost his life.

DUNCHURCH.
On Monday last, when it became known that the armistice had been signed, the whole village was soon decorated with flags. At Bilton Grange there was a large bonfire at night, and all the boys and masters marched up to the fire with flags, and singing “ God save the King.”

On Tuesday last the death took place at Dover of Pte J Hughes, of the Oxford & Bucks Regt, and who was only ill a short time. He was the second son of Pte J Hughes, Daventry Road, Dunchurch.

MONKS KIRBY.
MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Busby, “ Brockhurst,” who received a telegram informing them of the death of their second son, Corpl George Busby, 8th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, on October 24th from wounds received in action. Corpl Busby had been transferred from Italy to France only a month when he received the gunshot wound in his side, from which he succumbed. Mr Busby has two other sons at the front—one in Egypt and one in France.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
WALTER HART KILLED.—Mr & Mrs Hart have received an official intimation that their younger son, Lance-Corpl Walter Hart, K.K.R, was killed in action on the 6th ult. The sad news was nearly a month in arriving. Deep regret is felt at the untimely death of this promising young soldier. He volunteered early in the War, and had been practically four years in khaki. He had seen much fighting, and had been wounded three times. He visited home about a year ago.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
A MEMORIAL SERVICE was held in the Parish Church last Sunday for Pte Fred Knight. He enlisted on September 4, 1914, and for the last three years was in France. He was esteemed by all who knew him. His parents have received the following letter from his officer :—“ I am exceedingly sorry to have to inform you that your son, Pte F Knight, was killed in action on the 23rd inst. daring our attack upon an enemy position. At the time of his death he was in charge of a Lewis gun section, and was leading them forward when a shell burst among them, killing your son and one other man, and wounding the remainder of the section. I have only been in charge of the platoon for a short time, but I had already found your son to be one of the best soldiers, and we could ill-afford to lose him.”

WITHYBROOK.
THE news has arrived that Pte Charles Eversden, R.W.R, was killed in action on October 23rd. He was very much respected in the village, and a letter has been received from his officer, stating that he was an excellent soldier. Mr Eversden had four sons serving, and two of them have lost their lives. Previous to joining he was employed at the Sketchley Dye Works, Hinckley. Much sympathy is felt for his father, brothers, and sister.

ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Wednesday, before Mr J Carter, Pte George Hunt, R.W.R, was charged with being an absentee since November 7th. He was remanded to await an escort.

Recruiting has been suspended and calling up notices cancelled.

SOCIAL.—Christmas parcels will still be needed by our soldiers and ‘sailors, and, as the Rev D J Griffith remarked at the Congregational Y.P.A social on Wednesday evening, they will be the happiest gifts this year. The social, in aid of the Christmas Parcels Fund, was in every way a success. A musical programme had been arranged by Messrs Boynton and Phillips. Mr Mewis gave monologues, Miss Gibbs, Mr Phillips, and Mr Warden sang, and Mr Boynton accompanied. Refreshments were served, and games were enjoyed.

INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC ABATING.

The continued bright, dry weather, combined probably with the invigorating influence of the good news of the past week, has happily led to the abatement of the influenza epidemic, and the death-rate for the past week, although still high, showed a considerable decrease on that of the preceding weeks. The total number of deaths from the epidemic in Rugby and district now exceeds 100, and of these 18 have occurred during the past week.

In our last issue we mentioned that the wife, sister-in-law, and infant child of Mr Newman, of Houston Road, Brownsover, had all died of influenza, and we are now informed that Mr Newman’s four-year-old son died from the same complaint during the weekend.

DEATHS.

GARRETT.—On October 23, 1918, Pte. F. GARRETT, R.W.R., killed in action in France.
“ I pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—From his loving wife Alice.

HALL.—On November 5th, at the Fort Pitt Hospital, of influenza, in his 20th year, PEVERIL AUSTIN (TOMMY) HALL, 2nd-Lieut., Royal Engineers, of the Brompton Barracks, Chatham ; and Yelvertoft Rectory, Rugby ; fourth son of the late E. A. Hall, Esq., Mozufferpore, India. Interred at Yelvertoft, November 9th.

HORSLEY.—In loving memory of Pte. HORACE HORSLEY, of “ Scotia,” 33 Albert Street, Rugby, who was killed in action on March 21, 1918 ; aged 21[?] years.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered his country’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother and brother Freeman.

JONES.—On November 1st, Pte. GORONWY JONES, Machine Gun Corps, who died of wounds in France, the beloved fifth son of Mr. & Mrs. John Jones, Red House, Shuckburgh ; aged 22.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother ;
He bravely answered his country’s call,
he gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”

WEBB.—In loving memory of ARTHUR EDWARD, the dearly beloved and only son of Frederick and Fanny Webb, of 16 Alexandra Road, killed in action (in France) on October 23, 1918.—“ Until the day breaks.”—From his sorrowing Father, Mother and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

CLARKE.—In loving memory of WALTER, younger son of the late Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Clarke, of 19 Temple Street, Rugby, who was killed in action in France on November 15, 1915.
“ There is a link death cannot sever,
Love, and remembrance live for ever.”
—Never forgotten by his Brother and Sisters.

EVERSDEN.—In loving memory of Pte. CHARLES EVERSDEN, killed in action in France on October 23, 1918 ; aged 36 years. Also of Pte. WILLIAM EVERSDEN, who died of wounds in France on November 12, 1917 ; aged 33 years.
“ For our loss we must not weep,
Nor our loved ones long to keep ;
From the homes of rest and peace,
Where all sin and sorrow cease.”
—From his loving Father, Brothers, Sister, and Alice.

PATCHETT.—In loving memory of Trooper W. I. Patchett, who died of wounds received in action on November 14, 1917. Buried at Beersheba, Imara Military Cemetery, Palestine.
“ Give me sweet thoughts of heavenly joy,
My longed-for rest ;
Where I shall sing through endless days
Songs of the blest.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

PATCHETT.—In loving memory of WILLIAM IVENS, who died of wounds received in action near Gaza, Egypt, on November 14, 1917.
“ No father’s care did him attend,
Or o’er him did a brother bend ;
No sister there to shed a tear,
Or even his last words to hear.”
—From Dad, Brothers and Sisters.

ROBINSON.—In loving and sacred memory of our dear and only son, KENNETH, and all the brave Kitchener’s Army boys who fought and died for their friends and country at Gallipoli in 1915.—From B. & E. ROBINSON, 23 Stephen Street, Rugby.

ROUND.—In proud and ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, WILLIAM ALFRED (WILL) ROUND, who died of wounds received in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ A day of remembrance, sad to recall :
The loss of our dear one, loved by us all.
We think of him in silence, and his name we oft recall,
But there is nothing left but his photo on the wall.
Fondly we loved him, he is as dear to us still ;
But in grief we must bend to God’s Holy Will.
If we could have raised his dying head or heard his last farewell.
The grief would not have been so hard for us that loved him well.”
—Too dearly loved to be forgotten by his loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and brother Fred.

 

 

9th Nov 1918. An Unfounded Rumour

AN UNFOUNDED RUMOUR
PREMATURE REJOICING.

Feverish excitement was caused in the town on Thursday afternoon by the circulation of a rumour that an armistice had been signed at 2.30 p.m.

In several instances workpeople gave themselves up to jubilation, and work came to a standstill, until it was found later in the day that the statement had not come through an official source and was premature.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt George Alan C Smith, M.C, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, who has been killed by a shell in France, was the elder son of the Master of Dulwich College. At Rugby he was head of his house (Mr G F Bradby’s), and played in the School XV for two seasons, captaining the team during his last term.

Lieut G T S Horton, Royal Hussars, son of Mr T Horton, J.P, Ashlawn House, near Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Sergt A J Chadwick, of Kilsby, who has been on active service since December, 1914, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry on the field.

Lance-Corpl W L Gilks, Yorks & Lancs Regt, son of the late Mr Lewis Gilks, farmer, Grandborough, has been killed in action. He enlisted in August, 1914, and had seen considerable foreign service.

The following Rugby men have been posted as missing :—Pte E Cox, Pte F Smyth, Pte C Spokes, and Pte W Boote, all of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment ; Ptes A Webster, Royal West Surrey Regiment ; A J Webster, London Regiment ; G Watkins, R.W.R, and H Cockerill, M.G.C, have been reported killed ; and Pte W H Newman, Royal Berks Regiment, has died of wounds. Lance-Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, has been taken prisoner.

Gunner F J Lines, youngest son of Mrs Lines and the late Mr Lines, 17 Spring Street, died of wounds on October 6th. He was an old Murrayian, 20 years of age, and before joining the army in August, 1916, he was employed by the late Mr C B Jones, hairdresser, Murray Road, who has also been killed in action.

Lance-Corpl H Evans (23), son of Mr W Evans, Thurlaston, formerly of Crick, has died at Norwich Hospital from pneumonia, contracted on active service. He joined the K.R.R on September 2, 1914, and saw a good deal of heavy fighting round Ypres. He was wounded at Hooge in 1915, and again on the Somme in 1916. He was subsequently invalided home, and afterwards was transferred to the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C. He contracted a chill while on duty, and after laying up for a few days he reported for duty too soon, caught another chill, and died on Wednesday. In peace time he was well known as a footballer and cricketer. An elder brother was killed in June last, and another brother is in France.

Pte Victor Cowley, son of Walter Cowley, 34 Poplar Grove, 1st Dorset Regt, has been reported missing since September 30. He joined up in September, 1914, had been twice wounded, and went to France for the third time in March last. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before the war was employed in the Winding Department of the B.T.H.

Pte Bernard Woodward, youngest son of Mr and Mrs T Woodward, 39 Stephen Street, has been wounded.

Ptc A Allen, Gloucester Regt, who was employed in the B.T.H Foundry before the war, died from wounds on October 25th.

The Northants Yeomanry, twice mentioned by the Earl of Cavan in his official despatches for distinguished service in Italy last week, is commanded by Sir Charles Lowther, formerly Master of the Pytchley Hounds, and includes amongst its officers Major T E Manning, captain of the Northamptonshire County cricket team.

The death occurred at Stratford-on-Avon, on Tuesday, of ex-Sergt Norman Kinman, of the Warwickshire Royal Horse Artillery, who was well known in athletic circles in the Midlands prior to the War. He was a prominent sprinter and an excellent Rugby footballer, doing fine work for Stratford-on-Avon as wing three-quarter. He gained his Midland cap, and also toured with Leicester. He volunteered at the outbreak of war, and was dis-charged in February of this year after a bad gas attack, having gained his Mons Star and Military Medal. He was 30 years of age.

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR REV. R. W. DUGDALE.

A choral requiem in memory of the Rev R W Dugdale, curate in charge, who was killed in France recently, was celebrated at Holy Trinity Church on Saturday (All Souls’ Day). The celebrant was the Rev G H Roper, assisted by the Rev T H Perry. The 42nd Psalm was chanted at the beginning of the service, and the hymns were : “ Lord, it belongs not to my care,” and “ Let Saints on Earth.” At the conclusion of the service the Nune Dimittis was sung. The congregation included Mrs Hardy and Miss Dugdale (sisters), Canon Simpson, Capt & Mrs C P Evers, Messrs F J Kittermaster, C H Fuller, F Thompson, G E Over, W Brooke, A W Sheasby, W T Coles Hodges, C E L Wright, F W Cooke, W. M. and E R Giding. Senior P.M (representing the Lodge of Rectitude, Freemasons, of which the Rev R W Dugdale was chaplain), A Coaton, Mr & Mrs H Marple, Mrs C N Hoare, Miss Gray, Mike Tomlinson, Miss Dean, Miss Buckley, Miss Stuart, Mrs Stokes, Mrs Stanley, Miss Cope and Mrs Ray (representing Murray School, of which he was chaplain), Misses Hollowell, Miss Sargent, Miss Longstaff, Miss Lines, Mrs Beasley, &c.

DUNCHURCH.

The funeral of Leonard J Hopkins, aged 18 years, son of Mr and Mrs Wm Hopkins of Dunchurch, took place at Dunchurch on Tuesday last. Deceased, who was a private in the Devon Reserves, died after a short illness in Waveney Hospital, Ballymena, Ireland. Before joining the army he was employed as gardener at Thurlaston Grange, and a bunch of mauve chrysanthemums (his favourite flower) was sent by Mr Appleby, bearing the word, “These flowers he tended so carefully during his life are sent as a token of deep sympathy from all at Thurlaston Grange.” The funeral service was conducted by the Vicar, the Rev. E P Rowland, and the coffin was borne by four soldiers staying in the village.
Among the flowers were tributes from Mrs Mallam, Mr and Mrs Appleby, Mr and Mrs Dew, Mrs Borsley, Mr and Mrs Tomlin, and Mrs Busby. The deceased was very popular with the boys of the village, and in addition to the above were wreaths from “His Chums,” Pte R Jennings (serving in France), and the Scholars and Staff of Dunchurch Boys’ School. The people of the village fell the deepest sympathy with Mr and Mrs Hopkins in their bereavement.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr and Mrs Joseph Lane have now received official information that their son, Pte Ernest Lane (R.W.R), formerly porter at the Station here, was wounded and is missing from September 2nd last.—Mr and Mrs Fred Sabin have been advised through a letter from Pte T Sewell (his chum) that their younger son, Pte Edward Sabin (R.W.R), has been killed in action. His friend saw him fall, and was with him till death took place. The news has come as a great shock to Mr and Mrs Sabin, the latter of whom has been seriously ill with influenza.

SERGT RUSSELL WOUNDED.—News is to hand that Sergt F Russell (West Riding Regt) was wounded as he was leading his platoon into action on the 14th ult, a piece of shrapnel penetrating his left fore-arm. He was operated on, and is now at Nottingham. Sergt Russell, who served all through the Boer War, was called up as a Reserve in August, 1914, and has seen a great deal of hard and severe fighting in the present war.

WOLSTON.

DEATH OF CORPL L PAGE.—The news arrived at Wolston recently of the death of Corpl Lewis Page, Warwickshire Yeomanry, from dysentry in Egypt. Corpl Page was the third son of Mrs Page and the late Mr W Page, of Wolston, and was in his 35th year. Before hostilities commenced he was a member of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and was in business as a hay and corn merchant. Much sympathy is felt for his mother and brothers and sister, and for his young widow, who resides at Coventry. Three brothers of the deceased are still fighting.”

SOLDIERS’ CHRISTMAS PARCELS.—The sum of £56 13s 3d has been collected in the parishes of Brandon, Wolston, and Bretford. The committee have sent 74 presents of 12s each to men abroad, and 24 of 5s each to men in England, and £4 4s 5d for parcels to the six prisoners of war. The total expenses were £2 0s 10d.

LIEUT-COL. H. H. PODMORE, D.S.O.

On Saturday afternoon a portrait of Lieut-Col H H Podmore, D.S.O, Northants Regiment, killed in action in December, 1917, was unveiled in the Temple Speech Room by the Headmaster, Dr A A David. The painting was by Mr Charles Miller, and it was presented to the School by the past and present members of Mr B B Dickinson’s house.
Mr R G C Levens, head of the house, formally presented the portrait in “pleasant memory of Col Podmore’s tutorship.”
Dr David accepted the gift on behalf of the School from “ the house which Hubert Podmore served, loved, and inspired.” He added that the memorial was happily conceived, and before unveiling it he wished to thank the past and present members of the house who had joined in the gift, and who desired—and rightly desired—to set it among the pictures of those whom Rugby remembered with gratitude and with honour. They were also grateful to the artist. His was a hard task, but be (Dr David) thought when they saw the picture they would agree that his insight and his skill had been equal to it. He had seen in the photograph, and revealed to them again, what they remembered in the man. Dr David then formally unveiled the portrait, and, having done so. he said :—“ I do not suppose any of us knows a man whose features and expression more faithfully imaged the character within. If the face is ever the window of the soul it was so in him. There was nothing that he had need to hide, therefore the window was not darkened. I wonder if those who follow us here will know from this picture what manner of man he was ? I think they will.”

“ FEED THE GUNS ” CAMPAIGN.

A great effort is being made to extend this campaign in the local villages, and in connection with it representatives of Rugby Rural District (North) and Monks Kirby Rural District Local Committee met at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, Rugby, on Saturday afternoon, last, when the Earl of Denbigh presided, supported by Mr E H Carter, O.B.E (hon county secretary), and Mr R H Myers (hon local secretary).—Mr Myers gave an account of the progress of the organisation, and intimated that final arrangements had been made for a gun to tour the villages during Gun Week (Nov 18-23), when it is hoped that a sum of at least £66,000 will be subscribed in War Bonds and War Savings Certificates.—Lord Denbigh urged those present not to relax their efforts, in view of the satisfactory military position, but to vigorously prosecute the financial campaign til final victory is obtained.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.

There are signs this week that the influenza epidemic, which has claimed so many victims locally, is now on the wane, although unfortunately the death roll is still very high. Since the outbreak of the epidemic the number of deaths from influenza in Rugby and the immediate neighbourhood totals 86, of which 61 have occurred in Rugby and New Bilton. In Rugby alone 27 deaths from these diseases were registered last week, and another 14 occurred in the villages immediately adjacent to the town. Thirteen deaths were registered during the first three days of the present week. . . .

NEEDLESS ALARM.

Some alarm has apparently been caused in Cromwell Road by the proposal that the Mitchison Home is to be used as a hospital for influenza patients. Residents in that neighbourhood may feel assured there is no cause to be uneasy.

RUGBY MAN’S FOOLISH ACT.
UNLAWFULLY WEARING AN OFFICER’S UNIFORM.
A HEAVY FINE.

A remarkable story was told to the Mansfield Magistrates on Thursday last week in a case in which Percy Thos Tallis, a mechanical engineer, now on Government work at Coventry, living in Cross Street, Rugby, and whose father is an innkeeper in the town, was charged with unlawfully wearing the uniform of an officer of the R.A.F at Sutton in Ashfield on October 23rd. After being arrested by Insp Brooks, defendant made a statement, in which he said he received information that his brother, who had been seriously wounded, was lying in a military hospital at Nottingham. He went there to see him, his wife joining him the next day. On the 20th ult he made the acquaintance at a hotel of a man named Millus, who was wearing an officer’s uniform. He suggested that he (defendant) should put on a similar uniform and be photographed in it. He agreed to this, and after putting on the uniform they went into the streets, where Millus persuaded him to accompany him to Mansfield. He did so, and the next day, at Millius’s request, he consented to visit Mansfield again. They took tickets there, but alighted at Sutton, where he was arrested.
Mr W Gamble, who defended, pleaded guilty, but urged extenuating circumstances. When Millus saw defendant at the hotel he said, “Put on this uniform and be photographed in it.” Defendant several times refused to do so, and it was only after Millus said he belonged to the military police, and that no harm would result, that defendant consented. He went out with the intention of being photographed in the uniform, and then coming back and taking it off. but Millus persuaded him to go to Mansfield. It was evidently a case of a strong mind overcoming a weaker mental capacity. Defendant committed this foolish act, but Mr Gamble submitted that no real harm had been done. At Mansfield he found Millus was wanted on a charge, so the latter could afford to be reckless. Defendant bore an excellent character. This had been a lesson to him, and defendant would take care that he would not repeat such foolishness again.
The Chairman told defendant he had been guilty of a most foolish act, and had rendered himself liable to a much heavier penalty than the Bench proposed to inflict. He would have to pay £10, and they hoped this would teach him a lesson.—The money was paid.

NEW RATION BOOKS IN USE.

The new ration books came into use on Monday, and for the next six months they will be the medium by which the available supplies of meat, fats, sugar, and jam will be equitably distributed among the population. Should the War come to an end during the period there is no likelihood that the necessity for rationing will cease. Organised distribution of food, in fact, will have to be continued for many months after fighting stops. No exception is likely to be taken to the maintenance of restrictions. Rationing from the first has worked smoothly in this country, and has been accepted as the fairest—and indeed the only—method of apportioning foods the supply of which is insufficient to meet the normal demand.
Only one change is associated with the use of the new book. Jam, marmalade, and honey are added to the list of rationed articles. It was originally intended that syrup and treacle should also be included; but Lord Bledisloe, the Director of Sugar Distribution, announces that there is no need to surrender coupons when buying these foods. In view of the quantities in which jam is customarily sold, the ministry of Food has arranged that the jam coupons in the ration books may be used in each case in the week marked on the coupon, or in any of the seven succeeding weeks. The red coupon numbered 1 for the week ending November 9th may be used at any time before December 29th. A customer, therefore, may hold his coupons over for seven weeks, and in the eighth week buy a 2-lb jar of jam with the eight coupons saved.

WARWICKSHIRE WAR AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE.

The following reports have been made by the Executive Committee and the Women’s War Agricultural Committee to the County Council :—
The work of the harvest in this county has, generally speaking, been completed, notwithstanding the shortage of labour and bad weather experienced for the last six weeks. The inspection of farms has been continued, and in 34 cases cultivation orders have been issued. In three cases recommendations have been made to the Board of Agriculture to determine tenancies, and in two cases derelict land has been compulsorily taken for improvement. The total acreage ordered to be broken up is at present 35,103 acres.
Orders have been received from the Board of Agriculture for a re-survey of the county for the purpose of more carefully classifying the grassland and for obtaining particulars of all farms not properly cultivated. It is proposed to put this in hand forthwith. The committee continues its efforts to retain skilled men in their employment on the land, releasing for service only those who can best be dispensed with ; 1,402 soldiers from the distribution centre at Budbrooke Barracks are employed on the land. Additional camps have been established at Kingsbury and Mancetter. The total number of prisoners employed is 636, of which 507 are in the camps, 49 are billeted with farmers, and 80 are out with migratory gangs. Including the horses at the prisoner camps, there are 218 under the committee’s control. The number of tractors in the county is 73.
The organisation of threshing has been successfully carried out, district committees were formed, and districts allotted to threshing proprietors. Shortage of drivers has somewhat handicapped the work, but every endeavour is being made to rectify this.
During the past season Mrs Bedhall has given 92 demonstrations in fruit preservation, with an average attendance of 38. One week was devoted to training pupils to work the district canneries established in the county. Thirty visited have been made to such canneries for the purpose of giving further advice and assistance.
The appeal to school children to pick blackberries to be made into jam for the Army and Navy was taken up with keenness, and has been conducted with great success. Already 29 tons 7 cwt have born sent to jam factories.
The Women’s Agricultural Committee reported :—During the past quarter the principal work has been the formation of gangs of woman for threshing. These gangs consist of a number of women, varying from four to six, one of whom is invariably the forewoman. Twenty gangs are already at work, comprising approximately 90 women, and from reports already received they appear to be giving satisfaction. We are prepared to supply any further gangs that may be asked for. We have a total number of 406 girls working in the county at this time, and a welfare officer has been appointed from London to supervise their recreation and general well-being. The total number of L.A women trained in this county since April, 1917, is 261, a very large percentage of whom are still on farm work here, and we are greatly indebted to the farmers who have undertaken to help our committee in this way.

WARWICKSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL.
LAND FOR EX-SERVICE MEN.

At a quarterly meeting of the Warwickshire County Council, held at Warwick on Tuesday, Lord Algernon Percy, presiding, the Small Holdings Committee presented a report on the provision of land for ex-service men, and recommended “that the Small Holdings and Allotments Committee be charged with the matter of dealing with the settlement of ex-service men on the land in the county, all the powers of the Council being delegated to them.”
Alderman Sir H R Fairfax-Lucy moved an amendment : “ That the County Council considers the proposals of the Board of Agriculture for the provision of land for ex-service men a most unsatisfactory one, as it does not enable these men to become the owners of their holdings, and that, further, they consider that the powers of borrowing for purchasing land and adaptation should be restored, and that they should be informed at an early date on what terms loans will be issued for that purpose.” He pointed out that under the policy of the Board of Agriculture County Councils could take up land only through the powers of the board to obtain loans, and this depended on the adoption of the system of a perpetual rent charge. He thought it was their duty to ascertain the demand for land, and this information could be obtained through the Territorial Force Association, which had relations with discharged soldiers. It would be the duty of the County Council to find loans for those who had experience and capital to take up land. It would be necessary for the Small Holdings Committee to continue to press for the re-establishment of their old powers.—The amendment was carried.

SHOP HOURS IN RUGBY.

The following copy of a letter, written by a Rugby housewife to the Secretary of the Housewives’ Committee, was sent to us last week too late for insertion :—
DEAR MADAM,—We understand your committee tried some time ago to get some consideration and convenience for busy workers to do their shopping. They are the majority ; they are the ready cash people ; yet all our wants and purchases have to be crowded into Friday night and Saturday afternoon, waiting in crowded shops, getting served in a take-it-or-leave-it-quick style. If there was a later hour—say, 7.30 on Tuesday—it would ease both server and served at the week-end.
Does it ever occur to traders that the shops are already closed morning, noon, and night to the workers for four whole days?
Can we who have twenty minutes to half-an-hour’s walk home and live the same distance from the town sandwich a tea-dinner and a wash in-between, and yet get in town even by seven o’clock ? No, not for a bit of cotton wool or a pound of oatmeal, or any other necessary for whatever illness or emergency is in the home. If we—the majority—have still to be put to this inconvenience, there is no need for the leisured minority to require four days in which to make their purchases.
Why not even things up a bit ?—Yours very truly,
“ A.E.W.”

DEATHS.

ELLARD.—On October 30th, at 29 Station Hospital, Cremona, Italy, Trooper W. J. ELLARD, 14th Corps, Northants Yeomanry, younger son of Z. J. Ellard, Barby, aged 27 years.

EVANS.—On November 6th, at the Military Hospital, Norwich, Pte. HARRY EVANS, the beloved second son of W. E. & A. M. Evans.—“ Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God.”

GILKS.—Killed in action on October 13th, Lance-Corpl. WM. L. GILKS, Yorks. and Lancs. Regt., aged 22.

HOPKINS.—On October 30th, at Ballymena, Ireland, of pneumonia, Pte. L. J. HOPKINS, the dearly beloved son of Elphinstone and Annie Hopkins, Dunchurch, aged 18 years.

LINES.—On October 6th, Gunner F. J. LINES, R.F.A., youngest and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Lines and the late Mr. H. Lines, 17 Spring Street, who died of wounds received in action in France ; aged 20. Never forgotten.

OLDHAM.—Killed in action on October 24th, in France, HARRY, fourth son of the late Stephen and Annie Oldham, 33 Stephen Street, Rugby (late of Long Lawford), aged 25 years.—Deeply mourned by his loving Mother and Brothers and fiancee Lottie.

PEARMAN.—On November 4th, at Warley Military Hospital, after a short illness of pneumonia, HERBERT CARL, elder and beloved son of Thomas and Ada Pearman, of Ryton-on-Dunsmore, in his 23rd year.

STIBBARDS.—On the 31st October, 1918, at the 1st Eastern General Hospital, Cambridge, Seaman HARRY FRANK STIBBARDS, B.Z. 11286, “Attentive III,” passed peacefully away after a short illness, contracting pneumonia. Much suffering patiently borne. Interred in Cambridge Military Cemetery.—Deeply mounted by all who knew him.

WEBSTER.—In memory of ARTHUR JAMES WBSTER, beloved son of Mr. &. Mrs. Webster, of 9 Old Station Square, Rugby, who was killed in action during the evening of September 28, 1918.
“ A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother ;
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand ;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, and Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

ELKINGTON.—In proud and loving memory of our dear son and brother, JOHN THOMAS ELKINGTON (JACK), who fell in action “ somewhere in France ” on November 10th, 1916.—“ God’s Will be done.”
“ Just when his hopes were brightest,
Just when thoughts were best ;
He was called from this world of sorrow
To that Home of eternal rest.
Never a day but his name is spoken,
Never a day but he’s in our thoughts ;
A link from our family chain is broken ;
He’s gone from our home, but not from our hearts.
His loving smile, his cherry ways,
Are pleasant to recall ;
He had a kindly word for each,
And died beloved by all.”
—Too dearly loved to be forgotten by his Mother, Father, and Sisters, of Long Lawford, Brothers in France and Germany.

 

2nd Nov 1918. Influenza Epidemic, Over Fifty Deaths Locally.

INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.
OVER FIFTY DEATHS LOCALLY.

The influenza epidemic has assumed serious proportions locally, and from October 14th till last Thursday morning no fewer than 52 deaths from either influenza or pneumonia occurred in Rugby and the immediate vicinity. Of these over 40 have been registered within the past 12 days. A peculiar feature of the malady is that the victims chiefly consist of young and robust persons, and largely among people whose means, one would surmise, would enable them to live as well as rationing regulations will permit and engaged in healthy occupations.

During the past week there have been 17 interments in Rugby Cemetery—a figure which has surpassed all past experience. In the preceding week there were 14 burials. Two grave-diggers are normally employed at the Cemetery, but so many graves have been required that six additional men have been taken on.

No less than about 900 employers of the B.T.H Company and 200 employees of Messrs Willans & Robinson’s are suffering from influenza and pneumonia.

The seriousness of the malady is intensified by the shortage of doctors and nurses, and in many instances whole families have been stricken down, and have had to depend on the casual help of neighbours.

The few doctors that remain are working at high pressure,and they are only able to visit the most serious cases.

Owing to the shortage of voluntary helpers, caused by the epidemic, the issue of the new ration books, which should be completed by Monday, November 4th, will not be completed, until Wednesday next at the earliest.

Several social functions, including a concert at the Speech Room and the Elborow School prize distribution and concert, have been postponed owing to the outbreak.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
THE INFLUENZA.—October, 1918, will long be remembered in Long Itchington as intensely exemplifying those well-known words : “ The pestilence that walketh in darkness.” There has been no blacker time in its annals since August and September, 1842, when two adults and nine children were in a few weeks carried off by scarlet fever. The present visitation of influenza has in less than a fortnight accounted for seven victims, most of whom were young and in their prime. Others still lie seriously ill, and while many are approaching convalescence, fresh cases are still failing almost daily. It has been well nigh impossible to procure adequate nursing, and in some instances patents have been kindly tended by kind-hearted neighbours, well-nigh as ill themselves. The Vicar (Rev H G Kane), whose own son has been seriously ill, has been most assiduous in visiting the sick and in administering comfort and consolation to the dying and the bereaved. Among those who have succumbed are : Mrs T H Webb, aged 33, who was only ill a few days, and leaves behind a husband, two little ones, and an aged mother. Much sympathy is felt for Mr Webb, who is well known and respected as the local carman of the L & N-W Railway. Miss Eva Jeffs, aged 19, only child of Mr & Mrs Wm Jeffs, who up to the time she contracted influenza looked the picture of health, but succumbed to pneumonia after only a few days’ illness. More recent deaths are those of Miss Violet Taylor, assistant mistress at the Schools for the past 18 years, who died on Sunday after only a few days’ illness. She was an exceedingly capable teacher, and her loss to the schools will be severely felt. The body was removed to Stratford-on-Avon for interment. On Monday occurred the death of Miss Hilda S Jeacock, who received her education and tuition at the schools here, and had also been an assistant mistress for the past 12 years. She, too, has proved an efficient teacher, and her loss is greatly deplored. Gunner F Leigh, R.G.A. is at present on service with the victorious British Army in France ; he has lost his little son Dennis, aged 2½ years. An exceedingly sad case is the death of Mrs Charles Evetts, who leaves behind a husband and eight little children. Dr Clague is unfortunately feeling the strain of continuous work night and day, and was himself obliged to knock up on Tuesday.

BRINKLOW.

INFLUENZA.—Their has been an increase in the number of influenza cases in the village during the last fortnight, and in consequence the schools have had to be closed for a time.

DEATH OF DR. RING.—The greatest regret has been occasioned in Brinklow and neighbourhood by the somewhat sudden death of Dr Charles E Ring, which occurred at his residence on Tuesday. He was seized with influenza towards the end of last week, but heroically attended to his patents until he was absolutely obliged to go to bed, and, in spite of the best medical attention and nursing, he succumbed as stated. Dr Ring commenced his practice in Brinklow about ten years ago in succession to Dr James Hair, and had become well known in the village and neighbourhood as a most competent medical practitioner, and as such has been very highly esteemed. During the last few years he has had charge of the Monks Kirby and Pailton district, and has also served for about two years in France and Salonika. He leaves a widow and three children.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut R Aubrey Hastings Lloyd. R.A.F, who was in Rugby School XV in 1916, has died abroad from wounds.

The names of two more employees of the B.T.H Company have appeared in recent casualty lists, viz : Pte P C Roberts, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, of the Foundry Department, died from wounds on October 18th, and Bombardier A Jones, Royal Garrison Artillery (carpenters’ shop), died from malarial fever on Oct 15th.

Pte G W Marsh, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was reported missing on October 26, 1917. Official intimation has now been received by his friends that it is now concluded that his death took place on that date.

Lieut-Col H H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C (bar), Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mr S Neeves, Langdale, Murray Road, has been wounded in the left elbow and hip, and is now in hospital in France. Lieut-Col Neeves, who joined the Army as a private, was seriously wounded at Arras last year, when he gained the D.S.O and bar to the M.C.

Another Old Murrayian and former member of Holy Trinity Choir—Pte A C Ward, R.W.R, son of Mr & Mrs C Ward, 121 Grosvenor Road—was killed in action on September 27th at the age of 19. Before joining the Army in August, 1917, he was employed as a clerk in the L & N-W Railway Goods Depot. He had been in France since April last. Three of his brothers are still serving in the Army.

Pte Fred Knight, Oxon and Buck L.I, of Bourton, who has been killed in action, was formerly employed by the Rugby Rural District Council as a roadman. He joined the Army at the beginning of the War, and had served in France three years.

THE REV R. W. DUGDALE KILLED BY A SHELL.

The sad news has come to hand that the Rev R W Dugdale, a curate of St Andrew’s, Rugby, was killed during a German barrage in the early hours of Wednesday last week while on duty in a regimental aid post.

Mr Dugdale was the younger son of the Rev Sydney Dugdale, Whitchurch, Salop. and was educated at Rugby and Oxford. He was ordained by the Bishop of Worcester at the Advent ordination in 1913, and commenced work in his Rugby curacy at Christmas. He remained on the staff of St Andrew’s and was in charge of Holy Trinity Church during 1914 till the summer of 1915, when he became a Chaplain to the Forces. He went to France in the following summer, and did good work at the Battle of Loos, for which he was awarded the Military Cross.

Mr Dugdale was fond of all athletic exercises. He was a great runner, and held an unbeaten record for the Crick Run. He was an active member of the Church Cricket Club and a close personal friend of the late R W Poulton (O.R.), the International football player.

The remains were buried on October 24th in the Military Cemetery at Candry, near Cambrai. There will be a memorial service in the Holy Trinity Church at 11 o’clock to-day (Saturday).

ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Wednesday—before Mr A E Donkin—Pte Frank Batchelor, Machine Gun Corps, was charged with being an absentee since October 26th. He pleaded that he had had a lot of trouble at home, and that he intended to return early that morning, but he was prevented. As defendant had been through most of the heavy fighting, including the Retreat from Mons, and had been wounded four times, he was discharged on giving his word to return to his unit by the first train.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
DIED OF WOUNDS.—Mrs A Allen has received news from the sister-in-charge of a casualty clearing station in France that her husband, Pte A Allen, of 1/5 Gloucester Regiment, was admitted to the clearing station on October 24th, severely wounded in the head, back, and buttocks, and died on October 25th. Pte Allen was 33 years of age, and before joining H.M Forces in April, 1917, was employed at the B.T.H Works. He leaves a widow and three young children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

DUNCHURCH.
DEATH OF SERGT RIDOUT.—The death occurred recently, at Austruther, county Fife, of Sergt Wm Ridout, of the 10th Battalion Royal Warwicks, one of the heroes of the Battle of Loos. When war broke out he was a member of the Territorial Force. He then joined the Warwicks, and soon attained the rank of sergeant. At the Battle of Loos he was badly gassed, from which he only made partial recovery, and was discharged. A cold aggravated the trouble, which he suffered from the effects of being gassed, and his end came with startling suddenness. When resident at Dunchurch, Sergt Ridout was one of the best players in the football team, and was much respected in the parish.

BRITISH AND FOREIGN SAILORS’ SOCIETY.—A flag day on behalf of this society was held at Rugby on Saturday, the arrangements being earned out under the auspices of the Young People’s Association of the Congregational Church. Mr W W Litchfield, of the Northamptonshire Union Bank, was the hon treasurer, and the Rev DJ Griffiths hon secretary. Unfortunately the influenza epidemic incapacitated about 35 friends who had promised help as flag-sellers, but those who were able to turn up worked with a will. The organising committee were Miss M Bullock, Miss Whitbread, Miss Baillie, Miss Anderson, Miss Craze, Mrs Gatecliffe, Mrs J Tame, and Mr Tom Daynes. The total of collections and subscriptions amounted to £64 18s 6d.

WAR BONDS.—During the week ended October 19th Rugby subscribed £10,330 for War Bonds, or about £500 less than the weekly quota expected from the town.

BOOKS AND MAGAZINES FOR SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.—During the month of September the books and magazines collected through the agency of the Post Office, and handed over to the various distributing organisations, filled 1,772 bags. Towards this number Rugby contributed 19 bags and Leicester 20. The demands of our soldiers and sailors are greater now than ever. The books and magazines should be handed across the counter of any post office, unwrapped and unaddressed, and within a few days the donors may rest assured they will be in the hands of our fighting men.

HOW TO FEED THE PIG.
NO OFFAL AFTER JANUARY.
The following official “ Advice to Pig Keepers ” has been issued :—

Since the Board of Agriculture in the spring urged both farmers and cottagers to keep pigs, and encouraged the formation of Pig Clubs in urban district where household waste could be collected, the situation has changed greatly for the worse. A large number of people throughout the country responded to the invitation of the Board, and effected a substantial increase in the number of pigs.

It has now, however, become necessary to pig keepers that even the small allowance of concentrated food hitherto allotted to pigs may not be continued beyond January 25, 1919.

What is the pig keeper to do ? The farmer has at command a certain quantity of home-grown food ; he may be able to spare some roots, he may have chat or damaged potatoes. With these and a small daily allowance of tail or damaged grain he can keep his pigs growing, without even the allowance of offals to which he is entitled until January. No man ought to feed pigs on meal alone. Pig clubs can still command the waste that is being collected. With that and the allowance of offals they can still obtain they will be able to maintain their pigs until January. They must use their own judgment as to whether they can keep them any longer, or whether they must kill off some before that date in order to have food enough for the rest. Many cases are reported to the Board when pigs are being kept successfully on waste alone, and this is possible where the pigs are not too young.

The cottager is, perhaps, in the worst case. He must do the best he can in his own circumstances. Up to January he can still buy offal ; he has his small and damaged potatoes and a certain amount of waste and garden produce. He must get the pig on as far as he can with that, and at the worst kill it before the supply gives out.

The Board are being constantly asked whether they want pigs kept. They want every possible pig kept, but they cannot promise any food beyond January ; and they, therefore, cannot advise anyone to continue to keep pigs who does not see some way of providing for them out of local resources. The price of pork and bacon is high, and is not likely to fall. There will be a great demand for young pigs as soon as food becomes available again. These are the plain facts ; the Board want pigs, and believe in pig production, but cannot obtain any food for them from the outside. But they urge every pig keeper to make the best shift he can.

DEATHS.

RING.—On the 29th ult., CHARLES A. EDMONSON RING, F.R.C.S.E., late Capt. R.A.M.C., the beloved husband of Grace E Ring, of Brinklow, Rugby, and eldest son of C. A. Ring, late R.N., of Pandora, Seaview, Isle of Wight—of pneumonia, aged 39.

ROBERTS.—On October 18, 1918, at King George’s Hospital, London, Pte. P. C. ROBERTS, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry ; died of wounds received in action in Italy, in his 28th war.
—Deeply mourned by his Sisters and Brothers.

IN MEMORIAM.

GARDNER.—In loving remembrance of our dear and only son, Pte CHARLES GARDNER, R.M.L.I., who died from wounds received in action in France on October 28, 1917.
—Ever remembered by his loving Mother & Father.

KNIGHT.—In unfading memory of FRED, the dearly beloved son of Thomas and Emily Knight, of Bourton, killed in action on October 23, 1918 ; aged 27 years.
“ At duty’s call he went to France ;
Like other lads to take his chance.
He fought for home and Country,
God knows he did his best,
And now he sleeps in Jesus,
A soldier laid to rest.”
—From sorrowing Father, Mother, Brothers, Sisters, and Gertie.

MARSH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. W. G. MARSH, who died in France on October 26, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost him :
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—From his loving friends, Mr. & Mrs. Underwood and Family.

PARKER.—In loving memory of EDWARD JOSEPH, the beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Parker, of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action on November 3, 1914.—At rest.—Not forgotten by Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

THOMAS.—In ever loving memory of our dear nephew, Pte. W. H. THOMAS (Willie), killed in action October 24, 1917.
—Never forgotten by Aunt Amy & Uncle Will.

 

26th Oct 1918. The Influenza Epidemic.

THE INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.

The Medical Officer of the Local Government Board has drawn up a Memorandum on Influenza, which is being circulated to local authorities. Emphasis is laid on the fact that control over the disease is only practicable by the active co-operation of each member of the community. This co-operation involves considerable self-denial on the part of affected persons.

Even experts find difficulty in defining influenza, and the medical profession is ignorant as to the causes which lead to the occasional world-wide spread of the disease, such as is now being experienced. The only safe rule is to regard all catarrhal attacks and every illness associated with rise of temperature during the prevalence of influenza as infectious, and to adopt appropriate precautionary measures. In present circumstances, to quote official advice, “ every patient who has a severe cold or fever should go to bed and stay there for three or four days.”

Unfortunately one attack of influenza does not confer any considerable immunity against repeated attack. Frequently the patient does not realise the serious nature of his illness for several days, and it is probable during the earlier stages that infection is chiefly spread. Compulsory notification is not regarded as likely to be of practical use in present circumstances.

RULES FOR PATIENTS.

The following measures for patients are officially recommended :—

Isolation.—If every person suffering from a fever, with or without catarrh, were willing and able to stay at home for a few days the spread of disease in factories and workshops, offices and shops, schools and other institutions would be greatly reduced.

Personal Precautions.—Avoid scattering infection in sneezing and coughing. Use a handkerchief to intercept drops of mucus ; the handkerchief should be boiled, or burnt if of paper. Expectoration should be received in a special receptacle, its contents being subsequently disinfected or burnt. General disinfection of premises after influenza is not required, but a thorough washing and cleaning of rooms and their contents and washing of articles of bedding or apparel is desirable.

Relapses—Influenza is very liable to relapse ; and pneumonia may occur as a late as well an early complication. Relapse is less likely if the patient goes to bed at once, and remains there till all fever has gone ; avoidance of chill or over-exertion during convalescence is also of great importance. The use of boracic and weak saline solution for frequent irrigation of the nasopharynx is recommended.

Nursing.—Satisfactory nursing is important in the prevention of complications and in aiding recovery from a severe attack.

A HEAVY DEATH-RATE.

Rugby, in common with the rest of the country, is in the grip of the influenza germ, and many hundreds of persons of all ages have affected. The epidemic is of a very virulent character, and in many cases has been followed by pneumonia. School children apparently fall easy victims to the germ, and so many little ones have been attacked that most of the schools in both Rugby and New Bilton have been closed.

The majority of Rugby doctors are away on active service, and those remaining in the town are working at exceptionally  high pressure ; and in several cases queues of people have formed up outside the surgery door. The shortage of nurses has also added to the difficulties in dealing with the epidemic, and on Wednesday an appeal was issued by the Urban District Council for voluntary helpers to undertake the duties of visiting the sick.

Since the outbreak assumed serious proportions—i.e, about October 14th, the death-rate of Rugby and New Bilton has been exceptionally high, and already eighteen deaths due to influenza and pneumonia have been recorded.

FUTURE FOOD SUPPLIES.
GREATER SELF DENIAL NEEDED.

All the informed opinion that can be tested agrees that the housewife’s difficulties may be even greater this winter than they were a year ago. Supplies, with care will be sufficient, but there will be nothing to spare. Meat will certainly be much scarcer, and the bread position is again causing anxiety. Up to the present we have avoided the rationing of bread in this country, and it is hoped that this state of things may continue. But that is by no means certain. Owing to bad weather, the yield of the home market has not come up to the expectations formed before it was gathered, and the statistics of consumption show a disquieting increase.

It must not be supposed because the War news is so good that our food difficulties are disappearing. Quite the contrary. There could be no improvement during this winter if the War were to end to-morrow, and those whose business it is to watch the situation all agree that there will be a world shortage of foodstuffs for at least two or three years after the War. Our position this winter is certainly no better, and will probably be worse, than that of last winter, and it will be much aggravated by the shortage of coal. We must try to get through this winter without calling on shipping at all for the importation of food. That is vital to the presence of such an overwhelming number of men of the Allied forces on the Continent by spring as will ensure the victorious and early end of the War. The men have to be brought across the Atlantic in ships, which cannot be used for other work at the same time. The warnings that economy in foodstuffs is necessary are very seriously meant.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sec Lieut Ernest Thompson, R.G.A, Siege Battery, eldest son of Mr Edward Thompson, Head Master of East Haddon School, died of wounds in France on October 16. He was educated at the Northampton County School, and won one of the first Northants County Council Scholarships at Cambridge, where he had a very successful career, and secured an Open Scholarship. Five years ago he was appointed to the Head Mastership of a Secondary School in Norfolk. He had only been in France a fortnight when news was received of his death.

We regret to announce the death in action on Oct 8th of 2nd Lieut T S Owen, son of Mr H Starr Owen, of Drayton, Wylde Green. Sec Lieut Owen come to Rugby as a member of the local staff of Lloyds Bank in 1905, and resided at “ Belgrave,” Clifton Road. He was an enthusiastic sportsman and a member of the Dunsmore Golf Club, St Andrew’s Tennis Club, and the Hockey Club. He joined the Rugby Howitzer Battery immediately on the outbreak of war, and proceeded with them to France. when he served for two years. He came home on sick leaves and on re-joining the forces he was given a commission and posted to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He had only been in France about three weeks before his death.

Driver Harold Fredk Flowers, Mechanical Transport eldest son of Mr E Flowers, Vicarage Hill, Clifton, died of sickness in hospital at Birmingham on October 18th. He was 25 years of age, and had been wounded twice. He formerly worked at the B.T.H.

Pte Charles Sanderson, of the K.O.S.B, son of Mrs Sanderson, of 50 Lawford Road, New Bilton, has been awarded the Military Medal for conspicuous bravery in the field. Pte Sanderson, before joining up, was in the employ of Messrs Parnell & Son for many years. He is serving in the K.O.S.B’s as a stretcher bearer.

Gunner A J Renshaw, late of the Howitzer Battery, is lying in hospital at Rouen dangerously wounded in both arms, both legs, and head. The left leg has been amputated. He has served 3½ years in France, and was with a Lancashire Battery  at the time of receiving his wounds. His relatives reside at 149 Oxford Street, Rugby.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Saturday last the members of the Co-operative Women’s Guild invited wounded soldiers to a tea and entertainment. About 100 were present, and spent a most enjoyable time. After tea the programme was sustained by local artistes, and also some of the guests. The whole concluded with a dance.—Wounded soldiers were also entertained at the Church House on Saturday by members of the Women Workers’ Federation.

RUGBY TOWN HOSPITAL.—The wounded soldiers greatly appreciate the kindness of the ladies and gentlemen who each week provide them with such excellent concerts. For the one on Saturday last they were indebted to Mr F Giggs, who is always a favourite with the boys ; the Misses Shillitoe, Mr A Woodhams, Pte Foster, and Pte Thornley. On Wednesday evening the programme was sustained by Mr J T Clarke and a party of friends from the Congregational Church.

ABSENTEES.—At the Police Court on Thursday (before Mr A E Donkin), George Henry Websdale was charged with being an absentee.—P.S Hawkes said defendant was employed by Broncho Bill’s Wild West Show, and when witness asked him if he had any papers to show why he was not in the Army, he produced a discharge certificate, which had been altered in several instances.—Remanded to Petty Sessions.—Robert Yelding, equestrian, employed by the same company, was also remanded after evidence had been given by P.C Bryan.—Archibald Somerville, Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders, and Driver Leonard Lee, 34 Sandown Road, Rugby, were also remanded to await escorts.

President Wilson has answered Germany in terms which completely clear the air. In effect, he offers her the alternatives, Fight or Surrender.

From Sunday. December 1st, until Saturday midnight, January 11th, all meat coupons will be available for the purchase of poultry—turkey or otherwise. A temporary rate of 3lbs of poultry per coupon has been fixed for this period, irrespective of the size of the bird.

NATIONAL SERVICE.—The boys of Elborow School have collected over 6cwt of blackberries, and have decided to hand over their earnings, which amount to £12, to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund.

SHAWELL.
A VERY successful whist drive was held in the School room on Friday, October 18th, to provide Christmas presents for the soldiers, when the sum of £22 was realised.

STOCKTON.
THREE TIMES TORPEDOED.—Capt Lloyd, of the Mercantile Marine, who now holds a commission in the Navy, son of a former churchwarden of Stockton, paid a visit to the village last week. Capt Lloyd has had his share of exciting experiences, having been torpedoed three times. On the last occasion was in the water nine hours before being picked up.—An interesting letter has been received from our schoolmaster, Mr E K Steventon, who is now in France with a heavy battery.—A card has been received from Ernest Bayliss, of whom nothing had been heard for some time, stating that he is a prisoner in Germany.

WOLSTON.
GERMAN TREATMENT OF WOUNDED.—An ex-prisoner of war, belonging to the Royal Warwicks, who is now in Switzerland, writes to a Wolston resident —“ I was operated on last Friday. They took four pieces of bone away from my arm. Of course, they have opened all my arm again now. It is a nice big hole, I can tell you, but it will soon get better here (Switzerland). The bone is all smashed, and is about 2ins out of place from the shoulder. I shall never believe that a bullet did it. I shall always think they (the Germans) did it to cripple me while I was in Germany. They are terribly cruel. You would not believe half what anybody could tell you. It is the dirtiest and most uncivilised country under the sun. They try to cripple as many Tommies as they can, but still we keep on smiling. They think nothing of cutting a fellow open at an operation, or even legs and arms off without giving anything. I have seen several fellows having their fingers off in this way. I have had several slashes with the knife, so I know what it feels like. The worst of it was they only used to dress us once every five or six days, and then only used paper bandages, which stuck to our wounds, and they never cleaned it off.”

BRANDON.
WOUNDED.—Mr & Mrs Edward Healey, of Brandon, have received news that their son, Pte Arthur L Healey, has been wounded by a bullet in the left knee. He is making a good recovery.

WILLOUGHBY.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—News has been received of the death in action on October 3rd of Rifleman W B Hakesley, of the 15th Royal Irish Rifles, son of Mr and Mrs G Hakesley. Deceased joined up in 1915, and this was  his third visit to the front, where he had been gassed once and wounded twice. He was killed instantaneously by a piece of shell. Deep sympathy is felt for his bereaved parents and friends. The Captain of his Company writes expressing their sorrow at losing so good a comrade.—Mr A Drinkwater has received also official news that his son, Corporal Howard Drinkwater, was killed in action on September 29th. He joined up in 1915, and did duty at the Dardanelles. From thence he went to Egypt, where he did duty until June of this year, and on coming across on his first leave the ship he was on, Leo Castle, was torpedoed. After having his leave he returned to France, and the first time he went into action he was killed instantaneously by an H.E shell. The Sergeant of his section writes: “ He was in command of a gun and team of five men: We had taken up our position during the night of the 28th and 29th, and dug ourselves in, a few shells falling around us at the time. This continued all the day (the 29th). The shell, an H.E, dropped right in his trench amongst six of them, killing three and wounding three, about 2.30 p.m. All the boys wish to express their deepest sympathy with you in your great loss. Your son was so bright and cheery. I was thinking myself lucky when he was posted to my section, and I feel his loss very much.”

BRETFORD.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mrs. W Clarke received news in March that her husband, Pte Wm Clarke, was missing. She has now received a letter from Pte A R Harrison, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, whose home is at Leamington, stating that he saw him killed at Fayet near St Quentin. He was badly gassed in the morning, and later in the day he saw him killed by a bullet. Pte Clarke, before joining the Army in June, 1916, was an employee at Messrs Bluemel’s Works, Wolston, for many years. He proceeded to the front in September, 1916, and saw much fighting until invalided home with dysentry in 1917. As soon as he was convalescent he returned to France. Deceased was very much respected by the inhabitants of Bretford. He leaves a widow and four children. His parents are well-known inhabitants of Wolston.—News has reached Bretford that Pte F Huby died in hospital at Newcastle-on-Tyne last week. Deceased was a cousin of the late Pte W Clarke, with whom he resided at Bretford before the War. As soon as hostilities broke out deceased volunteered for active service, but was rejected owing to chest measurement. He tried a second time, but with the same result, but was eventually accepted under the Derby Scheme. He enlisted in May, 1916, in the 7th Royal Warwicks, and went over to France in the following August. He soon met with disaster, being buried in a trench, from which he was rescued with difficulty. He was sent home with dysentry and shell shook at the end of the year. Deceased was about to embark again when illness supervened, and paralysis set in. His death was caused from shell shock and exposure. He was a liberal subscriber to several war charities before going out, and was well liked by all who knew him. In civil life he was a clerk at Coventry Ordnance. His funeral took place at Leicester, where he was buried with full military honours.

DEATHS.

ENSOR.— Killed in action on September 21st, ERNEST JAMES, third son of William and Emily Ensor and beloved husband of Agnes Ensor, of 41 Highbury Place, London, N. ; aged 27. Also in loving memory of WILLIAM ALFRED, second son of the above, killed in October, 1916. “ Farewell, loved ones, until the morning.”

FLOWER.—In loving memory of Pte. H. F. FLOWER, who died in Birmingham Military Hospital on October 18th, 1918, eldest son of Mr. E. Flower, 18 Vicarage Hill, Clifton, aged 25 years.

OWEN.—Killed in action, on 8th inst., 2nd Lieut. T. S. OWEN, Royal Welsh Fusiliers (formerly of Lloyd’s Bank, Rugby), son of H. Starr Owen, of Drayton, Wylde Green.

RIDOUT.—At Anstruther Farm, Anstruther, on October 12th, the residence of his sister, WILLIAM RIDOUT, aged 28, late Sergeant, 10th Batt., R.W.R., late of Dunchurch.

SARGENT.—In loving memory of Pte. A. H. SARGENT, Barby, of the D.C.L.I., killed in action on October 23rd in France.
“ We loved him in life, and we love him still ;
But in grief we must bend to God ? Holy Will.”
— From his Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. ERNEST ANDREW BATCHELOR, of 10th Worcesters Regt., killed in action on October 24, 1916, aged 29 years.
“ God knows how much we miss him,
More than loving words can tell.
Not a day have we forgotten him
Since he bade us his last farewell.
Daily in our minds we miss him
As we did in days of yore,
But some day we hope to meet him
On that bright and golden shore.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

BEASLEY.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. CLEMENT FELL BEASLEY, Rose Cottage, Napton, of the 14th R.W.R., who was killed in action east of Gheluvelt, near Ypres, October 26, 1917.
“ One year has passed since that sad day
When he we loved was called away.
A loving son and faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered Duty’s call,
And gave his young life for one and all.
Some may think that we forget him
When at times they see us smile,
But they little know the sorrow
Which is hid behind that smile.
He is gone but not forgotten—
Oh dear. no ! not one so dear.
He is gone safe home to Heaven,
And we hope to meet him there.”
—From his ever loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

BEASLEY.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. C. BEASLEY, killed in action “ somewhere in France,” October 26, 1917.
“ When last they saw his smiling face
He looked so strong and brave ;
He little thought how soon he’d be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.”
—From Horace, Alice, and his niece Mary.

BEASLEY.—In fond and ever-loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. C. BEASLEY, killed in action on October 26, 1917 ; aged 27 years.
“ A day of remembrance sad to recall :
The loss of our dear one, loved by us all.
We think of him in silence, and his name we oft recall,
But there is nothing left but his photo on the wall.
Fondly we loved him, he is as dear to us still ;
But in grief we must bend to God’s Holy Will.
If we could have raised his dying head or heard his last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard for us that loved him well.”
—From his sorrowing sister Nance, brother Albert in Germany, and his two little Nephews.

COLLINS.—In ever loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. W. COLLINS, who was killed in action in France on October 26, 1917, aged 29 years.
“ We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand,
But God postponed it otherwise,
Till we meet in the promised land.”
—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, Brother and Sisters, of 45 New St., New Bilton.

DUCKETT.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. TOM F. DUCKETT, who was killed in action somewhere in France on October 26, 1917.
“ One year has passed, but oh, I miss him ;
Some may think the wound has healed,
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within my heart concealed.”
A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of very last towards his mother.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving mother, and brother Charlie.

FRENCH.—In loving memory of my late husband, Pte. J. FRENCH, R.W.R., of Long Itchington, who was killed in action on October 26, 1917.
“ When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
He did his best for one and all,
And those who loved him well.”
— From his loving Wife and Children and Mother and Father.

GOODWIN.—In loving memory of Pte. ALBERT GOODWIN, aged 21 years, of B Company, 2nd Royal Warwicks, who was killed somewhere in France on or about October 24, 1914, eldest son of Ex-P.S. Goodwin.
—Sadly missed by his loving Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

HARDMAN.—In loving memory of Pte. W. HARDMAN, of the 15th R.W.R., of 9 James Street, who died of wounds received in action on October 28th, 1917. Interred in the Military Cemetery, Poperinghe, France.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost him,
Just a year ago.
Too far away thy grave to see.
But not too far to think of thee.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

MILLS.—In loving memory of Bombardier J. M. MILLS, of the R.F.A (of Marton), killed in action on October 23, 1917.
“ Days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you ;
Just a year ago.
Too far, dear Mawby, thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters, and godson, Little Bertie.

MILLS.—In memory of comrade and friend, No 11685 Bombardier J. M. MILLS, R.F.A., killed in action in Flanders on October 23, 1917.—11688 Corpl. A. E. Clarke, R.F.A., B.E.F.