16th Mar 1918. The Advertiser Passing on Scheme Works Smoothly


We should like to take this opportunity of thanking our readers for the generous way in which they received the suggestion we made last week with regard to sharing copies of the Advertiser with their friends, and for the wholehearted co-operation of a very large number in giving effect to it ; and in this acknowledgment we desire to include our agents who are giving their loyal assistance in the practical working of the idea.

It may be useful to again remind all concerned that the object of the drastic reduction of paper supplies by the Government is to limit the importation of pulp and other materials from which news-paper is made in order to release shipping for the conveyance of food to our shores, and other purposes vital to the carrying on of the war. To make one copy of the paper serve as many readers as possible is, therefore, a distinctly patriotic action.

Our sincere apologies are due to our readers for so much space in our last issue being taken by advertisements and official notices. The change we had to make came upon us so suddenly that we had no time to re-arrange our advertising contracts, but we are now taking steps to ration the space allotted to this class of matter, as well as our output of papers.

It should not, however, be forgotten that a medium like the Advertiser for making public one’s announcements is of national importance to the commercial and social life of the community. This applies especially to auctioneers’ announcements of agricultural sales, which this time of the year are always very numerous.

Then, too, space must be found for official announcements, and we were further handicapped last week by a heavy demand upon our already crowded columns by a lengthy notice under “ The Representation of the People Act,” which it was necessary to insert on that date.

Advertisements are generally read with interest, but our readers may feel assured that we shall do our best to keep them within reasonable limits, and that all important happenings in the town and district will be duly recorded in the Advertiser as heretofore.


The first general meeting of shareholders of the Warwickshire Fruit and Vegetable Collecting Society Ltd (registered under the Industrial and Provident Societies’ Act), was held at the County Hall, Warwick, last week. The primary business was to amend and pass the rules of the society. The report of the Provisional Committee was then read and adopted. Great interest was shown in the progress made towards establishing branch depots in the rural districts for the collection and marketing of surplus produce from cottage gardeners and allotment holders. It is probable that the neighbourhoods of Warwick, Rugby, Solihull, and Brailes will be the first to benefit under the scheme, and that the method of working these depots will be the same as those already found successful at Stratford-on-Avon, where a pioneer collecting and marketing depot was established last summer. The report of the Provisional Committee showed that already 6,63l shares had been applied for. The Provisional Committee was elected en bloc, with power to add to their number, as the Committee of the Warwickshire Fruit ans Vegetable Collecting Society. They comprise : Lord Leigh, Lady Ilkeston, Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, Mrs Arkwright, Mrs Melville, Mr A Allsebrook, Mr F Quartley, Mr J James, Mr H C Smith, Mr A Trafford. and Miss C Margesson.


During the past few weeks the food problem has been much easier locally, and most people have been able to obtain provisions of one kind or another. The usual quantity of stock was sent to the Cattle Market on Monday ; and although the local butchers failed to secure their full quota of beef, mutton was fairly plentiful. Since Monday several beasts have been sent to the local butchers, so that there is every prospect of householders obtaining fair supplies this week-end.

The quantity of cheese has been very limited of late, but it is hoped that this state of affairs will now rapidly improve.


Held at Rugby on Friday test week, before Messrs E M G Carmichael (chairman), J Findlay (assessor for the employers), and E G Evans (workmen’s assessor).

R. J. Skinner, 83 Abbey Street, pleaded not guilty to refusing to leave the workshop while the worse for liquor and creating a disturbance by persisting in remaining until he was ultimately carried out.—The foreman stated that on February 15th defendant was ordered to come back at seven o’clock and work all night. He did not turn up at seven o’clock, and at 10.15, while witness was at supper, he was fetched to Skinner, whom he found lying in the balance pit. Witness roused him, and he then appeared to be dazed. Witness told him he had better go home and come in in the morning, but he was mad drunk and commenced to use filthy language. He picked a hammer up and said, “ I will smash your brains out if you give me the sack.” Defendant produced a bottle of beer, and after drinking the beer he smashed the bottle on the wall. As witness could not persuade him to go home, he sent for the watchman.—Defendant : Perhaps he is the bloke who knocked me about.—Witness added that the watchman tried to persuade defendant to leave but he took his coat off and threatened to fight. They had to send for another watchman, and in the end to carry him out.—Defendant stated that he had been on the premises a quarter of an hour before he was accused of being drunk, and he also contended that he was entitled to sleep from 10 till 11, and should not have been disturbed—The night watchman deposed that defendant was very drunk and kept the other men from working. After he was put out he tried to get back, and was swearing and raving near the gate till two o’clock in the morning.—This was corroborated by another witness.—Defendant said the reason he would not go away was that someone said, “ Put him out.” He replied, “ There is not one amongst you can put me out.” They then started upon him and knocked him about.—In reply to the Chairman, he said he had been in the Army, and had been wounded and blown up. He had not been discharged, but lent to the firm.—The representative of the firm stated that Skinner had asked to be returned to the Colours. They had done so, and at the same time they sent a copy of the report to the Ministry of Munitions. He was a skilled fitter, and served his apprenticeship with them. They were very sorry the affair had happened, but defendant held up the whole shop.—Fined 60s in one case, and the other adjourned.

G Bailey, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, was summoned for sleeping during working hours.—It was stated that defendant was found lying on a table in the winding department fast asleep. The man who worked with him had complained that he had to do most of the work, and the foreman had remonstrated with him on the matter.—Defendant said he had a pain in his stomach ; he laid down to ease it, and he dropped off to sleep. He contended that he had always done his fair share of work.—Adjourned till May 17th.


Mr D H Hefford, stepson of Mr W F Wood, has recently been gazetted Second-Lieutenant and attached to the 5th Battalion Worcestershire Regiment.

Mr Arthur Morson (clerk to the Rugby Urban Council) and Mr A H Moseley (formerly of Rugby) attended an Investiture by the King of the Order of the British Empire at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday last.


Pte P Mace, 2nd Oxford and Bucks L.I, of Hillmorton, who was recently transferred from his internment camp in Germany to Murren, Switzerland, writes : “ I can assure you it is quite a relief to be away from that wretched barbed wire. Everything here is so different to what it used to be in Germany. There you had a snarling Hun and a rifle following you everywhere.” After expressing his thanks for the splendid parcels sent to him, he adds : “ I suppose you know that all we have to live on was what you kind people sent from England. . . .”

Sergt Walter Kempton, Rifle Brigade, of Rugby, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany for exactly 3½ years, has been transferred to Holland. For 2½ years food parcels and bread have been regularly despatched to Sergt Kempton through the Rugby Committee, and grateful letters of thanks have been received from him.

A Dunchurch man, Rifleman W Pearce, K.R.R.C, who is a prisoner of war at Cassel, has this week been added to the Rugby list. Arrangements have been made for the regular despatch of his food parcels.

A PIONEER AVIATOR.—One of our village lads, Joseph Henry Dell, though barely 17 years old, joined the R.F.C. nine weeks ago as a fitter. On Saturday last he ess[?]yed his first aerial voyage, and writes in glowing terms of his experiences. With Dell on board as his passenger, the pilot flew some 70 miles at a height of 2,000ft. and while in the air looped the loop twice and performed other revolutions. The embryo airman [illegeable] writes :—“ It made me feel nervous for a while, being so young, but I enjoyed it afterwards.”


A EWE belonging to Mrs Cosby, the Lodge Farm, has given birth to three fine lambs ; and Mr W Harker, Bilton Grange Farm, has a ewe which has followed suit.

DURING the last few weeks collections of eggs for the use of hospitals and the wounded soldiers have been made by the scholars. The boys collected no fewer than 335, and the girls and infants about 100—a splendid result, of which Dunchurch Schools may be proud.

THE COMMITTEE OF THE NURSING ASSOCIATION are very glad to state that Nurse Ridout having completed her training and successfully passed her examination in London, has returned to take up her duties as district nurse. She is most highly recommended by the matron under whom she has trained.


SERIOUS DAMAGE BY A BOY.—At the Daventry Divisional Children’s Court on Tuesday, Walter Ernest West, aged 15, of Watford, was charged with maliciously maiming a bullock, the property of Wm Cullen, of Ashby St Ledgers. He inflicted such injuries with a stick that the bowels of the bullock were perforated, and it had to be slaughtered.—The father was ordered to whip the boy in the presence of the police, and also to pay a fine of £5 inflicted on the boy.


MR & MRS THOMAS BONEHAM, of Bretford, have been notified that their son, Francis Wm Boneham (Dorsets), has been wounded.

£45,000 AIMED AT—£85,000 RAISED.

As was anticipated, Rugby played up well towards the end of last week. The £45,000 aimed at was easily surpassed, and when the list was closed on Saturday evening the amount reached was £75,000. Two other sums of £5,000 each arrived on Monday, thus bringing the total up to £85,000, or nearly double the figure required for the purchase of a squadron of aeroplanes, which was the object in view.

Satisfactory as this result was, however, there is little doubt but that, had the committee had longer notice, a considerably higher figure could have been fixed up ; and, in view of Rugby’s past achievements, this would, doubtless, have been forthcoming.

The suits on the first three days were very meagre, but on Thursday things began to improve, and a total of £19,921 was realised on that day ; Friday’s total was £29,965, and Saturday’s £20,431. Of the £85,000 subscribed £73,800 was invested in War Bonds and £11,000 in War Savings Certificates.


SIR,—I am glad to see that attention has been drawn by a letter in your last issue to the growing nuisance in Rugby of scribbling with chalk upon wills and gates, and even on the doors of private houses. Quite apart from the more seriously objectionable nature of some of the writings and drawings, such disfigurement of our streets is a very great eyesore, and a source of annoyance to the more respectable inhabitants. Moreover, it is a step towards the hooliganism which is filling our principal streets any evening with yells and shrieks and forms of rowdiness on the part of youths and girls—suggesting pandemonium itself, and bringing discredit to our town in the eyes of visitors from elsewhere. Cannot the teachers in our elementary schools add their already valuable services by organising a crusade against this undesirable state of affairs, and so obviate the possible necessity of police action ?

I am, Sir, yours faithfully,


GIDDINGS.—In loving memory of Corpl. A. GIDDINGS, Hillmorton, who was killed in action on March 11, 1915.—Not forgotten by his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

SKINNER.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. G. SKINNER, 19th Canadians, who was killed in Belgium on March 15, 1916.
“ I do not forget him, nor do I intend ;
I think of him daily and will till the end.
I miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—From his loving wife, Charlotte.

STEEL.—In loving memory of our dear son, EDWARD, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on March 16, 1915.
“ It’s hard, dear son, to lose you,
Who have filled your place so well ;
May God above now repay you
For your acts which but Him can tell.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers & Sister.




9th Mar 1918. The Paper Famine – Share Your Advertiser with Others


It is a very unusual experience in the history of a local newspaper to have to stem the tide of an increasing circulation, and our readers may feel assured it goes very much against the grain of the proprietors of the Advertiser to announce that, owing to further drastic reductions in the weight of paper they are allowed by the Government to purchase, it is impossible to satisfy the increasing demand for copies of the paper. We are rationing the supplies sent out to our agents, and it may be the increase of the price of the paper to 2d, which we find it necessary to adopt with this issue because of the enormous advance in the cost of production, will automatically assist them in the difficult task of apportioning the papers they have for sale satisfactorily among their customers.

Some will certainly have to go without—particularly those who have been in the habit of making casual purchases ; others will voluntarily relinquish the paper for the time being, but it does not follow that the actual number of readers need be reduced. On the contrary, we do not wish our friends to sever their association with their favourite journal altogether. If will be quite possible and easy for relatives or neighbours to arrange to make one copy serve for two or more households, and this is a system which “ The Times ” (London) proposes to force upon its patrons if the rationing system which they, like the Advertiser, have been compelled to adopt, does not limit the demand sufficiently. They intimate that in such an event they will only supply those people who will agree to share their copies with others.

For our part we prefer to rely upon the indulgence and voluntary co-operation of our readers to assist us in tiding over this unprecedented crisis, which we hope will only be temporary.

We have no doubt the agents for the Advertiser will be glad to assist in such a scheme by re-purchasing papers and passing them on to others who cannot otherwise be supplied. On our part, we are prepared to do this by purchasing at a penny each, clean copies brought to the Advertiser Office while it is open from 9 a.m till mid-day on Saturdays ; and in this way it should still be possible for a great many to have an opportunity peruse the Advertiser at no greater cost than before.

Newspapers are recognised as a national necessity, but further tonnage has to be saved, and food and the raw materials for munitions must come first. It is urgently necessary to release more tonnage for food supplies, and for that reason paper imports have had to be cut down.


The National Food Rationing Scheme, which was to have come into force on March 25th, has been postponed a fortnight—to April 7th. But there are certain duties to be performed by the people as a preliminary to getting their cards, and all applications for food cards must be in by to-day (Saturday). In our advertisement columns will be found the official time table relating to these duties, which must be strictly observed.


We understand the Warwickshire Agricultural Committee are, under the powers given to them, entering upon four farms in the vicinity of Knightlow Hill for the purpose of seeing that they are properly cultivated. The occupiers have had to turn out at a month’s notice.


In several districts, including Birmingham, credence appears still to be given by a few people in the recent rumour that the Food Controller would take over compulsorily the produce of allotments and gardens this year. Three weeks ago the Food Production Department denied the truth of this rumour, and stated that there was no foundation for it whatever. A fortnight ago the Department renewed this assurance, and it now emphasises the denial in view of the persistence of the rumour.


At the weekly meeting on Thursday in last week there were present : Mr H Tarbox (chairman), Rev R S Mitchison, Mrs Draper, Mrs Neilson, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Townsend, Mrs Peet, Messrs   J C Harrison, W Woodward, A Appleby, J Cripps, A T Watson, and T E Smart.

It was reported that 200 lbs of sugar had been deducted from the monthly allotment in respect of a school, the housekeeper of which had reported having this quantity left over from the amount alloted them for jam-making last year.

A long discussion took place as to the system by which the new sets of sugar coupons were being issued by the Postal Authorities.—It was stated that some the sub-postmasters in the district had received books of coupons, but no instructions as to how they were to be issued, and in some cases they were being handed out without regard to the question of whether the first set of coupons had been issued.—The Executive Officer was directed to write to the Postmaster, and ask that proper instructions be given to sub-postmasters in the district.

The Executive Officer read a letter from the Ministry of Food, stating that the position with regard to cheese will improve rapidly within the next two months.

The Executive Officer reported that Mr J T Clarke had been appointed to take charge of the preliminary arrangements for the rationing scheme. The period of his employment would be six weeks, and the salary £3 weekly.

This being the last meeting of the committee as then constituted, the Chairman briefly thanked the retiring members for their assistance, and also expressed his gratitude to the committee as a whole for the manner in which they had applied themselves to their duties. He mentioned that it was unique for the sole representative of organised labour to be elected chairman, and he was very grateful for the support they had accorded him.—On the motion of the Rev R S Mitchison, seconded by Mr Smart, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded Mr Tarbox for his services as chairman.


Lance-Corpl G S Taylor (OL), of the 1st H.A.C, has been given a commission in that regiment.

In the Ministry of Munitions Estimates an extra grant is included of £300 a year to the widow and children of the late Mr L S Robertson, formerly a Director of Messrs Willans and Robinson, who was drowned with Lord Kitchener when the “ Hampshire ” was torpedoed.

News has come to hand that Acting-Sergt T G H Buxton, A.T.C, R.E, has been mentioned in despatches, and promoted to the rank of Second-Lieutenant. His home is at 10 Frederick Street, Rugby. He joined up in May, 1915, and has been serving in Egypt two years.

Pte H Addison, 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was posted as missing on May 13th last, has now been reported to have been killed in action on that date. Prior to enlisting he was employed in the B.T.H Lamp Works.

Corpl A E Lamb, 18th Middlesex Regt, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field. Corpl Lamb has seen service in China and South Africa during his twelve years with the colours. He was employed in the B.T.H controlling department previous to his joining up at Rugby in November, 1915.


THE death of Lance-Corpl W A Blockley, D.C.L.I, took place at Fargo Military Hospital, Salisbury Plain, on February 27th. The remains were interred at Hillmorton on the 3rd Inst, with military honours, a party from Budbroke being sent at the instigation of Col Johnstone. There were many wreaths, and a large number of parishioners paid their last tribute of respect. Before joining the Army he was in the employ of a firm of chemists in Rugby. By his perseverance he gained the confidence of his employers, and was soon promoted to the position of assistant. He was the chairman of the Junior League of the Conservative Club. He joined up in December, 1916, and soon gained promotion, but his health began to fail, and consumption developed. He leaves a widow and two children. The widow desires to thank all who have so kindly shown sympathy in her sad bereavement.


WAR SAVINGS.—Since its formation m January. 1917, the Harborough War Savings Association has purchased 482 15s 6d certificates.

SAPPER R BAYNES, whose parents live in this village, asks us to state that he is conversant with most of the burial grounds on the Somme, and if any relatives of soldiers who have fallen and have been buried in any of the cemeteries out there will communicate with him he will take the first opportunity of visiting the graves indicated to see if they are being attended to.


To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,—I would like to be allowed to protest vigorously against the growing nuisance of marking and writing with chalk on hoardings and walls in the town. Some of it may be done by thoughtless schoolboys, but more appears to be the work of youths of low and degraded intelligence, and is both disgraceful and disgusting. It is sad to think that when England should be striving to aspire to a purer life and service of God the young people can find no better thoughts or occupation than this.—Yours faithfully.


The death look place, at the Rugby Institution Infirmary, on Saturday, of Thomas Brown, of Lawrence Sheriffe Almshouses. He was 82 years of age, and was born near Watlington, Oxfordshire. As a young man he joined the 16th Army Battalion of the Oxfordshire Regiment, and served in the Crimea War, subsequently leaving the Army with the rank of corporal. He was very reticent concerning his early days, and left no record of the engagements in which he participated, although on occasions he favoured his personal friends with accounts of the terrible experiences through which our soldiers passed in the dark days of that war. He came to Rugby about 40 years ago, and was well known as a jobbing gardener.

The funeral took place with military honours on Wednesday afternoon, and was witnessed by a large crowd of sightseers. A firing party from Budbroke attended, together with a detachment from the Rugby Company of the Volunteer Corps, under Capt C H Fuller. The deceased was a member of the Salvation Army, and the local band attended and played the “ Dead March ” on the way to the cemetery, and also led the singing of the hymns, “ O God, our help in ages past,” and “ Rock of ages ” at the graveside, where the service was conducted Major Vickers, of Northampton, assisted by Adjutant Tickner. The Rugby Board of Guardians was represented by Messrs J W Pendred, W Dickens, Mrs Dickens, and Nurse Gordon, and amongst others present were several old soldiers, including Lance-Corpl Joe Norman, late R.F.A, another veteran, who also served through the Crimean War.


BENCH.—In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, Pte J. BENCH, who passed away in a hospital at Puchevillers, France, on March 5, 1917.
“ He left us and home like a soldier brave,
Wounded though he had been ;
But now he lies in a warrior’s grave,
Dearest Joe, we should loved to have seen.
It breaks our hearts to think of him,
Of how our boy has died ;
Not one of us went near him,
Not even by his side.
And yet some time there’ll come a day
When our loved ones we shall meet,
To be together for ever and aye,
Kneeling Jesus’ feet.”
—From his loving Father, Sisters and Brothers.

FIDLER.—In loving memory of W. G. FIDLER, who died March 7, 1916, in France.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from his friends who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Father and Mother.

FIDLER.—In loving memory of my dear brother, Pte. W. G. FIDLER, of Harborough Magna, who was accidentally killed in France on March 7, 1916.
“ Rest on, dear brother, in a far-off grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From your loving sister, Nell.

REEVE.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR KIMBELL REEVE, Royal Berkshire Regiment, who died in Queen Alexandra Hospital, Dunkirk, France, on March 4th, 1917.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again.
Here life to me without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could I have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For me who loves you well.”
—Sadly missed by his sorrowing Wife & Daughters.

REEVE.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. ARTHUR KIMBELL REEVE, who died in France on March 4th, 1917.
“ One year has passed since that sad day,
When one we loved was called away.
God took him home, it was His will,
But in our hearts he liveth still.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

2nd Mar 1918. Food must not be Wasted


Under the Waste of Foodstuffs Order, 1918, which came into force on Monday, it is an offence for a person to waste any foodstuffs or permit it to be wasted.

The definition of waste is given as follows :—

(a) Whenever the foodstuff, being fit for use in human food, is wilfully or negligently damaged or is thrown away ; or

(b) Whenever any person having the control or custody of the foodstuffs omits to take any precaution which ought reasonably to be taken for its preservation ; or

(c) Whenever a person procures for any purpose a greater quantity of foodstuff than is reasonably required for such purpose, and any part of such foodstuff becomes unfit for human food ; or

(d) Whenever any person having the disposal of the foodstuff unreasonably retains the same undisposed of until the same becomes unfit for human food.

An exception is made in the case of trade waste not arising from want of due care, where the trader has been ready to sell foodstuff at reasonable prices, and could not reasonably have made it available for human food otherwise than by way of sale.

Any person authorised in writing by the Food Controller may enter premises where he has reason to believe that foodstuff is being wasted and may take samples.


The Food Distribution Scheme now being set on foot in the above Districts will come into force on MONDAY, 25th MARCH NEXT.

The Foodstuffs to be first rationed will be Butter, Margarine, Tea. and Meat.

Ration Cards will be issued, one for Butter, Margarine, and Tea, and one for Meat.

Forms of application are now being delivered through the Post Office to every house in the district, and it is hoped that the delivery of these will be completed this week. The following is a table of dates which everyone must keep carefully in mind, as it is essential to the smooth working of the Scheme that the dates shall be strictly adhered to:—

WEDNESDAY, 6th MARCH.— Last day for receiving Shopkeepers’ Applications for Registration as Retailers.

SATURDAY, 9th MARCH.— Last day for receiving applications from the Public for Food Cards.

Do.     Do.            Last day for receiving applications from Caterers and Institutions for Authorities to obtain supplies.

THURSDAY, 14th MARCH.— Last day for Public to lodge their Food Cards with their chosen Retailers.

FRIDAY, 15th MARCH.— Last day for Caterers and Institutions to lodge their Authorities with Retailers.

SATURDAY, 16th MARCH.— Last day for receiving Retailers’ Returns of Individual Cards and Caterers and Institutions Authorities lodged with them.


An Enquiry Office for the Rationing Section has been opened at Benn Buildings, Rugby,

where all information may be obtained.

F. M. BURTON, FREDK. FELLOWS. ) Executive Officers.
Food Office, Rugby, 28th February, 1918.


In the “ London Gazette ” of February 18th the following appeared :—
Awarded bar to Military Cross, Capt Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, M.C, R.A.M.C ; M.C gazetted 25th November, 1916.

Capt Townsend (son of Mr T S Townsend, of Clifton Manor) has been serving in France since 1915. He is regimental surgeon to the 20th London Regiment.

SOLDIER’S WEDDING.—On Saturday a very pretty wedding took place at St. Peter’s Church between Sergt C A Carter, R.F.A, nephew of Mr & Mrs G East, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, and Miss Allen, of Grosvenor Road, Rugby. The Rev — Perry officiated,and the bride was given away by her father. Her two sisters were bridesmaids, and her youngest brother was best man. The guests numbered between 30 and 40, and there were many handsome presents. Sergt Carter has been in the Army nine years, and has been in the fighting ever since the War began. He wears the bronze star. He goes to back to the front again to-day (Saturday), and leaves Dunchurch with the best wishes of the parishioners.

There are now


Six Standard Food Parcels, of an average gross weight of 10lbs, each parcel are sent to every man in the course of every four weeks, in addition to 26 lbs. of Bread.

The cost to provide for the 72 local men is now


Are you helping to provide for our own Men ?

The poor boys count on the parcels, not merely as a means of keeping body and soul together, but as the break in the monotony of their prison life, which saves them from unutterable despair.

Proofs of this are abundant in the assurances of exchanged prisoners that the parcels stood between them and starvation, and they speak not only for themselves but for their comrades who are still in captivity.

DONATIONS or promises of regular or Monthly subscriptions, which will be gladly acknowledged, should be sent to


Hon. Organising Secretary,


9, REGENT STREET, RUGBY (Registered War Charity).

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—At the last meeting of the Urban District Council a was expressed that a Roll of Honour to the memory of those men of Rugby who have, during the present terrible war, made the great sacrifice in their countries cause, should be compiled. The Council are very anxious and desirous of carrying out this object, but to enable them to do so it is necessary to prepare a list of all the men so far as can be ascertained. May I appeal through your columns to the relatives of all our Rugby men who have given up their lives in the noble cause, to send their full names, together with their rank and the Navel or Military unit to which they belonged, to me, so that the Council may be in possession without delay of as accurate a list of Rugbians as is possible.—Yours faithfully,

ARTHUR MORSON, Clerk of the Council.


CHEDGEY.—On February 23rd, ROBERT EDWIN CHEDGEY, officer’s steward, H.M. Destroyer “ Norman,” lost overboard and drowned at sea ; third son of Mr. & Mrs. Chedgey, Bitteswell, Lutterworth ; aged 23 years.


HEWITT.—In loving memory of ELLIS JOHN (JACK), youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Hewitt, 42 Dunchurch Road, Rugby, who was killed in action on February 27, 1917.—Not forgotten by his loving Mother, Dad, and Brother.

PRATT.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. F. PRATT, of the 6th Oxford and Bucks L.I., (New Bilton), who died of wounds on March 1, 1917, in France.—Still sadly missed by his loving Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers.





23rd Feb 1918. Local Elections Postponed


A memorandum issued by the Local Government Board to local authorities points out that the Parliament and Local Elections (No. 2) Act which received the Royal Assent last November, provides that the next statutory elections of county and borough councillors, district councillors, guardians, and parish councillors, which would ordinarily take place in March and April, shall be postponed, or in the case of elections already postponed under previous Acts further postponed for a year, and that accordingly the term of office of the existing councillors and guardians shall be extended by one year.

Having regard to the importance of economy in paper, it is desirable that local authorities in any notices, &c, which are issued by them should use as little paper as possible by, for instance, having the matter printed on both sides of a sheet and in as small a type as is convenient. Small envelopes should also be used whenever practicable.

THE DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS PRODUCE.—A Fruit and Vegetable Collecting Society has recently been formed in the county for assisting small growers to dispose of their surplus garden produce. In connection with this local branches or depots will be formed in various parts of the county, and it is hoped that a branch will be started for the Rugby Rural District. Each branch depot will have to employ a local manager, whose duty will be to collect, pack, market, and consign the produce, and a minimum profit of 15 per cent. will be aimed at in all transactions. The nett profits will be used first to pay dividend on the share capital of the society and a bonus will be paid to the members in proportion to the amount of business done through the society. A general manager will be appointed by the County Society to assist local branches with advice or by finding markets for produce.


At a meeting of the Joint Urban and Rural Food Control Committees, on Monday, Mrs Dewar asked if the period of the temporary margarine rationing scheme would be extended ?—Mr F M Burton replied that when they fixed the period of the temporary scheme at four weeks they had hoped that by the end of that time the permanent scheme would be in operation. Unfortunately, however, this would not be the case, and he had discussed the matter with Mr Fellows, as a result of which asked for power to have a further supply of coupons printed. These would be sent round to the tradesmen, who would issue them to the people when they lodged their last coupons with them. He thought it would take a month or six weeks to get the scheme in force.—This was agreed to.


The Director of Sugar Distribution, on behalf of the Food Controller, wishes it to be understood that sugar proved to have been saved from weekly rations will not be regarded as hoarded, and that if the purpose of this saving is for jam-making it is immaterial whether the fruit to be preserved is grown or purchased by the preserver.

COVENTRY’S TANK TOTAL.—The official return of Coventry Tank Week is £1,370,236, representing £10 10s 9d per head of the census population of 130,000. A feature of the week’s subscription is the huge issue of 15s 6d certificates through the Post Office. There were 155,907 transactions, representing £120,827. The Bank of England section of the Tank took £775,265.


At a largely attended meeting of the M.F.H Association, held at Tattersall’s, Knightsbridge, London, on Thursday, February 14th, it was unanimously resolved :— “ That owing to the short supply of cereals and to assist in economising the stock of provender in the country, this meeting of the Masters of Foxhounds’ Association has voluntarily agreed to stop hunting on Saturday, March 2nd, for this season.”


Summer-time (putting the clock on an hour) is to begin on Sunday, March 24, a fortnight earlier than last year, and to end on September 29, three weeks later than last year.


The parents of Rifleman Leonard Thompson, Rifle Brigade, who reside at 12 Union Street, have received official intimation that their son, who has been missing since May 3rd last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was only 19 years of age, and was an old St Matthew’s boy.

Mr R E Driver, 137 Newbold Road, has received official notice from the War Office that his son, J C Driver, Air Mechanic, Royal Flying Corps, who has been missing since December 31st, is now believed drowned on the occasion of the sinking of the Osmanieh in the Eastern Mediterranean. Before joining up he was employed in the L & N-W Railway Loco Department, and was a general favourite with his shopmates. He was an old Elborow boy.


PTE F BLACKMAN WINS MILITARY MEDAL.—Pte F Blackman (of the 29th Division, Essex Regiment) has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the field on the 20th-22nd November, 1917. His name and deeds have been entered in the records of the 29th Division. Pte Blackman is a son-in-law of Mr Horace Amos, of Brandon, and for several years was in the gardens at Brandon Hall. He was wounded twice and gassed once in 1917. He won his present distinction for running with messages through streets infested with snipers, and nor giving in until absolutely exhausted, and thereby greatly assisting the advance. His wife and son are still residing at Brandon.

GERMAN PRISONERS.—About 40 German prisoners arrived here on Tuesday night, and were located in commodious premises in the village secured for the purpose. They are to be utilised in ploughing and agriculture, having been specially selected. They are a small type of men, and comprise Germans, Prussians, and Bavarians. Mr H B Finch (Lutterworth) is in control of the agricultural arrangements for the breaking up of the land and supply of the horses, &c.

A MEMORIAL SERVICE was held at the Parish Church on Thursday evening, February 14th, for Sergt John Webb, R.B, who died in German East Africa from enteric fever. The service was conducted by the Rev L G Berrington, and there was a good congregation. Hymns 537 and 716 were sung. On Sunday evening the Rector preached a very impressive sermon, in which he referred to Sergt Webb. Mr & Mrs W Webb have received the usual telegram from the Secretary of State expressing the sympathy of his Majesty and the Queen.


PHILLIPS.—In loving memory of ERIC SUTHERLAND PHILLIPS, Captain, 8th Battalion Border Regiment, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Phillips, St. Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, who died of wounds received in action in France on February 21, 1917 ; aged 22.
“ There laid the world away ; poured out the red
Sweet wine of youth ; gave up on the years to be
Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene,
That men call age ; and those that would have been,
Their sons, they gave, their immortality.”


16th Feb 1918. Tank Bank at Coventry


The Coventry Tank Bank was opened on Monday by the Mayor, who was accompanied by the Mayoress, Lord and Lady Aylesford, Lord Leigh, and large a number of representatives of commercial and Labour, interests. Before the Tank arrived the local bond subscription amounted to over £1,000,000, and the new announcements after Monday’s ceremony included the contributions of Courtaulds, Ltd, £100,000 ; the Mayor, £5,000 ; Lord Aylesford, £3,000 ; Lady Aylesford, £1,000 ; and Lord Leigh, £l,000.

Corpl Hutt, the Coventry man who recently received the V.C. appeared on the Tank, and handed the cheque for the citizens’ gift of £l,000, made in recognition of his bravery, to the Tank bank.

The Tank Bank results continue to be very satisfactory. Some big investments were announced on Tuesday, and more are expected.

Employees and workpeople are showing a gratifying realisation of the need to act generously. Coventry Ordnance employees, for instance, invested £33,300.

Farmers’ Day on Tuesday realised £107,303. Thus the opening two days of the Tank Bank produced £509,303.

Wednesday was Women’s Day. The opening ceremony was gracefully performed by the Mayoress.

The Earl of Denbigh, who appeared in uniform as a Colonel of the British Army, was one of the speakers. He spoke with experience of actual warfare upon the menace which faces this country if a peace of “ shreds and patches ” is arrived at.

The figures for the week up to Thursday are :—
Monday . . . . . . . . . £402,000
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . .£107,303
Wednesday . . . . . . . £100,390
Thursday . . . . . . . .. . .£72,038

Total for the four days . . £681,731


The following committee has been formed to help supply H.M. Navy with fruit and vegetables : —Mrs Brooke, Mr Burdekin (hon treasurer), Mrs Dickinson, Mr Gough, Mr A R Taylor, Mrs Paramore, Miss K Whitelaw, and Mrs H C Bradby (hon secretary).

Admiral Beatty writes that fresh vegetables have done much to maintain the health of the Fleet.

Contributions urgently required. Fruit and vegetables may be sent to the old Council Chamber, Windmill Lane (kindly lent by the Rugby Urban District Council), every Monday, between 10 a.m and 6 p.m, beginning February 18th. If contributors are unable to send their fruit and vegetables they should send a postcard to Mr Gough, Eastlands School, Clifton Road, and he will let his boys call for them weekly. Contributions of money may be sent to Mr H P Burdekin, Dalkeith Avenue, Bilton.


During the present week all persons who think they have excessive supplies of food are requested to furnish details to the Local Food Committee. A number of enquiries have already been made at the Rugby Food Office, and in each case the persons have been advised to submit a list of their stock to the committee, several of these have been received but in no case was the quantity excessive.


Previous to Christmas it was given that it was advisable to money instead of parcels of food to soldiers at the front because it had been made possible for them to purchase goods at their canteens at cheaper rates than they could be procured at home ; and, furthermore, the risk of damage or loss was not so great, and it lessened the strain on the transport service. A letter has come to hand from a trooper in the Warwickshire yeomanry, now in Palestine, which shows that the question is affected by the circumstances and locality in which the troops are situated. He writes :—

“ We have come down for a rest, and have received a quantity of mails, letters, papers and parcels, including one of your Christmas parcels. The cake and plum pudding were A1, and we enjoyed them very much indeed ; also the mince pies. Unfortunately some these were soaked owing to the heavy rain, but enough were eatable to remind us that there were still such things. I was sorry to see a letter in the Advertiser, saying that we prefer money ; but I can tell you that nothing pleases us out here more than to receive something from home, and I think it a great shame to infer that we do not appreciate a parcel from home. If these people could see us when the mail arrives I feel sure that their opinion would alter. . Of course, there are some fortunate people who are at the bases and get good food issued, but are never certain, and are frequently on bully and biscuit. It is then that your parcels are doubly appreciated. If things are very short, then we would not mind going without, and would do without rather than take everything from home.”


The funeral, with full military honours, of Lieut F G Smith, R.F.C, took place on Wednesday at Coventry. This promising young officer, a former resident of Rugby, met with a fatal accident while flying on February 8th. Lieut Smith was educated at Rugby School, and Dr David (headmaster of Rugby) with Canon Robinson (Coventry), conducted the Funeral Service. Owing to his widespread popularity, much sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Henry Smith. Previous to going to Rugby School he passed by County Scholarship from St. Matthew’s to the Lower School.


Quite a gloom was cast over this village on Tuesday when the sad news was received that Sergt J Webb had died of enteric fever in German East Africa. Sergt Webb belonged to the Rifle Brigade and had seen a lot of hard fighting in France, where he went on 1915. He was badly wounded, and had to undergo several operations, as a shrapnel had to be taken from his stomach. But he made a splendid recovery, and after a rest was called upon once more for duty, this time in German East Africa, where he helped to drive the Germans into Portuguese territory. Here he was promoted to acting Sergt-Major, and was attached to the King’s African Rifles to train natives. Prior to the war he was under-gamekeeper for Mr Leo Bonn, of Newbold Revel.


SOLDIER HONOURED.—Corpl H H Seeley, Signal Section, R.E, has been awarded the Mons Ribbon in France.


THE LATE LANCE-CORPL. WM RAVEN.— Since the official report of the death of Lance-Corpl Wm F Raven, letters have come to hand from his Regimental officer and comrades. Capt A Loader Hall, the officer commanding, writes that he was his own personal runner, and was a man for whom he had the greatest admiration, and he finishes thus : “ This letter is, I am afraid, only a poor appreciation of one of the finest men I have ever had in my Company.” Lieut Burton G Scrase states that his memory “ will live for ever in the minds of all who knew him,” and adds this testimony, “ I have no hesitation in saying that he has never once failed to do his duty as a soldier.” The Chaplain (Rev G C R Cooke) says that was very highly thought of also as a religious man. He was killed instantly by a bullet through the head, so he would not have suffered and I am quite sure he was ready and prepared. L-Corpl Raven’s chum, Pte A Hutton, in returning his Bible to his friends, says he read it every night before going to rest, and used to take pride in doing so.

GEORGE WINDSOR, PRISONER OF WAR.—Good news continues to be received by his parents, Mr and Mrs H Windsor, from Pte George Windsor (R.W), who has been a prisoner of war in Germany since May 3, 1917. He is now located at Gustrow in Mecklenburg. In a recent letter he say: “ I had quite a surprise packet last week. The officer I was servant to in France was wounded and captured the same day as I was, and is in a camp in Germany a prisoner war. He has found out where I am and has sent me 100 marks, German money, to the value about £3 10s English money.”


DANCE.—On Saturday evening a very successful dance was held at the Village Hall in aid of the Red Cross Hospital, Bilton, and amongst the company was a good number of wounded soldiers, who remained till about eight o’clock. There was a large company. Mrs W H Heap and Miss Commons presided at the piano ; while Mrs Powell and Mrs Shadwell had charge of the refreshments.


SMITH.—On February 8th, Lieut. F. G. SMITH, R.F.C, killed while flying ; aged 20 years.—Deeply mourned by all.

WEBB.—On February 6th, in German East Africa, of enteric fever, JOHN HENRY, second son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Webb, of Churchover, aged 24.


CLEWLOW.—In loving memory of Pte. HARRY CLEWLOW, who died of wounds received in action on February 15, 1917.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.”

DUNN.—In loving memory Pte. JAMES DUNN, the dearly beloved husband of Clara Dunn, who died of wounds received in action on February 13, 1917 ; aged 27 years.
“ Somewhere in Belgium there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved gave his all.”

9th Feb 1918. The New Franchise Law.


The Representation of the People Bill on Wednesday night received the Royal Assent. The revolution it creates in the parliamentary franchise is shown by the following summary :—

Voters increased from 8,357,000, to about 16,000,000.

6,000,000 women voters enfranchised, 5,000,000, being wives of electors.

Youths of 19 who have served or are serving in the Army or Navy in connection with the war to have votes.

Soldiers and sailors to vote in foreign lands or at sea by post or by proxy.

“ Conscientious ” objectors who have refused all work of national importance disqualified during war and for five years after.

Number of M.P.’s increased from 670 to 702.

All polling in a general election on one day.

Six months’ residence qualification.

General election under new register possible in August or September.


We understand representatives of the Government are looking round in the Midlands for suitable premises for the establishment of a sausage factory, at which it is proposed to deal with 18 to 20 tons of meat per day. A building with about 10,000 square feet floor area is required. When made the sausages are to be sold to the public at fixed prices through retailers.


Mr & Mrs Horsey, of 23 Manor Road, have received news that their son 2nd A.M E Horsey, R.F.C, was in the Osmanich, which was blown up by a mine on the 31st December, and sank in five minutes. He was in the water about half-an-hour before he was picked up, and he is now in Egypt.

Sergt F C Gurney, King’s Royal Rifles, eldest son of Mr T Gurney, bookbinder, of 30 Cambridge Street, has been awarded the Military Medal. He is an old Murrayian.

Second-Lieut J Y Rouse, R.F.A, headmaster of Eastlands Boys’ School, was wounded by shrapnel in the ankle on January 25th. He had only been with the guns two days when he received his wound.

SECOND-LIEUT H H H LISTER (Presumed Killed).

Second-Lieut H H H Lister, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, reported wounded and missing on May 4th, 1917, is now presumed by the War Office to have been killed in action on that date. He was 19 years of age, and was the only child of Mr & Mrs H L Lister, of 107 Clifton Road, Rugby. He was educated at the Lower School of Lawrence Sheriffe (1906-11), and Rugby School (1912-15).


Sergt A Phelps, of New Bilton, 1st Batt. Rifle Brigade, has been transferred from his prison camp in Germany to Scheveningen, Holland. For over two and a-half years Sergt Phelps has regularly received his parcels his through the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee. The recent repatriations and transfers of prisoners of war to neutral countries has now reduced the number of men in the care of the Rugby Committee to 74. To provide the necessary food parcels and bread for these men the sum of £205 7s is required every four weeks.


LOST AT SEA.—Mrs Eli Raven has received the sad intelligence from the War Office that her second son, Sapper Eli Raven, R.E, has been missing since the 30th December, and is believed to be drowned. Presumably he was on board the Aragon when she was and sunk in the Mediterranean. Mrs Raven, lost her husband after a long illness in 1916, and her eldest son, Richd Raven (Coldstreams), was killed in action last July. She has now only one son left,—Driver Albert Raven, R.H.A, now serving “ somewhere France.”


LISTER.—On May 4, 1917, Second-Lieut. H. H. H. LISTER, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, reported wounded and missing at Bullecourt, now presumed to have been killed in action, aged 19, only child of Mr. & Mrs. H. L. Lister, of 107 Clifton Road, rugby.


COLING.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son, CHRISTOPHER, who was killed in action on February 4th, 1917.
“ Yes, we shall meet our boy again.
Far up in that Home above ;
Where war and strife will be no more.
But all will be peace and love.”
—From Father Mother, Brothers and Sister.

DATSON.—In loving memory of CHARLES DATSON, beloved husband of May Datson (late of Brownsover) who died of wounds in France on February 9, 1917.
“ What though in lonely grief I sigh
For him beloved, no longer nigh ;
Submissive would I still reply.
‘Thy will be done.’”

ELLIOTT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. H. J. ELLIOTT, of the Rifle Brigade, beloved son of H. D. A. Elliott, who was killed in action in France on February 12, 1917.
“ Had we been asked, how well we know.
We should say, ‘Oh ! Spare this blow,’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say :
‘Lord, we love him, let him stay.’
He bravely answered duty’s call.
He gave his life for one and all :
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father & Brothers.

FRENCH.—In loving remembrance of Pte. OLIVER FRENCH, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, youngest son of Robt. & Emma French, of Napton, who died in France on February 10, 1917.
“ I Heard the Voice of Jesus say,
‘Come unto Me and rest.’”

RICHARDSON.—In loving memory of Pte. J. RICHARDSON, Coldstream Guards, who died of wounds received in action on February 11, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.”
—Sadly missed by his Mother, Brothers, Sisters, and Grandmother, of The Banks, Dunchurch.


2nd Feb 1918. The Food Shortage


The queue evil reached a climax at Rugby on Friday last when large crowds besieged practically the whole of the provision and butchers’ shops in the centre of the town. An unusually large quantity of margarine, five tons, was received in the town the previous day, and a large portion of this was commandeered by the Executive Officer and distributed amongst about a dozen other shops. Notwithstanding this, however, people were unable to obtain a share, while others by dodging from queue to queue, or sending different members of their families, secured considerably more than their reasonable requirements.

In the afternoon large crowds, estimated at several thousands of persons, including number of locomotive men, assembled in and near the Market Place. These latter were interviewed by Mr T A Wise, chairman of the Food Control Committee, and they also visited the warehouses of several tradesmen to satisfy themselves that there were no large hoards of supplies. The tradespeople did everything possible to satisfy the people, and when the much sought for fats could no longer be obtained a large stock of jam was released. The Police also exercised considerable tact in dealing with the crowd, which several occasions showed signs of exasperation. On the other hand those who were engaged in the difficult task of distributing were impressed with the inconsiderate and unreasonable attitude adopted by many of the people who besieged the shops.

On Saturday, however, the scenes were quite normal again, and in fact there were fewer queues than has been the case for some time.

This state of affairs continued til yesterday (Friday) morning, when large queues had assembled by seven o’clock, and at one establishment the police were sorely pressed to keep a huge crowd from forcing an entrance into the shop.

CULTIVATION OF RAILWAY LAND.—The L N-W announce that they are prepared to allocate plots of vacant land both inside and outside their fences to anyone, whether railway servants or not, who desire to add to the food production at a nominal rent of 1s each lot.


An inquest was held at the Court House on Friday last week by Mr E F Hadow (coroner), concerning the death of Second-Lieut Harold Griffith Nelson (25), which took place, as reported in our last issue, as the result of an aeroplane accident.

Capt William Hubert Taylor deposed that the deceased officer’s home was in New York. He was a member of the American Air Service, and attached to the R.F.C. He was a learner, but very competent, and had flown altogether 67 hours.

Sergt Eric Jack Robjohns and Corpl William Hunter gave evidence to the effect that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good condition before the flight.

Capt Leslie Randall Wren deposed that he saw decease start off. After he had been up about half-an-hour he pulled the machine into a vertical stall, an evolution by which the machine would be practically “ standing ” on the tail. This evolution was of no practical use. He added that the position would automatically cause the machine to nose dive violently, and it would be out of control for a time. One would want a good deal of depth for such a dive, but 2,000ft. would be quite high enough. While the machine was turning over into the nose dive witness saw the deceased fly out of the machine.—The Coroner: It came round so quickly that it practically “ chucked ” him out ?—A: That is what it comes to ; or, on the other hand, his head might have struck the front of the machine, and during unconsciousness he might have fallen out. The tendency would be for him to fall out if he was not strapped in. Witness added that he immediately went to the machine and examined the belt, but it was not strapped up. It was the pilot’s businesses see that he strapped himself in, and he could not say whether deceased had taken that precaution. There was a possibility, but not a probability, that he might have jerked the belt open by the motion of his arms. Witness had never hoard of such a thing being done.

Second-Lieut G W Curtis gave evidence as to the damage to the machine, which came to earth a-half to three-quarters of a mile away.

Surgeon-Major Collins explained the frightful injuries received by the deceased, who, he said, might have been alive, but would probably have been unconscious by the time he touched the earth. Despite the tremendous impact deceased’s wrist watch, with an open dial, was unbroken, and continued to go without losing a second.

The Coroner referred to the surprisingly few accidents which occurred, in view of the number of flights made daily, and said this appeared to be a clear case of the usual precautions not having been taken.

The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death ” ; but added that there was no evidence to prove whether the belt was fastened or not when deceased began the flight.

After the inquest an officer gave a demonstration with the belt, as a result of which the Coroner and Jury expressed the opinion that it probably was fastened up before the flight.



The presentation of efficiency certificates won by Warwickshire women at the Midland test last autumn was made the occasion of a public demonstration at Birmingham on Tuesday, in which between 20 and 30 workers from the Rugby district took part, along with several hundred women from all parts of the county. The majority were wearing the severely practical uniform in which they are accustomed to work, and the cheerfulness of the girls and their healthy and robust appearance were at once a tribute to the wholesome effect which the work, despite trying conditions, has upon spirits and physique. The certificates were presented by the Lord Mayor (Ald Brookes), who said there were now 180 girls employed on farms in Birmingham and Warwickshire, and, in addition, there were 1,400 women in the villages who had registered themselves as willing to give part of their time to farm work.

Out the 84 Warwickshire girls who entered the tests 70 received certificates. Among them were the following local workers who passed three tests:—Miss Mary Crofts (Long Lawford), Miss Nellie Harrison (Clifton), and Miss Constance Walton (Clifton). Passed two tests: Miss Doris Stent (Pailton), Miss Richards (Clifton), Mrs Lee (Bourton), and Miss Bertha Steath (Clifton). Passed one test: Miss Annie Oven and Miss Kate Foster (Catthorpe), Miss Harriett Dickens (Brownsover), Mrs Edward Eales (Bourton). Others of the Land Army mentioned as doing good work in this district were : Miss Pape (Bretford), Mrs Harry Smith and Miss Robinson (Lawford Heath), Miss Tew (Pailton), Miss Taylor and Miss Smith (Princethorpe), Miss Edwards (Newbold), Miss Allerton (Stretton-under-Fosse), Miss Hunt, Miss Gibbs, and Miss Packer (working near Lutterworth).

There are also many whole-time and part-time workers in the Rugby area who have earned as many as six stripes on their arms for length of service, all going to work on the land. Each stripe represents 1,440 hours’ work.


Four additional prisoners of war have been added to the list of the Rugby Committee. Reported missing since Nov 30, Sergt J R Sacree, 10th Batt. Rifle Brigade, is now known to be wounded with gunshot through the shoulder, and a prisoner of war interned at Soltau. Sergt Sacree, who joined up immediately on the outbreak of war, was an assistant for six years to Mr C T Tew, of Regent Street. He had been previously wounded four times, won the Military Medal and recommended again in September last year.— Rfn W E Boyles, 10th Kings Royal Rifle Corps, whose home is at Bishops Itchington, is a prisoner of war interned at Dulmen. An employee of Messrs Greaves, Bull & Lakin, Ltd. of Harbury, he enlisted in 1914. His firm have generously offered to defray the cost of his food parcels as well as for two other employees of theirs who are prisoners of war in Germany.—Pte A C Neal. Royal Warwickshire Regt, whose home is at Napton, is a prisoner of war at Limburg-a-Lahn.—Pte A E Mumford, Machine Gun Corps, attached Cavalry, is a prisoner of war at Minden. For three years he acted as barman for Mr W Jones, of “ The Barrel,” Market Place. He enlisted in August, 1914, in the Lancers, subsequently being transferred to the 17th Lancers—Mr J R Barker, hon secretary of Rugby Committer, has made the necessary arrangements for the despatch of the standard food parcels and bread to each of the above men.

The financial support given to the Committee has been splendid, sufficient to enable them to bear the whole cost of each man’s food parcels, etc. Every month means a grave increase in the number of prisoners of war and a corresponding increase in the expenditure. Constant help is very necessary to prevent any call upon the funds of the Red Cross. The number of prisoners of war now on the list is 83, and to provide for these men £230 6s 6d has to be found every four weeks.

Pte A King, of the Royal Scots, whose home is at Napton, has been repatriated, but no further news has yet come to hand.

The following further awards of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are officially recorded :—

10764 Pte J H Enticott, Oxford & Bucks L.I.(Rugby).
In spite of heavy machine gun fire, he volunteered to go out and look for wounded, and succeeded in bringing back successfully an officer and N.C.O. He showed complete disregard for danger.

32651 B.S.M H W Evans, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his wagon lines were heavily shelled he promptly organised the clearing of the lines, and removed the wounded to an aid post. All this took place under very heavy shell fire, which killed or wounded six men and 37 horses. By his complete coolness and splendid disregard of personal danger he averted all panic and saved many casualties.

840150 Bty Sergt-Major G Hopewell, R.F.A (Rugby).
When his battery ammunition dump was set on fire by enemy shelling he at once went to the position with his Battery Commander and another officer ; and although under heavy shell fire and in great danger from the exploding ammunition, he collected earth and saved a large quantity of material. Both . officers were wounded whilst performing this gallant act.

A RUGBY MASTER DIES AT SEA.—Second-Lieut Leonard George Colbeck, M.C (R.F.A), reported died at sea on the 3rd January, just after completing his 33rd year, was formerly an assistant master at Rugby School. A fine all-round cricketer at Marlborough when captain of the team in 1903, his batting had not a little do with his side averting defeat from Rugby at Lord’s. Two years later he secured a place in the Cambridge University team. One three occasions he figured in the Inter-Varsity hockey match.

MORE AIR RAIDS.—During an air raid on Monday night over London and the South-Eastern Counties 47 men. women and children were killed and 169 injured—30 of them in the basement of one establishment on which a bomb fell. There was a second raid on Tuesday injured.


The Warwickshire County Council, at their meeting on Wednesday, discussed the question of the future of Dunchurch Avenue, on consideration of a special report by the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and decided, after a long discussion, in favour of the first of two alternative schemes suggested by the Duke of Buccleuch. Ald J S Dugdale, K.C, presided.

The proposals made by the Duke of Buccleuch at an interview with the committee at London on January 4th were set forth in the report of the Avenue Committee. His Grace pointed out that his agent’s letter of June 15th last year had not been read or fully reported to the County Council meeting of October 24th last ; that if that had been done it would have made it clear that he himself would have been glad to preserve the Avenue intact ; but that the preservation of the elm trees was impossible because of the rotten and dangerous state of many of them ; and he made an alternative offer which is summarised in his agent’s letter of January 8th, given below. The committee added : We expressed regret to his Grace that any misapprehension should have arisen from the letter of June 15th not having been fully reported or read, and explained that it had been fully read to the County Roads and Bridges Committee, and that the report was in the ordinary course of the Council’s procedure.


The report of the committee continued : Mr Cyprian Knollys, the Duke’s agent, wrote on January 8th : ” I now write to confirm what passed at an interview between the deputation from your Council and the Duke of Buccleuch on the 4th ult. The Duke has always shared the desire expressed by the deputation that the Avenue (which is now about 180 years old) should be preserved. He has had it under observation for some years, and particularly since the gales of December, 1915, and March, 1916, when 74 of the elm trees were blown down. The opportunity which these windfalls afforded for obtaining accurate information as to the state and condition of the trees has convinced the Duke that they have become dangerous, and that even if left the trees, as an avenue, would in the course of a few years practically cease to exist. His Grace is also of opinion that any lopping or pollarding would never be successful, and would only hasten the process of decay. He feels, therefore, that he cannot take the responsibly of leaving the trees standing. In view, however of the importance of maintaining the Avenue for the public benefit in the future the Duke made the following alternative proposals :—

“ (1) That be should himself dispose of the trees standing on the unenclosed land, and after deducting expenses and charges, handover half the proceeds of the sale to the County Council (or other approved body) to be used for re-planting and keeping up the Avenue : or (2) that he should sell to the County Council (or other approved body) the trees standing on the unenclosed land at 6d per cubic foot, which may be considered half their value, on the condition that an avenue it kept up. In either case his Grace will give all his rights over this unenclosed land on which the trees stand.

“ Scheme No. 1 should provide ample money to replant the Avenue as circumstances will permit.

“ Under Scheme 2 the Avenue would belong to the public, but in connection with it there are one or two observations which the Duke thinks the Council may like him to mention for their consideration :

“ If say half the trees are cut, a sufficient sum should be obtained to pay the cost of the purchase, and young trees could then be planted in the vacant spaces. This would, to a great extent, preserve the present appearance of the Avenue. On the other hand, the shade from the remaining trees might injuriously affect the growth of the young plants, and there would be considerable risk of the young trees being injured by the fall of any of the old trees or their limbs. It should also be borne in mind that when trees are grown close, as in an avenue, every tree that is blown down increases the danger of the remainder being also blown. If it was thought desirable to reduce this risk it might be done by cutting down one-half of the Avenue and re-planting it, and then gradually to re-plant the other half.


“ From a practical point of view, the Duke considers Scheme 1 to be the best, as though there would be a temporary loss of the Avenue, all danger to the public would be avoided, and there would certainly be a superior avenue in the future, as experience has shown that making up an old avenue is seldom, if ever, successful. And if, as was suggested the Avenue is to be considered as part of the proposed permanent memorial to the 29th Division, it would if newly planted throughout, be in its prime 100 years after the date of his Majesty’s inspection. In making these observations, however, the Duke desires it to be understood that he leaves it entirely to the Council to decide which (if either) of these proposals they would like to adopt ; and I am to add that if the experience and advice of his Forester would be of any assistance to the Council in their consideration of the subject his Grace will be happy if they will avail themselves of it. It was suggested that you would be able to let me hear from you by March 1st.”


The committee proceeded :—


The question was then put to the vote, and the amendment was carried by 32 votes to 10—Scheme No. 1 being, therefore the one accepted.

It was pointed out that a public subscription would be necessary to provide the 29th Division Memorial.

A vote of thanks was passed to the Dunchurch Avenue Committee, and the committee will (it was stated) remain in being.


HERBERT.—In loving memory of Pte. JAMES HERBERT, 6th Northants Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Herbert, Yelvertoft ; killed in action January 19th, 1918, aged 38 years.


SMITH.—In loving memory of GEORGE EDWARD SMITH, who was killed in France on January 29, 1917.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him,
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN, who died of wounds on January 28, 1916.—From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brothers.