15th Dec 1917. On Christmas Day

ON CHRISTMAS DAY every household in Rugby and district is asked to make a collection at their Dinner Table to help to maintain a continuance of the very necessary food parcels for our unfortunate men who are

PRISONERS OF WAR.

The increase in the cost of the food parcels has caused a serious strain upon the funds of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, and it is felt that everyone will be glad of this opportunity of showing in a practical manner their sympathy with these poor fellows who are languishing in prison camps in Germany.

Please place your collection in the special envelopes which will be left your house and hand same to the authorised collector, who will call soon after Christmas.

If you going away this Christmas will you forward a donation towards this Special Effort to the Hon. Secretary : Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Recent Street, Rugby.

EVERY PENNY COUNTS.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, who was wounded at Cambrai on November 29th, is making satisfactory progress.

General Sir H S Horne, K.C.B, returned to the Front from East Haddon on Wednesday.

Lance-Corpl H F Hancox, who has been a prisoner of war and on the Rugby list of Prisoners of War Fund for 2½ years, has been transferred to Switzerland

Pte W Thomson, son-in-law of Mr & Mrs Mayes, Abbey Street has been wounded with shrapnel in the eye. They lost a son from wounds twelve months ago. Mrs Mayes has four brothers serving—three of them in France—and her husband has had two nephews killed in the War.

Mr T Horton, J.P, of Ashlawn, a late captain of the Northants County Cricket Club, is acting as a volunteer tram driver.

During the past ten weeks a total of £52,845 has been subscribed to the War Loans in Rugby, of which £7,680 was invested during the week ended December 8th.

Capt C N B Hurt, East Lancs Regiment, who has been appointed Assistant Controller of Statistics under the regional scheme of National Service at Headquarters, Leamington, has been presented with a silver cigarette-case by fellow-members of the Recruiting Staff at Rugby, where he has been stationed for the past two years. He was at Oxford when the War broke out, and, joining up immediately went, with his regiment to Gallipoli, where he contracted dysentery and enteric. He has played in the Derbyshire County Cricket XI.—Pte Bateman, a clerk on the staff, has also been the recipient of a present on leaving the town.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lance-Corpl H P Arnold, of the Royal Engineers, was killed in action on November 28th. Prior to joining the Army he was employed in the turbine works.

News has been received of the death in action of Capt Leystens Llewellyn Greener, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (T.F), son of Mr Charles Greener, of Four Oaks, Captain Greener, who was 24 years of age, was educated at Rugby, where he was captain of the football fifteen and a member of the shooting eight. He joined the Territorials about eighteen months before the outbreak of the War, received his commission in the 6th Warwicks in February, 1913.

NAVAL HONOUR FOR ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY.

Warrant-Officer E W Penney, an old scholar of St Matthew’s Boys’ School, has been awarded the Distinguished Service Medal for gallantry in the Battle of Jutland. He was on Admiral Beatty’s flagship Lion during the engagement, and the great skill and fearlessness effected essential repairs to the wireless installation while under heavy.

LIEUT-COL VISCOUNT FEILDING, D.S.O, AGAIN MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In Sir Douglas Haig’s list of mentions this week we again find the name of Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O (Coldstream Guards), son of the Earl of Denbigh. This is the third time during the War Viscount Feilding has gained distinction.

MILITARY MEDAL.

In a list of awards of the Military Medal issued on Thursday the following names appear :—Pte W Green, Worcester Regiment (Ryton-on-Dunsmore), and Gunner (Acting Bdr) W R Clarke, R.F.A (Rugby).

PRINCETHORPE.

NEWS has been received that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of Princethorpe.

MONKS KIRBY.

Farrier-Sergt-Major Bishop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has received news of the death from wounds on November 15th of his brother, Sergt Percy Bishop, Berks Yeomanry, serving with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. He was the son of the late Jonathan Bishop of this village.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another of the brave lads from this village has made the great sacrifice. Sergt S Batchelor, of the Royal Warwickshire regiment, only son of Mr & Mrs J Batchelor, died on December 1st of wounds received in action in France. He joined up on January 13th, 1915, and was drafted out to the front in April of the same year. Although not born at Church Lawford, Sergt Batchelor is regarded as a native, as his parents came to reside in the village when he was about two years old. He was educated at the village school, and when he was old enough to start work he went to Mr J Brierley’s at The Hall, Kings Newnham, to assist in the garden, &c. From there he took the situation of gardener and coachman to the Misses Townsend, of Kings Newham, where he was at the time of enlistment. Sergt Batchelor was 28 years of age, and was a fine strapping fellows, standing 6ft, and broad in proportion. He was as good-hearted as he was big, was ever ready to give a helping hand where it was wanted, and always had a cheery word and smile for everyone. He belonged to the local Cricket and Social Clubs and the choir at the Parish Church, where he was a most regular attendant. He was a very steady, thrifty young fellow, a total abstainer and non-smoker, and a jolly, all-round, good fellow. More especially, perhaps, because of these traits of character, very great sympathy is felt with his parents in the loss of their son in his prime, and whose life had taken as a whole, might well be regarded as an example by many country lads.

DEATHS.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Sergt. S. Batchelor of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment (only son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Batchelor, of Church Lawford), who died from wounds received in action in France on December 1st, 1917 ; aged 28 years.
Bravely he answered his country’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all.
Father in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our dear one sleeping.

IN MEMORIAM.

GLENN.—In affectionate remembrance of my dear husband, JOHN GLENN, who died in France on December 8, 1916.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, who was killed in action in France on December 15, 1916 ; aged 22 years.—“ God takes our loved ones from our homes, but never from our hearts.”
—From his Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

 

Advertisements

8th Dec 1917. Using Potatoes to Save Bread

USING POTATOES TO SAVE BREAD.

Sir Arthur Yapp, the Director of Food Economy, is anxious that the present very large surplus stock of potatoes and vegetables should be utilised in all private houses, and also in hotels, restaurants, and other public eating places, in such a way as to save bread.

It has been brought to his notice that in many public eating places the charge for a portion of potatoes and other vegetables is so relatively high as to encourage people to order bread instead. This is very much against the national interest at present, and Sir Arthur Yapp desires it to be clearly understood that he expects the management of all public eating places to alter their arrangements accordingly.

It is stated that it is still quite common for meat, eggs, etc, to be served on toast or bread. This practice should be immediately discontinued, and the use of bread should be discouraged in every way possible, so long as potatoes and other vegetables are abundant.

In particular, it is most if desirable that in all public eating places as little bread as possible should be served at lunch and dinner when potatoes and other vegetables are available in abundance, as at present.

Sir Arthur Yapp urges the public to give their full support to these recommendations, as this is of great importance in utilising the national food supply to the utmost advantage.

NOW TO OBTAIN SUGAR.
A NEW PROCEDURE.

It is important to remember that after December 31st you can only obtain sugar by one of the following systems ; that you can only use the system which applies to your particular case :—

A.—THE HOUSEHOLD SYSTEM.—If you have already deposited with your grocer a household sugar card, and if you are still a member of the same household, you must go to your grocer after December 8th and ask for Declaration Forms. When you have filled these up your grocer will give you a Retailers Sugar Ticket for each member of the household, which must be shown when buying sugar after December 31st.

B.—THE COUPON SYSTEM.—If you have not registered with your grocer on a Household Sugar Card, or if you have left the household from which you were registered, you must go to a Post Office before December 15th, ask for an application form, fill it up, and post it as directed. You will later receive a Ration Paper, which will entitle you to get Sugar Coupons from a Post Office.

AN ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Monday —before Mr J E Cox—Corporal Charles Hammett, of Long Lawford, was charged with being an absentee from the Agricultural Company.—P.C Hunt gave evidence of arrest and defendant was remanded to await an escort.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr A Marsh, 15 Little Elborow Street, Rugby, has received intimation that his son, Pte A Marsh (24) of Leicesters, was killed in action on November 2nd ; and that another son, Pte G W Marsh, of the Warwicks, was posted as missing on October 26th. The former was, before joining up, employed as a labourer by the late Mr W C Musgrave, and the latter worked for J Young, builder. Both were Murray school boy.

Mrs Bennett, 1 Hillmorton Road, has kindly forwarded to the funds of the Rugby War Hospital Supply Depot the sum of £3, the proceeds of her chrysanthemum show on November 21-24.

A SON OF THE VICAR OF GRANDBOROUGH KILLED.

The Rev John Martin, vicar of Grandborough, has just received the sad news of the death in France of his second son, Second-Lieut F H Martin, R.E, 84th Field Company. The Commanding Officer writes : “ He was shot by a German sniper whilst setting out a new piece of engineering work behind our front line. It is a consolation that he did not suffer, as he was killed instantly. He was interred by the Rev P H Hargreaves, C.F, in a military cemetery near Gonzeancourt. He had only been a very short time with the 84th Field Company. I can assure you that all the officers and men realise what a really excellent fellow he was, and we all feel we have lost a good comrade and an extremely valuable officer.” Second-Lieut F H Martin is brother of Capt C G Martin, V.C, D.S.O, R.E, and had only a few months since come home from Egypt, where he was engaged in engineering work for the Egyptian Government, to offer himself to the War Office for military service. After a few months at Newark, he left for the front in September last. He had given a few months to military work near the Suez Canal, where he was employed in laying down pipes to carry fresh water from the Canal into the desert for 21 miles. He has another brother in the R.A.M.C, who is now in India. Second-Lieut F H Martin was born in China in 1888. He was educated in Bath and Clifton College (while at Clifton he was captain of the Cricket XI). and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He had passed the examination for the I.C.E.

THE LATE CAPT FRANK NEVILLE.

Mrs T Neville of Rugby, whose son, Capt Frank Neville, was killed in action, as recorded in our last issue, has received a sympathetic letter from the Colonel commanding the battalion. He writes : “ I much regret that I should have been home on leave when this great loss happened to my battalion. It is difficult for me to express what your son was to the battalion ; he was a very exceptional soldier—in fact, during over two years of service in France I have not met his equal as a company commander ; and had he lived I should certainly have recommended him for rapid advancement. As a man he was loved by every man in the regiment. I, as battalion commander, was immensely proud of him, for he was a grand figure of a man and the most cheery of comrades. He overcame all difficulties with a laugh. You may be a proud mother to have had such a son. May you do as he would have wished, and bear bravely your great loss.”

DUNCHURCH.

NEWS was received on Tuesday that Pte C E Tuckey, 1st Royal Warwicks, previously reported wounded and missing, was killed in action on or about October 4th. He was the second son of the late Mr & Mrs Thomas Tuckey, of this village.

MR & MRS GAMBLE DAVIS, Mill Street, have received news that their son, Percy, has gone through a second operation, and is getting on well. He is a prisoner in Germany.

MR & MRS J BULL, Mill Street, have received news that their son has been wound in Palestine. This is the second time.

BRANDON.

PTE G BOSTOCK MISSING.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock, of Brandon, have been notified that their eldest son, Pte G Bostock, is missing. He had been in France for a long time. His parents have resided in the district all their lives.

FRANKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mrs Doyle has received the sad news that her youngest son, Pte W Doyle, Q.O.O.H, was killed in France. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved mother, this being the second son she has lost in the War. One brother is now at home wounded, and the fourth son is in Egypt. A memorial service was held on Sunday afternoon, when the Rector (Rev C Lunn) gave a sympathetic address. The Rev H F B Shuckburgh read the lessons. There was a large congregation.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT OWEN W W W MEREDITH MISSING.—Mrs Meredith, late of Wolston Vicarage, has received news that her son is missing. He had been in France for some short time, and was attached to the Royal Flying Corps. While residing in Wolston his cheerful disposition and amiable manner made him very popular. He is the only son of Mrs Meredith, who now resides at Leamington and the late Ven Archdeacon T Meredith, for upwards of seven years Vicar of Wolston.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory WILFRED JOSEPH (BILL), who was killed in France, November 11th, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave,
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MAYES.—In fond and loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, who died of wounds received in action in France at the General Hospital, Bristol, December 6th, 1916 ; aged 20 years.
“ A devoted son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered Duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
“ Some may think that we forget him,
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which that smile hides all the while.
“ Gone but not forgotten—
Oh no ! not one so dear.
He is gone to his home in heaven,
And with a smile we will meet him there.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

 

1st Dec 1917. Presentation to a Howitzer Man

PRESENTATION TO A HOWITZER MAN.

On the occasion of the presentation of medals at Chatham on the 25th inst, Bombardier F A Bosworth R.F.A, was the recipient of medals. The presentation was made by Colonel H R Adair, Commander Royal Artillery, Thames and Medway Garrison, who said : “ The Royal Artillery has no colours. Our colours are the proud traditions of our Regiment, to which we cling, and around which we rally, just as other Corps have rallied round their Banners. It is men like Bombardier Bosworth who not only preserve these traditions, but, who, by their deeds, actually add to and enoble them. I am proud to stand here to-day representing His Majesty the King, who, you will remember is our Colonel-in-Chief, to present to Bombardier Bosworth, on his behalf, two medals, which he has gained by his own brave hands. They are the Military Medal of England and the Military Medal of France.”

“ The records of the deeds for which he has won these read as follows:- Military Medal of England: “Repairing telephone lines and bringing in wounded under heavy shellfire.” Bar to Military Medal of England and Military Medal of France: “Maintaining communications under heavy shell fire.”

“ These medals are a proud possession for himself and splendid heirlooms for his kindred to possess. On behalf of our Country, our Ally of France, our Regiment and its Colonel-In-Chief our King. I shake hands with Bombardier Bosworth and wish him health and happiness and long life the to wear his noble distinctions.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt E Wood, Manchester Regiment, son of Mr T T Wood, The Laurels, Park Road, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Pte W Wilks, Cameron Highlanders, an old Murrayian, has been wounded by shrapnel a second time, near Ypres, and has undergone three operations. He is now in a Military Hospital near Norwich.

The many friends of Mr A Clarke, Spencer House, Crick, will be glad to hear that his eldest son, who was serving in France with the 1st Gordon Highlanders, has been promoted to Captain.

Lord Leigh is gazetted Colonel of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Lieut R W Friend, son of Mr R Friend, of Rugby, who has been serving in Salonika for about two years in the A.S.C, has been promoted to Captain and Adjutant. He was educated at Rugby School, and passed through Sandhurst. After leaving school he was a prominent player of both the Rugby Cricket and Football Clubs.

Gunner Harold Richard Hazlewood, R.F.A, second son of Mr & Mrs Hazlewood, Weedon, has been killed in action. In a sympathetic letter the Chaplain said :—“ He died a soldier’s death at the gun.” The deceased who was 21 years of age, was educated at Weedon Boys’ School, and afterwards at the Town and County School, Northampton. On leaving school he was articled to Mr W J Pearce, auctioneer, Northampton, and joined up in January, 1915, proceeding to France in January, 1916. He was in the Somme push, the Battles of the Vimy Ridge, Beaumont Hamel, &c ; was wounded in March, 1917, and had been recently recommended for his commission on account of meritorious service.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

At the monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee on Monday evening at the Benn Buildings, the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, reported that during the past month there had been further charges on the funds of the Committee. An additional prisoner of war had been added to the list—Pte T Bachelor, 5th Royal Berkshire Regt, of Napton, who is interned at Mulheim A/Ruhr. A lady had offered to pay for this man’s food parcels, and the Committee would only have to be responsible for the 26lbs of bread per month. Pte J Pescow, 1st Northants Regt, of Clifton, interned at Konigsmoor bei Tolstedt, who had been on the Rugby list for over two years, but who had been fully “ adopted,” had again become a charge to the Committee, as the guarantee on his behalf were only now 22/6 per month, the Committee, therefore having to provide a difference of 33/- per month. Mr Barker further reported that the subscriptions and donations received during November would cover the cost of the month’s standard parcels and bread.

The Chairman, Mr William Flint, C.C, said that this was indeed satisfactory, especially in view of the many other efforts, and showed there was no lack of support for the prisoners of war. He trusted that this excellent result would continue.

With regard to Christmas dinner table collection for the fund, Mr Barker said he had nearly completed the arrangements.

The scheme involved an immense amount of work, but many ladies had offered their services as helpers, and if a few more would assist every house in the town would have its appointed collector.

The response from the villages was excellent, and there only remained a few districts to fix up. He estimated that between 9,000 and 10,000 houses would be canvassed in the town and villages.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR

The Postmaster-General announces that the German authorities have decided not to admit parcels for prisoners of war in Germany between the 12th and 22nd of December next. Parcels intended for delivery to prisoners of war in Germany for Austo-Hungary by Christmas Day should, therefore, be posted without delay. In accordance with the arrangements made last year parcels reaching the camps in Germany before Christmas will be delivered not earlier than 24th December if they are prominently marked “ Weihnachtspaket.”

AID FOR ALIEN ENEMIES,

The fifth report of the Emergency Committee for the assistance of Germans, Austrians, and Hungarians in Distress has just been issued. The committee was convened in the early days of the war by the Religious Society of Friends, “ to aid innocent ‘ alien enemies ‘ in Great Britain rendered destitute by the war.”

The list of subscriptions from July 1, 1916 to June 30, 1917, totals £13,226 7s 6d. There are 74 amounts, ranging from £60 to one shilling under the heading of “ Anon,” and other subscribers include Messrs Cadbury Bros, £200 ; Mr J B Crosfield £100 ; eight members of the Fry family, and three Rowntrees.

Viscount Haldane sends £25, and the two largest subscribers are F Merttens and Edith M Ellis, and who send £500 each. The report states that in London alone more than 5,000 cases of need have been dealt with.

DR TANGYE’S MILITARY SERVICE.—At the meeting of the Mid-Warwickshire Joints Sanitary Committee on Thursday last week, presided over by Mr P E Shepheard, it was resolved, on the motion of Mr H Hulme, seconded by Mr Lloyd Evans, that the release of Dr C E Tangye for military service extended be extended for the period of the War on the same conditions that were agreed when he was released for a year’s service. Dr Tangye is in Aldershot Command, and is responsible for the sanitation of three large military camps, but may be called upon for foreign service at any time.

POLICE COURT.—At Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before Mr A E Donkin, Pte Fredk Curtis, of the Canadian Forestry Corps, was charged with being an absentee.—P.S Tromans deposed that on the previous evening he saw defendant in the Railway Hotel. He suspected him of being an absentee, and he called him outside and asked to see his pass. Defendant would not produce this, and admitted that he was an absentee. Remanded to await an escort.

ACORNS FOR STOCK.

The Food Production Department again drawn the attention of stockowners to the necessity of making full use of this year’s crop of acorns. In places where these are still lying on the ground collecting parties of children and others should be organized without delay. Landowners are urged to put no unreasonable obstacles in the way.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. H. BARNWELL, 2/7 Royal Warwickshire Regiment (of Bilton), who died from wounds received in action in France on November 19, 1917 ; aged 27 years.—From his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

ROUND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. W. A. Round, who died of wounds in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ When we last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
He did his best for one and all
And those who loved him well.”
—From his loving Father and Mother.

ROUND.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. W. A. ROUND, who died of wounds in Egypt on November 14, 1917.
“ In health and strength he left his home,
Not thinking death so near ;
It pleased the Lord to bid him come,
And in His sights appear.”
—From his loving Sisters and brother Fred.

IN MEMORIAM.

DODD..—In memory of Coy.-Sergt-Major DODD, R.W. Regiment, killed in France on December 2, 1915.—Sadly missed, Bill.

EDMANS.—In loving memory of our dear son, FRANK, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark on November 26, 1914.—“ Three years have passed, how much we miss him.”—From Father & Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

EVERSDEN.—On November 12, WILLIAM, youngest son of Joseph Eversden, of Withybrook, who died of wounds in France ; aged 33 years.
“ For days and nights he bore great pain.
We hoped for cure, but hoped in vain.
God saw it, too, and thought it best
To take him to His Home of Rest.”
—From his loving Father, Sister and Brothers.

24th Nov 1917. Food Parcels for Men on Active Service

FOOD PARCELS FOR MEN ON ACTIVE SERVICE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—Enquires into the reason for the local shortage of certain essential foodstuffs have brought the information that the Authorities were making first claim upon these for our Armies in the field ; and having had the opportunity on several occasions lately of mixing with a number of men straight from the trenches, and quite unknown personally to me, I have raised the question of food supplies, and feel sure that Rugbeians will be glad to know that without exception the men, who belonged to various units from different parts of the front, gave me the assurance that they were now very well fed, and that of most of the things which we are short they are receiving a sufficiency. They have been unanimous, too, in stating that it was quite unnecessary, and even wasteful, to send them either food or tobacco from home, and that I should be justified in giving publicity to the fact that the majority of them would prefer money, with which they can obtain little comforts when they have opportunities of getting them—tobacco and cigarettes they can buy duty free, and of practically any brand they choose. One article they are always glad to see, and cannot get enough of, is the humble sock. They assert that a clean pair of socks is a luxury, and often hard to obtain even to come home in for their leave.

I understand, too, that the old ration of biscuit and bully beef has been modernised, and is now served in an appetising mince.

At this season numbers of people will be contemplating sending parcels to the boys : and feeling that they would mostly desire to do their bit in the most acceptable way, I respectfully suggest that it take the form of money and socks.—Yours faithfully,

HARRY TARBOX,
Chairman Rugby Rural Food Control Committee.

PIGS FOR HOME CONSUMPTION.

AN UNFOUNDED RUMOUR.

A rumour has been widely circulated in the Midland Counties to the effect that pig-keepers are forbidden to kill their pigs for their own consumption, and as the consequence has been that large numbers have been killed in an immature condition.

Mr Ernest Parke, the chairman of the Brailes Rural District Council, has received a letter, dated November 21st, from the Minister of Food, as follows :—

“ There is no truth in the rumour that any order made by this Department forbids farmers and their labourers to kill their pigs for their own consumption.”

THE FOOD QUESTION.

NATIONAL VALUE OF THE POTATO.

An interesting discussion as to the best means of turning the present abundant potato crop to the greatest national advantage took place at the Ministry of Food on Monday. After providing for the normal consumption, there is, said Sir Arthur Yapp, a surplus of considerably over 2,000,000 tons of potatoes, which, if utilised during the next six months—a most critical period—in lieu of bread, will save 500,000 ton of grain, this being sufficient to keep the whole of the United Kingdom in bread for two months. In the course of an interest Dr J Campbell gave some important figures illustrating the economic food value of the potato. The said that 2 2/3 lbs of potatoes had an equivalent food value of 1 lb of bread. There was a national gain in the fact that one acre of land devoted to the growth of potatoes produced twice the quantity of flesh-forming protein compared with the same land devoted to wheat 4½ times more starch, and 3½ times more potash. He thought, therefore, that the acreage given over to potatoes should be increased to rather than reduced. Having recommended the greater use of potato flour in bread-making, he suggested that no bread should be served at meals when potatoes were abundant.

THE FOOD SHORTAGE LOCALLY.

The shortage of certain articles of food locally, which has during the past fortnight become acute, is causing considerable uneasiness and inconvenience in the town. Several commodities, such as matches, tea, butter, bacon, and other fats, are practically unobtainable, and then only in very small quantities. Several shops dealing largely in these articles have been besieged with customers, and housewives complain bitterly of the many hours spent, without result, in shopping. Shopkeepers are their wits’ end to supply the demands of the public, and in many cases commodities, of which the supply is limited, are reserved for regular customers. The Co-operative Society has adopted the rationing system in respect of a number articles, members being served only on the production of their old sugar cards—those issued by the society. In many cases customers have added to the difficulties of retailers by adopting an unreasonable attitude, and a reflection of this state of affairs was provided at the County Appeals Tribunal on Wednesday evening, when a grocer’s manager was exempted for six months, a representative of the firm pleading that it was unsafe to leave a woman in sole charge owing to the threatening attitude of numerous customers.

RUGBY BUTCHERS BEFORE THE TRIBUNAL.

A special sitting of the Appeal Tribunal was held at Rugby on Wednesday evening to consider the claims of the Rugby butchery trade. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), KV Rotherham, S J Dicksee. Capt M E T Wratislaw was the National Service representative.

The first three cases were applications for further periods of exemption.—On behalf of George William Thomson, 39, married, West Street, Mr Eaden suggested that the position was such that the man should not be called upon to join the Army. His wife’s health was delicate, and she had been advised by a specialist that she must shortly undergo an operation.—Capt Wratislaw said this was one of the men he was pressing for. The man’s business was situated in a district where there were plenty of shops to supply the public, and Mrs Thomson was capable of carrying on her husband’s business. Messrs Thomson and Haddon worked together, and he suggested that Mr Haddon should co-operate, and so release Thomson, whose business could still be preserved by his wife carrying it on.—Mr Thomson said his wife occasionally assisted in the shop by serving a pennyworth of suet, and so on ; but she was unable to cut up meat to advantage. Her health too, was delicate, and she could not stand for any length of time.—Mr. Eaden also appeared for Mr A J Haddon, 38, married, Lawford Road.—Capt Wratislaw suggested that this man should be allowed to remain in order that he could co-operate with Mrs Thomson to keep her husband’s business going.—George Roland Harris, 30, married, 41 Park Road, was described by Mr Eaden as one of the best slaughterers in the town, and he was always willing to help other butchers in case of need. His business premises were situated in a thickly populated part of the town, and on both sides the nearest butchers were some distance away. His wife assisted in the shop.—Capt Wratislaw said this was also one of the men he was asking for.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl E E Simons, of the Royal Engineers, landlord of the New Inn, Sharnford, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Lieut Herbert Proctor, of the Royal Engineers, who prior to the War was engaged in the Special Engineering Department, died on November 11th as the result of an accident in France.

Mr & Mrs Collins, 45 New Street, New Bilton, have received official news that their eldest son, Pte A Collins, Royal Warwicks, aged 29, was killed in action in France on October 26th. He was also wounded in September last year. He is their second son who has fallen in the War, and their youngest son, who is now recovering from wounds, has been wounded twice in France.

NEWS has reached Rugby that Capt Ernest Wood, Manchester Regiment, elder son of Mr T Wood, a Rugby accountant, has won the Victoria Cross. He enlisted in a Pals Battalion as a private in the early months of the War, and his brother, Capt Arnold Wood, also serving in the Manchesters, was another Pals Battalion recruit. Details of the exploits for which the coveted distinction has been awarded have not yet been known to his friends.

D.S.O. FOR CAPT P F FULLARD, M.C.

The D.S.O has just been awarded to Capt P F Fullard, M.C, Worcestershire Regiment and Royal Flying Corps, a son of Mrs Fullard, now living at 44 Clifton Road, Rugby. This gallant officer was educated at Norwich Grammar School. He joined the Inns of Court O.T.C in September, 1915, and subsequently received a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment and the R.F.C. He went out in April, 1917, and speedily won the Military Cross, and subsequently a bar to the same for daring work in the air. He is only just 20 years of age. On Saturday last, when taking part in a Rugby football match behind the lines in France, he unfortunately had his legs broken.

DISCHARGED SAILORS AND SOLDIERS.—A whist drive and dance was held in the Co-operative Hall on Friday, November 16th, in aid of the branch funds. The prize-winners were : Mrs A Neal, Miss C Gilbert. Miss Lockwood (Mr H V Ramsey, Mr Griffiths. A large number attended. Brown’s orchestra supplied the dance music. The first prize for ladies was a gramophone, value £6 6s, kindly presented by Mr J T E Brown.

PERSONAL PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.

A new scheme comes into force on December 1st, which will enable the NEXT-OF-KIN of a prisoner of war to send a “ Personal Parcel,” not exceeding 11lbs in weight and not less than 3lbs in weight, so as to minimize the risk of loss in the post. The “ Personal Parcel ” may be sent once a quarter only. It may NOT be packed and dispatched by any authorized association, and must NOT bear the British Red Cross label. It must be packed and dispatched through the Post Office by the next-of-kin or relative, who receives a special coupon, and the coupon must be affixed to the parcel.

In the case of men in the care of Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee applications for coupons should be addressed to the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby ; where the applicant is not the prisoner’s next-of-kin the written permission of the next-of-kin must accompany the request for the coupon.

WHAT MAY BE SENT.

Any of the articles noted below may be included :—

Pipe, housewife, cloth brushes, sponge, handkerchiefs (one a quarter), buttons, pencils, shaking soap (one stick a quarter), tooth powder, health salts, chess, draughts, dominoes, pomade, insecticide powder, cap badges and badges of rank, braces and belts (provided they are made of webbing and include no rubber or leather), dubbin, hob-nails, shaving brush, sweets, safety razor, combs, medal ribbons, bootlaces (mohair), hair brushes, brass polish, pipe lights, tooth brushes, mittens and mufflers (one pair each every quarter).

Relatives are warned that the inclusion in the parcel of any article not mentioned in the above list will entail the confiscation of the parcel. Persons who pack their parcel should use strong cardboard boxes, and should have pack the articles in such a manner that they will not move or rattle.

DEATHS.

PATCHETT.—Died of wounds on November 14, 1917, in Egypt, WILLIAM IVENS PATCHETT, 1st Warwickshire Yeomanry, the beloved husband of Ellen Patchett, 7 Manor Road, Rugby.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear.
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain ;
But trust in Christ to meet again.”

BEASLEY.—Pte. C. Beasley, of Napton, was killed in France Oct. 26th, 1917. Deeply mourned by his loving mother, father, brothers, and sisters.
Only a private soldier,
But a mother’s son,
Buried on a field of battle,
His duty he done.
He served King and country—
God known did his best ;
But now he sleeps in jesus,
A soldier laid to rest.
He sleeps besides his comrades,
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
His name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he has left at home.
A day of remembrance sad to recall,
A dearly loved son and brother missed by us all.
—Deeply mourned by us all at home.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. COLLINS, of the 15th Royal Warwicks, who was killed in action in France on October 26, 1917 ; aged 29.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear ;
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain,
But trust in Christ to meet again.”
—Deeply mourned by Father and Mother, Sisters and Brother.

FRENCH.—In loving memory of Pte J. FRENCH, of the R.W.R. (of Long Itchington), who killed in action on 26th October, 1917.—From his beloved Wife, Children, Father and Mother.
When last we saw his smiling face,
He looked so strong and brave ;
We little thought how soon he would be
Laid in a soldier’s grave.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He bravely fought and fell ;
he did best for one and all,
And them who loved him well.

THOMAS.—In ever-loving remembrance of Pte. W. H. THOMAS, killed in action in France on October 24, 1917. —From sorrowing Aunt and Uncle, Amy and Will.

THOMAS.—Killed in action Oct. 24, Pte. WILLIAM HENRY THOMAS, beloved nephew of Mr. and Mrs. ROSE, 78 Boughton Road.—Deeply mourned.

IN MEMORIAM.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of WALTER, the dearly-loved son of H. and C. PEARCE, of Dunchurch, who was killed on H.M.S. Bulwark, Nov. 26th, 1914.
There is link death cannot sever.
Love and remembrance last for ever.
—From Father and Mother.

 

17th Nov 1917. The Payment of Wroth Silver

THE PAYMENT OF WROTH SILVER.

This ancient custom was duly observed on Monday morning last before sunrising at the usual spot on Knightlow Hill. Mr John Heap, from the Estate Office, Dunchurch, again attended on behalf of the Duke of Buccleuch, to whom the tribute is payable. He read the charter and received the amounts due from the respective parishes called upon to pay it. In all but a few instances the money was either sent or thrown into the hollow stone by the parish representatives, and the exceptions were made good by the bystanders, numbering between 20 and 30. This small assemblage was strangely in contrast with the large crowds of people who in pre-war years found their way there to witness the proceedings. The falling off was attributable to the exigencies of the War, the petrol restrictions, and so forth, and not lack of interest ; and from the same primary cause the ceremony was shorn of an important adjunct—the breakfast, with its potations of hot milk and rum, which from time immemorial has followed. But ancient custom cannot prevail against licensing regulations and the Food Controller’s restrictions ; and so, instead of adjourning to the neighbouring inn for a substantial repast, the drinking of healths and smoking church warden pipes and tobacco, the visitors were invited by Mr Heap to partake of the Duke’s hospitality to the maximum extent circumstances permitted—to wit, hot coffee, which was provided in Mr Quarterman’s house close by.

Several old faces were to be seen in the modest group, including Mr D Borsley, of Stretton ; Mr Kelcey of Wolston (in khaki) ; Mr R T Simpson, who came from Edinburgh to demonstrate his undiminished interest in the time-honoured custom. Mr David Whiteman, of Church Lawford, woodman on the estate, acted as bailiff.

The ceremony did not last long, and as the company separated speculation was rife whether it would disappear altogether, and whether the magnificent avenue of trees, at the end of which Knightlow Hill is situated, would go with it. The hope was unanimously expressed that both would survive and be passed on to posterity.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.

At Warwick Town Council meeting on Friday last week Ald J C Purser, who represented the authority on the committee which met at Rugby recently to consider measures to be taken with a view to securing the preservation of Dunchurch Avenue, moved a resolution expressing the regret of the Town Council to hear of the proposal to cut down the trees and the hope that arrangement would be made by which the avenue might be preserved. He pointed out that the County Council Committee which was appointed to act in the matter had co-opted the Mayors of Warwick, Coventry, and Leamington, and that he attended the first meeting in the absence abroad of the Mayor and the inability of the Deputy-Mayor to attend. From what he learned at the meeting they were determined that no step should be left untaken to secure the preservation of the avenue. The committee decided to ask the Duke for a personal interview before he took any further step. A point of interest in connection with the preservation of the avenue was that it was contemplated to erect there a memorial to the immortal 29th Division, which were reviewed there by the King before going on active service, and the people of Rugby and Dunchurch felt that if the avenue was destroyed the memorial would be robbed of historic and picturesque surroundings.—Ald Purser’s resolution was carried unanimously.

WASTE PAPER COLLECTION.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—With reference to the waste paper collection which is being made in the town, and which not only helps the nation in supplying the raw material for paper, but also is of very great use in realising money for some of our local charities, I desire to call attention to the fact that these happy results could not be arrived at if it were not for the immense amount of hard work and keenness put into the movement by the boys of the Elementary schools, who do the collecting.

I think it reflects very great credit on these lads, and hope that their parents and the inhabitants of Rugby at large will realise what good work they are doing.

I regret to say that the quantity   collected has fallen off ; and I hope, therefore, that all who have any suitable paper will make a point of immediately advising Mr Simmonds, of Elborow School, or Mr Hodges, of the Murray School, and boys will be sent to collect.—Yours very truly,
J J McKINNELL.
27 Sheep Street, Rugby November 14th.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte F Smith, Royal Warwicks, the second son of Mr J G Smith, Bath Street, has been wounded in both thighs.

Pte Albert Coaton, Machine Gun Company, son of Mr C K Coaton, 42 Grosvenor Road, has been wounded by gunshot in the back.

Lieut R O Gladstone, Royal Engineers, who prior to the War was engaged on the outside construction staff of the B.T.H, was killed in action on November 2nd.

Mr W Eadon, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received information that his son, 2nd-Lieut L W Eadon, R.F.A, who been in France since September, 1916, and has been in most of the recent heavy fighting round Passchendaele, has been injured and is in hospital.

Lance-Corpl J A Maycock, Royal Warwicks, of Rokeby Cottage, Bennett Street, Rugby, son of Mr & Mrs J Maycock, of Market Harborough, who has been twice mentioned in despatches for good work and bringing in wounded under heavy shell fire, has now been awarded the Military Medal. His brother, Quarter-Master-Sergt C Maycock, has also received the Military Medal.

Sergt F Tucker, Rifle Brigade, Rugby, an employee of Messrs Frost & Sons, has been awarded a bar to his Military Medal ; and the following other Rugby soldiers have also gained the Medal :—Lance-Corpl F E Butler, Rifle Brigade ; Pte A Horne, Northumberland Fusiliers ; Bombardier W Vears, R.F.A ; and Gunner S F Painter, R.F.A, who is returned as having enlisted at Rugby.

PTE C B JONES.

News been received that Pte C B Jones, Gloucester Regiment, was killed in action on October 9th. Pte Jones formerly carried on business as a hairdresser in Murray Road, and he was also agent for the Rugby Advertiser. Before joining the Army in January last, however, he was employed in the Lamp Shipping Office at the B.T.H.

DEATHS.

GARDNER.—Died of wounds on October 28, 1917 in France Pte. CHARLES GARDNER, PO2163, 2nd Batt. Royal Marine Light Infantry, only son of Richard and Alice Gardner, Lower Shuckburgh ; aged 21 years.

HOWARD.—In loving memory of our youngest son, HARRY LEE HOWARD, who fell in action on October 26, 1917 ; aged 26.

JONES.—Killed in action on October 9th, “ somewhere in Flanders,” Pte. CHARLES BRADLAUGH JONES, 1/6th Gloucesters, the beloved husband of Ellen D. Jones, 148 Bath Street, Rugby.—“ Thy will be done.”

SARGENT.—Killed in action on October 23rd in France, Pte. ALBERT HARRY, aged 30, youngest son of the late J. H. Sargent and Mrs. Sargent, of Barby.
“ A sudden loss, a shock severe,
To part with him we loved so dear.
Our loss is great, we’ll not complain,
But trust in Christ to meet again.”
—Deeply mourned by Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

WILLARD.—In proud and loving memory of KENNETH HUGH WILLARD, 2nd-Lieut, York and Lancaster Regt., attached to R.F.C., killed in action on the Western Front on October 12, 1917 ; second son of T. W. and Tryphena Willard, Rugby ; aged 19 years.

 

 

10th Nov 1917. How to Save Food, Practical Suggestions

HOW TO SAVE FOOD.
PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS BY SIR A YAPP.
NO SUGAR IN TEA.

Sir Alfred Newton presided at a meeting on Tuesday morning, when Sir Arthur Yapp, Director of Food Economy, gave the first of a series of lectures on “ Food Ways and Means in War-Time.” The following practical suggestions for food saving were read by the Lecturer :—

No cream should be used except for infants and children ; as little milk should be used as possible ; no sugar taken in tea ; as little tea as possible should be used, and the morning cup should be given up. No more than one egg should be taken in any form in one day. No bread should be eaten at the mid-day or evening meals. Bacon and ham, essentially the foods of the poor and the working classes, should be used sparingly. He wanted to see all banquets and public dinners given up.

Sir Arthur Yapp said that the War was likely to drag on for a long time to come, and we could not afford to leave anything to chance. It was the long last mile which was the hardest to travel. The task of any one who preached economy in those days was a difficult one, but it was necessary that people at home should be convinced that economy in food must be practised by all if we were to win the War. There must be self-denial and self-sacrifice in all classes. Rich people said it was the poor and poor people said it was the rich who should be rationed, but his opinion was that there was waste and extravagance in all classes, which must be voluntarily suppressed. We were only being asked to do what German people were ordered to do in the first year of the War. A great many people were playing the game, but there was no guarantee of victory if the food supply was not properly husbanded at this time. We had to help our Allies as well as our people in the matter of food, and when the great American Army got to work we could not expect the help from the States and Canada which we were receiving.

All waste in food and unnecessary consumption must mean less efficiency at the battle fronts. Thank God there would be no need to give up the fight because of want of money, for money was assured, but the deficiency of freight and food might seriously hamper the progress of the War, especially if there was not great economy in the supplies available in the near future. A mighty effort, such as he believed the people would make if they realised the true position, could alone ensure national safety.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte W F Nash, of the Royal Warwicks, youngest son of Mr & Mrs Nash, Cemetery Lodge, Rugby, has been mentioned in despatches for the distinguishing himself in the field on October 4th.

Pte Clement F Scanlan, Worcestershire Regiment (step-son of Mr A E Treen, of Lawford Road, Rugby), been seriously wounded by a shell in the abdomen and thigh.

The Red Cross Hospital at Newnham Paddox in now closed for the winter mouths in order that Lady Denbigh and those who have been assisting her may have complete rest after the arduous work they have done since the hospital was opened.

The following is gazetted regarding the 2nd Battalion of the Warwickshire Volunteers :—C C Wharton to temporary Second-Lieutenant (September 22nd) ; Lloyd Chadwick to be temporary Second-Lieutenant (October 10th) ; W A Bezant to be temporary Quarter-Master, with the hon rank of Lieutenant (October 6th).

News has been received of the death in action of Second-Lieut Leonard Glover, R.F.A, youngest son of Mr J W Glover, J.P, of Warwick. He went to the front in the early stages of the campaign as a member of Lord Brooke’s troop of the Royal Horse Artillery, and on being recommended for a commission was posted to the Royal Field Artillery. His elder brother, Capt George Glover, is a prisoner of war in Germany.

John H Mawby, son of Alfred Mawby, Long Lawford, and nephew of the late Mr John Mawby, has been (from October 5th) gazetted to a Second-Lieutenant in the R.F.A. He was employed at the B.T.H Works before joining the Colours on September 2, 1914 He attained the rank of sergeant after 21 months’ service in France, and was recommended by his Commanding Officer for a commission. He passed through the R.A Cadet School at Exeter.

REV P W WORSTER AS CHAPLAIN.

In the current issue of the “ St Andrew’s Parish Magazine ” the Rector, referring to the departure of the Rev P W Worster to take up work as Army chaplain at Woolwich, says :—“ I cannot let him go away without saying that, however loudly we applaud his decision, we very much regret his going. During the 2½ years that he has been here he has been a most generous and loyal colleague, always ready to do the hardest and humblest job, eager to hear other men’s burdens, unselfish and imperturbably sweet-tempered. Of his work with the King’s Messengers I cannot speak warmly enough. May God bring him back safe to us.”

AVIATION FATALITY.
TWO OFFICERS KILLED.

On Thursday an aeroplane, while flying near Rugby, came down, falling about 300 feet, and the two officers—Lieuts. Price and Croeger—received such injuries that the former died immediately and the latter about hour 2 hours later, after being removed to hospital under the care of Surgeon-Major Collins.

NAPTON.

Pte Thomas Bachelor, of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, who was reported missing, is now reported as a prisoner of war in Germany. His sister, Mrs Thornicroft, has made arrangements for his parcels to sent out.

AT LAST.—Several seats marked “ Soldiers only ” have been placed round the Clock Tower.

WOUNDED ENTERTAINED.—A concert was given last week to the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall and “ Te Hira ” by the Rugby Amateur Dramatic and Social Club. Solos were given Mrs Ewer, Miss Stephenson, Mrs and Miss Lamb, Miss Coles, and Mr J Smith ; recitations by Mr J Smith; and a duet by Messrs Brown and J Swift. A sketch, “ Mixed Pickles,” was performed Misses Hadfield and Coles, and Messrs Haycock. Misses Poole and Lamb were the accompanists.

DISCHARGED SAILORS AND SOLDIERS.—Messrs. J Smith and E Cooke represented the Rugby branch of the National Association of Discharged Sailor and Soldiers at the first annual conference at Blackburn recently. The following resolution from the Rugby branch was carried unanimously :—“ That this conference urges that the Minister of Pensions issue instructions to Medical Boards that discharged sailors or soldiers shall not be asked the questions : Are you working ? and What wages are you earning ?”

RUGBY V.T.C. RECRUITING RALLY.

Continuing their recruiting rally, the “ B ” (Rugby) Company of the 2nd Warwickshire Volunteer Battalion gave a demonstration of the system of military training as carried out by them in accordance with the Army Regulations at their headquarters, the Howitzer Battery Drill Hall, on Sunday afternoon. The Officer Commanding (Capt C H Fuller) invited all interested to attend, and a large number of people gathered on the parade ground, amongst those present being the Battalion Commander, Col F F Johnstone. The Company was divided into instruction squads, and gave demonstrations of musketry, physical drill, bayonet fighting, bomb throwing, rifle grenade firing, and trench storming. The recruits were also taken in squad drill and physical exercise. At intervals the squads changed over in accordance with the general practice, so that during the afternoon all the men had instruction in the different parts of their training. Great interest was taken by the public in the various courses, and the interest which apparently attaches to the training ought to induce others to join the Corps. As there seemed to be a number of eligible men witnessing the instruction, the hope was expressed that the efforts of the Corps to add to their membership would be successful.

A very successful Bohemian concert was given at their headquarters on Wednesday evening last. The members of the Corps had decorated the large Drill Hall at the Howitzer Battery and the stage with very pleasing results. An excellent programme of music was presented to a large audience by the following members and friends of the Corps :—The Misses Nelson, Dukes, Barnwell and Phyllis Vann, Sergt-Major Cluett, Corpl Seymour, Ptes Farrar, Saddington, Everard, Browning, and Mr Gardner. All the items were excellently rendered and thoroughly enjoyed.

In the interval Major C P Nickalls, who was quite at home in his old headquarters, addressed the audience, and said that, as a Volunteer, he was proud to be again in the old hall, every beam of which had been hallowed by the boys of the Rugby Battery, who had shed their blood for their country. In peace time everyone knew the difficulties he had in raising the Battery, but in these days and in the crisis for which we were asked to prepare in the way of Home Defence no such difficulty ought to occur. He had taken out his Battery to France, and it had never been beaten, nor, he thought, equalled. Out of the members of the Battery only 25 had not been hit. Major Nickalls said that he had to thank the ladies very largely for the success of the recruiting in his Battery. They had a great influence over the men, and he hoped they would continue their interest with the present Volunteer movement. What had happened to Belgium and other countries might happen to us, and every man must be prepared to fight in order keep our enemies out of this country. For the Volunteers a man was not asked give up his home and his comforts, and leave everything he possessed—possibly for ever—which was near and dear to him. He was only asked to learn a little, and that little at home ; he was only asked to give 10 hours a month to drill and learn the practical bit, so that if an emergency does come he is of some use to his country and everything that we all hold dear. It simply meant a few drills close to their own home, and he could not think why more Rugby men did not come along and do it. No one could tell how long this War was going to last ; it might last some years ; but he did know that during this time it is the duty of every man to prepare himself, so far as he could, for anything which might come along. There were a great many men who said they had not got the time, but that is all rubbish. There is time with many if they will make it, and the sacrifice was worth it.

Capt C H Fuller also addressed the audience. and urged everyone to get rid of the feeling of “ self-satisfaction ” among many of those at home, which was growing to be the curse of the country, and in many cases amounted to a lack of patriotism. He asked them to consider the general outlook, and to bear in mind that it was only by enthusiasm that this War was going to be won, and by willingness on the part of the men left in this country, however busy they might be, to put themselves to some inconvenience in order to be prepared to assist in the protection of their country if necessity should arise.

Dr Relton, medical examining officer of the Corps, made a strong appeal for recruits, and said that we had arrived at a time when it was not a question of choice, but a matter of national necessity and our duty of citizenship that every man who is available for the purpose should be prepared, even at some inconvenience, to undertake the Volunteer training. He pointed out that in these days of danger there were other duties in the world besides putting in a hard day’s work and getting paid for it, and that the conditions of the men fighting at the front ought not to be lost sight of by those who were remaining at home and to whom our fighters looked for assistance of every kind.

Capt Fuller, in thanking the performers for their kind services, said that while they came with willingness to assist the Corps, they were expecting payment for their services, and the payment they asked for was a good result from the recruiting rally. He was quite sure nothing would please them more as a reward for their trouble than hear that the men were rolling in to increase the strength of the country.

THE DUNCHURCH AVENUE.

At the meeting of the Rugby Rural District Council, the Chairman drew attention to the proposal of the Duke of Buccleuch to cut down the elm trees on the Coventry Road. The County Council had taken the matter up, and had done their best to come to terms with the Duke, but had been unable to do so. They had, therefore formed a committee to deal with the matter, and hoped to arrange for a deputation to meet the Duke and try to see if some arrangements could be made to spare the trees. Before doing so, however, they had asked that Council to pass a resolution similar to the one passed by the County Council. He therefore proposed : “ Rugby Rural District Council has heard with deep regret that it is your gracious intention to cut down the elm trees which form the avenue on the Rugby and Coventry Road. As this avenue is so widely known as one of the most beautiful in Warwickshire, and also of historical interest, the Council hopes that your Grace may be induced to re-consider your decision and to allow the trees to remain.”—Mr Evans seconded.—Mr Burton supported, and said if the trees were cut down it would not only be a local loss, but a national loss.—The resolution was carried unanimously.

DEATHS.

AMOS.—Killed in action on October 9th, 1917, Pte. HARRY AMOS, Gloucester Regiment, at Poelcappelle, the dearly beloved husband of Clara Amos, 41 Lodge Road.
“Do not ask us if we miss him ;
There is still his vacant place.
We shall ne’er forget his footsteps,
Nor his dear, sweet, smiling face.”

CHENEY.—In loving memory of Gunner LEONARD CHENEY, killed in action in France on November 2nd.—Sadly missed by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

COWLEY.—In ever-loving memory our dear HARRY (JIM), only and dearly beloved son of the late Henry Cowley & Mrs. Cowley, Rockingham House, Clifton Road, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on October 19, 1917.
“ United in life, not long undivided in death.”
“ Had we been asked, how well we know
We should say, ‘Oh, spare this blow’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say,
‘Lord, we love him—let him stay.’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever know.”
—From his broken-hearted Mother and Sister, George and his little Midge.

HARDMAN.—In loving memory our dear son, Pte. WILLIAM HARDMAN, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who died of wounds received in action on October 27, 1917.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from those who loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

HIRONS.—Killed in action in No Man’s Land on October 17th, 1917, Corpl. W. J. HIRONS, King’s Royal Rifles, son of Mrs. Helen Hirons, of Long Lawford ; aged 25.

HOUGHTON.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7th R.W. Regiment, who was killed in action on October 4, 1917, “ somewhere France ” aged 32 years.
“ Sleep on, loved one, in your far-off grave :
A grave I may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We shall always remember thee.”
—From his sorrowing Wife and Child.

HOUGHTON.—In loving memory of Pte. W. T. HOUGHTON, 1/7th R.W. Regiment, who was killed in action on October 4, 1917.
“ Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

RANDLE.—In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner LEWIS RANDLE, R.G.A., who fell in action on October 19, 1917 ; aged 25.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in Memory,
And will for evermore.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, Bothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASKEW.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. S. J. T. ASKEW, who died of wounds in France on November 11, 1916.
“ The call was short, the shock severe,
To part with one we loved so dear ;
Our hope in heaven that we may meet,
There our joy will be complete.”
—Still mourned by his Wife, Sisters and Brother.

CLARKE.—In ever-loving memory of WALTER, younger son of the late E. S. & Mrs. Clarke, 19 Temple Street, Rugby, who was killed in action in France on November 15, 1915.
“ Called away while young in years,
Away on a foreign shore.
He sleeps in an honoured soldier’s grave,
In peace for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his Mother, Brother & Sisters.

ELKINGTON.—In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, JOHN THOMAS ELKINGTON (JACK), who fell in action on November 10th, 1916. “ God’s will be done.”
“ Only a private soldier, but a mother’s son,
Buried on a field of battle, my duty I have done ;
I have served my King and Country, God knows I did my best ;
But now I sleep in Jesus—a soldiers laid to rest.
He sleeps beside his comrades,
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.
A day of remembrance sad recall,
A dearly loved son and brother missed by all.”
—Deeply mourned by his Mother, Father, and Sisters of Long Lawford and Rugby, and his Brothers in France.

GARDNER.—Died of wounds on October 28th in France, Pte. CHARLES GARDNER, PO2163, 2nd Batt. Royal Marine Light Infantry, only son of Richard and Alice Gardner, Lower Shuckburgh ; aged 21 years.

PARKER.—In loving memory of TED, who died from wounds in France on November 3, 1914.—Not forgotten by Mother, Father, Brothers, and Sisters.

 

 

3rd Nov 1917. Value of the Acorn Crop

VALUE OF THE ACORN CROP.

The President of the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries again urges upon stock-keepers the great importance of making full use of the present abundant crop of acorns. Acorns are specially adapted for pig-feeding, and can be used most effectively and economically when pigs are allowed to gather them where they fall. While it will still be necessary to prevent the indiscriminate straying of pigs, the Home Office concurs with the Board in thinking that, if in consequence of this notice the number of pigs found straying on highways by the police should increase, proceedings against their owners should not be instituted except when direct negligence on the part of the owners is shown.

THE SALE OF POTATOES.

The Potato Order, which prohibits any person, except the grower, to sell potatoes without a license, came into force on Thursday. It is also necessary for retailers to exhibit price lists in their places of business.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of this committee was held on Monday, Mr W Flint, c.c. presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs Anderson, Mrs Wilson,. Mr G W Walton, Mr A W Shirley, Mr Pepper, and the Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker). The latter reported that since the last meeting there had been five additions to the list of prisoners of war, and he regretted say that there were the prospects of further increases in the near future. The acknowledgements from the men had much improved, and letters he had received and reports from Regimental Care Committees showed that practically all the parcels now reached the men. Apart from the newly captured men, all the others were now in regular communication. The only one who had been giving any anxiety of late was Driver F Furniss (A.S.C), of Rugby, of whom nothing had been heard for several months. During the week-end, however, Mr Barker said he had heard from Furniss, who in his letter said that he had received all his parcels from Nos. 1 to 55 inclusive, which were quite satisfactory, and adding that he was in good health. A number of efforts were promised during the winter months, which would assist the funds of the committee. He regretted that it had been found necessary to increase the cost of the standard food parcels from 6s to 8s owing to the rise in the price of commodities and materials and the necessity for making the parcels a little larger. This meant that, instead of £2 3s 6d per month per man, the cost would be £2 15s 6d, or a total charge of £216 9s per month inclusive for the 78 men. Fortunately for the fund 27 of these men were now fully adopted, and with small sums guaranteed on behalf of other men, there remained a balance of about £130 per month still to be found, provided, of course, it was the committee’s wish that they bear the increased cost. The subscriptions continued to come in splendidly, and during the past two months they had received more than sufficient to cover the cost of the parcels, thus being able to add slightly to the bank balance.

Mr Barker said he thought the committee and the subscribers to the fund would feel proud of the fact that they had been able to “ carry on ” without asking for financial assistance from the British Red Cross Society, who, who as they knew, had guaranteed the parcels. The committee would appreciate this more fully when he reminded them that the Chairman of that Society recently stated that they had to find £1,500 per day to make good the lack of funds and support given to other Prisoners of War Committees throughout the country. Mr Barker said he could not too strongly emphasise the fact that every subscription to the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was virtually a subscription to the British Red Cross Society.

Mr Flint said that, in view of this report, he felt that it would be everybody’s wish that the committee completed the cost of the food parcels and bread, and therefore moved this resolution.—In seconding, Mr G W Walton said that, notwithstanding the many other demands upon the public, the Prisoners of War Fund received the support of everyone. There were many persons contributing every week in a quiet way, and he felt sure they would be able to secure sufficient funds to enable the increased expenditure to be made.—The resolution was unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr & Mrs Brett have received official intimation that their son, Pte A J Brett, R.A.M.C, was wounded in October 7th, and is in hospital in France.

Mr W Cowley, of 34 Poplar Grove, has been notified by the War Office that his son, Pte G V Cowley, of the Dorset Regiment, was wounded by shrapnel in the thigh in an advance near Ypres on October 4th. He is an old St Matthew’s boy, He was previously wounded in September 1915.

Pte C E Freeman, Royal Warwicks, was wounded on October 17th, sustaining a severe gun-shot wound in the chest. His home is at 17 Charlotte Street.

In the list of casualties published last week-end appears the name of Lieut W E Littleboy, of the Warwickshire Regiment. He was educated at Rugby School, and was a prominent member of the Football XV of three years ago.

A letter has been received from Second-Lieut Basil Parker, Machine Gun Company, who was recently reported missing, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He is a son of Mr E Parker, of the Avenue Road, New Bilton, and was formerly a teacher at St Matthew’s School.

Mr and Mrs Whitbread have now received definite news from the War Office that the only son, Second-Lieut Basil Whitbread, was killed in action on the night of the 22nd July, 1916. His body was found outside the lines and was buried at High Wood.

The Rev R F Morson, M.A, elder son of Mr & Mrs Arthur Morson, who has for the past 4½ years been assistant priest at St Silas the Martyr, Kentish Town, London, has offered his services as a chaplain to H.M Forces, which have been accepted. He has been ordered to Salonica.

At the Rural District Tribunal on Thursday conscientious objection was pleaded by a Bilton youth, 18, single, who asked to be allowed either to undertake work with (1) the Friends’ War Relief Committee ; (2) Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section ; (3) full-time work on the land ; or (4) that the case should be referred to the Pelham Committee. He had previously been temporary exempted in order that he might complete his education. He was given conditional exemption on joining the Friends’ Ambulance Unit, general service section.

CORPL C H TOMPKINS.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C H Tompkins, of the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, who prior to the War was employed by the Company, died on October 23rd from wounds received in action.

BRANDON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook, of Brandon, have received the news that their son, Pte Banbrook, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital in Mesopotamia suffering from sand fly fever. Out of their five sons who enlisted two others are still suffering from wounds. Pte S Banbrook was for several years in the stables at Brandon Hall.—Pte G. Newman, Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the right foot. He formerly worked at market gardening for Mr Gupwell.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford have been notified of the death of their second son, Pte S G Halford. He has been missing for more than 12 months. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, who some short time back lost another son. Deceased was formerly in the employ of Mr J Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, where his father was employed for many years.

BINLEY.

Mr & Mrs J L STEVENS have received news of the death of their elder son, Pte J A Stevens, of the Machine Gun Company. Before entering the Army he was employed at Binley Colliery, and his father was in the employ of the Earl of Craven as a keeper, and resided at Piles Coppice.

BILTON.

REPORTED MISSING.—Miss E Watts has received official notification that her nephew, Private C Eccles, Royal Warwicks, has been reported missing as from October 4th. He was in the great push on the Yser in which Lance-Corpl Houghton, also of Bilton, lost his life.

ROYAL RED CROSS AWARD.

The King has been pleased to award the Royal Red Cross to Miss Kathleen Bolam, superintendent, Ashlawn and Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital, for valuable services rendered. We believe this is the first V.A.D member in Warwickshire to receive this honour which Miss Bolam has thoroughly earned and deserves.

DEATHS.

BYERS.—In loving memory of Corpl ANGUS BYERS, 1st K.O.S.B, who was killed in action on September 20, 1917, “ somewhere in France.”—Deeply mourned. From all at 82 Rowland Street.

GRENDON.—Killed in action on the Vimy Ridge on April’s 9th, Pte. WM. GRENDON, 2nd Canadian mounted Rifles, aged 31 ; dearly loved only son of J. & A. M. Grendon, late of Grandborough.

MILLS.—In ever-loving memory of JOSEPH MAWBY, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Mills, Marton ; killed in action on October 23rd ; aged 23.
“ Had we been asked, how will we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow,’
Yes, with streaming tears, would say,
‘ Lord, we love him—let him stay,’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown gravest is the bitterness blow,
None but his loved ones will ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters, Brothers, and Percy.