20th Oct 1917. Street Lighting in Rugby

STREET LIGHTING IN RUGBY.

By permission of the Chief Constable, a number of lamps at the most important points in the centre part of town are now being lighting at night. The majority of these have to be extinguished at ten o’clock, but the remainder will be alight all night, subject to arrangements being made for them to be extinguished within a few minutes of the receipt of the Field Marshal’s warning. Needless to say, this concession is greatly appreciated by all who use the streets after dark.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Major F Glover is gazetted second in command of the 2nd Battalion, Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Pte W Slater, of 36 Frederick Street, has been wounded in France, and is now in Kitchener’s Hospital, Brighton, where he is progressing favourably.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks L.I, son of Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terence, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th. He has been previously wounded twice, and had served in France over two years. This is the second son of Mr. Boyes, returned as missing this year.

Mrs Rathbone, 23 James Street, Rugby, has received official notification that her brother, Pte George Ruddle, was killed in action in France on September 3rd. He was an Old Murrayian.

Mr & Mrs Summers, of Long Lawford, have received news that their son, Pte A Summers, has been wounded in the back and is going on well.

Mr & Mrs Plumb have received news that their only son, Lance-Corpl J W Plumb, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been wounded. He is an Old St Matthew’s boy, and before he enlisted in September, 1914, worked for the Rugby Gas Company.

Corpl E P Moore, Machine Gun Section, who before joining the Army was employed in the Electrical Laboratory at the B.T.H, died from wounds received in action on October 6th.

SECOND-LIEUT K H WILLARD MISSING.

Second-Lieut Kenneth H Willard, Yorks and Lancs Regiment, attached to the Royal Flying Corps, second son of Mr T W Willard, 26 Bilton Road, has been officially reported missing as from October 12th. In a letter to Mr. Willard a fellow officer writes : “ He went out with six other machines on the 12th inst. to do a patrol, the leader being one of our best pilots. About 15 to 20 enemy machines were encountered, and a general mix-up ensued, in which your son was seen to be handling his machine and fighting in a most efficient manner. Although our machines were greatly out-numbered, they put up a great fight, but on returning to the aerodrome, It was discovered that your son was missing. No one saw him go down, and it is just possible that he may have been hit in the engine, and had to descend in the enemy lines.” Lieut Willard was educated at Rugby School and Sandhurst, and visited his parents a fortnight ago on his final leave before proceeding to the front.

CAPT. HON. HENRY FEILDING.

Captain Hon Henry Feilding, Coldstream Guards, the third and youngest son of the Earl and Countess of Denbigh, died of wounds on October 9th, aged 23. He had just been given command of his Company, and was leading them into action for the first time in the attack of October 9th. They had achieved their first objective when they came under heavy German artillery barrage. It was then that Capt Feilding was severely wounded by a shell. He was carried back to the casualty clearing station, where he had every possible care and attention, but the case was hopeless from the first. Recovering slight consciousness in the afternoon, he died peacefully and painlessly at 10.30 p.m. Father Crisp, R.C chaplain to the Forces, of Leicester, was with him at this period and gave him the last helps[?] of religion.

Captain Henry Feilding was educated at the Oratory School, Edgebaston, and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he held a commission before the war in King Edward’s Horse, with which he mobilised and went to France in April, 1915. He was later taken on the staff as A.D.C. to General Sir Henry Horne, with whom he went to Egypt in January, 1916. As he wished to with a fighting regiment, he resigned his appointment on the staff after six months, and transferred to the Coldstream Guards, with which he served at the front for 12 months.

His elder brother, Lieut-Commander Hon Hugh Feilding, R.N, was killed at the Battle of Jutland on May 31, 1916 ; whilst his eldest brother, Lieut-Col Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, has served in France since September 1914.

The C.O. Writes of Capt Feilding :—“ I cannot tell you what a loss he is both as a friend and a soldier. It was the first time that he commanded a company in action, and he was doing so well. He was full of enthusiasm for this first attack, and I only wish he could have seen the successful ending of such a great day for the regiment, but all officers of his Company fell wounded before reaching the final objective.”

A brother officer writes :—“ He was always so cheery and so full of fun, and was the life of our of mess, and in every way a most delightful companion. In his work he was always very thorough, and would take any amount of trouble over the men, with whom I always felt he was a great favourite. He will be terribly missed by everyone in the Battalion. I had such a cheery letter from him only a day or two ago, telling me he was just of to battle.”

A personal telegram of sympathy has been received from the King.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—News has reached Mr & Mrs Reuben Banbrook that their son has been wounded in the foot. He belongs the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and has been on foreign service for a considerable time. Mrs Banbrook has five soldier sons, of whom Pte James Banbrook has been gassed and Pte Bert Banbrook wounded twice.—Mr R Hart has received the news that his brother has been badly wounded. He was in the Regular Army before the War started, and been through most of the engagements. His ankle has been smashed and the other leg badly wounded.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.

The Christmas parcels for prisoners in Germany will be despatched during the first week in November.

The special parcel will be substituted for one of the six standard packages sent during November, and will include a rich Christmas pudding, roast beef, potatoes, sausages, cheese, and 50 cigarettes. If the relatives or “ adopters ” pay for this (the price is 8s) their names will be put on the parcels, but only one parcel can be sent to each man.

A larger parcel can costing 15s, will contain extras in the shape of turkey, bacon, butter, spaghetti, chocolate, tongue, and dried ginger.

Relatives of Rugby and district men desirous of sending one of these parcels in their own names should remit the cost, not later than Saturday next, the 27th inst, to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary, Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, 9 Regent St, Rugby.

No person can send any foodstuffs direct to a prisoner.

ANOTHER RED CROSS SALE.

At a meeting of the Rugby District Farmers’ Red Cross Committee on Tuesday, presided over by the Rev R S Mitchison, it was thought that the time had arrived for another effort on behalf of the Red Cross Society, as there is a very pressing need of increased support, the expenditure being largely in excess of the receipts. Opinions were expressed that all classes of the community should join.

It was decided to ask the Rector of Rugby, the Headmaster of Rugby School, the representatives of the Urban Council, the Chamber of Trade, the Butchers’ Association, the Trades and Labour Council, influential gentleman, and others to join the Rugby District Farmers in a united effort to hold a Red Cross sale.

A preliminary meeting will be held on Tuesday, October 23rd, at 7 p.m., at the Eagle Assembly Room, Market Place, Rugby.

WOLSTON.

THE HOUSING QUESTION at Wolston in fast becoming a serious matter. There are already numerous couples living with their parents, and are having to store their goods—in one instance in a hovel. A number of the present houses have been condemned, and this further accentuates the shortage. It is felt by many of the working-men of the village that the 25 houses the District Council propose to build after the War will be quite inadequate. Much unrest is at present caused, and only within the last few days a soldier’s wife has been threatened with proceedings if she does, not leave, the cottage being wanted for someone else.

DEATHS.

BOOTE.—In loving memory of Pte. S. BOOTE (SID), 4th Worcestershire Regiment, who died of wounds in France on October 11, 1917. “ He did his duty.” —From his loving brother and sister, JACK & JEANNIE, and his little nephew, AUBREY.

CROMBIE.—In loving memory of Regimental Q.M.-S. W. CROMBIE, 1st K.O.S.B., who died of wounds in France on October 4, 1917. From all at 35 Oliver Street.

HAYES.—On October 10th, at 14th General Hospital, Wimereux, France, from wounds received in action, Coy.-Sergt.-Major G. H. Hayes, 265385 R.W.R, third son of Mrs. Hayes, 80 York Street, age 34 years. Also, on July 19, 1916, Pte. FRANK H. HAYES, 2215, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France.”—On earth divided, in death united.”—From his sorrowing Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

LANE.—On October 13th, BERTRAM CHARLES, the youngest son of Mrs. Lane, 76 Bath Street ; aged 24.

STAY.—ARTHUR GEORGE STAY, eldest son of F. Stay, 99 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, killed in action Sept. 21.

IN MEMORIAM.

BACHELOR.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte ERNEST ANDREW BATCHELOR, Worcester Regiment, who was killed in action on October 24, 1916.
“ In a soldier’s lonely grave,
Beneath France’s blood-stained sod,
There lies my dearest son,
Resting in peace with God ;
Though rolling seas divide us,
And he sleeps on a pitiless shore,
Remembrance is a relic that shall live for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

 

 

 

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13th Oct 1917. War Prisoners’ Food Parcels – Serious Increase in Cost.

WAR PRISONERS’ FOOD PARCELS.
SERIOUS INCREASE IN COST.
NEED FOR FUNDS GREATER THAN EVER.

The standard parcels of food which are sent to the Rugby and district men who are prisoners of war in Germany have this week been increased in cost from 6s to 8s each owing to the continual rise in price of all commodities and materials. As six of these parcels are sent in the course of each month to every man, in addition to 26lbs of bread, costing 7s 6d, it will thus be seen that, instead of an expenditure of £2 3s 6d per man per month, the cost is now £2 15s 6d. There has been a further addition to the list this week, the total number of men in the care of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee being now 78. The cost to feed these men is, therefore, £216 9s per month. About one-third only of this amount is guaranteed, the remainder having to be met by general subscriptions. Without these parcels of food the prisoners of war would be in a perpetual state of semi-starvation, as the food supplied to them by the German authorities is not sufficient for their proper nourishment, as well as being unpalatable. More funds are, therefore, needed to enable the Rugby Committee to continue the regular supply of parcels so vitally necessary to our unfortunate countrymen. Practically all the parcels reach their destination, and are acknowledged with gratitude. One can help by sending a donation, becoming a regular subscriber, organising concerts, whist drives, &c, throughout the winter months, or “ adopting ” a prisoner.

The Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, will, gratefully acknowledge all contributions, which should be sent to him at the registered Office of the Committee, 9 Regent Street, Rugby.

“ FRANCE’S DAY ” AT RUGBY.

The flag day in aid of the French Red Cross, held at Rugby on Saturday last, was crowned with success ; and, in view of the fact that it was a town effort only, the financial result, which was in advance of past flag days confined to the town, was very gratifying. The weather in the early hours was very miserable for the first relay of workers ; and although the rest of the day was bright, it was very cold. There were several varieties of emblems, and these were sold by 150 fair helpers, some of whom, with a brief respite for meals, remained at their posts from 5.30 a.m till dark. The district superintendents were : Mrs A G Salter, Mrs J R Barker, Miss O’Beirne, Miss Hinks, Miss B Wood, Miss G Woods, Miss D Roberts, Miss Robbins, and Miss Baillie. Four of the sellers—Misses Jessie Mills, P Batchelor, P Hinks, and G Hinks—were attractively dressed in French national costume. The highest individual amount was yielded by Miss Priors box (£3 9s 2d), and Miss D Eadon was second with £3 0s 6½d.

Mr J J McKinnell (chairman of the Urban Council) was president of “ The Day,” the organisation of which was again in the hands of Mr J R Barker, and he was assisted at the supply depot, Bonn Buildings, by Mrs B B Dickinson, Mrs Barker, and Miss Robbins. The counting of the money was supervised by Mr R P Mason, manager of the London City and Midland Bank, and he was assisted by Mr J Ferry and the Hon Organiser.

The amount realised was £92 0s. 5d.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt A G Barford. M.G.C, has received the following from the Major-General Commanding his Division :— “ I have read with great pleasure the report of your Regimental Commander and Brigade Commander regarding your gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the field on August 10, 1917, during an attack on Westhoek Ridge.” Sergt A G Barford joined Kitcheners’s Army in August, 1914, and has been out in France just over two years. He is a son of the late Mr George Stops Barford, of Plumpton Manor, Northamptonshire, and of Mrs Wells, Claybrooke, and grandson of the late Mr George Eagles, of Little Lawford.

Lance-Corpl Bert Warden, R.W.R, has been posted as missing since August 27th. He was 20 years of age, a member of “ E ” Company, and had been in France 2½ years. For the last two years he acted as a Lewis gunner, and had been wounded four times. He fought on practically the whole length of line from Ypres to St Quentin, and participated in the Battle of Loos, the Somme offensive, and most this year’s fighting round Ypres. He was an Old Murrayian.

On October 4th Second-Lieut E W White, who at the time of joining up was a clerk in the National Provincial Bank, Rugby, was killed in action. He joined as a private, but he was soon picked out by his Colonel as a promising officer, and after training received his commission. His home was at Burton-on-Trent.

AN URBAN COUNCIL EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Mrs A M Thompson, of 49 Union Street, Rugby, has received official notification that her husband, Pte L Thompson, of the Yorkshire Regiment, was killed by a shell while in action on September 23rd. He would have been 33 years of age in November, and had been a number of years in the employ of the Urban Council as a dustman, in which capacity he was an excellent workman and much respected. He joined up in September, 1916, and had been abroad about four months. He leaves a widow and four little children. Mrs Thompson has received a sympathetic letter from the Major commanding, and the sad news has been also conveyed by Pte F C Walton, a comrade, who hails from Thurlaston, and has since writing been wounded.

PTE W HOUGHTON KILLED.

In a letter received this week by Mrs Houghton, the Chaplain of a clearing station in France communicates the sad information that her husband, Pte W Houghton, Machine Gun Corps, died on October 4th. When brought in he was suffering from a wound in the neck. He was in no pain, and quite conscious and cheerful, and in the ordinary way of things it did not appear to be a severe wound. Unfortunately he died in the operating theatre after an operation had been performed. Pte Houghton was 31 years of age, and was the youngest son of the late Mr Houghton and of Mrs Houghton, Queen Street, Rugby. For many years he had been employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society, and was manager successively of the branches at Kilsby, Hillmorton, and Bilton. He joined the Warwicks on November 7, 1916, and had been in France nine months. He leaves a widow and one child, now residing at Eastleigh, Southampton.

LOCAL FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEES.

Assisted by a capable and enthusiastic band of workers, Mr F M Burton, the executive officer for the Rugby Urban District, has made considerable progress with the organisation of the local food control machinery. So far 91 sugar retailers, 61 potato retailers, and seven wholesale dealers in potatoes have registered, and certificates authorising the purchase of sugar have been issued to caterers, institutions, and manufacturers.

The number of persons to be catered for under the householders’ rationing system is approximately 21,000, and the first batch of sugar cards was dispatched through the post on Wednesday. Unfortunately, however, the Executive Officer and his staff have been greatly handicapped by the careless manner in which some of the application forms have been filled in. In many instances—and these cases are, strangely enough, not confined to the least educated section of the community—the applicant has failed to fill in his or her address, while important details have been omitted from other forms. In those cases where children are attending school the address and other details can be easily ascertained, but in others the task of obtaining the particulars is a formidable one. In cases where the address has been given, but the form otherwise filled up inaccurately, the householders will be visited by canvassers, who have kindly volunteered their services. In some instances applicants have added particulars which are not required by the regulations. One person has written across his form an indignant protest, in which he asks : “ Are we living in Germany ?” and continues : “ Want of sugar will not make England give up its liberty. By what right should a man be required to give occupation ? Prussian ways and systems will not be tolerated in this country.” Another applicant has added to the particulars concerning her eight months old daughter the information, “ Bottle fed ” ; while in another case the early arrival of an increase in the family is clearly foreshadowed. A number of ladies and gentlemen have placed their services at the disposal of the Executive Officer, and the Assembly Room at the Benn Buildings presents the appearance of a hive of industry.

THE RURAL DISTRICT.

Mr F Fellows; executive officer for the Rural District Control Committee, and his assistants have also made satisfactory progress, and the task of issuing the sugar cards is now in hand. Fortunately the application forms in this district have, on the whole, been correctly filled in, and the number of incomplete forms has been negligible, although one applicant followed the instructions too literally, and addressed his application to the Paddington Committee, the name on the model form posted in the district for the guidance of householders. The approximate number of consumers in the district is 17,750. Sixty-six sugar retailers, 30 potato retailers, and 13 wholesale dealers in potatoes have been registered.

CHEESE MAKING.

The Agricultural Committee reported that the cheese making classes had been most successful. At Kineton 19 students attended, and 16 of these were now making cheese at home. At Pillerton 13 attended, of whom 12 are now regularly making cheese. They asked the Council to sanction cheese making classes for 1918-19 at a cost not exceeding £100.

DEATHS.

BRADSHAW.—Killed in action in France on September 24, 1917, Pte. ERNEST BRADSHAW, R.W.R., dearly beloved husband of Eilen Bradshaw, 39 Wood Street, and son of Mr. J. Bradshaw, 8 Newbold Road, Rugby; aged 37.

CUFAUDE.—In loving memory of 45459 EDWARD HENRY CUFAUDE, of the 9th Suffolk Regiment, son of the late John Cufaude, solicitor ; killed in action September 22, 1917, near Hill 70 ; aged 26.

PEARCE.—In loving memory of Gunner H. C. PEARCE, R.F.A., who fell in action on September 11, 1917.
“ Sleep on, loved one, in your far-off grave :
A grave I may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
You will be always dear to me.”
—Alice.

SAVILLE.—On September 28th, near Ypres, WALTER STANLEY SAVILLE, eldest son of the late Mr. Walter John & Mrs. Saville, 93 Clifton Rd., Rugby; aged 22.

TAYLOR.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. W. TAYLOR, aged 26 years, who was killed in France.—They miss him most who loved him best.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Brother and Sisters.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. L. THOMPSON, 49 Union Street, who was killed in action on September 23, 1917 : aged 33 years.—“God takes our loved one from our home, but never from our hearts.”—From his loving Wife & Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARBER.—In ever-loving memory of DAD, who passed away suddenly on June 26th, 1913, and of dear brother FRED, killed in action on September 25, 1915.—From Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

CHAMBERS.—Gunner E. CHAMBERS, son of Mr. & Mrs. E. Chambers, of Wolston, died of wounds, Oct. 11, 1915.
“ Rest on, dear brother, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But so long as life and memory lasts
We shall always remember thee.”
—Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

DYKE.—In loving memory of Corpl. OTHELLO DYKE, of the R.W.R., who was killed in action on October 12, 1916.—“ Peace, perfect peace,”—Not forgotten by his loving Sisters and Brothers.

WILKINS.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. R. G. WILKINS, killed in action on October 12, 1916.
“ Re-union is our abiding hope,
Only those who have loved and lost
Can know the bitterness of gone.”
—Sadly missed by EVELYN and WINIFRED.

WILKINS.—In loving memory of my deadly-beloved son, Pte. REGINALD GERALD WILKINS, R.W.R., late, of 32 Regent Street, previously reported missing, now believed killed ; aged 21 years.

 

6th Oct 1917. Successful Effort for Rugby Prisoners of War Fund

SUCCESSFUL EFFORT FOR RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
SHOW & SALE ON BENN FIELD.

Glorious weather and the prospect of performing a pleasing duty under pleasant conditions attracted a large crowd to Benn Field on Saturday afternoon, when a show and sale, arranged by the “ G.H.S ” Philanthropic Society on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held. The decision to hold the show was only reached about ten days previously, but so enthusiastically did all connected with the effort work, and so generously were they supported by the public, that the success of the undertaking was never in doubt, and this feeling of confidence was justified by the results.

The opening ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, who explained that the object of the effort was to raise as much money as possible to send parcels, of food to those “ poor chaps ” who had been taken prisoners by the unspeakable Hun, and who, as they knew well, were treated very badly indeed and were not properly fed. It was, therefore, up to the people of Rugby to see that enough money was raised, so that parcels of food could go to these men week by week, and so that they, when they were liberated after the end of the War, would be restored to their friends hale and hearty and able to take their place again in the life of the community. If they did not find the money, and if they left those poor fellows to the tender mercies of the Germans, some would never come back at all, and others would come back with their constitution devitalised by continual semi-starvation, and many, perhaps, would only come back to linger and to die. The Rugby Prisoners of War Committee was started two years ago by an energetic committee, of whom Mr J R Barker was the equally energetic secretary, and he had worked like a Trojan for it. The fund now supported 77 prisoners, all of whom were boys from Rugby or villages in the immediate neighbourhood. There was no doubt therefore, that there was a special call for them to look after these men. It cost £170 per month to send the requisite number of parcels, and of this £70 had already been guaranteed by certain kind and patriotic individuals, but the balance of £100 per month still had to be raised, and they were going to see that day if they could not realise at least several hundreds (a voice : “ Thousands ”). Thank God, Rugby, during this War had always come up to the scratch, and he had never known her let them down ; and he earnestly appealed to them to support the effort that day to the best of their ability. . .

A large number of attractions had been arranged by the committee, the principal of which was the vegetable show, where some exceptionally fine exhibits were staged and were much admired. Prizes were offered for the best exhibits, and these were divided into 27 classes, the winners being as follows :–

The judges were Messrs W Harmon (Newnham Paddox) and A Chandler (Coton House).

The Fire Brigade competitions were keenly contested. The prizes were given by the B.T.H Foremen’s and the Assistant Foremen’s Association. Mr W Spencer and Engineer Reece were the judges ; Messrs J Taylor and Cooke, timekeepers ; and Third Officer Fletcher (B.T.H) starter. . . .

A short concert was also given, the programme being arranged by Mr Charles T Mewis, and those who took part were Messrs H Phillips, W Jackson, J Farley and J Heap (Rugby Glee Party), Mr Geo Pratt, Coventry (humorist), Mr W C Sutton (ventriloquist), Mr Gough (conjuror). Mr J Littler was at the piano. A Punch and Judy show was also provided for the entertainment of the children. There was a musical chairs competition on bicycles, which was arranged for Boy Scouts, a number of whom from the Murray School Troop rendered valuable assistance during the afternoon. The competition was won by P Leader, G Day being second.

Various side-shows, skittles, “ Kaiser Bill and Little Willie,” guessing competitions, &c, were provided, and each of these did a good business.

A quantity of poultry and several sheep and lambs were sent by sympathisers for the benefit of the funds, and early in the evening the poultry were sold by Mr W Wiggins. Some very choice birds were offered, and in a number of cases they were sold over and over again. The prices, on the whole, were very satisfactory, the buyers sympathising with the genial auctioneer’s exhortation to “ Never mind the value of the things, but remember it is for a good cause.” A pet lamb was sold and re-sold ten times, realising £2 2s 6d.

The live stock having been disposed of the scene of interest shifted to the exhibition tents, where the produce was sold by Messrs W Wiggins, W Howkins, and F Frost. The visitors were in a generous mood, and, on the whole, very satisfactory prices were given. A small tan of petrol, containing about a gill of spirit, was sold and re-sold many times, the total realised being over £5 ; and by a similar method a toy motor-car realised about £7 10s. A potato, shaped like a bulldog’s head, also found many purchasers.

The sheep, lambs, and goat were sold in Rugby Market on Monday, and realised between £30 and £40.

Other diversions arranged for had to be omitted, as permission for extension and lighting could not be obtained. The proceeds will amount to well over £150.

The committee was assisted during the day by Messrs A Lord, G Vickery, G W Lawson, G Hansbury, G O Watson, W Henson, W Martin, H Clark, A C Bennett, A Allcutt, A Padbury, Mrs Barker, Misses R Palmer, Johnson, Ward, Kitchen, Twyford, Renshaw, Bromwick, Franklin, Prince, Owen, Spencer, Holyoake, Houghton, Fairfield, Walker, Cooke, and Gibbs.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R O Squarey, R.E, who has won the Military Cross, was captain of football at Rugby School.

Mrs Wakelin, of 15 Adam Street, New Bilton, has received news that her husband Pte L A Wakelin, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded by shrapnel.

Lieut Stanley Hidden, who has been serving for some considerable time with the Headquarters of a Mounted Division, has recently been promoted captain.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks, son of Mr & Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terrace, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th, after being twice previously wounded. He was 20 years of age, and had been in France two years. He had ten days’ leave at home in July. An elder brother, Pte F W Boyes, Berkshire Regiment, who was reported missing on July 1st, was subsequently reported killed.

ANOTHER HONOUR FOR LANCE-CORPL J H ENTICOTT.

Lance-Corpl J H Enticott, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr J Enticott, of 60 Union Street, who has already won the Military Medal and bar, has now been awarded the D.C.M for gallantry. Before the War Lance-Corpl Enticott, who is an Old St Matthew’s boy, was employed at the B.T.H. He is the third “ old boy ” to win the D.C.M, three others have received the Military Cross, about half-a-dozen the Military Medal, and numerous others have been mentioned in despatches.

LIEUT BASIL PARKER MISSING.

News has been received that Lieut W Basil Parker, of the Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr E Parker, 85 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been missing since September 29th. He was a pupil, and afterwards a student teacher, at St Matthew’s School, from where he gained a candidate teachers’ scholarship to the Lower School. He completed his education at Saltley College, and when he enlisted he held a teaching appointment in Derbyshire. He was formerly a member of the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade, and had also played forward for Rugby Football Club.

PERSONAL.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, medical officer of the London (Queen’s) Regiment, has received the Order of St Sava of Serbia in recognition of his services in that country in 1914-15.

WAR HOSPITALS SUPPLY DEPOT.

Many workers have been obliged to give up coming to the depot in order to take up other war work. More workers are urgently needed and invited to come to 8 Market Place, which is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays each week from 10 to 1 in the mornings, and from 2.30 to 4.30 on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. M MICHELL.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

HIRE TRADERS AND THE WAR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–I notice that more people are required for the National Service, and I think it is a scandalous shame that hire traders are allowed to keep groups of able-bodied men and women going from door to door pestering people to buy their goods on weekly payments. Some of the men look fit to be in khaki, while the others might also be doing useful work at a time like this. They seem to make a special business of calling on soldiers’ wives and trying to induce them to buy goods and pay for them out of the separation allowances which the Government pays to maintain the women and children, and not for any other purpose. I don’t think it right that these agents should be allowed to go about persuading soldiers’ wives to incur this liability without the knowledge or consent of the husband, and it will be a great shame if anything happens to prevent the women keeping up their payments if the trader seizes the goods without the consent of the Court when there has been a considerable sum paid. I think the Government would be justified in passing legislation to protect these people, as it would put the hire trader on a level with other tradesmen and not leave the customer at their mercy.–I remain, yours truly.
FAIR PLAT.

FOOD PRICES.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–Can anyone explain why food prices are rising simultaneously with the multiplication of Control Committees ? Take the case of butter. Why is it put up 4d a pound as soon as Rugby has a Food Control Committee ? I have had to pay an extra 2d twice lately, and I suppose I shall have to help pay the expenses of the Food Controllers. Surely we consumers are being forced to pay all round. As for the bread, we shall have to pay for it in the taxes, even if we get it for 9d a 4lb loaf. And we shall be made to fork out the money for the salaries of the hundreds and thousands of officials of the Government from top to bottom.

It was said in the old time of some professing Christians, “ Ye do wrong and defraud, and that your brethren.” What would St Paul or Thomas Carlyle say now about the greed of gain ? And what are the ministers of religion saying and doing in the face of all the avarice prevalent among traders and workmen of almost every sort ? Are honesty and religion standing a tiptoe in our land, ready to pass–I know not where !–Yours sincerely, INQUIRER.
Rugby, September 26, 1917.

SEATS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,–If your correspondent, “ Visitor,” resided here he would know that Rugby does possess public seats, but for some pre-war abuse they were banished by the “ City Fathers ” to the “ Rec,” and the Park, and thither Tommy must go if he wants a rest. It is not want of thought on the part of townspeople, because the seats have been pleaded for in previous summers, but the said Fathers said, “ No,” and it is so. What little bit of life is in this small town Tommy wants to see it, but he must stand or hang on railings to do it now the Parks are too cool.–Yours, sir, very truly,
CITIZEN.

DEATHS.

PEARCE.–On September 11, 1917, HAROLD, the dearly beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, who was killed in action in France.
“ He marched away so bravely,
His young head bravely held ;
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed ;
There on the battlefield
He calmly took his place ;
He fought and died for Britain :
An honour to his race.”

RUSSELL.–Gunner Walter Russell, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Russell, Toft Farm, Dunchurch, died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917; aged 27.

RUSSELL.–In loving memory of my dear husband, Gunner WALTER RUSSELL, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917.–NELLIE RUSSELL, Whitehall Farm, Dunchurch, Rugby.

VEARS.–Killed in action in France September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest son of Harry and Nellie Vears, of Bedworth, late of Rugby ; aged 21 years.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of a dear son and soldier brave :
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better Land.”

VEARS.–Killed in action in France on September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest grandson of Mrs. F. Draper, Long Buckby ; aged 21 years.
“ Bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
–From Grandma, Aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

SALMON.–In loving memory of Rifleman J. R. SALMON, R.B., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. H. Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road, Rugby ; killed in action on the Somme Front, October 7, 1916.

TANSER.–In ever-loving memory of Lance-Corpl. T. TANSER, of South Kilworth, killed in action October 3rd, 1916.
“ Ever in our thoughts, but the hardest part still yet to come.
When the heroes all return and we miss among the cheering crowd the face of our dear boy.”
–Mother, Wife, Sister and Brothers.

 

29th Sep 1917. Blackberry Picking

BLACKBERRY PICKING.-During the past fortnight the scholars of various schools in Rugby and the neighbouring villages have picked 2 tons of blackberries, to be used to make jam for the Army and Navy.

UTILITY POULTRY KEEPERS’ MEETING.-There was a satisfactory attendance at a meeting held at the Eagle Hotel on Saturday to consider the formation of a branch of the National Utility Poultry Society, which, in conjunction with the Agricultural Organisation Society, is seeking to put the poultry industry on a business footing. Mr Walter Barnett (Bilton) presided, supported by Mrs Barnett, Mr E B Covington, Mr W T Fischer, &c. Mr H Tarbox read letters from a number of interested poultry keepers ; from the Secretary of the N.U.P.S, and from Capt Peirson Webber, the County Council expert, regretting inability to be present that day. After discussion, it was resolved to form a society for Rugby and district, and to convene a further meeting when the experts can tend to give details of the working of similar existing branches.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CANTEENS.

It has been decided to close – at any rate, temporarily – the Food Economy Canteen opened at New Bilton in July last, and meals will not be obtainable there after today (Saturday). Although there is no doubt that if workers had been brought to realise that meals can be obtained there far cheaper than they could be prepared at home, the canteen has not been well patronised, and there has been a weekly loss since it opened. It is gratifying to note, on the other hand, that the Chester Street canteen continues to be a great success, and there are hopes of an extension in the accommodation. Not only is bread conserved, but, thanks to the willing aid of enthusiastic honorary helpers and to the hearty co-operation of an efficient paid staff, the prices as at New Bilton, rule low for very satisfying meals. The place is always full at meal times, and many people purchase cooked food to take home. Working expenses are being met, and a weekly profit, which will go to the liquidation of the debt incurred in setting up the canteen, is being made.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier Reg Covington, R.F.A, son of Mr Richard Covington, has been gassed during the recent fighting.

The latest list of war honours contains the name of Pte J French (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte George Ruddle, of James Street, Rugby, is reported missing, believed killed. From his comrades it was gathered that he was almost certainly killed. He was in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Sergt L C Cox, elder son of Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth House, Popular Grove, Rugby, after much active service in France with the King’s Royal Rifles, during which time he was wounded four times has passed first class in a special course of instruction and sails for Africa this weekend to join the King’s African Rifles. His younger Brother Albert, also with experience of the fighting in France, being twice mentioned and awarded the Military Medal, has been presented as a second-lieutenant in the King’s Liverpool Regiment.

Official intimation has been received from the War Office, that Bombardier S G Smith, son of Mrs Smith, 28 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, was killed in action in France on August 18th. He was formerly a member of the of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, and was employed by the Rover Company, Coventry when called up. A letter from the officer commanding the battalion speaks in high terms of Bombardier Smith’s performance of his duties.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.

CAPT E G PASSMORE, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr S A Passmore, is in hospital at Dieppe suffering from trench fever.

News has reached the village that Pte Stowe, who was reported missing, is now a prisoner of war. This is the second prisoner of war from this village, Pte Roberts having been wounded in the leg and taken prisoner a few months ago.

BRETFORD.

KILLED IN ACTION.-Mrs Archer College, Hill Farm, Bretford, has been notified that her husband, Pte Archer Colledge, Royal Warwicks, was killed in France on September 3rd. Pte College, who went to the front in June last, lost his life in his first engagement. He was educated at Pailton Church School and was employed at Coventry Ordnance Works until called up in March last. Pte College’s Company Officer, in a letter to Mrs College, writes :- “ Although he had recently joined us, by his cheeriness and courage he soon made himself liked, and his platoon feel his loss keenly, as I do myself.” A comrade of Pte College’s, who has been in continuous action for the last 16 months, writes that the present fighting is the bitterest he has yet experienced. Pte College was 29 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

TO HELP THE PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

AN IMPORTANT EVENT.

To-day (Saturday) an attractive event will take place in Benn’s Field, North Street, Rugby, in aid of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, for which a continuous and increasing flow of money is needed. The effort will consist of a great show and sale of agricultural and horticultural produce, which is being freely given by generous donors in the town and district.

Mr J J McKinnell, C.C, chairman of the Urban District Council, is the chairman of the committee, and, supported by leading residents, will open the affair at 2.30 p.m.

In the horticultural section 26 prizes are offered for competition ; and, of course, contributions of produce merely for sale will be gladly received. Already a large number of sheep, lambs, pig, rabbits, and poultry have been promised for the agricultural department ; and the auctioneers of the town, who will sell the goods, are giving their services gratuitously, as well as all others who are working so energetically to ensure success, and it only remains for the public to give their attendance-and their money-for which there will be plenty of bargains.

A large marquee. which will be lighted by electricity in the evening, will be provided ; and apart from the exhibition and sale, there will be various competitions and side-shows of an attractive nature. These will include a fire brigade competition-always an interesting item-and four brigades from Coventry will be represented in this. There will be dancing also for the young people.

For a small admission fee of 6d the visitor will, therefore, get plenty of money.

The Committee consists of Messrs. A Bell, chairman ; J Cash, hon treasurer ; G Allford, J Reginald Barker, C Cockerel, F Dunkerley, J Harker, G Harrowing, G Henton, J P Lennon, C Mewis, J J   Scrivener, F Starmore, with J R Blyth and H Lovell, joint hon secretaries.

DEATHS.

COLLEDGE.—In ever-loving memory of Private ARCHER COLLEDGE, 20249 Royal Warwickshire Regt., killed in action on 3rd September, 1917, somewhere in France, aged 29 years.
A loving husband, true and kind,
A better father you’d never find ;
But He who orders all things best,
Has given to him eternal rest.
The end was bitter, the shock severe,
To part with one we loved most dear.
We did not see him die or hear him say goodbye ;
We miss him and mourn for him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the days is his young life has seen.
—Deeply mourned by his Wife and Child.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed at the battle of Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915, son of the late James Barnett and Mrs. Sansome, 5 Gas Street. Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Step-father, Brothers, Winnie and May.
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of my pal, Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxford and Bucks, killed in action September 25th, 1915.
Two years had passed, my heart’s still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face
No pal on earth can fill his place.
BILLIE WEBB, somewhere in France.

BROWN.—In loving memory of our dear Son & Brother, PERCY EDWIN BROWN, who was killed in action on September 25th, 1915.
Sleep on dear son and brother in your far off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts,
We will remember thee.
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of PRIVATE C. CASHMORE, Oxon & Bucks L.I., who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
Our hero gone, but not forgotten,
Never shall his memory fade ;
Our sad thoughts so often wonder
To that far-off land where he is laid.
Yes, we think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall,
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his photo on the wall.
—From his loving Wife and Children.

EMERY.—In loving memory of ERNEST HARRY EMERY, Bdr. R.F.A., accidentally killed whilst on active service with the Salonica Forces, Oct. 1st, 1916. Interred in Mekes Cemetery.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, FRED, who was killed in France on Sept. 25th, 1915.
From POLLIE AND SARAH.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, JOHN HINKS, of 33 Essex Street, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who fell asleep in action in France on September 25th, 1915.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave,
Of a dear son and soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand,
When we meet again in the better land.”
—Not for granted by his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

STENT.—In loving memory of my dear son, Corpl. P. V. STENT, who was killed in action at Loos, on September 25th, 1915.
“ Two years have passed and friends around us
Think, perhaps, the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow,
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Silently mourned by his loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

STENT.—In loving memory of PERCY VICTOR STENT, who was killed at Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915. “ Death divides, but memory lingers.”—From Mr. and Mrs. HARBAN and family.

STONE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, PTE. C. G. STONE, who was wounded 28th Sept., and died the 1st October, 1915.
“ They miss him most who loved him best.”
—From his loving wife Amy.

WHITBREAD.—2nd Lieut. BASIL, 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Reported missing 22 July, 1916 ; now presumed to have been killed in action on that date.

WEST.—In proud and loving memory of FRANK WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel R.F.A. (T.), who was killed near Pozieres on September 28, 1916 ; aged 33.—“ We have found safety with all things undying.”

22nd Sep 1917. Seats for Soldiers.

SEATS FOR SOLDIERS.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—As a visitor to the town, I learn that Rugby has already done a good deal for wounded soldiers, so that it must be from want of thought, and not from want of heart, that one arrangement has not been made that I have seen in many towns. I refer to the placing of garden seats and chairs in the public streets for the use of soldiers. One sees these poor fellows sitting on the kerbs and other uncomfortable positions. There are many patriotic-spirited inhabitants who might loan their garden seats ; also probably many who would see their way to put a notice on their garden gate, inviting the men enter the garden and use the seat therein, and thus confer both rest and pleasure. Surely these men have done enough for their country to deserve these little attentions.—Yours sincerely, VISITOR.
September 13, 1917.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt A Goode, of the Machine Gun Company, son of Detective-Insp Goode, of Rugby, who was recently reported missing, has written to his father stating that he is a prisoner and at a Red Cross Hospital at Neuminster, in Germany.

Pte W J Boyce, Royal Warwicks. son of Mr J E Boyce, a member of Long Lawford Parish Council, has sent to his father a certificate from his Colonel to the effect that he “ has been specially noted for gallantry and good work in the trenches during the last tour, and notice has been inserted in the battalion orders to that effect. This is the second mention has received within the last week.”

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

APPOINTMENT OF AN EXECUTIVE OFFICER.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Wednesday evening Mr Frank Middleton Burton was appointed executive officer at a salary of £200 a year. Mr Burton is secretary of the Rugby Liberal Association, and also clerk to the Military Advisory Committee. In the latter capacity he has done much to forward recruiting locally. He is also a member of the Rugby Board of Guardians and Rural District Council, the Rural District Food Control Committee, and Bilton Parish Council.

WILL OF THE LATE LIEUT HART-DAVIES.—Lieut Ivan Beauclerk Hart-Davies, of Rugby, Warwick, late of the R.F.C, son of the late Rev John Hart-Davies and Mrs. Hart-Davies, of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire, aged 39, who was killed in an aeroplane accident in England on July 27th, left estate valued at £8,679. Testator leaves £500, his dog Jock, effects in his office and residence, and motor-cycle to his late clerk, Arthur Douglas Miller ; £20 to his cashier, John Griffin ; £10 each to other persons in his employ ; and the residue to his sister, Blanche Violet Hart-Davies, if a spinster, or should she be married, then to Arthur Douglas Miller.

RED INDIAN PAGEANT AT HILLMORTON.

Arranged primarily for the amusement of the patients of the local V.A.D Hospitals, a unique entertainment, taking the form of a Red Indian pageant, was given in a field kindly lent by Mr Busby, near Hillmorton Wharf, on Saturday afternoon last. The entertainment was arranged by Mrs Price, with whom the idea originated, and she was assisted by an enthusiastic company of ladies and gentlemen of the district. The weather was all that could be desired, and there was a good number of the general public present at the hour the entertainment was timed to begin. Unfortunately, however, an inspection of the V.A.D Hospitals was also fixed for Saturday, and none of the soldier guests had arrived at this time. The commencement was postponed until four o’clock ; but as none of the soldiers had arrived then a start was made. The first brake load of soldiers arrived half-way through the performance, and others at brief intervals until some time after the entertainment had concluded, and in consequence the performers kindly agreed to repeat the entertainment after tea.

The pageant was admirably enacted, and was full of humorous as well as blood curdling incidents. . . .

A ventriloquial entertainment was also given by Mr Wal Sutton, of Rugby, and this proved very popular among the juvenile members of the company.

Horses were kindly sent for the pageant by Mrs Balding, Mr Crane, and Mr Kendal. The treasurers were Col F F Johnstone and Mr Tom Lever, and if there is a balance after paying expenses it will be devoted to the local Nursing Fund. Valuable assistance was rendered by the Hillmorton Scouts, under the direction of Mr Tom Lever.

WITHYBROOK.

SCENE IN A GIPSY CAMP NEAR COVENTRY.—Coventry county magistrates on Friday last week had before them a gipsy hawker, Hugh Fury, on a charge of obstructing the police. P.C’s Knight and Walker having reason to suppose there were two young men liable for military service in prisoner’s camp at Withybrook, went there. They found a couple of youths, but difficulties were put in the officers’ way of obtaining information as to who the young men were, and prisoners and others appeared with various weapons and assumed a threatening attitude. The result was that the lads got away.—Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said he had “ about 16 children,” of whom some were the Army, and both he and his wife promised to give information to the police if and when the wanted sons were heard of.—The Bench imposed a fine of £5 on the prisoner.

 

IN MEMORIAM.

BURTON.—In loving memory of EDWIN THOMAS BURTON, New Bilton, who died September 20,1916.
“ We have lost one earthly treasure ;
Death has snatched him from our side.
Life has been so sad and dreary
Since that day our loved one died.”
—From his loving Wife and Daughter.

COURSE.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Sergt. A. L. COURSE, who was killed in action on September 16, 1916.
“ Farewell, dear son, in a soldier’s grave
A grave we shall never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

DRAKE.—In loving memory of ALFRED HURST DRAKE, who was killed in action in France on September 25, 1916 ; eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. B. Drake, Lutterworth.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. FREDERICK FRANKTON ; killed at Loos, September 27, 1915. —“ They miss him most that loved him best.”—From his loving Wife and Children.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who fell at Battle of Loos, 25th—27th September, 1915.—From is ever-loving Wife and Children.

GRIFFITH.—In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, Rifleman L. GRIFFITH, K.R.R., who died of wounds September 18, 1916.—“ Gone from sight, but to memory ever dear.”—From ever-loving Brothers and Sisters, 74 South Street.

JEFFS.—In loving memory of my dear husband, HENRY EDWARD JEFFS, who died September 16, 1915.
“ I miss and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memories of days that have been ;
Not thought of or forgotten by some he may be ;
But the grave that contains him is sacred to me.
Those that loved him best miss him most.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

MEADOWS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner C. H. MEADOWS, R.F.A., who died on September 4th, 1917, at 11th Stationary Hospital, Rouen, of wounds received in action on July 17th, and was buried in St. Seven Cemetery, Rouen, after much suffering, borne patiently ; aged 26 years.—At rest.
“ Had we been asked, how well we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow ‘
Yes, with streaming tears would say,
‘ Lord, we love him, let him stay.’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Mother and Father, Brothers and Sister, and Fiancé.

NEAL.—In loving memory of my pal, Bombardier F. G. NEAL (Birdingbury), of D Battery, 46th Brigade, who was killed in action September 9, 1916.
“ One year has passed, my heart still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face,
No pal on earth can fill his place.”
—FRED REEVE (somewhere in France).

NEAL.—In ever-loving memory of Bombardier FRANK NEAL, R.F.A., who was killed in action on September 19, 1916.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best :
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Sister.

SHONE.—In loving memory of Rifleman TOM SHONE, who was killed in action at Loos on Sept. 25, 1915.
“ Two years have passed, and friends around us
Think perhaps the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—From Father, Mother, and Sisters.

SHONE.—In loving memory of our dear brother TOM, who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in your far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From FLO & HORACE.

15th Sep 1917. A Successful Experiment.

A SUCCESSFUL EXPERIMENT.—One of the war-time experiments tried at the Murray School this year was the utilisation of the flower plots for vegetable growing. This proved very successful, and resulted in the raising of 116lbs of carrots, 86lbs of beet, and 46lbs of parsnips. This does not include thinnings, which have been constantly pulled, amounted to about 50lbs.

OUTING.—A very pleasant outing to Kenilworth was enjoyed by the shell workers of the B.T.H last Saturday. They journeyed in brakes via Bubbenhall and Stoneleigh Deer Park. After tea a visit was paid to the Castle ruins. A concert was arranged, and those who contributed to the harmony were : Miss Cave, Miss Hollinsworth, Mrs Cotching (accompanist), Messrs Barnett, Boff, Welsh, Brown and A Harris. The party, numbering 70, had a most enjoyable time. The arrangements were made by Mr D Barnett.

NORMAL TIME ON SEPT. 17th.

The Home Secretary gives notice that summer time will cease and normal time will be restored at 3 a.m (summer time) in the morning of Monday next, the 17th inst, when the clock will be put back to 2 a.m.

All railway clocks and clocks in Post Offices and Government establishments will be put back one hour, and the government requests the public to put back the time of all clocks and watches by one hour during the night of Sunday-Monday, 16th-17th inst. Employees are particularly recommended to warn all their workers in advance of the time change of time.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mrs Angell, 17 Little Pennington Street, has received official intimation that her son, Pte A Angell, Royal Warwicks, has been seriously wounded by gunshot in the face, arms, and neck, and his left leg has been amputated. Pte Angell has been twice wounded previously, lost a finger, and has been gassed twice.

MR W J LARKE HONOURED.

The many friends of Mr W J Larke, 71 Hillmorton Road assistant chief engineer at the B.T.H, who has been lately employed in the Ministry of Munitions, will be pleased to hear that he has been appointed an officer of the Order of the British Empire.

PTE. BRADSHAW KILLED.

Mrs Bradshaw, of 216 Lawford Road, Rugby, received news this week that her husband, Pte Bradshaw, had been killed in action on August 19th. In writing to the widow deceased’s officer states : “ It was a great shock to me when I returned to the regiment to find Pte Bradshaw had been killed in action. He had just carried a wounded man to the first-aid post when a shell came and smashed the post. I am not wont to praise unduly, but your husband has, during the very long period he has been with us, done work of very great service, especially when the lines. To those of us who have been with the battalion through many months his loss will be very keenly felt.” Pte Bradshaw was in the 7th South Staffs. He enlisted on the outbreak of war. He has seen service in Egypt, the Dardanelles, and France.

OLD MURRAYIAN GAINS MILITARY MEDAL.

In a letter to Mr. W T Coles Hodges Sergt F H Bird, of the Army Service Corps, writes :—“ We have had a very hot time for the past ten weeks. We were in the big push of July 31st, and I was mentioned in dispatches, and have since been awarded the M.M. . . . . We have had some very bad weather, but for the past few days has been lovely and fine. . . . I have never met any of the ‘old boys’ out here. We have been out here two years, and I have only met two fellows who came from Rugby.”

ANOTHER B.T.H EMPLOYEE KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Second-Lieut Percival Thistlewood, Rifle Brigade, died of wounds on August 24th. Second-Lieut Thistlewood was the only surviving son of Mr Thistlewood, a well known Leamington resident, and brother of Corpl Frank Thistlewood, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, who was killed on September 3, 1916. He enlisted in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry within a month of the commencement of the War, and was soon promoted sergeant-major. After being in France 18 months he returned to England to train for a commission, and was eventually gazetted to the Rifle Brigade. After leaving school he came to the B.T.H with a view to qualifying as an electrical engineer. Here he showed marked aptitude for the work, and in 1913 he won the first prize in an open competition as an electrical engineer. Second-Lieut. Thistlewood was 26 years of age, and like his brother Frank was very popular with his fellow-employees at Rugby.

Mr W H W PARSONS’ NEPHEW KILLED IN AN AIR RAID.—One of the victims of the recent air raid in London was Mr Henry Over Parsons, 33, a violinist, who was injured by the bursting of the time fuse of an aerial torpedo or shrapnel, and died two days afterwards. Deceased’s widow stated at the inquest that her husband informed her that he must have been blown 10 yards. Mr. Parsons was a nephew of Mr W H W Parsons, sanitary inspector to the Rugby Urban District Council.

WOLSTON.

MR A J POXON ILL.—The numerous friends of Mr A J Poxon will be sorry to hear that he is ill in hospital at Chatham, He is in the Naval Air Service, and for some length of time has been on foreign service. Before joining the Navy he was assistant overseer of Wolston and attendance officer for the Warwickshire Education Committee in the Monks Kirby district. He is the elder son of Mr John Poxon.

LANCE-CORPL G READER A PRISONER.—Mrs Reader has received a postcard from her husband, who was reported some weeks ago by the Army Authorities as missing. In the postcard he stated that he was slightly wounded and a prisoner of war at Munster, Westphalia. The news that he is still alive has given general satisfaction in the district. The facts have been communicated by the Rev J C Gooch to Mr J R Barker, hon. secretary of the Ruby Prisoners of War Help Committee, and arrangements have been made to send Lance-Corpl Reader the standard food parcels and bread.

BRINKLOW.

DEAD HERO’S WIDOW RECEIVES HIS MEDAL.—Pte R E H Murden, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal. Before hostilities broke out he has served seven years in the Army and at once proceeded to France where he went through all the early engagements. He was a native of Brinklow and before entering the Army was employed by Mr W Dunn, of Church Lawford. He has been killed since the medal was awarded, and his widow, who resides at Longford, was summoned to the hospital at Birmingham on Saturday, when it was presented to her by Lieut-General Sir H C Slater, C.C.B No record had been taken of the brave deed deceased had performed—a fact for which the General expressed regret. As Mrs Reeves received the medal she was heartily cheered by the wounded soldiers and staff at the hospital. Her brother-in-law, Pte J Murden, lost a leg in France.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee was held in Benn Buildings on Monday last. Mr W Flint C.C, chairman of the committee, presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden (hon. Treasurer), Mrs Anderson, Messrs G W Walton, J H Mellor, Thatcher, Porter, Clarle, and the Son Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker).

The balance-sheet for the year ended July 31st, particulars of which have already been published, was presented by the Chairman, who also read a letter from the Hon. Auditor, Mr W G Atkinson I.A, congratulating the committee upon the excellent results they have achieved as shown by the year’s figures. Only those who actually go through the accounts could form any idea of the enormous amount of work entailed, and great credit is due to Mr Parker for the methodical and painstaking manner in which this work is carried out. The Chairman felt that not only the committee, but all interested in the fund, would be very pleased to have this testimonial to the efficient manner in which Mr Barker carried out his duties.—This was cordially endorsed.

Mr Barker reported that there were now 73 prisoners of war on their list, the total cost of the regulation food parcels and bread to these men now amounting to £162 18s 6s per month. He had, however, been in constant communication with the Regimental Care Committee of each man’s unit, and had, through these committees, secured “ fairy-godmothers ” for 26, and, in addition, various sums on behalf of others amounting to £74 10s per month ; thus the balance to be raised in Rugby and district was still very great, no less than £88 per month being required. Constant effort would have to be made to see that this was maintained.

The Chairman referred to the gifts sent from Egypt by Rifleman Fred Staines, with the wish that they be disposed of for the benefit of the fund. It was decided that they be competing for, the snake being offered as first prize and the necklaces second and third prizes—the tickets to be one penny each.

The prizes are on view at 9 Regent street. Persons willing to sell tickets are invited to make application for books of same to the Hon. Secretary at this address.

WARWICKSHIRE WAR AGRICULTURAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

At a meeting of this committee it was decided to send a further resolution to the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries on the matter of fixed prices for meat. The resolution was to the effect that, in the event of the present Order being allowed to stand, a great waste of grass and consequent loss of meat would result, inasmuch as farmers would sell all their cattle while the higher price was obtainable rather than leave them on the grass, where they would gain more weight, but which would not pay on account of the declining price as fixed by the Food Controller. The statement of the soldier supply to date shows that there are 630 working on farms, and that there is a further available supply at the barracks.

RUGBY RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL.

THE HOUSING QUESTION.

The committee to which the letter from the Local Government Board with reference to the provision of houses for the working classes after the War had been referred reported, that the Clerk should reply that they estimated that the number of houses required, and which should be built on the conclusion of the War, was 500, as overcrowding was very prevalent.—The Vice-Chairman : It is a very big order, 500 houses ; but the committee think they will be required.—On the motion of Mr Cripps, seconded by Mr Burton, the motion was approved.

DEATHS.

BRADSHAW.—On August 19th, in France, Pte. F. J BRADSHAW, 7th Staffords, of Long Itchington, aged 28. Deeply mourned by his sorrowing wife.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best :
In a hero’s grave he lies.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of JOSEPH WILLIAM BARNETT, who was killed in action at Barent in le Grand, near Albert, France, September 11, 1916 ; second son of Mr. & Mrs. Barnett, Hillmorton Paddox.
“ One year has passed, our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more ;
His welcome smile, his dear, sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say ‘Good bye’
Before he closed his eyes.”
.—Sadly missed by his loving Wife, Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

BARTLETT.—In loving memory of our dear REG, who was killed in action in France on September 17, 1916. At rest.—Sadly missed by his loving Dad, Brother, Sisters, and Trixie.

COLING.—In ever-loving memory of Gunner JOHN THOMAS COLING, R.F.A., the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. John Coling, Grandborough, who died of wounds at Rouen Hospital, France, Sept. 10, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

HAYES.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband Pte. WILLIAM GEORGE RUSSELL HAYES, Coldstream Guards, of Combroke ; killed in action at Ginchy, France, September 15, 1916 ; aged 33.—His duty nobly done.

HOPKINS.—In loving memory of FRANK, the beloved and youngest son of Henry Hopkins, of Long Lawford, who was killed in action in France on Sept. 18, 1915.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Sister.

LISSAMER.—In loving memory of Pte. WILLIAM ARTHUR LISSAMER, youngest and beloved son of Thomas and Emily Lissamer, 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who fell in action in Frances on September 15, 1916.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of a dear son and soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand,
When we meet in the Better Land.
—Sadly missed by his loving Father and Mother.

OVERTON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, GABRIEL GEORGE OVERTON, Gaydon, of the Coldstream Guards, officially reported missing, now reported died of wounds received in action on September 15, 1916.
“ His comrades will return one day,
But he will be sleeping in a far-off grave,
And the saddest of it all, dear,
It not to know where you are laid.”
—Sadly missed by his loving wife PEM.

 

8th Sep 1917. Everyone Must Provide Their Own Sugar.

EVERYONE MUST PROVIDE THEIR OWN SUGAR.— Hundreds of business premises (as well as Government departments) who have tea clubs have raised the point as to whether they will be allowed any sugar under the card scheme. Their hopes are doomed to disappointment, as it will not be possible for them obtain a single lump of sugar unless each member brings the sugar from his or her domestic allowance. Even the charwoman will have to provide her own sugar when working at a house unless the mistress gives some out of her own store. The form of registration shortly to be issued will make it dear that only people actually sleeping in the house will be counted in the sugar allowance.

THE MEAT ORDER.
DOUBTFUL IF LOCAL PRICES WILL BE REDUCED.

“ Unless we can purchase animals at considerably lower prices than those prevailing at present, I am afraid there is little prospect of the price of beef being reduced locally,” a prominent Rugby butcher informed our representative on Thursday. “ In fact,” he added, “ if we are able to get 2½d per lb profit on cost price allowed by the Food controller, we shall have to advance the price of beef somewhat, although the consumers may expect a little relief in so far as mutton and lamb is concerned.

It is not perhaps generally known that while the price at which stock is to be sold to the government is fixed, up to the present time the butchers are having to buy their cattle in the open market at a figure considerably in advance of that fixed by the Government, and this naturally places the butchers in a very difficult position. Our informant pointed out that the butcher bears practically the whole brunt of the consumer’s displeasure.

“ There is a great deal of talk about profiteering,” he added ; “but anyone who attends Rugby Market and observes the prices we are charged with for the live meat will quickly see who is the real profiteer. It will be quite a new experience for us to make as much as 2½d per lb profit ; that is a figure we have never reached before.”

Several meetings have been held by the Rugby masters butchers during the past week, and the whole of the figures have been most carefully worked out. It was decided that give effect of the Order of the prices for certain cuts of beef would have to be advanced a shade ; but that mutton and lamb must be reduced, in some cases as much as 2d per lb. Great difficulty was experienced in arriving at a decision as regards pork owing to the excessive price of pigs, and it is probable that in this case the price will remain as at present.

At present no price lists have been exhibited in the butchers’ shops in Rugby.

WARWICKSHIRE FARMERS’ PROTESTS.

Strong protests against the prices of meat fixed for the New Year by the Food Controller, especially for beef, were made by representative agriculturists at Warwick on Saturday, and there was general agreement during discussion that if an alteration was not made at once there would be a strong tendency towards a meat famine next spring.

Sir E Montagu Nelson said he knew that the Government were making enquiries about putting English meat into cold storage ; but that, he thought, was a question they did not understand. We had storage to keep meat frozen, but not for freezing it, and he did not think it was possible to get any freezing establishments fitted up before January. Apart from the possibility of larger importations, he could not conceive the object of fixing the figure of 60s per cwt live weight of beef in January.

The meeting passed a resolution urging the Food Controller to raise the price to 70 s.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR.
FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR, The following is the text of a letter which has been sent to the Chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council by the employees of the B.T.H and which will probably be of interest to your readers.
C H GAY, T FALLA, H YATES, F THACKER, and E A GATEHOUSE, Executive Committee

“Sir,-A meeting representative of all grades of employees of British Thomson-Houston Co. was held this evening and I am directed to acquaint you with the text of the resolutions which were put to the meeting and unanimously passed.

“(1.) That the Rugby Food Control Committee as at present constituted does not command the confidence of the employees of the British Thomson-Houston Co., in view of the fact that its constitution embodies so large a proportion of members whose interests are mainly connected with the sale of food.

“(2.) That consequently it is very strongly urged that the committee should be reconstructed, so no persons directly concerned with the sale of food should remain a member. It is felt that the interests of traders could be fully safeguarded by their incorporation in an advisory sub-committee.

“(3.) That in view of the fact that the employees of the British Thomson-Houston Co, together in their dependants represent at least one-quarter of the total population of Rugby, the B.T.H employees should be asked to nominate not less than three representatives to become members of the committee

“ It is hoped that very careful consideration will be given to these matters at the next meeting on your Council.-Yours faithfully,
E RICHES, Acting Secretary.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Gunner Sydney Ivens, Warwickshire R.H.A, is in hospital at Warrington with gunshot wounds received on the 21st ult.

Major John L Baird, C.M.G., D.S.O, has been awarded the Croix de Chevalier by the Present of the French Republic for distinguished service rendered during the course of the campaign.

Gunner W D Duncombe, Garrison Artillery, has been killed in action, death being instantaneous. Gunner Duncombe was an assistant a the Leamington Free Library for about four years, and left in 1911 to take up a position in the B.T.H Works at Rugby. He enlisted about 18 months ago. He was a nephew of the late Chief Inspector Edwards.

Pte Frank S Stockley, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is in hospital at Portsmouth suffering from a broken leg, caused by a fall inot a shell-hole near St Julien. Before joining the Army, Pte Stockley was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and subsequently in the Co-operative Society’s Bakery.

Mrs Chadburn, of 18 Oxford Street, has received official information that her son William has been seriously wounded, and is now in Hospital in France. He formerly belonged to the Rugby Howitzer Battery, but was subsequently transferred to the Warwicks. He is 19 years of age.

SERGT-MAJOR EVAN’S GETS THE D.C.M.

Sergt-Major Evans, R.F.A, Regular Army, son of Mr Frank Evans, Craven Road, has been awarded the D.C.M for gallant conduct in the field on August 5th. He organised a clearing of killed and wounded men and horses from the wagon lines, which were under very heavy shell fire, thus averting a panic and setting a splendid example. Sergt-Major Evans, who went to France in October, 1914, with the Indian Expeditionary Force, is an Old Murrayian, and also an old member of the 1st Company Boys’ Brigade.

CRICK.

PTE W MORGAN, of Crick, is reported as killed on the Western Front. This is the second son David Morgan has lost in the War. The other son was killed in the Battle of the Marne. Mr Morgan has two other sons serving with the Salonica Force, and a son-in-law a prisoner of war in Germany. A memorial service to Pte W Morgan was held in the Parish Church on Sunday afternoon last.

DISCHARGED SAILORS’ and SOLDIERS’ ASSOCIATION.—A meet of the Rugby Branch was held at the Trades Hall on Sunday, Mr Rose presiding over a good attendance. The branch decided to take action in the case of a local discharged soldier, who, it was stated, came off the funds of his club in order to go to job found him at Coventry. Owing to his lameness he was not accepted, and his club refused to take him back on the funds. A sum was collected for him at the meeting to tide him over his present financial stress. Mr C W Browning gave an address enlightening the members on the position of labour towards the association. Arrangements were also made for a concert and dance in aid of the funds of the branch.

FORTHCOMING FLAG DAYS.—Several official flag days to be held under the auspices of the Urban Council are now being arranged. Saturday, September 22nd, will be observed as Lifeboat Day, and this will be followed by efforts for the French Red Cros, British Red Cross, and the Y.M.C.A Huts. It is hoped that these efforts will meet with a generous response from the general public, and any offers of assistance will be welcomed by the hon organiser, Mr J R Barker.

HORSE CHESTNUTS.—We notice from “ The Spectator ” that it is hoped school teachers will encourage the children to collect horse chestnuts, not for the mysterious games of “ conquerors,” but to help in winning the War. It appears that horse chestnuts can be used by the Ministry of Munitions as a substitute for grain in some important industrial processes. Every ton of chestnuts will save half-a-ton of grain for food, and there are, it is said, 200,000 tons of chestnuts to be picked up. A depot for the receipt of chestnuts will probably be opened in Rugby.

DEATHS.

FLETCHER.—In loving memory of my dear nephew, Pte. G. E. FLETCHER, Napton, who died in France from wounds received in dug-out on August 17, 1917 ; aged 19 years..—“ God’s will be done,”—From his loving Aunt TILL and Cousin WILL.

FLETCHER.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. G. E. FLETCHER, second eldest son of Dennis and Amy Fletcher, of Napton, who was wounded on August 27th. 1917, and died shortly afterwards in France, aged 19 years.—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

BADGER.—On August 27th, 1917, at the General Hospital, Rouen, of wounds received in action, ARTHUR FRANCIS, dearly-beloved third son of Charles and Mary Badger, of Shuckburgh Road, Napton, aged 24 years.
“ Alive in our hearts he will ever be,
For love must survive in eternity;
And its just to wait till He bids us rise,
And see the same light in the same dear eyes.”

GILLINGS.—In fondest memory of Rifleman WALTER (Gunner) GILLINGS, R. B., of Dunchurch, who died of wounds received in action August 18th, 1917, aged 25 years.
“ If love, and care could death prevent,
Thy life would not so soon spent;
But God knew best, and He did see,
Eternal life is best for thee.”
—From his Father and Mother, Brother & Sisters.

GILLINGS.—In loving memory of Rifleman WALTER GILLINGS, who died of wounds August 18th, 1917.—From Mr. and Mrs. Fox and Family, Burton Green.

GREEN.—ALBERT (52nd Batt. Canadians), youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Green, of Clifton, killed in action in France, aged 23 years.

SUMMERFIELD.—PRIVATE WALTER ERNEST SUMMERFIELD, 3 Winfield Street, Rugby, killed in action in France Aug. 20th, 1917, aged 25 years.
“ Lost to sight, but to memory ever dear.”

IN MEMORIAM.

GREEN.—In affectionate remembrance of FREDERICK JOHN, the dearly-loved son of Frederick and the late Louisa Greenfield Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, who was killed in action at Le-Neuvelle, France, on September 7th, 1916.—Sadly missed by his Father, Brothers and Sisters.

HENTON.—In ever loving memory of Cecil Henton, 13th Batt. R.W. Regt., eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Henton, Railway Terrace, who died September 9th, 1916, from wounds received in action on the Somme on August 29th, age 20.—For the land he loved and the King he served he gave his life. We who sorrow find consolation in the knowledge that he nobly did his duty and died a hero’s death.

LEE.—In loving memory of Charles Lee, of the 1st Coldstream Guards, who died September 6th, 1916.
“ A year has passed, our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more;
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
—From his loving Wife and Children.

LEE.—In loving memory of Pte. CHARLES LEE, who died Sept. 6th, 1916.—Never forgotten by his Mother, Dad, Brothers, Winnie and May.

LEE.—In loving memory of my dear son, HERBERT, who was killed in France, Sept. 3rd, 1916.—Never forgotten by his loving Mother, Sisters, Brothers, and Brothers-in-law, Charlie and Bob.

MURDEN—In loving memory of dear husband Pte HENRY MURDEN, killed in action Sept. 3rd, 1916, aged 26.
Had I but seen him at the last
And watched his dying bed,
Or heard the last sigh of his heart,
Or held his drooping head.
My heart, I think, would not have felt
Such bitterness and grief.
But God had ordered otherwise
And now he rests in peace.
Never forgotten by his loving wife.

MURDEN.—In loving memory of ROBERT EDWARD HENRY MURDEN (Bob), the beloved grandson of the late James Murden, Brinklow, and Mrs. James Murden, widow, Rugby, who was killed in action in France Sept. 3rd, 1916, aged 26 years.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None aching hearts can know.

WARD.—In loving memory of CHARLES WARD (late of the Rifle Brigade), son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Ward, of Brandon, who was killed in action in France, Sept. 3rd, 1916.—From Father, Mother, Sisters, and Brothers. “ A day of remembrance sad to recall.”