18th Aug 1917. Fatal Accident to an Aviator

FATAL ACCIDENT TO AN AVIATOR.

A shocking aeroplane accident, resulting in the instant death of a pilot, Lieut William Alexander Taylor, of the Royal Flying Corps, occurred near Rugby early on Friday evening last week. Lieut Taylor, who was only 21 years of age, and the son of Mr William Taylor, of Mary Hill Park, Glasgow, was flying at a height of about 3,000 feet, when one of the plane collapsed, and the machine fell to the earth. The engine was deeply embedded in the pound, and the unfortunate aviator was badly mangled. His skull and practically every bone in his body were broken, and Dr Wardrop, who was quickly on the spot, was only able to state that death had been instantaneous.

The inquest was held by Mr C H Davis, Northampton, on Saturday evening. Mr J G Harper was foreman of the jury.

Second-Lieut Frank William Balls, R.F.C, identified the body, and said deceased was 22 years old. He had been in the Flying Corps at least 18 months.

Captain Kenneth Graeme Leask, R.F.C, said the accident happened about 5.53 p.m on Friday last week. Witness was in the air at the time testing a new machine, and saw the accident. Deceased’s machine was the only other one a in the air. It went up vertically at great speed. Witness than saw the left-hand wing collapse. The machine spun upwards one turn, and then fell to the earth with a spinning nose dive. There were no flames about the machine. When deceased went up vertically witness thought he was trying to loop the loop, and probably he pulled the control back too suddenly, pausing a great strain on the planes and the left-hand plane to collapse. The machine was in order, and had been used the same day by Lieut Park, while witness had used it the night before, when he looped and spun it, and everything was all right. The speed must have been very great for the machine to speed upwards as it did. Witness was about half-a-mile away when deceased went up. Deceased had done observing in France, and also acted as a pilot. In witness’s opinion deceased was very capable pilot for the time he had flown, and on one occasion witness saw him show great presence of mind in saving two machines from clashing together. Deceased had only been in witness’s flight about ten days. Immediately witness saw the occurrence he came down.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned.

A REMARKABLE COINCIDENCE.

This is only the second fatal mishap that has occurred at the aerodrome since its institution, and when we take into account the number of aeroplanes that go up daily year in and year out, this immunity from more numerous accidents is quite re-assuring.

But there was a remarkable co-incidence about the two accidents. The records kept by Surgeon-Major Collins, the Medical Officer of the Flying Corps, show that both happened on the same day of the month, August 10th, within a few minutes of the same time of the evening, and at a spot which might be said to be identical. The other fatality was twelve months ago, when two officers came into collision.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Corpl W Hyam, Lincolnshire Regiment, son of Mr H Hyam, Drury Lane, was wounded in the last big push. He is going on well. He ia an “ Old boy ” of St Matthew’s School.

Mr P F Fullard, R.F.C., son of Mr A H Fullard, of West Haddon, who recently received his captaincy, has just been awarded the Military Cross for services at the front.

Mrs May, 8 Ringrose Court, North Street, has received information from the War Office that her youngest son, Joe, who is in the Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded in action on July 18th, and is now making satisfactory progress. Before the War he was an apprentice at Willans & Robinson’s.

Captain Alan Greenshields-Leadbetter, R.H.A, who was killed last week, was an Old Rugby boy. He served in Gallipoli with the 29th Division until January 8, 1916 — the night of the evacuation of Helles.

Quarter-Master-Sergt Painter, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been injured in action by his horse falling upon him.. His foot was fractured.

Mrs John French, of 3 Bridge Street, Rugby, has received news that her husband, Pte J French, R.W.R., has won the Military Medal in France. He has been wounded three times, and has returned to the trenches for the fourth time. He also won the Queen’s Medal in the South African War. He is the son of Mr and Mrs James French, Long Itchngton.

REV. F. B. HARBORD KILLED IN FRANCE.

General regret was occasioned in Dunchurch and Thurlaston and the district around at the news, which arrived on Sunday morning, of the death from wounds while serving as chaplain with the R.F.A of the Rev F R Harbord, vicar of Dunchurch. Mr Harbord was 49 years of age, and was the youngest son of the late W Engledow Harbord, of the Manor House, Stutton. He was preparing for Cambridge when he had a breakdown in health, and was ordered to South Africa, where he took Holy Orders. For many years he was stationed in the Orange Free State, and for two years was an acting chaplain with the Forces in the Boer War. On returning to England he was curate of Yorktown and Camberley, Surrey, 1909-10, and then rector of Pershore till his subsequent appointment to Dunchurch. On the outbreak of the present War he volunteered for service, but was not called up until August, 1916, and had completed exactly a year of service abroad on the day of his death, August 8th. He had just arranged for a further extension of leave from his parish, and in one of his last letters home wrote :- “ I cannot leave the Army when the hardest fighting is to take place.” Mr Harbord succeeded the Rev C T Bernard McNulty, Leamington, as vicar of Dunchurch five years ago, and he was exceedingly popular in the parish. He was a true friend to the poor, taking a keen interest in all matters appertaining to the welfare of his parishioners. He was one of the governors of the Boughton Trust, chairman and correspondent to the Managers of the Schools, chairman of the Almshouse Trustees, a trustee of the Poor’s Plot Charity, and a member of the Committee of the Dunchurch Working Men’s Club. He is the 19th man from Dunchurch to fall in they present War. Until recently the vicarial work at Dunchurch was undertaken by the Rev B B Carter, who relinquished duty about a fortnight ago, and has been succeeded temporarily by the Rev A F G Wardell.

In a letter to Mrs Harbord, an officer of the R.A.M.C. Writes :—“ I have just come back from a little military cemetery, where we laid to rest this afternoon, at three o’clock, the body of your husband—and to all of us—our Padre. We got the sad news this evening. I went down to the dressing station after breakfast this morning to see the arrangements carried out, and we took him back a few miles to our wagon lines. At the dressing station there was a Church of England chaplain, who saw him when they brought him in, and the end was peaceful and quiet. The doctor there assured me that he was beyond human aid. He had a billet on the main road, and, as was his custom, he used to give a cheery word to the men as they passed. It was while talking to a sergeant and one or two men that the fatal shell came. I do not think he could have suffered much pain—the shock would be so great. There were five officers and five men at the funeral, and Major Dickinson, the senior chaplain, conducted the Burial Service. How much we miss him I cannot say. We had known him now since August of last year, and had lived with him, and out here a constant friendship of a year means a great deal. We, the officers of the staff, are having a cross made to mark the spot where he is laid, and as long as we are in his area you can rest assured that the grave will be looked after. He was a personal friend to everyone, and in that degree the loss to us is a personal one. How vividly some of his great thoughts stand out-thoughts that had helped many of us to bear these hard things in the past and to look forward with some hope to the future. He used to say to us in his service and in the mess that whosoever made the supreme sacrifice out here made it as it was made two thousand years ago. It is a fine thought.”

Another officer writes :—“ I cannot possibly tell you how terribly grieved we are at the death of our Padre. He was a friend of every single man in the Divisional Artillery, and especially in this Brigade, with whom he had lived since he came out last August, and there were very few whom he did not know personally. I should think the greatest consolation you could possibly have must be the knowledge that he died as he himself would have wished—talking to some of the men outside his billet on the road where the infantry pass on their way down from the trenches, and the gunners bring their guns and ammunition wagons.”

The Commanding Officer has written :—“ I regret to have the sad task of informing you of the death of your husband in action. The best consolation I can offer you is that he suffered no pain, and that he has been tireless in his efforts throughout this trying time in cheering and looking after the men of this brigade. My staff and the whole Brigade feel his loss very deeply, and we offer you our very heartfelt sympathy in your great loss. It may comfort you to know that he performed his duties often under severe fire with cheerfulness and personal bravery. The Brigade, one and all, are deeply grieved.”

[Memorial Service also reported in this issue]

WOUNDED ENTERTAINMENT.—On Wednesday last Mr Smith and friends entertained the wounded at “ Te Hira ” with a musical programme. A sergeant acted as chairman. During the concert cigarettes were passed round, and the soldiers were very appreciative.

RUGBY SCHOOL NOTTING HILL MISSION.—Following the visit of the girl members of this Mission which is supported by past and present members of Rugby School, about 60 boys, all employed in munition work in the east end of London, have had a week’s holiday at Rugby. They arrived on Saturday, and were accommodated at the School Gymnasium. On Tuesday they played a team of wounded soldiers at cricket, and they were entertained by the R.F.C. Officers at Lilbourne on another day this week.

VARIETY OF FOOD IN WAR TIME.

In the pursuit of national economy, the daily round of mealtime is apt to become a little monotonous in these days. Any suggestions which provide change, without adding to the cost, and also show the way to use up in the form of tasty dishes such commonplace items as left-over rice pudding and stale bread , will be more than welcome to our readers.

The well-known firm of Messrs Alfred Bird & Sons, Ltd. Have sent us a copy of their very useful and well-produced cookery booklet, entitled “ Pastry and Sweets.” This contains about 120 well-tried household recipes of great interest to every housewife. They have placed a limited number of these books at our disposal. Any reader, therefore, of the Rugby Advertiser who would like to have a copy sent to them post free can obtain same by writing on a post-card to Alfred Bird & Sons, Ltd, Birmingham, and mentioning the name of this paper. As the number available is strictly limited, early application is necessary.

DEATHS.

PARNELL.—On July 23rd, 1917, Corpl. JAMES PARNELL, of Withybrook, 1st Batt. R.W.R., killed in action in France ; aged 22 years.
“ So ready to answer the call to the brave,
Although you now rest in a far-distant grave ;
More or better could any man give
Than die for his country that others might live.”

IN MEMORIAM.

LEACH.—In loving memory of our dear son, PERCY JOHN LEACH, who died at Sulva Bay, August 4th, 1915.
Two years have passed—our hearts still sore.
Day by day we miss him more ;
His welcome smile, his dear sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say “ Good bye ”
Before closed his eyes.
Still sadly missed by his loving Mother and Father, Sisters and Brothers.

11th Aug 1917. War Anniversary Commemoration.

WAR ANNIVERSARY COMMEMORATION.

At the places of worship throughout the United Kingdom on Saturday and Sunday services of intercession for the victory of our arms this world tragedy were held.

At the churches in St Andrew’s parish, Rugby, on Saturday there were celebrations of the Holy Communion and a cycle of prayer throughout the day until Evensong.

On Sunday the form of services authorised by the Archbishops was used, and the charge read at Matins. After a shortened Evensong, the members of the various churches joined in procession in the following order :—Wardens, cross, priest, choir, and congregation. The members of the Parish Church, Holy Trinity, St Phillip’s, and St Andrew’s Mission met near the Hippodrome, and proceeded to the Lower School field, where they were joined by the members of St Peter’s Church. Altogether about 2,000 were in the imposing procession, and there was another 1,000 present at the short intercession service, conducted by the Rector (the Rev C M Blagden). On the platform were the clergy of the churches mentioned and Dr David. The massed choirs were conducted by Mr Hidden (Parish Church organist).

At St. Matthew’s Church on Sunday services were held in commemoration of the War anniversary. The Rev. T. Watson gave an address at early morning prayer meeting, and preached during the day. The collections amounted to nearly £50, and are to start a fund of about £140, which is being raised for a memorial window and tablet to those from the parish who have fallen in the War.

On Sunday last the Rev E Wyman conducted services at Cambridge Street Wesleyan Church in the morning, and at the Market Place Wesleyan Church in the evening. The special form of intercession was used at both places. Mr Wyman gave discourses on “ The Secret of Sustained Strength.” He said with every new problem came a feeling of uneasiness and a growing feeling of pessimism. Our enemies, knowing that anything like panic was impossible, had striven to create a feeling of uneasiness and depression that would reflect upon our Army abroad. But that endeavour had not been successful, as the morale of the British nation at home or abroad was unaffected. The time of waiting would prove a greater strength upon the nation. They needed a lofty vision, for the future spelt freedom. Their source of strength was waiting upon God, Who revealed the secret of strength and of radiant optimism.

Special reference was made to the third anniversary of the War at the Primitive Methodist Church, Railway Terrace, on Sunday evening. The Rev W Vaughan conducted the service. Taking for his text the “ Parable of the loaves,” he dealt with the unifying work of the Divine Spirit. From the process of transforming the separate grains of meal, which represented self centred individuals, into one mass of dough, he illustrated the work of God in the human race as bringing about a brotherhood not only of people within a nation, but a universal brotherhood, including all the nations of the earth, and referred to the progress of the War as a breaking down of the spirit of tyrannical rule as represented by the dynasties based on the so-called Divine right of kings. They looked forward to the triumph of the principles of brotherhood and freedom as the governing principles of the nations of the earth. This, and this only, would be a right ending of the War which, though not yet, was becoming more and more certain.

At the Congregational Church a special service was held in the morning, and was conducted by the Rev Peter Morrison, Kenilworth. There was a good congregation, and the form of service arranged by the National Free Church Council was used. The congregation stood during the reading of the roll of honour, containing the names of Church members who have joined the Army or Navy, and this was very impressive, especially when reference was made to those who have fallen. The sermon was most appropriate the occasion.

There was a good attendance at the open meeting of the Brotherhood, held in the Co-operative Hall on Sunday afternoon. The speaker was the Rev W Vaughan, who stepped into the breach at very short notice. His address was of a wartime character, and the subject was “ Freedom and Independence v Force and Tyranny.” Two solos, “ Just to-day ” and “ Nearer my God to Thee,” were nicely sung by Miss Phyllis Foxon.

At the Baptist Church on Sunday evening the Rev J H Lees (pastor) gave an address on “ The War,” and the American National Anthem was sung.

SUGAR CARDS TO BE ISSUED.

Lord Rhondda has asked the local authorities—namely, the Municipal Borough Councils and the Urban and Rural District Councils—to appoint Food Committees for administering a new scheme of sugar distribution, and later for dealing with other foodstuffs, including bread and meat. For all important foodstuffs the Food Controller will fix a general scale of prices based at each stage on the reasonable profits of traders. The committees will be entrusted with the enforcement of this scale, and will be asked to advise on any necessary modifications of it in their districts. The committees will consist of not more than twelve members ; some members may be co-opted. Each committee must include at least one woman and one representative of labour. The cost, including a special staff, will be a charge on the Exchequer. It will be the first duty of the committees to safeguard the interests of consumers. Immediately the local committees are constituted they will register grocers and other retailers of sugar, and after October 1st no retailer who remains unregistered will be allowed to deal in sugar.

THE HOUSEHOLDER’S DERBY.

The public will not be called upon to move until towards the end of September, when forms of application for sugar cards will be distributed by the Postal Authorities. These forms must be filled up by householders, and show the names, age, sex, and occupation of all members of their households. They must be posted to the Food Office not later than October 5th. The householder will receive from the Food Office a household sugar card, which must be taken to the tradesman from whom he desires to buy his sugar. The tradesman will retain one part. He will stamp the other part with his name or sign, and it must be kept by the customer, who must be prepared to produce it when making purchases. The grocer’s supplies will be authorised by the local food control office on the basis of the number of customers thus registered by him. The reorganisation of sugar distribution under the new scheme cannot be complete before December 30th. It will be the retailer’s duty, when the allowance is made regular, to see that no customer is supplied twice in one week. He may number the cards deposited with him, and keep them in order in a box ; when the purchase for the week is made he can transfer the card bearing the customer’s number to a second.

RUGBY SCHOOL NOTTING HILL CLUB.-During the past Rugby has been invaded a number of fair “ munitioneers ” from London. The girls, sixty in number, belong to the Notting Hill Club, which is supported by past and present members of Rugby School. Each year a camp is held in connection with the Club at Romney ; but this year, at the last moment, the camping ground was required by the Army, and the organisers were forced to seek “ fresh woods and pastures new.” Happily the School Authorities at once came to their assistance, and a hearty invitation was sent to the members to spend their holiday at Rugby—an offer which was gladly accepted. The spacious gymnasium has been fitted up as a dormitory, and the girls, many whom are engaged in high explosive factories, are thoroughly enjoying the quietude of Rugby and their open-air life under the shadow of the famous School, where the time passes only too quickly in cricket, fives, and other outdoor pastimes. The party is in charge of the Rev C S Donald, the head of the Mission, and the local arrangements were made by Mr C P Evers and Mr H C Bradby. On Saturday sixty boys connected with the Mission will arrive.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier G B Morgan, H.A.C, brother-in-law of Mr J M Squires, Rugby, has received a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the Royal Artillery.

Mrs Hipwell, 110 Oxford Street, has received official news that her husband, G W Hipwell, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in France on May 3rd. He was previously reported missing.

Sapper A Findlay, R.E, of Mr & Mrs James Findlay, of 171 Clifton Road, Rugby, is in the Essex County Hospital, Colchester, suffering from shell wounds received in action after two years’ service in France.

Corpl F Rixom, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mrs Rixom, Claremont Road, was picked out with others to represent the Training School to which they are attached at an investiture by the King. Subsequently the King went over to inspect the unit, and as he was doing so his Majesty noticed the gold stripes on Corpl Rixom’s arm. He stopped and asked all particulars as to how, where and when the wounds indicated were received, and expressed the hope that he was getting on all right.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of Murray School, has received intimation from Mr John C Ensor, late of Rugby, now of Nottingham, that his son, John Leslie Ensor, was killed in action in a coast battle in Flanders. Deceased and his brother Claude, both Old Murrayians, joined at the outbreak of the War. The latter has recently been wounded. As showing how the boys in the trenches remember their old school, we might state that the Headmaster of Murray School has received a letter from an Old Murrayian congratulating the prize-winners at the recent distribution.

THE LATE LIEUT. HART-DAVIES.

At the inquest on Lieut Hart-Davis, whose death was recorded in our columns last week, evidence was given by officers who saw the accident to the effect that on the Friday evening the deceased was flying over the grounds. When, at a low altitude, he was about to land the machine, he probably turned the ’plane down too sharply, which caused it to give a nose dive, and dashed it to the ground. Lieut Hart-Davies was killed immediately, he being the pilot. It was stated that the machine had been in use during the day, and was in perfect condition to the time of the accident. Dr Hunt, R.A.M.C, who also saw the accident, examined the body, and considered that death was due to shock from the fall.—The jury returned a verdict accordingly.

A brother officer writes :—“ A gallant fellow whom we all liked immensely, and are deeply grieved that he should have been fatally injured when he so much wished to go to France, where, doubtless, he would have won honours.”

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

A BRAVE ELECTRICIAN.—The Officer commanding the unit in which Sergt C H Sylvester is serving—the Scots Fusiliers reports :— “ I beg to recommend Sergt C H Sylvester for an immediate award for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on the night of the —— inst-. When we were about to attack – he laid out a cable line right up to the enemy wire, only withdrawing when hotly fired on by the enemy. During our advance on – he was untiring in his efforts to keep up communication with the result that, no matter how quickly our troops advanced, there was always telephone communication to battalion headquarters. In -, where our lines were constantly under shell fire, he was always showing a marked disregard to personal danger by his example, encouraging others ; and although ill, he remained on duty till the battalion was relieved, doing excellent work. He remained with the incoming battalion till they were quite settled down, when eventually he did leave the signal office he was almost unable to walk, and had to helped to the ambulance.”

DEATHS.

HARRIS.—Killed in action in France on July 27th, Pte. J. Harris, 8th Gloucesters, youngest son of Mr. J. Harris, Harborough Magna. A devoted son and brother.

WILKINS.—On October 12th, 1916, Pte Reginald Gerald Wilkins, R.W.R., killed in action (previously reported missing), age 21 years ; the dearly-loved son of Mrs. Wilkins, 22 Cannon Street, St. Albans (late of 32 Regent Street, Rugby).

IN MEMORIAM.

OGBURN.—In loving memory of Pte H Ogburn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed some where in France, on July 30th, 1916.
“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those who loved him best,
IN a hero’s grave he lies.”
-From his loving wife and children.

4th Aug 1917. A Trade Union Protest

THE TRIBUNALS AT WORK.
RUGBY URBAN TRIBUNAL.

Of the nineteen cases for decision on Thursday evening in last week fourteen concerned local butchers. Mr J J McKinnell presided, and there were also present Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, L Loverock, W H Linnell, and H Yates. Mr H P Highton was the Military representative.

A TRADE UNION PROTEST.

A letter was read from the Rugby Branch of the National Union of Clerks drawing attention to the fact that during the last few months several military units who had been given exemption to find work of national importance had been sent by the officials of the Labour Exchange to fill clerical positions at a local factory, and several were so employed at present. The Union considered this practice reprehensible, unfair, and against the national interest. The case cited a coachbuilder who had been sent by the Labour Exchange to fill a position as material list clerk in the main drawing office of a local factory. This man was of military age, and was thought to a B1 man. This being so, the Union considered it unfair to the other clerks employed in the office that, whereas fully trained clerks in the lowest all medical categories were called to the Colours, they should be asked to train a man from an outside trade as a technical clerk on material list work. The N.U.C failed understand how a coach-builder could become sufficiently proficient under at least twelve months’ training to be of national importance as a clerk, while men of far greater clerical experience were declared to be non-essential. Then, too, if a B1 man (with no experience) was national importance as a clerk, why were trained clerks of all categories being called the Colours ? The clerks doing this particular class of work claimed to be specially trained as the result of experience and hard work, and if they were to train unskilled men sent to them they asked that these men should be ineligible for the Army. In conclusion, the writer said, in justice to themselves and those dependent upon them it was necessary to safeguard the conditions under which and by which they earned their living.—Mr Highton said in the case in question the man was sent to the works as a labourer, but was subsequently transferred to the offices because the other workmen made it “ too hot ” for him.—Mr Wise expressed the opinion that there was a great deal of justice in the complaint, and the Chairman concurred ; but it was pointed out that this matter was not within the purview of the Tribunal, and the Clerk was instructed to reply accordingly.

The case of the Secretary to the Rugby Trades and labour Council was again up for decision.-It was stated that this man had received exemption for a month to enable him to obtain work of national importance, and the Superintendent of the Labour Exchange had suggested that he should undertake the supervision of the structural alterations at the Trades Hall. The Tribunal had Agreed to this ; but the Advisory Committee were of opinion that the work was not of sufficient importance to justify exemption.—Temporary exemption till September was given for work of national importance to obtained.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL AT RUGBY.

The first sitting of the Coventry Munitions Tribunal at Rugby was held at the Court House on Friday in last week. Mr E G M Carmichael presided, and the assessors present were : Mr T W Smith (employers), Mrs Griffiths (women), and Mr W H Dexter (men).

Ernest Albert Eyres Riley, Newbold Road, Rugby, applied for a leaving certificate. He stated that he was a night driver on the power and lighting plant. On one occasion he pointed out to a day charge-hand a fault on the engine, and this man accused him of neglecting his work. This was the only time that the charge-hand had complained to him, and he contended that he was not to blame, rather that the fault lay with the chargehand. Applicant had since left the firm, but they had refused to give him a leaving certificate.—The representative of the firm pointed out that the man worked nearly six weeks after the incident referred to ; but in reply to Mr Morris (General Workers’ Union), applicant stated that he only allowed one week to elapse before giving notice.—Refused.

Walter John Farn, borer, 19 Sun Street, also asked for a leaving certificate. He stated that was wounded at Mons, and had since been discharged from the Army as medically unfit. He had been taken from the machine he was accustomed to work and put on another one, which was obsolete and too hard for him.—The representative of the firm stated that the man’s average weekly earnings were £3 7a.-Farn asked that the machine should inspected by a member of the Tribunal.—Mr Carmichael said thought this was a case in which every consideration should be shown to the man.—The firm’s representative pointed out that the difficulty was that Farn refused to give the machine a trial. It was no harder to work than his present machine.—Sent to medical referee, and ordered to give the machine trial.

For failing to work on several dates, W J Price, 9 Holbrook Avenue, was fined £2.—It was slated that this was a case persistent bad time-keeping, but the respondent contended that on a number of occasions there was no work to in the shop.—Mr Carmichael pointed out that had he had no right to leave work without permission.—The representative of the firm stated that there was no shortage in the department where respondent was employed. If the men were temporarily out of a job they were paid day work rates.

H W Jarvis, 60 Victoria Street, who had been fined on three previous occasions for losing time, was fined for a similar offence.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has come to hand that Major Cecil Nickalls, Hillmorton, has been wounded in the face and arm. The injuries are, fortunately, not very serious.

Sergt E H Rixom, Suffolk Yeomanry, eldest son of Mrs Rixom, Claremont Road, Rugby, has been gazetted second-lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Bombardier C W Packwood. Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr C J Packwood. of 10 St Matthew’s Street, has been wounded in the chest in two places during the recent fighting.

Second-Lieut R L Cowley, Northants Regiment, son of Mr John Cowley, of Brackley, and formerly of Kilsby, has been missing since the historic Battle of the Dunes, and great anxiety is felt his parents, who will be glad of any news respecting him.

Bombardier Albert Goode, Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr A Goode, 78 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been severely wounded, and is now in a base hospital in France. Bombardier Goods is an old St Matthew’s boy, and was a member of the Football XV, which first won the Schools Union Football Shield in 1905. He was employed as an engineer at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s.

The Rev R W Dugdale (curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church) has been appointed chaplain of the Royal Flying Corps in France, and he is at present the only R.F.C chaplain in the Army.

Mr & Mrs Meadows, Inwood Cottage, near Rugby, have received information that their son, Gunner C H Meadows, was seriously wounded with gun-shot in the back on July 20th, and is lying at a casualty clearing station in France. Before joined up on November 1st, 1915, he was employed in the Telegraph Department at Rugby Station (L & N-W).

CORPL J C CHIRGWIN KILLED.

Unofficial news has been received of the death in France of Corpl J C Chirgwin, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, an assistant master at St Matthew’s School. Corpl Chirgwin was 29 years of age and a native of Cornwall. He came to St.Matthew’s School about seven years ago, soon after leaving college. He attested in the early days of the Derby scheme, and was called up eighteen months ago, and proceeded to the front last Christmas. He had two hairbreadth escapes in the recent fighting, and was killed by a stray shell last week. Corpl Chirgwin, who was shortly taking up a commission, was very popular with the pupils and staff of the school, and the news of his death was received with deep regret.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

On Sunday last a memorial service was held at St Peter’s Church, Bourton, for the late Gunner Thomas Wilson, third son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Wilson, Gate Farm, Bourton, and who was killed in action in France on July 10th. He was a splendid specimen of manhood, and was a general favourite amongst the young people in the neighbourhood. Letters of sympathy have been received by his parents from the officers of the regiment, in which he is highly spoken of as being always cheerful, strong, and ever ready to do his duty, and his death will be a great loss to his regiment. Deep sympathy is felt throughout the village for Mr. & Mrs. Wilson and family.

MARRIAGE OF SECOND-LIEUT. L. J. HUNTER.

The marriage of Second-Lieut L J Hunter, Yeomanry, fourth son of Mr & Mrs T Hunter, Elmhurst, Rugby, to Gwenn, only daughter of Mr & Mrs S H Fraser, Kensington at St Andrew’s, Well Street, London, W, on Tuesday, July 31st. The ceremony was performed by the Rev H H Kemble, the uncle of the bride, assisted by the Rev S K Knight, Vicar of St Andrew’s. The service was fully choral, and the hymns, “ O Father all creating ” and “ O Perfect Love,” were sung. The Rev H H Kemble gave a short address. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a gown of white charmeuse and Georgette, with a ninon train embroidered in silver, and carried a sheaf of lilies. Lieut. J. Mitchell, R.F.C., acted as best man. As the bride and bridegroom left the church Mendelsohn’s “ Wedding March ” was played. few relations and friends returned afterwards to the Langham Hotel.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN.

A communication has been received from Headquarters advising the local Food Economy Campaign Committee to suspend its active stimulation of propaganda for a period ; but in order to avoid misapprehension the urgent necessity which still exists for the strictest economy in food consumption is urgently emphasised. The situation in regard to food supplies is still extremely grave. Meanwhile local committees may vigorously address themselves to their normal function of war savings.

DEATHS.

CRAWFORD.-In loving memory of Pte ERIC CLEMENT CRAWFORD, 18th Canadians, who died of wounds in University College Hospital, London, on July 23rd.-“ Greater love hath no man than that he gave his life for his friends.”-From his loving Mother and Dad, Sisters and Brother.

HART-DAVIES.-On July 27, 1917 (aeroplane accident) at Northolt, Middlesex), Lieut IVAN BEAUCLERK DAVIES, R.F.C., Rugby ; son of the late Rev John Hart-Davies and Mrs. Hart-Davies, of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire ; aged 39 years.

SPENCER.-Killed in action in France on July 22nd, Pte JAMES BARTLETT SPENCER, 11th R.W.R., son of Mr. and Mrs. Spencer, 94 Wood Street, Rugby.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for his country gave his all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

DUNCUFF.-In ever-loving memory of ARTHUR FRANCES DUNCUFF, dearly beloved husband of Mildred Grace Duncuff, who died of wounds on Aug. 8, 1916.

DUNCUFF.-In ever-loving memory of our son and brother, who died from wounds received in action in France on August 3, 1916 ; aged 22 years 11 months.
“ Death hides, but it cannot divide ;
Thou are but on Christs’s other side.
Thou with Christ and Christ with me,
And so together still are we.”

GOODMAN.-In loving memory of GUNNER FRED GOODMAN, R.F.A., who died from wounds received in action on August 3, 1916 ; aged 20 years. Also Pte W. G. GOODMAN, brother of the above, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, who was killed in action on August 27, 1914 ; aged 29 years.
“ Farewell, dear sons, in a soldiers grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
-From his loving Mother and Father.

GURNEY.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son, Pte HARRY GURNEY, of Church Lawford, who was killed in action on July 30, 1916 ; aged 21 years.
“ Could I have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell.
The grief would not have been so hard
For those who loved him well.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think we could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘
Before he closed his eyes.”
-From Mother and Father, Brothers and Sister.

HOWKINS.-In proud and loving memory of Lieut. MAURICE HOWKINS, W.R., R.H.A., elder son of William Howkins, Hillmorton Grounds, Rugby, who gave his life for his country at the Battle of Romani, Egypt, August 4, 1916 ; aged 22 years. Mentioned in despatches for valuable services in the field, F.C.C. “ A fine soldier. I never wish to see a better officer ” (his C.O.).-“ Be thou faithful unto death, and I will give thee a Crown of Life.”

NEAL.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, WILLIAM NEAL, of the Berkshire Regt., who was killed in action on his 19th birthday, July 30, 1916.
“ One year has passed away
Since our great sorrow fell ;
Still in our hearts we mourn the loss
Of him we loved so well.”
-From Father and Mother, Sisters and Brother.

PURTON.-In loving memory of HARRY PURTON, be beloved husband of Sarah Purton, who fell asleep on December 3, 1912. Also Lance-Corpl G. H. PURTON, son of the above, who died of wounds in France on August 6, 1916 ; aged 24 years.
“ His country called, he answered with his life ;
Not gone from memory, not gone from love,
But gone to dwell with his dear father
In God’s bright home above.”
-From his loving Mother, Brother and Sisters.

 

28th Jul 1917. Rugby School Farming Squads

RUGBY SCHOOL FARMING SQUADS.

From “ The Meteor ” (the journal of Rugby School) we gather that this year the farming squad season extended from May 16th to July 24th ; 75 squads (comparing with 55 last year) have been sent out to assist the neighbouring farmers. Most of the work took the form of hoeing and spudding, which is a little tedious after a bout of four or five hours.

In the last month many parties have rendered assistance in the hay harvest. The earnings of the squads were allocated as follows :—Hospital of St Cross, £15 ; Y.M.C.A, £8 13s ; Mine-Sweepers’ Fund, £5 ; Blue Cross, £5 ; Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, £3, total, £36 13s.

“ The Meteor ” also records the experiences of one of the squads in the Evesham district—at Pensham, near Pershore :—

On Monday, July 2nd, a squad of 21 started off for a fortnight’s work on the land—an entirely new experiment. After a long journey, during which we seemed to do nothing but change from one train to another we reached Pershore Station at about 1.30 p.m. The cyclists of our party went ahead into the town (1½ miles from the station) to find where Pensham was. Having found the farm, they returned to guide the weary “ labourers,” who found three miles in the blazing heat quite sufficient. After doing the first natural thing—ordering tea—we all went for a bathe in the river Avon, which was only two or three hundred yards from the farm. All the squad except four slept in a fairly capacious barn, with as much straw as they wished ; but the quartet preferring the open air and chancing the rats slept on a straw rick, in which they made great havoc by digging themselves in.

For the next three days we only did six hours a day, 9 a.m—1 p.m, 2 p.m—4 p.m. After work was over we were allowed to do anything we liked—in moderation. Our first day in the field made us all feel that 6 hours in the form room would be infinitely preferable to the work we were doing, which consisted of weeding mangolds with pen-knives! But fortunately as the days went on the work became better. On Friday and for the rest of our stay we did eight hours a day, after which most of us felt we should never be able to straighten our backs again. . . . We were very fortunate in having fine weather all the time, except on Sunday, when it really did not matter.

The work chiefly consisted of picking broad and French beans, “ topping ” runner beans, pulling docks and hoeing. It was generally considered that a fortnight is just about the right length of time for work of that sort.

The chief amusements were bathing, boating, fishing (for pike which would not bite), riding horses (if they could be caught), chasing pigs, and, on the last night, strafing beans.

COMMANDEERING OF HAY AND STRAW.
FARMERS’ AND DEALERS’ MINDS RELIEVED.

The Secretary of the War Office announces that two new Army Council Orders are being gazetted dealing with hay and straw, one taking possession of all hay and straw, and the other regulating the price of these commodities. There are one or two points in which they differ from previous Orders of a similar nature, and one in particular will relieve the minds of farmers. Under the new Order wheat straw may now be used for bedding and other than feeding purposes. A point which will also commend itself to dealers in straw is that the difference between “ producers’ ” and “ retailers’ ” prices is now £2, instead of 30s. Further, the retailers’ prices for lots of 10cwt and less for both hay and straw are somewhat increased.

POSSESSION WANTED.—Henry Webb, Gipsy Row, High Street, Hillmorton, was sued by Mrs Emily Forrest, Stoke Newington, for possession of cottage and premises.—Mrs Webb attended, and said that her husband was a prisoner of war in Germany.—For the plaintiff it was stated that the rent was £3 18s in arrears.—Mrs Webb said that she had not paid her rent because the agent had insulted her, and he had also refused to do any repairs. He had threatened that he would take the roof and doors off. She was willing to pay the arrears, and should leave the house as soon as she could get another one.—Plaintiff was non-suited because the notice had been served on the wife, whereas the husband was the tenant.

INSPECTION OF RUGBY V.C. AND VOLUNTEER MOTOR TRANSPORT.

Brigadier-General T C P Calley, C.B, M.V.O, of the Southern Command, made a tour of inspection of the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Volunteer Regt on Saturday and Sunday last. The inspection of the Rugby Corps, B Company, took place on Sunday afternoon at the Howitzer Battery Headquarters. There was no ceremonial parade, the inspection being for the purpose of seeing squad work. The Inspecting Officer was accompanied by Lord Leigh (Lord Lieutenant of Warwickshire), Colonel F F Johnstone (O.C. the Regiment), Major Glover (Second in Command), Captain Johnson (adjutant), and Lieut Stranger Jones (Transport Officer) and others.

There was a good parade, under Capt C H Fuller. The Company was inspected in bayonet fighting, trench warfare and bombing, and an infantry attack across adjoining land, under command of Lieut M W Yates.

THE INSPECTING OFFICER AND UNIFORM.

General Calley, after congratulating the squads on the good progress they had made, addressed those who had taken part in the attack, and said he was very pleased with what he had seen. The attack was very well done, and it showed they had been well taught and that they had used their brains, and meant to learn and understand what they were doing. Presently they might have to do this in the open, and in this connection he gave them a little advice with regard to firing orders and the words of command. The attack was carried out as well as any he had seen, and great credit was due to their commanding officer and instructors. Evidently the members of the Company had paid attention to what had been said to them, and they had brought both their brains and their bodies to bear on it. He would be very happy to report to the General that he had seen a very good body of men. He wished them every success in their patriotic effort, and said he hoped to come and see them again when they had their uniform, adding he could not understand how it was they were not provided with it, and that he was going to make enquiries about the matter on his return, as most of the Battalions in the country had now got uniform and equipment, and he hoped the Rugby Corps would have them very soon.

COUNTY OF WARWICK MOTOR VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The inspection of the Rugby Section of the County of Warwick Motor Volunteer Corps was made on the arrival of the General. The cars, lorries, and motor cycles present, capable of transporting upwards of 50 men and four tons of supplies, were drawn up in line on the smaller parade ground. The General inspected each motor in turn and afterwards addressed the members of the corps, expressing his gratification at the manner in which Rugby motorists had responded to the appeal for volunteers, and stated that after what he had seen in this and other towns he was of the opinion that the Government should recognise the Motor Corps as a body and make provision for the necessary petrol supply, etc, for conducting the work of the Corps. He said that Lord Leigh had consented to be nominated for the command of the Corps.

Major Glover afterwards addressed the members present, explaining the object of the movement, and stated that over 500 private motorists had already been enrolled in Birmingham and the County of Warwick.

In a short address given by Lord Leigh, he expressed great pleasure in being nominated for the command of the Corps.

Further motor volunteers with either cars, lorries, or motor cycles, are urgently needed. There are also a few vacancies for experienced motor mechanics capable of undertaking repairs. Application for full particulars as to enrolment should be made to Mr Bernard Hopps, Thurlaston, near Rugby.

DISTRESSING FATAL ACCIDENT.

Co-Sergt-Major Charles John Simpson, Motor Cycle Section of the R.E, second son of the late Mr John Simpson and Mrs Simpson, 28 Craven Road, Rugby, met with his death under exceptionally sad circumstances at Houghton Regis recently. The deceased was a valuable and highly esteemed non-commissioned officer, and it was stated at the inquest that he had been shooting at a tin with a miniature rifle in the yard of the camp. Deceased was showing his little boy, aged 4½ years, how to use the rifle, and on one occasion he held the rifle while the boy pulled the trigger and fired at the tin. At the same time some men came up to speak to deceased, and while he was talking he brought the rifle down to the ground. The boy said, “ Let me shoot it, daddy ” ; and deceased pulled the rifle, which was pointing to another sergeant, towards himself. The boy then bent down, touched the trigger, and discharged the rifle. The bullet entered deceased’s mouth, and caused practically instantaneous death.—A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned.—The funeral was witnessed by a large number of sympathisers. The coffin was placed on a gun carriage, drawn by six horses, with three sergeants as outriders. Six company sergeant-majors acted as pall bearers. The chief mourners were : Mrs Simpson (widow), Mrs Simpson (mother), Mrs N Brevig, Miss Winnie Simpson, Mr Bert Simpson (sisters and brothers), Mrs Walker (mother-in-law), Miss Walker (sister-in-law), Mr N Brevig (brother-in-law), and Mrs H Simpson (sister-in-law). Deceased was a Freemason, and a number of members of the craft attended the funeral, as well as a numerous contingent of the Motor Cyclists Co., under the command of Capt W F How, R.I Rifles, and a large number of deceased’s fellow N.C.O’s from the Signal Depot. Amongst those present were Lieut-Col E H Leaf, R.E, Commandant Army School of Signalling ; Lieut-Col W F Danter, R.E, Camp Commandant, and Capt O P Edgcumbe, D.C.L.I, Adjutant. The floral tokens were so numerous that it was found necessary to have a party from the Motor Cyclists’ Co. to carry the wreaths which could not be accommodated on the gun carriage. The three brothers of deceased, who was 33 years or age, are still on active service.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr H J Beddow has left the town to take up a commission in the R.A.M.C.

Mr W J W Gilbert, Blandford House, has gained a commission in the Army Service Corps (Horse Transport). He joined the Royal Gloucester Hussars (Yeomanry) in May, 1916 as a trooper.

The Rev G A Studdert-Kennedy, C.F (formerly of Rugby), vicar of St Paul’s, Worcester, has just gained the Military Cross for bravery on the Western front. Whilst in charge of a temporary dressing station, he found the supply of morphia was exhausted, and went under heavy shell-fire to procure more. He also brought two severely wounded men into a place of safety. He was chosen to preach the National Mission to the troops in France, and gave addresses in all the base camps and at the front.—“ Church Times.”

The Military Medal and bar has been awarded to Pte J Enticott, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, for acts of gallantry on the field in carrying out his duties as a stretcher bearer in December, 1916, and May, 1917. At the time of enlistment Pte Enticott worked at the B.T.H, and previously for some years on the L & N-W Railway.

R V Wilson (Old Laurentian), late H.A.C, son of Mr J G Wilson, York Street, has been gazetted Second-Lieutenant, and has received a commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Parkhurst, Isle of Wight.

A tale that is going the round and causing some amusement among our boys is that of a Tommy on one of our Eastern fronts, having his photograph taken in the regulation shorts and thin vest, a copy of which he sent home. His mother, in thanking him for his photo, remarked : “ But, dear me, you should have let me know before that you were so short of clothes, and I would have sent you some on !”

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Wednesday afternoon Mr B Morris, of the Empire, entertained about 250 wounded soldiers, together with their nurses and assistants, from Rugby Town V.A.D, “ Te Hira,” Bilton Hall, St John’s, and Pailton Red Cross Hospitals, to a garden party at the Manor House, Bilton. An excellent programme was given by the artistes appearing at the Empire this week : Black and White, The Pallangers, The Deldees, Wolfland (comedian), Miss Danby (soloist), “ One of the Boys ” (ventriloquial sketch), and Rolando Martin. A sketch was also performed by Misses Morson, A Pratt, Walrond, and F Shillitoe. A substantial tea was provided for the visitors, and at the conclusion Mr and Mrs Morris and their family were cordially thanked by the guests, who evidently appreciated and enjoyed the entertainment.

BLIND SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.—A meeting of the workpeople was recently held at Willans & Robinson’s Rugby, which was addressed by Mr F R Davenport and Mr Macaulay (a blind representative) on the objects of the Institute for the Blind, and particularly on the training of blinded soldiers and sailors at St Dunstans Hostel. The appeal was sympathetically received, and a committee of the workpeople was at once formed to put in operation a scheme to enable all employees of the company to contribute weekly, for a period of 12 weeks, to this most deserving object.

MARTON.

PTE L J YOUNG.-In connection with the death in action, on July 3rd, reported in our last issue, a letter has been received by his mother, Mrs J Young, of Church Street, from the Commanding Officer, stating that her son was wounded in the front line trenches by a shell on July 3rd.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

NEWS OF MISSING HUSBAND WANTED.—For many months Mrs Richard Fell has been anxiously awaiting news of her husband, and after fruitless enquiries from the authorities and other likely sources, she asks us to make known the following facts, in the hope that she may obtain tidings through returned soldiers or comrades who have known him. He had served 12 years in the Royal Warwicks on the outbreak of the war, and joined up in November, 1914. In November, 1915 he was transferred to the Rifle Brigade, and proceeded with his regiment to India. Here he was on duty in the Punjaub, and corresponded regularly with his wife. His last letter was posted in Bombay, and received on December 21st, 1916. He then believed he was about to sail for Salonica or Mesopotamia, but no further tidings of his whereabouts have come to hand. His wife also has three little children dependent upon her, and is, naturally, in great anxiety.

BRAUNSTON.

KILLED IN ACTION.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Clarke have received news that their son, Driver Thomas Clarke, Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in France on July 11th. He enlisted shortly after the outbreak of war, previous to which he was employed at the B.T.H, Rugby.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—A gloom was cast over the village when it became known that Mr Arthur Clarke had received official news that his other son, Pte Lucas Clarke, had been killed in action on July 8th. They have received letters of sympathy from two of their sons’ officers, in which it is stated that he was a splendid man, and is missed by all ranks in his Company. He was killed instantaneously by a shell which burst in the dug-out where he was sleeping.

DEATHS.

COPE.—In loving memory of Gunner PERCY LESLIE COPE,
who was killed in action in France on June 21st, 1917, aged 22.
Not dead but sleepeth.
Somewhere there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file—he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all,
—From his Wife and Son, 62 Lawford Road, New Bilton, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

ALLSO.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl PERCY ALLSO, who was killed in action in France on July 27, 1916 ; aged 23.—
“ Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.”—From his
loving FATHER MOTHER, and FAMILY.

DUNKLEY.—In loving memory of our dearly-beloved son, Pte. HARRY DUNKLEY, who was killed on July 30th, 1916, somewhere in France.—Also in loving memory of our dear beloved son, Pte. PERCY JOHN DUNKLEY, who was killed somewhere in France on July 25th, 1916.—15 Chester Street, Rugby.

HOWARD.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. STEVEN HOWARD, who died of wounds in France, August 1st, 1916, age 28.
“ A little time has passed, and friends around us
Think the wound is almost healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Never forgotten by his loving MOTHER and FATHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS, and also from A. CROFT, Long Lawford.

PRESTON.—In loving memory of Rifleman JACK PRESTON, 7th K.R.R,,who was killed in action on July 30, 1915.—“ Loved and lost awhile.”—From MOTHER, FATHER, and SISTERS.

REFEARN.—In loving memory of Rifleman JOSE (Tim) REDFEARN, 7th K.R.R., who died from wounds on July 21, 1915. Buried in Lyssenthock Cemetery.
“ He sleeps not In his native land,
Bur ‘neath a foreign sky,
And far from those who loved him best,
In a soldier’s grave he lies.”
—From WIFE and DAUGHTERS.

SHAW.—In loving memory of Pte. J. C. SHAW (JACK), R.W.R., who was killed in action on August 1, 1916.
“ The midnight stars are gleaming
On a grave I cannot see,
Where sleeping without dreaming
lies one most dear to me.”
—From his loving WIFE and CHILDREN.

SIMS.—In loving remembrance of HARRY SIMS, the dearly beloved elder son of LOUIE SIMS JENKINS, who was killed in action in France, July 30th, 1915, aged 19.
Sweet be thy rest, thy memory dear,
‘Tis sweet to breathe thy name ;
In life I loved thee very dear,
In death I do the same.
—From his still sorrowing Mother.

SIMS.—In ever sweetest remembrance of our dear brother HARRY SIMS, killed in action, July 30th, 1915.
Gone from our sight, but to memory ever dear.
—From his Brothers Bert, George, and Trevor ; Sisters Daisy and Mabel.

SMITH.—In loving memory of HERBERT, the dearly-loved son of FREDERICK and the late SARAH J. SMITH ; killed in action July 30th, 1915.
“ We miss and mourn thee in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memories of days that have been.”
—From FATHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory, of my dear husband, Pte. ALFRED HENRY THOMPSON, who died of wounds in France on July 17th, aged 34.—“ Sleep on, dear one, till we meet again.”—From his loving WIFE and CHILDREN.

WAREING.—On July 23rd, 1916, STANLEY, the only son, of JAMES WAREING, of Lilbourne Farm, reported missing—now reported killed. Aged 18.
I often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say “ Good-bye,”
Before he closed his eyes.
-Mother, Father, and Sisters.

 

21st Jul 1917. The House Famine in Rugby

THE HOUSE FAMINE IN RUGBY.
NO BUILDING SCHEME TILL AFTER THE WAR.

An interesting discussion on the Dearth of Houses in Rugby took place at the meeting of the Urban District Council on Tuesday, as a result of which it was reluctantly decided that no further steps towards remedying the shortage should be taken at present.

The discussion arose out of the reply from the Local Government Board to a letter from the Council on this question. The Board stated that they were still unable to sanction any loan for the erection of new dwellings, except where additional housing accommodation was urgently necessary in connection with War requirements, and where this was certified by one of the Government departments concerned. If the Urban District Council could furnish evidence of the need for the immediate erection of dwellings from the point of view of the War, the Board would consider whether the case should be submitted to the Ministry of Munitions. The Board also enquired whether, if sanction was given for a loan, which could be raised at the current minimum rate of interest of 5½ per cent., the District Council considered that they could carry out the scheme on an economical basis. Apart from these questions, there would probably be difficulties arising out of the shortage of labour and materials, e.g. timber.

Mr Robbins urged that the matter be referred to the Joint Plans and Estates Committee.—Mr Stevenson supported, and pointed out that practically every county in the country was suffering from a dearth of houses, and even if the War finished at once it was questionable whether the percentage charged for loans would be reduced.—Mr Wise : Is it possible to produce an economically sound and paying scheme at a rate of 5½ per cent ? If it is not it is no use going any further.

Mr Stevenson contended that most house property was paying a rate of 25 per cent, on the original capital outlay. The house in which he lived was formerly let at 4s 6d per week, but he now had to pay 7s 6d rent.—Mr Loverock : What did it cost to erect ?—Mr Stevenson : If 4s 6d per week paid a percentage on the original capital-Mr Loverock (interrupting) : Probably it did not pay.—Mr Stevenson : Certainly it must have done so. You will not find builders building for the sake of building.

Mr Robbins said, in consequence of the interest paid on the War Loan, the interest on money borrowed would remain at the present percentage for some time after the War ; but Mr Seabroke contended that they had not only to consider the high rate of interest, but the also the enormous cost of all building material. In these circumstances he did not see how it was possible to let new houses at a rent which would pay.—Mr Loverock asked if there was any immediate demand for houses at the present time ? They knew that when the War was over people were prepared to build in large quantities, and they also had plans for over 100 houses. If there was no immediate demand, what was the use of considering the matter, especially when they knew that no economical scheme could be produced.—Mr Robbins replied that there was a great demand for houses, and he said last week one of his tenants went to look over a house. She had not given notice to him, but the next day he had had 35 people asking for her house. — Mr Yates supported the motion to refer the matter to the Joint Committee, and said the reason that he had raised the question was that he wished to know in what position they stood with regard to obtaining a loan. He had heard it suggested that other towns were more favourably considered than Rugby, and that in some cases subsidies were being paid. If that was so, he thought Rugby might make a claim for a subsidy, but the Local Government Board did not seem disposed to consider their case favourably. With interest at 5½ per cent, and the high cost of material, it seemed impossible for any scheme to be economically successful. It was a primary consideration that any housing scheme should not be a drag upon the rates, and he for one would not wish to subsidise house building at the expense of other sections of the community. He thought under normal conditions the Council could build better houses than any private individual was disposed to build ; but be did not think at present the Council could put up a good enough case to induce the Ministry of Munitions to sanction a building certificate. Even if such a certificate was sanctioned, he would not be inclined to support the scheme under the present terms, because when the housing scheme was initiated he wished it to have some reasonable prospect of success. — Mr Linnell agreed, and said it would be impossible for some years to build houses at much less than 30 per cent. more than pre-war cost. To build houses similar to those now let at 8s per week they would have to charge 12s per week rent ; and though they might be able to let them at present, he asked what would become of the house after the War was over ?

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte T Kirby, Machine Gun Corps, son of Mrs Kirby, of 24 Sun Street, was wounded in action on July 10th.

After being twice mentioned in despatches, Pte J Hickman, of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. Pte Hickman is the son of Mr & Mrs John Hickman, of Harborough Magna.

Sergt Steve Ward (Kilsby), of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. The official record states : “ This N.C.O has done consistent good work during the period of preparation for the operations for the offensive near Hill 60. He has on several occasions had charge of detached parties digging assembly trenches under heavy shell and machine fire, and has always succeeded in completing his task. On the night of the 7th-8th June, 1917, his platoon was detailed to dig a strong point near Hill 60, He set a good example by his coolness and great courage, and was of great assistance to his platoon officer.” Before the War Sergt Steve Ward was employed in the B.T.H Tool Stores.

Squadron Sergt-Major J R Tait, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry in Egypt, has been mentioned in despatches by General Murray. In the same despatches the name of his cousin, Capt W I Tait, of the Suffolk Regiment, also appears. The latter is the son of the late Mr William Tait of Rugby, who afterwards resided at Leicester.

Miss Child, of Higham-on-the-Hill, has this week received news that her brother, Trooper Child, who was reported wounded and missing since April 11th, has been killed.

Pte Oliver Hipwell, of the Warwickshire Howitizer Battery, an old St Matthew’s boy, whose home is at 73 King Edward Road, has been wounded in the shoulder and thigh, and is now at a hospital at the base.

Sergt F Claridge, instructor at the 1st Army School, France, and son of Mr W Claridge, of 57 Manor Road, has been awarded the Military Medal for “ conspicuously good service in an isolated and heavily bombarded trench ” near Ypres. He held this position for 48 hours without rations. Before enlisting in September, 1914, Sergt Claridge was employed by Messrs. Lavender and Harrison. For nine years he was a chorister at the Parish Church.

Driver S Lamb, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been wounded in France. Driver Lamb is the son of Mrs Lamb, 17 St Marie’s Terrace, and although he is only 19 years of age, he has been in the fighting line two years. His father (who went through the South African war), and his elder brother, are also serving at the front.

AN OLD ELBOROW BOY WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Lance-Corpl W Haggar, son of Mr and Mrs J Haggar, of St Cross, Alexandra Road, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct on June 7th. He is at present in hospital suffering from wounds received in action on that date, and has received a congratulatory letter from his commanding officer, 3rd Worcestershire Regiment. Lance-Corpl Haggar, joined up at the outbreak of war, and, after serving in the 11th Hussars, was transferred to the 3rd Worcesters, being attached eventually to the Machine Gun Section. He has been in the fighting at Ypres, Hooge, Loos, Neuve Chapelle, Vimy Ridge, the battles of Somme, Arras, and Messines. At the battle of Somme he was wounded and received his first stripe for bravery. Previous to the war he was a painter at the B.T.H. and was educated at the Elborow School.

A GOOD RECORD.

The three soldier sons of Mr & Mrs John Wheeler, 135 Abbey Street, have recently been promoted from corporals to sergeants. Sergt E Wheeler, who has served 22½ years in the Army and is now in the 4th Royal Warwicks, has been appointed an instructor in musketry. Sergt A J Wheeler (17 years’ service) has been transferred from the Oxfordshire Light Infantry to a Cycle Division in Salonika as a gymnastic instructor ; and Sergt W B Wheeler (six years’ service), 1st Warwicks, is now a bomb instructor. Sergt W B Wheeler has served in France for two years and seven months. He took part in the first and second Battles of Ypres, and was wounded at Zonebeke in October, 1914. He was subsequently wounded again during the Battle of the Somme, and was also gassed on Whit-Monday of this year.

SERGT. A. GOODE MISSING.

Detective-Inspector Goode, of Rugby, has received news that his youngest son, Sergt A Goode, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been missing since July 10th. The news was contained in a letter from an officer, who wrote : “ The Germans attacked successfully and took a number of our men prisoners, your son amongst them. He was an excellent sergeant, well liked by his officers and men, and from information I have been able to obtain he did everything that could be done before he fell into the hands of the enemy.”

A RUGBY OFFICER’S DECORATIONS.

At an investiture at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday his Majesty conferred the Distinguished Service Order and a bar to the Military Medal on Capt H H Neeves, M.C, Northumberland Fusiliers. Capt Neeves received the D.S.O for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in handling his company during an attack of the enemy position. His skilful leading and determined courage enabled him, in spite of enemy flanking and reverse fire, to get his men to within a few yards of the enemy’s rear position. Owing to many casualties, however, he was compelled to withdraw. On his return he gave his battalion commander a full and lucid report on the situation—the only accurate one received. It was subsequently found that he had been wounded in the lungs early in the attack, and had remained with his men under fire 23 hours after being wounded. He was awarded the Military Cross on January 1, 1917, and the bar to this has been conferred for not only maintaining his own company during a long and difficult advance, but also taking command of another company involved in the front line attack. He set a splendid example throughout. Capt Neeves is the son of Mr S Neeves, of Murray Road, and was employed at the Rugby Post Office. At the commencement of the War he was called up as a trooper in the Yeomanry.

MARTON.

The death has occurred in action of Pte L J Young, Section, R.W.R, in France on July 2rd. The deepest sympathy is felt with the widowed mother in her sad bereavement. The deceased, who was 21 years of age, joined up in March, 1916. Pte Young, who was a general, favourite with everybody, was for some time in the employ of Major Hicks Beach, late of Eathorpe Hall, as gardener, and was very keenly interested in the social side of the Marton Recreation Room, being sport secretary in 1915[?].

DUNCHURCH.
CASUALTY.—On Tuesday morning Mr and Mrs H Pearce, of Coventry Road, received news that Sergt H Pearce was killed or missing. He and two others failed to return after a raid, and their fate is unknown. Sergt Pearce was the youngest sergeant from Dunchurch, and was much liked by everyone.

EASENHALL.

Mr and Mrs Alfred Smith have received news that their son Pte Percy A Smith, Hants Regt, was killed in action on April 23. He had previously been reported as missing and hope was entertained that he might have been taken prisoner. Previous to joining the army he was in gentleman’s service near Bournemouth, where he won the affection of all with whom he worked by his bright and genial disposition and cheerful service. He joined the army in May, 1915, and went to France in July, 1916.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE.

The usual monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Wednesday evening last week.

Mr William Flint, c.c (who presided), extended a very cordial welcome to Mrs Blagden, remarking how pleased the committee were to see her with them once again and to know that she had completely recovered from her long illness.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that the donations continued to come in well, and since his previous statement in connection with the recent War Prisoners’ Day effort he had received further sums on behalf of same, amounting to over £50, bringing the total up to over £800. In addition to this, he had received since July 1st 30 individual subscriptions, amounting to £42 8s 5d, and they had now a balance in hand of nearly £700. The cost of the food parcels for July amounted to £91 16s, after allowing for guarantees from Regimental Care Committees, and for August the committee would have to provide over £100 owing to the additional men that had been added to the Rugby list during the past fortnight.

The Chairman remarked that the financial position was most satisfactory, Mrs Blagden observing that, in spite of the recent effort, the interest on the part of the public in the welfare of the local men who were prisoners of war showed no abatement.

Mr Barker informed the meeting that Sir Starr Jameson (chairman of the Central Prisoners of War Committee) had recently issued a statement with reference to criticisms that had been made regarding the administration by the Central Committee. The report of the Joint Committee appointed to enquire into the work carried out at that great establishment at Thurloe showed clearly that most of the discontent aroused throughout the country was due to the rigid War Office regulations, which interfered everywhere with private effort. “ There is no question,” says Sir Starr Jameson, “ that these regulations were necessary to remedy the evils which had grown up, and, where possible, the Central Committee had tried to get them modified.” Then, too, when the first few weeks’ parcels under the new scheme reached Germany there was a breakdown of the German railway and postal services, causing long delays in the deliveries. Thousands of our prisoners, wrote home to complain, and their friends very naturally laid the blame on the Central Committee. It was hardly just to criticise them for what was beyond their control.

NEW SCHEME WORKING WELL.

The Central Committee and the Care Committees all over the country have ample evidence, consisting of reports from the prisoners themselves or their relatives, which all go to show that the scheme has been working well for months past, and that the prisoners’ wants are fully supplied, without overlapping or waste. This statement was, Mr Barker felt sure, very encouraging to the committee ; but it only bore out what he had maintained during the past few months. He had repeatedly brought forward evidence to prove that most of the men who were being cared for by the Rugby Committee were receiving their food parcels safely. The acknowledgments from the men continued to come through splendidly. There was, of course, the inevitable delay between the time a man was taken prisoner and when the acknowledgment was received that he had had his first parcel. It was frequently the case that some weeks would elapse, and during this time the man would be writing home complaining that he was getting no parcels, causing his relatives to think that he was getting neglected or his parcels being stolen.

Mrs. Blagden reminded the committee that since the new scheme came into force last December practically the whole of the work fell upon the hon secretary. There was a very great amount of clerical work involved, and in this Mr Barker has received most valuable help from Miss C M Judd, to whom the committee passed a vote of thanks.

WAR CHARITIES.

The Rugby Master Butchers’ Association wrote asking the Council to register their Bath Chair Charity under the War Charities Act.—Mr Wise drew attention to the fact that a raffle was being held in connection with the fund, and he asked whether the Council were in order in supporting a raffle, seeing that such things were absolutely illegal.—M. Ringrose : It comes within the Lottery Act, doesn’t it ?—Mr Stevenson said he believed this was so, but such things were winked at in Rugby, providing the authorities knew the person who was managing it. The question was, however, was not the Council lending themselves to something which they might wish to get out of later.—Mr Yates pointed out that the Council were not authorising a raffle, but registering a charity. It was no business of the Council how the money was raised, and if the promoters committed an offence they would be amenable to the Common Law.—Mr Robbins expressed the opinion that if the Council made themselves responsible for all these things they would be busily employed. It was difficult to go to any effort on behalf of charity without taking part in a raffle, a “ dip,” or a draw (laughter).—It was decided to register the charity.

RUGBY INFIRMARY V.A.D. HOSPITAL.—Through the kindness of the Commandant and staff, the female inmates of the institution were entertained to supper, and afterwards invited to a soldiers’ concert, on Saturday, under the presidency of Miss Walrond. A very enjoyable programme consisted of songs by Miss F Shilittoe and Sergt Till ; children’s play, “ Brownikins,” by King’s Mssengers ; sailor’s hornpipe by Misses C & H Rushall ; muff dance by the Misses Norris, Squires, and Hazelwood ; and an amusing sketch, “ Mechanical Jane,” in which the characters were taken by Miss Morsen, and the Misses Walrond.—On Wednesday evening Sergt Evans presided over a concert arranged by Mr Hickman, Songs, duets, and part songs were given by Mrs Hickman, Mrs Ward, Mrs Painter, Miss Spencer, Messrs Hickman, Lovett, Bowell, Allison, and Sergt Till ; also two solos on the banjo and mandoline by Mrs Bostock. Every item was heartily appreciated by all present.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Sunday evening members of the Rugby Brotherhood gave a concert to the patients at the St Johns V.A.D Hospital. Mr J Chisholm presided, and the programme consisted of selections by the Orchestra, under the conductorship of Mr A E Alneham ; songs, “ When you come home ” and “ Monarch of the woods,” Mr Phillips ; piccolo solo “ Silver birds,” Mr W Rowley. Cigarettes were distributed amongst the patients, and the concert was much appreciated.

The current Issue of the “ Murrayian,” a smart little paper issued by members of the Murray School, contains several interesting items, including an appreciation of Pte James Irving, London Scottish, formerly an assistant master at the school, who was recently killed in action.

A RUGBY SCHOOL WAR MEMORIAL.—A service of communion plate-the gift of Mr & Mrs W B Gair—in memory of Old Rugbeians who fall in the War was dedicated at Rugby School Chapel on Sunday last. It consists of thirteen pieces, and with one exception the patens are exact reproductions of Seventh Century originals either at St Peter’s, Cornhill, or in possession of the Goldsmiths’ Company. On the obverse of the alms paten appears the motto of Rugby School, “ Orando Laborando,” surmounted by the date of the foundation, 1567, and the coat of arms of the founder, Lawrence Sheriff, flanked by his initials.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

“ PEACE.”

SIR.—Many Rugby residents have had leaflets, printed in London, pushed slyly under their doors these last few days, apparently on behalf of the Society of Friends, asking whether it is “ necessary ” to go on with the War.

While respecting that Society’s Christian efforts one detects a connection between this premature peace pamphlet—for it is little else—and the pro-German elements that Rugby and district unhappily still shelters.

The very method of circulating this leaflet is un-English, and reminds one of the pre-war meetings at odd corners, calling for a reduction in the Navy, and similar pro-German tricks.

It must surely disgust the overwhelming majority of Rugby folk that these same people are supporting anything which tends to encourage a premature peace.-Your obedient servant,

July 13, 1917.            F R DAVENPORT.

BILTON HALL HOSPITAL.

DEAR SIR,—To prevent any misconception among those who have subscribed so liberally or worked so hard in the interests of the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Hospital, I should like to state that, in response to my offer to lend the house until the end of March, 1918, I have this week received a letter from the County Director of the Warwickshire Branch of the B.R.C.S, saying that they do not intend carrying on the hospital beyond September.—Yours truly, WALTER BARNETT.

THE COUNTY OF WARWICK MOTOR VOLUNTEER CORPS.

SIR,—I regret that the account of the efforts being made to form a County Motor Volunteer Corps and a reference therein to the supply of petrol, which have appeared in the Press, has led to misconception as to the intention of the promoters on the part of those who are engaged in the wholly admirable work of transporting the wounded under the Red Cross Society.

Nothing can be further from the intention of the promoters than to hamper or restrict the excellent work of those owners of motor-cars who have so generously taken part in this errand of mercy. But I would point out that there is nothing incompatible to those so engaged in joining the Warwickshire Motor Volunteer Corps. Large numbers of members are already giving their services to the Red Cross Society ; and, indeed, we lay it down as one of our duties that, when not employed on military service, we shall place our organisation at the disposal of those who require assistance in the removal of wounded soldiers.

Mr F van den Arend may, therefore, rest satisfied that the representations that are being made as regards the renewal of petrol licenses are not intended to affect the supply of petrol for the Red Cross Society, or for cars already engaged in work of national importance.

In the event of national emergency the Government may decide to commandeer all private cars which, in their opinion, might be used to better advantage elsewhere. It is the object of the Motor Volunteer Corps to organise this Corps before such an emergency arises in order that they may be available at once for the service of the Government.

Therefore, I repeat that the fact of a private car being engaged in Red Cross Society work, or any similar work, should not debar the owner from joining the Motor Volunteer Corps.

Permit me to add that Lord Leigh has allowed himself to be nominated for the command of the Corps, which already embraces two heavy sections and two light sections, consisting of over 300 lorries and cars, collected from Birmingham and the county, and that the scheme has the entire approval of the Regimental Commandant, Colonel D F Lewis, C.B.-Yours faithfully,

(Signed) FRANK GLOVER, Major,
Headquarters : 2nd Batt. Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment, Clarendon Place, Leamington.

DEATHS.

COPE.-In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner PERCY LESLIE COPE, who died of wounds in France on June 21st.—“ Sleep on, dear one, till we meet again.”—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER.

WHITE, ALBERT J., aged 31, the beloved eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. White, Murray Road, Rugby, and dearly beloved husband of Ethel M. White. Killed in action in France, June 30th.

WILSON.—Killed in action, in France on July 10th, THOMAS, third son of Mr. & Mrs. Wilson, Gate Farm, Bourton ; aged 25.

IN MEMORIAM.

BERRY.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl HARRY BERRY, 2/7 R.W.R., who died (prisoner of war) from wounds received in action on July 19, 1916.—Not forgotten by his pals, T. ADAMS, D.G. and T.H.

DICKEN.—In ever-loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, who died of wounds in France on July 20, 1916,—“ We miss him most who loved him best.”—From his loving FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS, BROTHERS, and ELSIE.

DICKEN.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, 14th Gloucester Bantam Regiment, who died of wounds on July 20, 1916 ; aged 22 years.
“ A little time has passed, and friends around us
Think the wound is almost healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Fondly remembered by BROTHER and SISTER, WILL and AMY.

HIPWELL.—In ever-loving and sweetest remembrance of our dear son, Pte JOHN HIPWELL, Lilbourne, M.G.C., who died of wounds on July 23, 1916. Interred in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt, France.
“ He fought for his country,
He answered duty’s call ;
His home, his friends, his comforts,
He sacrificed them all ;
But he won the admiration
Of Britain’s glorious name.”
“ Peace, perfect peace.”
—Never forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, SISTER and BROTHERS.

LENTON.—In loving remembrance of our dear brother, Pte. W. H. LENTON, who died of wounds in France on 19,1916.—Ever remembered by FRED in France, and ERNE, ETHEL and FAMILY, 64 Wood Street.

LENTON.-In loving memory of WILL, dearly beloved son of the late Mr. & Mrs. T. Lenton, Wood Street, who was killed in France on July 19, 1916.
“ Greater love hath no man than this,
That he lay down his life for his friends.”

SMITH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. T. W. SMITH, of Swinford, who was killed in action at Beaumont Hamel on July 21-22,1916.

WHITE.—In loving memory of Sergt. WILLIAM HARVEY WHITE (2/7th Batt., R.W.R.), dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Geo White, Dunchurch, who died a prisoner of war in Germany on July 19,1916 ; aged 19.

14th Jul 1917, The Rugby Baking Trade – No more men can be spared.

THE RUGBY BAKING TRADE.
TRIBUNAL SAYS NO MORE MEN CAN BE SPARED.

On Thursday evening in last week the Rugby Urban Tribunal spent hours in considering the suggestion of the Military that, by means of a scheme of co-operation in the baking trade, a number of men could be dispensed with. There were present : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), W Flint, T A Wise, L Loverock, and H Yates. Mr H P Highton was the Military representative, and Col F F Johnstone (recruiting officer) and Mr F M Burton (secretary to the Advisory Committee) were also present. Two of the cases were applications for further exemptions, and the remaining 28, consisting of master bakers, their employees, and the employees of the Co-operative Society, were questions raised by the Military.

Mr H P Highton opened the case, and explained that, from figures which had been laid before the Advisory Committee, that body were of opinion that the quantity of bread consumed in Rugby was far beyond the requirements under Lord Devonport’s scheme. With a view to preventing overlapping and wastage of labour, a deputation from the Advisory Committee met the Committee of the Co-operative Society, and asked them to formulate a scheme for the centralisation of the baking trade locally. The reason the Co-operative Society was approached was that they possessed by far the largest plant in the town, and the Advisory Committee thought they would be much more capable of propounding a scheme. The Co-operative Committee were very reluctant to put forward such a scheme, and it was only by appealing to their patriotism that the Advisory Committee could gain their consent. This scheme was explained to the master bakers, but failed to meet with their approval. On June 13th the Advisory Committee met the master bakers to discus» this or an alternative scheme, and after this meeting the Chairman of the Master Bakers’ Association wrote to the Committee :- “ The master bakers agree to co-operate, and to leave you (the Advisory Committee) to take which employees you think fit. At the same time, we ask you to be good enough to give substitutes where possible, and to allow a little time before calling up.”—A further conference of all the parties concerned was held on June 25th, and as it then appeared that there was no prospect of arranging a definite scheme, the only course left to the Military was to call up all the bakers who had received exemptions. He wished to emphasise the fact that this had not been done on the spur of the moment. The Advisory Committee had not acted impulsively, but they had endeavoured to act in a manner which would cripple the industry to the least extent. He suggested that, after hearing the facts, the Tribunal should decide how many men should be made available for the Army, and then the members of the trade themselves could, within a week, submit a list from which the final selections could be made. If this course was adopted, he asked the bakers to consider the national interests before everything else, and to deal fairly with the Military by releasing, as far as possible, general service men. He was quite aware that the baking trade was a hard and exacting one, and that “ A ” men were most useful to them. Doubtless a system of co-operation might mean that they would have to work longer hours, but the sacrifice they were asked to make was not comparable to that which was made by the men in the trenches, or of the mother who gave up her boy.

SOME INTERESTING FIGURES.

The following statistics were then agreed upon after some discussion :—Population of Rugby and New Bilton, 28,000 ; bread baked by Co-operative Society and delivered outside the town, 2,400 loaves per week ; bread sold by private bakers in the country, 2,390 loaves ; bread sold in town by country bakers, about 90 loaves per week ; number of 4-lb loaves to sack of 280lbs, 90. It was agreed that each employee of the Co-operative Society, with the assistance of machinery, could make up 11 sacks a week, and other bakers 10 per week. On this basis it was calculated that five men were required to bake the bread which was delivered from Rugby in the country. In order to arrive at the number of bakers required to supply the town, Mr Highton suggested that they should take Lord Devonport’s rations as a basis, indeed, this was the only basis they were allowed to work on, he contended.

Mr Eaden objected, however, and pointed out that this was not a compulsory, but a voluntary ration. It was not within the province of the Military or the Tribunal to say what the public should consume, and he contended that they should work on the basis of the bread which was actually consumed in the town. A large number of railway men were employed in the town, and many of the engine-drivers, firemen, guards, &c, when starting on a journey, often took one or two meals with them, and some of them took a loaf. The Tribunal must not work on an imaginary basis, but upon facts. A few weeks ago the actual number of sacks baked in the town was 491, and if the rationing had been adhered to on a basis of 30,000 population only 312 sacks would have been required.

It was pointed out that at present the private bakers made up 258 sacks (bread only) and the Co-operative Society 182—a total of 440. To do this the private bakers would require 26 men and the Co-operative Society 17—total, 43. Of the 440 sacks made up 52 was for country delivery, leaving 388 for the town. This would bring the average consumption per head to 4 27-28ths lbs of bread. The Davenport ration of 4lbs included flour used for other domestic purposes, however.

Mr Highton contended that only 30 men were required to bake the bread necessary for Rugby and New Bilton, and five for the villages. It was possible, too, he thought, to dilute the trade by women labour. This had been tried with successful results in some towns.

Mr F M Burton gave the figures of employees in the Rugby baking trade as follows :—Private traders, whole-time bakers 29, youths 10, boys 9 ; Co-operative Society, whole-time bakers 18, women (confectionery) 4, and 1 boy. This made a total of 47 whole-time bakers, and the youths between them might do as much as two whole-time bakers.

Mr Baden contended that the private traders only had 22 whole-time men engaged in the trade.—Mr Yates pointed out that, although it had been urged that 43 men were required to bake the bread for the town and district, according to the figures only 40 men were employed, and Mr Wise drew attention to the fact that from Mr Eaden’s figures his 22 men were making up 11 sacks a week each on an average.—Mr Eaden informed the Tribunal that several of the master bakers were engaged wholly on confectionery and smalls, and others only made up a small quantity of bread. He also asked whether the Military were anxious to go on with the scheme suggested, whereby all the bread should be made at the Co-operative Society’s bakehouse.

Mr Highton replied that the Military held no brief for the scheme. He would be delighted to see a scheme adopted, but they had no means of enforcing such a scheme.—Mr Yates said, as the disparity between the capacity of a baker working at the Co-operative bakehouse and the other bakers was so little, only one sack per man per week, he failed to see that a centralisation scheme was advisable. Had there been any marked difference it would have been worth considering.—Mr Highton thought the scheme would save labour in many ways, especially in delivering.—Mr Eaden : We have very serious objections to any such scheme.

THE SCHEME EXPLAINED.

At the request of the Tribunal, Mr F M Burton briefly explained the scheme which had been put forward, and said it had been suggested that the whole of the bread should be baked on the premises of the Co-operative Society, and that the master bakers should send in their orders on the day before they required it. The cost of production, such as wages, rent, fire, light, rates, gas for the engine, &c, would be added to the costs of the flour, and the master bakers would be charged cost price. The wages of the men employed would be on the scale of the Bakers’ Union, and the control of the scheme would be vested in a committee of seven—three master bakers, three members of the Co-operative Society, and an independent chairman. Every week each master baker would receive a share of the profits based upon his purchases. The Advisory Committee were of opinion that if such a scheme was adopted it would result in a great saving of labour.—In reply to Mr Loverock, Mr Burton said, if they agreed upon Lord Devonport’s rations, the whole bread required for Rugby could be baked by 30 men at a central station.—Mr Eaden contended that there was not a suspicion of a satisfactory factor in the scheme so far as the master bakers, were concerned. When the bread was baked at the Co-operative Society the bakers would be expected to fetch it away, and before they could do so they would be charged with a proportion of the Society’s rent, rates, taxes, &c ; while at the same time their own rent would be running on. Was it suggested to cause all this upheaval and throw all these men out of business for the sake of one extra sack per week per man ? He also pointed out that if ovens were not used for any length of time they tended to deteriorate.

In giving the decision of the Tribunal, the Chairman said, after very careful consideration, they were unanimously of opinion that the state of affairs which had been disclosed did not warrant them taking any more men from the baking trade. In view of the quantity of flour baked, they did not see how they could carry on with fewer men. The two applications would be adjourned, and the exemptions, which had been reviewed at the request of the Military, would be allowed to stand.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

DR 17 PROSECUTIONS.—Austin William Harris, baker, 37 Pennington Street, Rugby, and William John Eales, farmer, Ling Hall Farm, Church Lawford, were summoned for failing to deliver to the Recruiting Officer at Rugby a statement of all their male employees of 16 years of age or over on July 2nd and June 30th respectively.-Eales wrote stating that he was too busy to answer the summons personally. He was sorry the offence had occurred, but he did not know that he had to send any forms in. He only employed two men, and one of these was over 60.—P.S Percival stated that on June 30th he called on defendant, and asked if he had sent the form in, and he replied that he did not know he had to do so.-Frank Middleton Burton, supervising clerk, Recruiting Office, Rugby, stated that on June 30th no Form DR 17 had been received from defendant. He added that the non-receipt of these forms retarded the work of the Recruiting Officer and caused considerable delay. The Military Authorities had spent large sums in advertising the regulation in the newspapers, and already they had had one prosecution in that Court.-In reply to Mr Wise, Mr Burton said the advertisement appeared for 10 or 12 weeks.—In imposing a fine of £2, the Chairman said employers must understand that they must comply with the law.-Harris admitted the offence, and pleaded ignorance.—The Chairman : What are you ?—Defendant : A baker.—Q : Don’t you ever see a local newspaper ?—A : I don’t get much time for reading.—Mr Wise pointed out that the Advisory Committee had done everything possible. They advertised the regulations conspicuously in large type, and one could not open a newspaper without seeing it.—Defendant stated that he only employed one man casually, and as this man was over military age defendant did not think he had to send a form in in respect of him.—Mr Burton said the form had not yet been sent in.-Fined £2.

LIGHTING OFFENCE.—Christopher H Pywell, dentist, Rugby, was summoned for an offence under the Lights Order, at Rugby, on June 29th.—He pleaded guilty.-P.C Lester deposed that at about midnight on June 29th he saw a bright light shining from a window at the back of 49 Church Street. The light was unshaded. On the following day witness saw defendant, and he said he would take all responsibility. He added that he switched the light on to see to write a letter, and he forgot to turn it off when he went out.—Fined £1.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second Lieutenant Maurice V Eyden (son of Mr Alfred Eyden), 2nd Northants Regiment, has been promoted to the rank of First-Lieutenant.

Lieut M E T Wratislaw, supervisor of Warwickshire Military Service Appeal Tribunals, has been promoted to the rank of Captain.

Second-Lieut J A Hattrell, who for some time was at the Rugby Recruiting Office, but is now in the Birmingham area, has been promoted to a captaincy. He is the son of Mr G P Hattrell, of Welford.

Signaller L Smith, R.F.A, who prior to enlisting was employed for several years in the saloon of Mr A Coleman, hairdresser, Church Street, has been recommended for the Military Medal for conspicuous gallantry by remaining at his post under particularly heavy shell-fire on June 7th and 8th. He has served in France nine months. His home is at Cambridge.

Warrant-Officer A Forsyth, son of Mrs Forsyth, 48 Murray Road, has been personally thanked by the General-in-Command of the R.F.C in the East for his splendid work out there. He also obtained his commission on the field, being promoted to lieutenant. He has twice received the Serbian decorations—first the Silver Star and since the Cross of Karageorge.

Sapper W A Tandy, Royal Engineers, attached to the to the Leicester and Lincoln Territorial Brigade, has been awarded the Military Medal. Prior to the War Sapper Tandy was employed as a machine minder at Messrs Frost’s, printers.

Mrs Mulliner invited a number of people to attend a concert given on Saturday evening by the Sports Club of the 84th Squadron R.F.C, to the officers who are patients in her hospital at Clifton Court. A more beautiful or healthy position for convalescents could not be desired, and the recreative facilities have been added to by the transformation of the rose garden into an open-air theatre. This sheltered nook in the grounds lends itself admirably to such a purpose. A spacious stage has been erected at one end, and scenic effects are obtained by the tasteful arrangement of flowers, evergreens, &c. The auditorium was fairly well filled with officers and visitors, and also men of the Flying Corps and their friends, who enjoyed the excellent programme presented by the entertainers.

Corpl S Souster is amongst the names given in General Murray’s list of recommendations in his Egyptian dispatch. Corpl Souster, who lives at Grosvenor Road, Rugby, joined the Rugby Company of the Royal Engineers as surveyor on its formation, and went out to Egypt with the Company. He was afterwards put on the important work of taking the water supply across the desert, and was greatly complimented by the Chief Engineer of Egypt. He has since been promoted to a sergeant.

FOOTBALL IN FRANCE.—During their “ rest ” behind the, lines the khaki men play various games, notably, Association football. Recently the 1/7 Royal Warwicks met a team of Australians, and beat them by 12 goals to 3. In the return game, however, the tables were turned, and the Warwicks were defeated by 14 goals to 9. C M S Hayes, of Rugby, captained the Warwicks XI.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

PROPOSED MOTOR TRANSPORT VOLUNTEER CORPS, RUGBY.

DEAR SIR,—Under the above heading an article appears in your issue of June 30, stating “ representations are being made to the War Office and Petrol Committee to the effect that all petrol licenses should be made subject to membership of the Motor Corps,” and in another sentence the “ commandeering of cars ” is mentioned.

May I ask on whose authority these statements are made, so that I may have some tangible source to quote when making counter-representations ? Have the Ministry of Munitions or the Red Cross Society been consulted ?

The latter is more especially of personal interest to me, being responsible for the organisation of transport for wounded in connection with two local hospitals. Am I to understand that those car-owners who have given their help for so many months, sometimes running their cars a hundred miles in a single week for this purpose, are to be debarred from the use of their cars unless they join the Motor Volunteer Corps ?

Many car-owners, like myself, take exception to the tone of the article. The composer of it is evidently unaware of local conditions and still less of the saying that “ one catches more flies with honey than with vinegar.”

—Yours truly,            F. VAN DEN AREND.
Whitehall, Rugby, July 12, 1917.

CROOP HILL ALLOTMENTS.—An Allotment-Holders’ Association has been formed by the tenants of these allotments, the objects being : To foster the spirit of co-operation in the production of food and its distribution ; to eliminate waste labour ; to buy in bulk where practicable seeds, raw material, and implements for cultivation ; to endeavour to place under cultivation all unused land in the Bilton district, and to affiliate to kindred societies. At the initial meeting a committee of twelve was formed, with Mr Goodacre as president ; Mr R Lovegrove as chairman ; Mr W R Beasley, 14 Adam Street, New Bilton, as secretary ; and Mr W H Corfield is treasurer. The association has bought a sprayer and the members are co-operating in the spraying of the potato crop. Steps are being taken for registration of the association. Although beginning in a small way, it is felt that there is a wide field for the development of the association.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
A BRAVE SOLDIER HOME.—Gunner Mark Herbert, R.G.A, recently reported severely wounded, has now been invalided home.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNWELL.—In ever-loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl. GEORGE T. BARNWELL, who died of wounds on July 15, 1915.-“ A day of remembrance sad to recall.”—From his loving MOTHER, SISTERS, BROTHERS and ELSIE.

BUTLIN.—In loving memory of my dear son, Rifleman R. B. BULTIN, of the K.R.R., who fell in action in France on July 10, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear one, in a soldier’s grave ;
Your life for your country you nobly gave.”
—Ever remembered by his FATHER, BROTHER, SISTER and AUNT.

DAVENPORT.—In loving memory of our dear and only son and brother, 1210 Gunner WILLIAM EWART DAVENPORT, killed in action July 18th, 1916, aged 18 years.
Gone to the face we loved so dear,
Silent your voice we long to hear,
Your gentle hands, your loving face,
There is none can take our dear one’s place.
Fought with the brave, his life he gave,
And now he rests in a soldier’s grave.
—From his sorrowing MOTHER, FATHER, & SISTERS.

HIPWELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. ARTHUR HIPWELL, who was killed in action in France on July 14,1916 ; aged 25 years.
“Out on yonder battlefield there is a silent grave
Of one we loved so dearly, and yet we could not save.
His King and country called him ; he bravely did his best :
But God saw fit to take him to his eternal rest.”
—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

KENNEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. ROLAND ISAAC (1/7 R.W.R. Territorials), dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Kenney, Stretton-under-Fosse, who was killed in action on the Somme in France on July 14th, 1916 ; aged 23 years.
“ He fought for his country,
He answered duty’s call ;
His home, his friends, his comforts ;
He sacrificed them all ;
But be won the admiration
Of Britain’s glorious name.”
“ Peace, perfect peace.”
—Never forgotten by his loving MOTHER & FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

LANGHAM.—Killed in action on April 20th, in France, WILLIAM LANGHAM, son of Mrs. Langham, 14 New Street, New Bilton, Rugby.
“ Not dead to those who loved him :
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving brother, Sergt. LANGHAM, B.E.F., France.

MANNING.—In loving memory of Pte. THOMAS MANNING, Northants. Regiment, of Braunston, who died of wounds on July 11, 1916, at 13 General Hospital, Boulogne.—Not forgotten by his wife GEORGINA, of Leamington.

PAYNE.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. E. PAYNE, who was killed in action on July 15, 1916.—“ He died a hero’s death fighting for King and country.”—Gone but not forgotten by his WIFE and CHILDREN.

7th Jul 1917. Baby Week at Rugby

BABY WEEK AT RUGBY.

The War has led to a quickening of the public conscience in many directions ; and several much-needed reforms, which have long been advocated, but which only three years ago seemed almost unattainable, have already been elected ; while others are daily becoming inevitable. Few subjects have of late met with more sympathetic consideration than that of the welfare of the children ; and in order to seize the favourable opportunity for securing the adoption of measures to arrest the terrible rate of infant mortality which has occasioned so much concern to all thinking people, the past week has been observed throughout the kingdom as a propaganda week for “ baby,” and lectures and demonstrations emphasising the importance of the proper care of the babies have been given in most towns. Rugby has not been behind in the good work, and for some weeks past a committee of ladies has been arranging a local campaign, which opened on Sunday, when sermons bearing on the subject were preached at most of the places of worship.

On Wednesday afternoon a meeting for mothers was held in the Empire. There was a large attendance, and many of the mothers were accompanied by “ His Majesty the Baby ” ; and, despite the infantile accompaniment which was maintained by a number of the little guests, they were heartily welcomed.

Dr A A David presided, and he was supported by Mrs Nevinson (London), Rev R 8 & Mrs Mitchison, Mrs A A David, Mr & Mrs J J. McKinnell, Dr & Mrs Crookes, Mrs F Merttens (President) and Mrs Waddy (secretary of the movement).

The Chairman who addressed the audience as “ Ladies, gentlemen, and babies,” after a few remarks in a lighter vein, said they were there not only to think about their own babies but to be moved to a sense of responsibility about other people’s babies. Every child born in England belonged to the nation. If it grew up into a strong and healthy life the nation was the richer and the stronger, but if it was sickly the nation had to suffer with it, and if it died when it need not have died, then England had lost something which nothing on earth could ever replace. They were told that every year 50,000 babies died in England who need not die. It was not inevitable. He was always suspicious of that word “ inevitable.” Things happened, and people thought they must happen, whereas if they bestirred themselves they need not happen. This week had been set apart to set in motion forces to remedy this state of affairs. When every man and woman in England knew about these things they would care, and when they cared they would find the time would not be long distant when this grievous waste of life and health would be stopped. Then would come a day of new happiness for England, and also of new strength—strength not only for war—if the need ever arose again, which God forbid—but strength also for peace.

[Full report continues in original newspaper]

PROPAGANDA BY CINEMA.

The great value of the moving pictures as an educational force is well illustrated at the Empire this week, where two excellent propaganda films are being screened. The first, entitled “ Motherhood,” is shown under the auspices of the National Baby Week Council. The picture is remarkably interesting, especially to women, and the correct and incorrect ways of bringing up children.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.-At Coventry Munition Tribunal on Tuesday, H Boult, fitter, Rugby, employed in a Rugby firm, made an unsuccessful application for a leaving certificate. Boult contended that he could be used to better advantage in national service.

RUGBY BAKING TRADE NOT TO RE DEPLETED.

At the Rugby Urban Tribunal on Thursday evening the exemptions granted to the Rugby bakers, 30 in number, were reviewed at the instance of the Military. After a lengthy hearing, the Tribunal decided to make no change, and all the exemptions were allowed to stand.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte S C Howkins, of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, son of Mr H Howkins, of 9 Manor Road, has been seriously wounded, and as a result his left leg has been amputated. Pte Howkins, who is in a Military Hospital at Newcastle-on-Tyne, is making good progress.

Sapper George Alfred Wright, Royal Engineers, who prior to joining the Army at the beginning of the War was employed in the Controller Department at the B.T.H, was killed in action on June 7th.

News has been received from the War Office that Pte Jack Beech is in hospital with sand fly fever at Amara. He is the son of Mr W G Beech, New Bilton, and has been 3½ years in the Army, which he joined before he was 17 years of age in February, 1914. He has been through the fighting in the Dardanelles, Mesopotamia, and at the capture of Bagdad. In a recent letter from him he writes :—“ We have taken Bagdad, but my pal, Walter Scarlett, of Long Lawford, got killed by my side, poor chap. He died smiling, and I saw him buried.”

ANOTHER OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Pte Arthur William Woods, son of the late Mr Joseph Woods, of 153 Grosvenor Road, was killed in action on June 10th. Pte Woods, who was 21 years of age and an Old Murrayian, enlisted in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry in August, 1914 ; but he afterwards transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. He was invalided home in December, 1916, suffering from septic poisoning, caused by a shrapnel wound, and he returned to France in April.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Two more local men have been taken prisoners of war, and the facts have been communicated to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, who has made arrangements for these men to receive, on behalf of the Rugby Committee, the standard parcels of food and bread. They are : Pte A Brown, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, interned at Dolmen, whose home is at Dunchurch, and Pte W Line. Buffs Regiment, interned at Soltau, whose home is at Napton. This makes the sixth addition to the Rugby list within a fortnight.

WAR SHRINE.-A war shrine has recently been unveiled at St. Andrew’s Mission Church. The ceremony was performed by the Rector, the Rev C M Blagden, who delivered a brief but inspiring address. This is the first of the shrines to be erected in Rugby.

BRANDON.

DEATH OF PTE ELLOITT G HALFORD.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford, who for about 20 years were in employ of Mr Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, have received news of the death of their fourth son, Elliott, of the Cheshire Regiment, who fell in action. He had only been out at the front for seven weeks. Two of his elder brothers—Pte Sidney and Corpl Thomas Halford—have been on service for a long time, but nothing has been heard of Sidney for nearly 12 months, and he is reported missing. Deep sympathy is felt for the parents. In a long letter to the parents Elliot Halford’s Platoon Commander say :— “ He was killed about eight o’clock on the morning of the 7th. We had just turned the enemy out of one of our strongholds, and captured one of the highest points of the ridge. Halford was in the foremost line of our attacking troops, and was conducting himself, as he has done all along with the utmost bravery and devotion. A piece of bursting shrapnel overhead caught him, and the only consolation was that he suffered no pain—it was so sudden. . . . He was an exceptionally nice, good fellow. During the short time he was with us your son showed proof of those good qualities of courage, energy, endurance, and good comradeship which would have made him one of the best.”

WOLSTON.

RIFLEMAN W FLOWERS.-Mr & Mrs John Flowers, of Brook Street, Wolston, have received news of the death of their son, William. He joined up in September, 1914, and was on service in France for about 18 months, being attached to the 10th Rifle Brigade. He fought at Ypres in May, 1915, and in the Battle of Guillemont, and had been missing since September 3, 1916. His parents were thinking that he might be a prisoner of war until a letter came from the War Office announcing his death. Deceased was well known in local cricket and football circles. For the Brandon and Wolston Cricket Club he was a tower of strength in the field, and a daring football player and very popular.

BRINKLOW.

RED CROSS ACTIVITIES.—The Brinklow Branch of the British Red Cross Society has recently been making requisites for the wounded, and the following articles have been sent to the Central Depot in London :—104 comfort bags, 27 mufflers, 22 pairs day socks, 14 shirts, one vest, five pyjamas, seven pairs bed socks, and one feather pillow. Ninety-six of the comfort bags were made by the school children, the mothers giving the material for 23 ; 24 of the mufflers and 14 of the day socks were also made by the children.

DEATHS.

PARKINSON.—On 1st inst., at the Military Hospital, Cambridge, of wounds received in action in France, Second-Lieut. HORACE J. A. PARKINSON, the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. S. Parkinson, of the Old Bank House, Southam.

SANDS.—On June 17th, in Egypt, of diphtheria, Pte. HARRY SANDS, dearly beloved husband of Jennie Sands ; aged 34.—Deeply mourned.

WOOD.-On June 10th (killed in action in France), Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, Machine Gun Corps, son of the late Joseph Wood, 153 Grosvenor Road ; aged 21 years.—
From his loving Brother and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

BLAND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. C BLAND who was killed in action July 1st, 1916, aged 18 years.
Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.
From his loving Mother & Father, Sisters & Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of FREDERICK ROBERT, youngest son of the late Reuben & Mrs. Cashmore, of Hillmorton, who died from wounds in France on July 5, 1916. “ The love that lingers round his name is more than fame.”—From his sorrowing MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS, and his brother JACK in France.

FACER.—In loving memory of my dear husband Lance-Corpl. FREDERICK FACER, who was killed in action on July 3,1916.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—From his loving WIFE and CHILD.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. H. E. COLLINS, who was killed in action in the Battle of Labosal on July 3, 1916, in France ; aged 25. Gloucestershire Regiment.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS, New Street, New Bilton.

EADON.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother GEORGE, of the R.W.R., who was killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Our home has never been the same
Since thy voice has silent been ;
Nor is the world the same to us
Since death has come between.”
—Never forgotten by his loving PARENTS, SISTERS and BROTHER.

HAMMOND.—In loving memory of PTE. ARTHUR HENRY HAMMOND, Church Lawford, 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Peace, perfect Peace.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

SEENEY.-In loving memory of SIGNALLER W. SEENEY who was killed in France July 2nd, 1916.
Where is our soldier boy to-night ?
Laid in a soldiers grave,
Far, far away in a foreign land
He died like a soldier brave.
Oh, may we meet our boy again
Far up in that home above,
Where war and strife will be no more,
But all will be peace and love.
—From his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of GEORGE BERRY, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thompson, Braunston, who fell in action on July 1st, 1916, aged 21, years.—From Father, Mother, and Brother Sid.— “ They miss him most who loved him best.”

WATSON.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR JAMES WATSON, jun., son of Thomas and the late Harriet Watson, of 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Killed in  action in France on July 2, 1916 ; aged 19 years.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file—he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—From his FATHER & BROTHERS & SISTERS.