21st Jul 1917. The House Famine in Rugby

THE HOUSE FAMINE IN RUGBY.
NO BUILDING SCHEME TILL AFTER THE WAR.

An interesting discussion on the Dearth of Houses in Rugby took place at the meeting of the Urban District Council on Tuesday, as a result of which it was reluctantly decided that no further steps towards remedying the shortage should be taken at present.

The discussion arose out of the reply from the Local Government Board to a letter from the Council on this question. The Board stated that they were still unable to sanction any loan for the erection of new dwellings, except where additional housing accommodation was urgently necessary in connection with War requirements, and where this was certified by one of the Government departments concerned. If the Urban District Council could furnish evidence of the need for the immediate erection of dwellings from the point of view of the War, the Board would consider whether the case should be submitted to the Ministry of Munitions. The Board also enquired whether, if sanction was given for a loan, which could be raised at the current minimum rate of interest of 5½ per cent., the District Council considered that they could carry out the scheme on an economical basis. Apart from these questions, there would probably be difficulties arising out of the shortage of labour and materials, e.g. timber.

Mr Robbins urged that the matter be referred to the Joint Plans and Estates Committee.—Mr Stevenson supported, and pointed out that practically every county in the country was suffering from a dearth of houses, and even if the War finished at once it was questionable whether the percentage charged for loans would be reduced.—Mr Wise : Is it possible to produce an economically sound and paying scheme at a rate of 5½ per cent ? If it is not it is no use going any further.

Mr Stevenson contended that most house property was paying a rate of 25 per cent, on the original capital outlay. The house in which he lived was formerly let at 4s 6d per week, but he now had to pay 7s 6d rent.—Mr Loverock : What did it cost to erect ?—Mr Stevenson : If 4s 6d per week paid a percentage on the original capital-Mr Loverock (interrupting) : Probably it did not pay.—Mr Stevenson : Certainly it must have done so. You will not find builders building for the sake of building.

Mr Robbins said, in consequence of the interest paid on the War Loan, the interest on money borrowed would remain at the present percentage for some time after the War ; but Mr Seabroke contended that they had not only to consider the high rate of interest, but the also the enormous cost of all building material. In these circumstances he did not see how it was possible to let new houses at a rent which would pay.—Mr Loverock asked if there was any immediate demand for houses at the present time ? They knew that when the War was over people were prepared to build in large quantities, and they also had plans for over 100 houses. If there was no immediate demand, what was the use of considering the matter, especially when they knew that no economical scheme could be produced.—Mr Robbins replied that there was a great demand for houses, and he said last week one of his tenants went to look over a house. She had not given notice to him, but the next day he had had 35 people asking for her house. — Mr Yates supported the motion to refer the matter to the Joint Committee, and said the reason that he had raised the question was that he wished to know in what position they stood with regard to obtaining a loan. He had heard it suggested that other towns were more favourably considered than Rugby, and that in some cases subsidies were being paid. If that was so, he thought Rugby might make a claim for a subsidy, but the Local Government Board did not seem disposed to consider their case favourably. With interest at 5½ per cent, and the high cost of material, it seemed impossible for any scheme to be economically successful. It was a primary consideration that any housing scheme should not be a drag upon the rates, and he for one would not wish to subsidise house building at the expense of other sections of the community. He thought under normal conditions the Council could build better houses than any private individual was disposed to build ; but be did not think at present the Council could put up a good enough case to induce the Ministry of Munitions to sanction a building certificate. Even if such a certificate was sanctioned, he would not be inclined to support the scheme under the present terms, because when the housing scheme was initiated he wished it to have some reasonable prospect of success. — Mr Linnell agreed, and said it would be impossible for some years to build houses at much less than 30 per cent. more than pre-war cost. To build houses similar to those now let at 8s per week they would have to charge 12s per week rent ; and though they might be able to let them at present, he asked what would become of the house after the War was over ?

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte T Kirby, Machine Gun Corps, son of Mrs Kirby, of 24 Sun Street, was wounded in action on July 10th.

After being twice mentioned in despatches, Pte J Hickman, of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. Pte Hickman is the son of Mr & Mrs John Hickman, of Harborough Magna.

Sergt Steve Ward (Kilsby), of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. The official record states : “ This N.C.O has done consistent good work during the period of preparation for the operations for the offensive near Hill 60. He has on several occasions had charge of detached parties digging assembly trenches under heavy shell and machine fire, and has always succeeded in completing his task. On the night of the 7th-8th June, 1917, his platoon was detailed to dig a strong point near Hill 60, He set a good example by his coolness and great courage, and was of great assistance to his platoon officer.” Before the War Sergt Steve Ward was employed in the B.T.H Tool Stores.

Squadron Sergt-Major J R Tait, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry in Egypt, has been mentioned in despatches by General Murray. In the same despatches the name of his cousin, Capt W I Tait, of the Suffolk Regiment, also appears. The latter is the son of the late Mr William Tait of Rugby, who afterwards resided at Leicester.

Miss Child, of Higham-on-the-Hill, has this week received news that her brother, Trooper Child, who was reported wounded and missing since April 11th, has been killed.

Pte Oliver Hipwell, of the Warwickshire Howitizer Battery, an old St Matthew’s boy, whose home is at 73 King Edward Road, has been wounded in the shoulder and thigh, and is now at a hospital at the base.

Sergt F Claridge, instructor at the 1st Army School, France, and son of Mr W Claridge, of 57 Manor Road, has been awarded the Military Medal for “ conspicuously good service in an isolated and heavily bombarded trench ” near Ypres. He held this position for 48 hours without rations. Before enlisting in September, 1914, Sergt Claridge was employed by Messrs. Lavender and Harrison. For nine years he was a chorister at the Parish Church.

Driver S Lamb, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been wounded in France. Driver Lamb is the son of Mrs Lamb, 17 St Marie’s Terrace, and although he is only 19 years of age, he has been in the fighting line two years. His father (who went through the South African war), and his elder brother, are also serving at the front.

AN OLD ELBOROW BOY WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Lance-Corpl W Haggar, son of Mr and Mrs J Haggar, of St Cross, Alexandra Road, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct on June 7th. He is at present in hospital suffering from wounds received in action on that date, and has received a congratulatory letter from his commanding officer, 3rd Worcestershire Regiment. Lance-Corpl Haggar, joined up at the outbreak of war, and, after serving in the 11th Hussars, was transferred to the 3rd Worcesters, being attached eventually to the Machine Gun Section. He has been in the fighting at Ypres, Hooge, Loos, Neuve Chapelle, Vimy Ridge, the battles of Somme, Arras, and Messines. At the battle of Somme he was wounded and received his first stripe for bravery. Previous to the war he was a painter at the B.T.H. and was educated at the Elborow School.

A GOOD RECORD.

The three soldier sons of Mr & Mrs John Wheeler, 135 Abbey Street, have recently been promoted from corporals to sergeants. Sergt E Wheeler, who has served 22½ years in the Army and is now in the 4th Royal Warwicks, has been appointed an instructor in musketry. Sergt A J Wheeler (17 years’ service) has been transferred from the Oxfordshire Light Infantry to a Cycle Division in Salonika as a gymnastic instructor ; and Sergt W B Wheeler (six years’ service), 1st Warwicks, is now a bomb instructor. Sergt W B Wheeler has served in France for two years and seven months. He took part in the first and second Battles of Ypres, and was wounded at Zonebeke in October, 1914. He was subsequently wounded again during the Battle of the Somme, and was also gassed on Whit-Monday of this year.

SERGT. A. GOODE MISSING.

Detective-Inspector Goode, of Rugby, has received news that his youngest son, Sergt A Goode, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been missing since July 10th. The news was contained in a letter from an officer, who wrote : “ The Germans attacked successfully and took a number of our men prisoners, your son amongst them. He was an excellent sergeant, well liked by his officers and men, and from information I have been able to obtain he did everything that could be done before he fell into the hands of the enemy.”

A RUGBY OFFICER’S DECORATIONS.

At an investiture at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday his Majesty conferred the Distinguished Service Order and a bar to the Military Medal on Capt H H Neeves, M.C, Northumberland Fusiliers. Capt Neeves received the D.S.O for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in handling his company during an attack of the enemy position. His skilful leading and determined courage enabled him, in spite of enemy flanking and reverse fire, to get his men to within a few yards of the enemy’s rear position. Owing to many casualties, however, he was compelled to withdraw. On his return he gave his battalion commander a full and lucid report on the situation—the only accurate one received. It was subsequently found that he had been wounded in the lungs early in the attack, and had remained with his men under fire 23 hours after being wounded. He was awarded the Military Cross on January 1, 1917, and the bar to this has been conferred for not only maintaining his own company during a long and difficult advance, but also taking command of another company involved in the front line attack. He set a splendid example throughout. Capt Neeves is the son of Mr S Neeves, of Murray Road, and was employed at the Rugby Post Office. At the commencement of the War he was called up as a trooper in the Yeomanry.

MARTON.

The death has occurred in action of Pte L J Young, Section, R.W.R, in France on July 2rd. The deepest sympathy is felt with the widowed mother in her sad bereavement. The deceased, who was 21 years of age, joined up in March, 1916. Pte Young, who was a general, favourite with everybody, was for some time in the employ of Major Hicks Beach, late of Eathorpe Hall, as gardener, and was very keenly interested in the social side of the Marton Recreation Room, being sport secretary in 1915[?].

DUNCHURCH.
CASUALTY.—On Tuesday morning Mr and Mrs H Pearce, of Coventry Road, received news that Sergt H Pearce was killed or missing. He and two others failed to return after a raid, and their fate is unknown. Sergt Pearce was the youngest sergeant from Dunchurch, and was much liked by everyone.

EASENHALL.

Mr and Mrs Alfred Smith have received news that their son Pte Percy A Smith, Hants Regt, was killed in action on April 23. He had previously been reported as missing and hope was entertained that he might have been taken prisoner. Previous to joining the army he was in gentleman’s service near Bournemouth, where he won the affection of all with whom he worked by his bright and genial disposition and cheerful service. He joined the army in May, 1915, and went to France in July, 1916.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE.

The usual monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Wednesday evening last week.

Mr William Flint, c.c (who presided), extended a very cordial welcome to Mrs Blagden, remarking how pleased the committee were to see her with them once again and to know that she had completely recovered from her long illness.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that the donations continued to come in well, and since his previous statement in connection with the recent War Prisoners’ Day effort he had received further sums on behalf of same, amounting to over £50, bringing the total up to over £800. In addition to this, he had received since July 1st 30 individual subscriptions, amounting to £42 8s 5d, and they had now a balance in hand of nearly £700. The cost of the food parcels for July amounted to £91 16s, after allowing for guarantees from Regimental Care Committees, and for August the committee would have to provide over £100 owing to the additional men that had been added to the Rugby list during the past fortnight.

The Chairman remarked that the financial position was most satisfactory, Mrs Blagden observing that, in spite of the recent effort, the interest on the part of the public in the welfare of the local men who were prisoners of war showed no abatement.

Mr Barker informed the meeting that Sir Starr Jameson (chairman of the Central Prisoners of War Committee) had recently issued a statement with reference to criticisms that had been made regarding the administration by the Central Committee. The report of the Joint Committee appointed to enquire into the work carried out at that great establishment at Thurloe showed clearly that most of the discontent aroused throughout the country was due to the rigid War Office regulations, which interfered everywhere with private effort. “ There is no question,” says Sir Starr Jameson, “ that these regulations were necessary to remedy the evils which had grown up, and, where possible, the Central Committee had tried to get them modified.” Then, too, when the first few weeks’ parcels under the new scheme reached Germany there was a breakdown of the German railway and postal services, causing long delays in the deliveries. Thousands of our prisoners, wrote home to complain, and their friends very naturally laid the blame on the Central Committee. It was hardly just to criticise them for what was beyond their control.

NEW SCHEME WORKING WELL.

The Central Committee and the Care Committees all over the country have ample evidence, consisting of reports from the prisoners themselves or their relatives, which all go to show that the scheme has been working well for months past, and that the prisoners’ wants are fully supplied, without overlapping or waste. This statement was, Mr Barker felt sure, very encouraging to the committee ; but it only bore out what he had maintained during the past few months. He had repeatedly brought forward evidence to prove that most of the men who were being cared for by the Rugby Committee were receiving their food parcels safely. The acknowledgments from the men continued to come through splendidly. There was, of course, the inevitable delay between the time a man was taken prisoner and when the acknowledgment was received that he had had his first parcel. It was frequently the case that some weeks would elapse, and during this time the man would be writing home complaining that he was getting no parcels, causing his relatives to think that he was getting neglected or his parcels being stolen.

Mrs. Blagden reminded the committee that since the new scheme came into force last December practically the whole of the work fell upon the hon secretary. There was a very great amount of clerical work involved, and in this Mr Barker has received most valuable help from Miss C M Judd, to whom the committee passed a vote of thanks.

WAR CHARITIES.

The Rugby Master Butchers’ Association wrote asking the Council to register their Bath Chair Charity under the War Charities Act.—Mr Wise drew attention to the fact that a raffle was being held in connection with the fund, and he asked whether the Council were in order in supporting a raffle, seeing that such things were absolutely illegal.—M. Ringrose : It comes within the Lottery Act, doesn’t it ?—Mr Stevenson said he believed this was so, but such things were winked at in Rugby, providing the authorities knew the person who was managing it. The question was, however, was not the Council lending themselves to something which they might wish to get out of later.—Mr Yates pointed out that the Council were not authorising a raffle, but registering a charity. It was no business of the Council how the money was raised, and if the promoters committed an offence they would be amenable to the Common Law.—Mr Robbins expressed the opinion that if the Council made themselves responsible for all these things they would be busily employed. It was difficult to go to any effort on behalf of charity without taking part in a raffle, a “ dip,” or a draw (laughter).—It was decided to register the charity.

RUGBY INFIRMARY V.A.D. HOSPITAL.—Through the kindness of the Commandant and staff, the female inmates of the institution were entertained to supper, and afterwards invited to a soldiers’ concert, on Saturday, under the presidency of Miss Walrond. A very enjoyable programme consisted of songs by Miss F Shilittoe and Sergt Till ; children’s play, “ Brownikins,” by King’s Mssengers ; sailor’s hornpipe by Misses C & H Rushall ; muff dance by the Misses Norris, Squires, and Hazelwood ; and an amusing sketch, “ Mechanical Jane,” in which the characters were taken by Miss Morsen, and the Misses Walrond.—On Wednesday evening Sergt Evans presided over a concert arranged by Mr Hickman, Songs, duets, and part songs were given by Mrs Hickman, Mrs Ward, Mrs Painter, Miss Spencer, Messrs Hickman, Lovett, Bowell, Allison, and Sergt Till ; also two solos on the banjo and mandoline by Mrs Bostock. Every item was heartily appreciated by all present.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Sunday evening members of the Rugby Brotherhood gave a concert to the patients at the St Johns V.A.D Hospital. Mr J Chisholm presided, and the programme consisted of selections by the Orchestra, under the conductorship of Mr A E Alneham ; songs, “ When you come home ” and “ Monarch of the woods,” Mr Phillips ; piccolo solo “ Silver birds,” Mr W Rowley. Cigarettes were distributed amongst the patients, and the concert was much appreciated.

The current Issue of the “ Murrayian,” a smart little paper issued by members of the Murray School, contains several interesting items, including an appreciation of Pte James Irving, London Scottish, formerly an assistant master at the school, who was recently killed in action.

A RUGBY SCHOOL WAR MEMORIAL.—A service of communion plate-the gift of Mr & Mrs W B Gair—in memory of Old Rugbeians who fall in the War was dedicated at Rugby School Chapel on Sunday last. It consists of thirteen pieces, and with one exception the patens are exact reproductions of Seventh Century originals either at St Peter’s, Cornhill, or in possession of the Goldsmiths’ Company. On the obverse of the alms paten appears the motto of Rugby School, “ Orando Laborando,” surmounted by the date of the foundation, 1567, and the coat of arms of the founder, Lawrence Sheriff, flanked by his initials.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

“ PEACE.”

SIR.—Many Rugby residents have had leaflets, printed in London, pushed slyly under their doors these last few days, apparently on behalf of the Society of Friends, asking whether it is “ necessary ” to go on with the War.

While respecting that Society’s Christian efforts one detects a connection between this premature peace pamphlet—for it is little else—and the pro-German elements that Rugby and district unhappily still shelters.

The very method of circulating this leaflet is un-English, and reminds one of the pre-war meetings at odd corners, calling for a reduction in the Navy, and similar pro-German tricks.

It must surely disgust the overwhelming majority of Rugby folk that these same people are supporting anything which tends to encourage a premature peace.-Your obedient servant,

July 13, 1917.            F R DAVENPORT.

BILTON HALL HOSPITAL.

DEAR SIR,—To prevent any misconception among those who have subscribed so liberally or worked so hard in the interests of the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Hospital, I should like to state that, in response to my offer to lend the house until the end of March, 1918, I have this week received a letter from the County Director of the Warwickshire Branch of the B.R.C.S, saying that they do not intend carrying on the hospital beyond September.—Yours truly, WALTER BARNETT.

THE COUNTY OF WARWICK MOTOR VOLUNTEER CORPS.

SIR,—I regret that the account of the efforts being made to form a County Motor Volunteer Corps and a reference therein to the supply of petrol, which have appeared in the Press, has led to misconception as to the intention of the promoters on the part of those who are engaged in the wholly admirable work of transporting the wounded under the Red Cross Society.

Nothing can be further from the intention of the promoters than to hamper or restrict the excellent work of those owners of motor-cars who have so generously taken part in this errand of mercy. But I would point out that there is nothing incompatible to those so engaged in joining the Warwickshire Motor Volunteer Corps. Large numbers of members are already giving their services to the Red Cross Society ; and, indeed, we lay it down as one of our duties that, when not employed on military service, we shall place our organisation at the disposal of those who require assistance in the removal of wounded soldiers.

Mr F van den Arend may, therefore, rest satisfied that the representations that are being made as regards the renewal of petrol licenses are not intended to affect the supply of petrol for the Red Cross Society, or for cars already engaged in work of national importance.

In the event of national emergency the Government may decide to commandeer all private cars which, in their opinion, might be used to better advantage elsewhere. It is the object of the Motor Volunteer Corps to organise this Corps before such an emergency arises in order that they may be available at once for the service of the Government.

Therefore, I repeat that the fact of a private car being engaged in Red Cross Society work, or any similar work, should not debar the owner from joining the Motor Volunteer Corps.

Permit me to add that Lord Leigh has allowed himself to be nominated for the command of the Corps, which already embraces two heavy sections and two light sections, consisting of over 300 lorries and cars, collected from Birmingham and the county, and that the scheme has the entire approval of the Regimental Commandant, Colonel D F Lewis, C.B.-Yours faithfully,

(Signed) FRANK GLOVER, Major,
Headquarters : 2nd Batt. Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment, Clarendon Place, Leamington.

DEATHS.

COPE.-In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner PERCY LESLIE COPE, who died of wounds in France on June 21st.—“ Sleep on, dear one, till we meet again.”—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER.

WHITE, ALBERT J., aged 31, the beloved eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. White, Murray Road, Rugby, and dearly beloved husband of Ethel M. White. Killed in action in France, June 30th.

WILSON.—Killed in action, in France on July 10th, THOMAS, third son of Mr. & Mrs. Wilson, Gate Farm, Bourton ; aged 25.

IN MEMORIAM.

BERRY.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl HARRY BERRY, 2/7 R.W.R., who died (prisoner of war) from wounds received in action on July 19, 1916.—Not forgotten by his pals, T. ADAMS, D.G. and T.H.

DICKEN.—In ever-loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, who died of wounds in France on July 20, 1916,—“ We miss him most who loved him best.”—From his loving FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS, BROTHERS, and ELSIE.

DICKEN.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, 14th Gloucester Bantam Regiment, who died of wounds on July 20, 1916 ; aged 22 years.
“ A little time has passed, and friends around us
Think the wound is almost healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Fondly remembered by BROTHER and SISTER, WILL and AMY.

HIPWELL.—In ever-loving and sweetest remembrance of our dear son, Pte JOHN HIPWELL, Lilbourne, M.G.C., who died of wounds on July 23, 1916. Interred in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt, France.
“ He fought for his country,
He answered duty’s call ;
His home, his friends, his comforts,
He sacrificed them all ;
But he won the admiration
Of Britain’s glorious name.”
“ Peace, perfect peace.”
—Never forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, SISTER and BROTHERS.

LENTON.—In loving remembrance of our dear brother, Pte. W. H. LENTON, who died of wounds in France on 19,1916.—Ever remembered by FRED in France, and ERNE, ETHEL and FAMILY, 64 Wood Street.

LENTON.-In loving memory of WILL, dearly beloved son of the late Mr. & Mrs. T. Lenton, Wood Street, who was killed in France on July 19, 1916.
“ Greater love hath no man than this,
That he lay down his life for his friends.”

SMITH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. T. W. SMITH, of Swinford, who was killed in action at Beaumont Hamel on July 21-22,1916.

WHITE.—In loving memory of Sergt. WILLIAM HARVEY WHITE (2/7th Batt., R.W.R.), dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Geo White, Dunchurch, who died a prisoner of war in Germany on July 19,1916 ; aged 19.

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28th Apr 1917. Eat Less Bread and Avoid Waste

EAT LESS BREAD AND AVOID WASTE.

The wheat crop of 1916 was a failure the world over. How intimately that shortage affects this country is obvious when we remember that before the War we imported four-fifths of our wheat supplies. Indeed of all the food we ate we brought three-fifths across the   seas. To-day we are short of food ships to bring our[?] wheat ; hundreds of the vessels which formerly carried food are plying purely in the interests of our Army, and those of our Allies. The keynote of the campaign must, therefore, be ; CONCENTRATE ON THE SAVING OF BREAD. That, first and foremost, is the necessity of the moment.

The mass of the population must have bread. To the poor it is the chief necessity of life, for it to cheap and needs no cooking. Not only people of means, but those who at present are earning high wages, can afford to buy and cook other foods. Let the cheaper foods—cheap rabbits, the cheaper cuts of meat, the more popular kinds of fish—be left for those who cannot afford to buy anything else. The rich can endure breadless days, but the poor cannot.

Another aspect of the campaign is TO CHECK WASTE. Waste of any kind of food is, under the present stress of war, not only selfish and disloyal, but criminal. Before the War, it has been said, the nation could have lived on the food it wasted, and the waste is still very great. Waste of meat, of vegetables, waste in over-cooking or in over-eating-the campaign aims at checking all the forms of helping Germany.

To bring home to the people the enormous losses in the food supply by the apparently trivial waste of food which goes on daily, the Food Controller has issued a series of leaflets, of which the following is an example :

MR SLICE-o’-BREAD.
“ I am a slice of Bread.
I measure three inches by two-and-half, and my thickness is half-an-inch.
My weight to exactly an ounce.
I am wasted once a day by 48,000,000 people in Britain.
I am the “ bit left over;” the slice eaten absent mindedly when really I wasn’t needed ; I am the waste crust.
If you collected me and my companions for a whole week you would find that we amounted to 9,380 tons of good bread—WASTED !
Two Shiploads of Good Bread !
Almost as much—striking an average—as two German submarines could sink—even if they had p[?] luck.
When you throw me away or waste me you are adding twenty submarines to the German Navy.”

TO UTILISE WASTE PAPER.
A LOCAL SCHEME.

Probably no result of the War has been brought home to the public generally more emphatically than shortage of paper, due to the great reduction in the quantity of pulp and other materials for making it being imported from abroad. There are, however, in the country vast accumulations of paper which might be used up and re-manufactured if it could only find its way to the mills. Any white paper, whether printed or written upon or not, such as newspapers, letters, old receipts, and other documents too numerous to describe, old account books, magazines, novels, &c, can be utilised ; and in order to facilitate the collection of these materials and have them forwarded to the proper quarters for re-manufacture, an organisation has been formed in Rugby, which, if adequately supported, cannot fail to have gratifying results. In conjunction with Mrs Blagden, of The Rectory, Mr J Reginald Barker has undertaken to receive all waste paper of the kind mentioned, and see that it is properly baled and sent off to certain mills, the owners of which will pay good price per ton for it—much higher than the rates which have usually been paid on waste paper.

All the proceeds will be devoted to Rugby charities, so that no one will make a personal profit, and all who help will know they are gaining a twofold advantage by helping to maintain the paper supply and assisting charity.

Mr W T C Hodges, headmaster of Murray School, and Mr W T Simmonds, headmaster of Elborow Schools, have made arrangements to collect the waste from people’s houses, and a postcard addressed to either of these gentlemen will receive prompt attention.

Those who turn out old letters, documents, account books, &c, are assured that they will be carefully baled, despatched, and destroyed without being subjected to the scrutiny of prying eyes.

All stiff covers should be removed from books before being handed over to the collectors. It is estimated that several tons per month can be collected in Rugby, and a very handsome sum may in due course be available for disposal in charitable objects.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Frank Leslie Hogg, second son of Mr and Mrs George Hogg, of the Eagle Hotel, has passed as a Second Air Mechanic into the Royal Flying Corps, and is now stationed at Farnham.

A PURE BRED BELGIAN HARE rabbit, belonging to Harry Redgrave Lovell, the infant son of P C Lovell, was sold by Mr W Wiggins in Rugby Cattle Market on Monday for the Red Cross Funds, £5 being realised.

Mr T Johnson, High Street, has received information that his son, 2nd-Lieut H T Johnson, of the 129th Field Company, Royal Engineers, was wounded in the shoulder last week in France. He has now been removed to a London hospital.

A letter has been received from Pte Huckle, R.A.M.C — a member of the Rugby St John Ambulance Brigade — whose home is at 14 Spring Street, Rugby, stating that he was on a hospital ship that was recently torpedoed.

Pte T Lane, Durham Light Infantry, of Bridget Street, formerly employed at the Newbold Road Co-operative Stores, has sustained a badly shattered arm and other wounds ; Corpl L G Archer, Bennett Street, has been severely wounded, and his right arm has been amputated ; and Lance-Corpl W Labraham, Little Pennington Street, has been wounded in Palestine. All three are Old St Matthew’s boys.

Lieut R C Herron, of the Second Anzacs Supply Column (whose marriage with Miss Thompson, of Paradise Street, Rugby, we recently announced), has been promoted to the rank of captain and adjutant.

Corpl Bert Wilkins (bandsman), of the Rifle Brigade, was killed on the 4th inst. He was brought up from childhood by Mrs Kempton, 67 King Edward Road, and before joining Kitchener’s Army at the age of 16 was employed at the B.T.H Works, and was a drummer in the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade. Mrs Kempton’s eldest son has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the Battle of Mons. Her youngest son had been twice wounded, and went back to the front as recently as a month ago.

RUGBY PLATELAYER WINS D.C.M.

Corpl Ernest W Hallam of the Railway Section of the Royal Engineers, whose wife lives at the New Station, has won the D C M. Before joining the army he was a platelayer in Rugby Coal Yard.

LIEUT J J McKINNELL AGAIN WOUNDED.

Mr J J McKinnell has received news that his son, Lieut J J McKinnell, of the R.W.R, has been seriously wounded in the ankle. Some time ago Lieut McKinnell was wounded, and he had only returned to the front a fortnight when he received his present injury.

BRANDON.

PRIVATE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs T Ward have received news that their son, Pte J Ward, of the Warwicks, has been wounded in the left shoulder and face. ‘Mr and Mrs Ward’s four sons joined up—one, Charlie, has been killed ; Jack has lost the sight of one of his eyes from wounds, and the other son was invalided home. Much sympathy is felt for them in their trouble. Mr Ward himself has been ill for some length of time.

RUGBY WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, SATURDAY, JUNE 2.

WILL YOU HELP THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE TO MAKE THIS EFFORT A SUCCESS BY TAKING UP A COLLECTION IN YOUR OWN HOME EVERY WEEK UNTIL SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd ?

It is very necessary that Generous Support be given to ensure that the Men from Rugby and District who have fallen into the hands of the enemy shall not lack the Food necessary to keep them in Health and Strength.

ANOTHER RUGBY HOSPITAL.

Colonel and Mrs Mulliner recently offered to lend and to entirely equip Clifton Court as a hospital, and this generous offer has now been accepted by the Military Authorities, who will devote it to wounded officers of the Royal Flying Corps.

Mrs Mulliner will act as commandant, and the voluntary aid detachment will consist entirely of local ladies.

The charming situation and beautiful gardens of Clifton Court make it an ideal place for convalescent patients.

ONE MAN BUSINESSES.

Dear Mr Editor,-—A conference comprising committees appointed by the Urban and Rural District Councils of Rugby, and the Rugby Chamber of Trade, has been formed with a view to framing a scheme for assisting owners of one man businesses in Rugby, in the event of their being called up for military or national service. Will anyone interested in the scheme kindly communicate with the secretary, at the address given below, by Wednesday, the 2nd May ? Yours faithfully, T Wise, Chairman, H LUPTON REDDISH, Secretary, Market Place, Rugby.

DEATHS.

PYWELL.—Killed in action, on Easter Monday, Sergt. F. W. Pywell, of London (Middlesex) Regiment, youngest son of E. Pywell, 23 Sandown Road, Rugby ; aged 30.

THORNEY.—Died in France on April 10th of wounds received in action, ALFRED, the second and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Thorney, Rose and Crown, Basingstoke.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVIS.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private ROLAND DAVIS, of New Bilton, who was killed in action in France on April 27, 1916.-Not forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS.

GREEN.—In loving memory of Private JOHN GREEN, of Catthorpe, who died in Tidworth Military Hospital on April 16, 1914 ; aged 35 years.—“ His memory is as fresh to-day as the hour in which he passed away.” — Never forgotten by his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTER.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, HERBERT, who was killed in action at Ypres on April 27, 1915.
“ Two years have passed since Jesus called him ;
As time goes on we miss him more.
His loving smile, his kindly face,
No one can fill his vacant place.
Not dead to those who love him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory,
And will for ever more.”
—From PARENTS, SISTERS and BROTHER, Kilsby.

OGBURN.—In loving memory of my dear husband. Pte. CHARLES ROBERT OGBURN, who died April 26, 1916.—“ He is gone but not forgotten.”

OWEN.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother. GEO. ERNEST OWEN (TAS), Royal Warwicks., who fell in action at Ypres on April 25, 1915. — “ He nobly answered duty’s call, and gave his life for one and all.”—Never forgotten by DAD, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

ROBBINS.—In affectionate remembrance of Lance-Corpl. F. ROBBINS, Royal Warwicks., who was killed in action in France on April 30, 1916.
“ Sleep on, beloved, in a far-off grave :
A grave I may never see ;
But as long as life and memory last
I will remember thee.”
—From EM.

16th Dec 1916. Dr Hoskyn Recommended for the Albert Medal

DR. HOSKYN RECOMMENDED FOR THE ALBERT MEDAL.

Capt C R Hoskyn, R.A.M.C, of Rugby, has been recommended for the Albert Medal of the First Class—the highest medal for saving life outside the fighting line. The act for which Dr Hoskyn has been recommended was on the occasion of a serious railway accident at Gezaincourt on the 24th November, 1916, and it is referred to in the general orders issued to the Fifth Army by the General commanding in the following terms :—

Capt C R, Hoskyn, R.A.M.C.—In addition to other plucky acts he crawled under some burning debris at great risk and commenced to amputate the leg of a man who was pinned down. In doing so he loosened the man’s body, and he was got out alive.

The Commanding Officer wishes to express his appreciation of the gallantry and initiative displayed by the officers and N.C.O.’s mentioned in the report.

The Director-General of Medical Services, British Armies in France, also mentions Dr Hoskyn and others in his orders, and adds : “ I wish to express to you the greatest admiration which I feel for your splendid conduct under conditions calculated to try the courage of the bravest. You all showed courage, resource, and coolness, and I consider that your behaviour is an honour to yourselves and a credit to your Corps.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr F Turner, of 6 West Street, has this week received official news that his son, Pte J L Turner, who has been posted as missing since September 25th last year, was killed in action on that date. Before the war Pte Turner was in the Machine Shop at the B.T.H., and was only 19 years of age.

Corpl Harold Orchard, youngest son of the late Councillor Joseph Orchard, formerly of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field. He was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch of April 30, 1916. Corpl Orchard enlisted in the Royal Engineers in December, 1914.

Major J L Baird, M.P, C.M.G, D.S.O, has been appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Air Board in the new Ministry, and Mr Steel Maitland, M.P, a former Unionist candidate for the Rugby Division, is to be Under-Secretary for the Colonies.

The war is now costing the country upwards of 5½ millions per day.

THE parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : 1 tin fruit, 1 tin salmon. ½lb ration biscuits, 1 tin syrup, ½lb tin cafe au lait, 1 tin beef, 3 soup squares, 1 tin prunes, ¼lb chocolate, ½lb figs. ½lb margarine.

STRETTON-UNDER-FOSSE.
DEATH OF A SOLDIER HERO.—Deep sympathy is extended toward the parents of Pte Fergus Benson, of the 7th Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action last week. Pte Benson went out to France with the second draft of the 7th Warwicks, and was very popular with his fellow-soldiers.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.
CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR THE TROOPS.—At a meeting held recently the Whist Committee decided to arrange a house-to-house collection to provide funds for sending a Christmas parcel to each of the thirty-five soldiers from the parish. The following school girls—Lizzie Hickman, Lily Isom, Edith Davenport, Evelyn Thompson, Nancy Lane, Edith Neal, Olive Gamble, Kate Lane, and Maggie Ritch—acted as collectors. The sum collected, with the balance from the last whist drive, amounted to £5 1s 11d, and this was expended on the parcels and postage (£1 4s 3d). The parcels contained oxo cubes, cocoa and milk tablets, chocolate and cigarettes or tobacco, with a note of good wishes from the parishioners.

BRANDON.
PTE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward have received news, that their son, Pte J. Ward 4th Worcesters, has been wounded in the eye and thigh rather severely, and is now in hospital in France. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, as it is only recently that they lost their son, Charles Ward. They also have another son in the Army.

CATTHORPE.
In order to provide parcels for the men who have joined H.M Forces, two whist drives have lately been promoted for that purpose, and have been very successful. The proceeds were further augmented by gifts, and altogether £5 10s was collected for providing the 25 parcels which have been sent off this week.

CHURCHOVER.
A SUCCESSFUL whist drive and dance was held in the School to raise money to provide Christmas parcels for Churchover soldiers. Twenty-four tables were occupied. Mrs Arthur James and Col Forkus came down from Coton House, and took part in the drive. Mr E W Berrington was M.C. The prize-winners were :—Ladies : 1 Miss L Grundy (148), 2 Miss D Davis (145), 3 Miss A Skeet (142). Gentlemen : 1 Mr F Leatherland (144), 2 Mr C Whitehead (143), 3 Mr F Gibbs (143). Messrs Whitehead and Gibbs cut for second prize. Mrs James gave the prizes away, and said that Mr James had asked her to tell them how sorry he was that he could not be with them. He sent £1, and hoped the effort would be a success. About 150 then commenced dancing to the strains of Mr Ash’s band. Mr W W Mathews and Mr W Sutton were the M.C’s. The arrangements were admirably carried out by the following committee :— Mrs B Berrington, Mrs Semple, Mrs Rimmington, Miss M Beesley, Rev L G Berrington, Mr E Berrington (hon secretary and treasurer), Mr W W Mathews, Mr W Sutton, and Mr A Daynes. The sum of £22 12s 6d was cleared, so that each soldier will be able to have a nice parcel.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR BRAVE SOLDIERS.—Pte Arthur Priest, Coldstream Guards, who was wounded on September 8th is now in the King George’s Hospital, Stamford Street, London. His wounds consist of a bad fracture of the right leg and flesh wounds in the left leg, hip and side. His parents, who have visited him, found him in good spirits.—This week-end Pte Tom Hunt has paid a visit home. He and his brother Richard are both in the Rifle Brigade. They are sons of the Kandahar veteran, Mr Richard Hunt.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains 159 names of local soldiers. Of these ten have given their lives for their country, one is missing, one is a prisoner of war, and over thirty have been wounded.

DUNCHURCH.
P.C Cox, who was formerly stationed at this village, and who is now in the Army, paid a visit to Dunchurch, on Tuesday, and was warmly welcomed by the villagers, amongst whom he was always very popular.

GERMAN PRISONERS TO WORK ON THE LAND.—Warwickshire Chamber of Agriculture at Warwick on Saturday passed a resolution approving the employment of prisoners of war in agriculture. A letter from the officer commanding the Southern Command, which was read to the meeting, stated that only selected men of good character would be sent—with an interpreter. The Government would find rations, and charge the farmers the average rate of wages for the prisoners’ services.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

OTHER CASES.

An appeal was made by Mr F Sharpe, of Bath Street, for John George Bennett, carriage builder and wheel[wright] 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton.—Adjourned for the Military representatives to find out whether the Army is in need of wheelwrights.

On behalf of Mr Chas Wilson, Three Horse Shoes Hotel, Mr Eaden appealed for Bertram Henry Waring (36, married), shepherd and stud groom, 13 Earl Street.—The Military having offered a discharged soldier as a substitute, the Tribunal allowed 28 days for the exchange to be effected.-The appeal of Leonard Page (33, single), butcher and farmer, Wolston, for a long term of exemption was dismissed, but he was given 28 days.-Mr W Howkins, farmer, Hillmorton Grounds, desired to retain the services of Fred Shaw (36, married), cowman, &c.—The Chairman said he would get to April 1st in any event, and an exemption was given to that date.

A letter was read from Joseph Evan Walters, fruiterer and fishmonger, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, asking for his exemption to be extended until his wife had gained her strength.—Mr Wratislaw offered no objection, and he was given 28 days.

With respect to an application by Mr Robt Bucknill, threshing machine proprietor, Marton, for his son, Francis John Bucknill (19, single), described as a stockman and wagoner, Mr. Wratislaw said appellant had refused a substitute to go with his threshing machine because he could not patch a boiler, so he did not deserve any consideration at all.—Mr Bucknill said this statement was not correct.—The Chairman said they could quite see appellant’s attitude—he wanted to keep that boy—and if he was going to take that line there was a very easy way of dealing with him.—Mr Worthington submitted it was a case for substitution, and the case was adjourned till the next meeting for the Military to see what they could do.

Henry James Hopkins (31, married), thatcher and manager of the Co-operative Stores at Broadwell, had been granted an exemption by the local Tribunal, the Military appealing.—Mr Wale said he was a grocer, but he had never heard of a grocer and thatcher.—Mr Worthington : It is rather a peculiar combination.—Adjourned for medical examination.

DEATHS.

GLENN.—On the 7th inst., in France, of asthma and bronchitis, Pte. JOHN GLENN (Warwicks), beloved husband of Nellie Glenn, 35 Rowland Street, aged 40 years.

MAYES.—On December 6th, at Bristol Hospital (died of wounds received in action), Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, of the 3rd Oxford and Bucks L.I., the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Mayes, 28 Abbey Street ; aged 20 years.
“ One less at home, one more in heaven ;
Our Saviour has taken the bloom He has given.
Flowers may wither and die of decay,
But the love of our son will for ever stay.”

IN MEMORIUM.

TURNER.—In affectionate and loving remembrance of our dear son, Pte. Joseph Lewis Turner ; killed in action on September 25, 1915 ; aged 19 years.—From Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters, & Gladys.

29th Jul 1916. Some After Effects of the Great Offensive

SOME AFTER EFFECTS OF THE GREAT OFFENSIVE.

An artillery officer who is in the great offensive writes to a friend in Rugby :- “ For days before the attack we were firing continuously, and on the actual day we got rid of a prodigious amount of ammunition. Fortunately[?], there was a bit of a lull after the attack, and we got some well-needed rest. So tired was one of my Sergeants that a rat gnawed at his face as he was lying in his dug-out. In a sleepy way he brushed it on one side, but it only returned, and finally he slept on, to find his face a mass of blood in the morning.

“ As for my Subalterns, they did nothing but eat and sleep for many days.

“ The Battery did very well, especially —who was complimented on the “ gallantry and initiative ” which he displayed.

“ It was rather sad to see our wounded come back, but they all seemed very cheery, and generally were hugging a German helmet, cap, pistol, or something as a souvenir. We escaped very fortunately in the casualty line, only having one N.C.O and two horses wounded, but on the day of the attack the Bosches fired gas shells at us, which made us all very sick and faint. On the whole, however, our worst enemy is the rain. There have been some extraordinary heavy showers, which have flooded our gun-pits and dug-outs at times. We are experts at mud shovelling, but it takes a lot of work and ingenuity to keep our homes from washing down. Getting out of bed in the morning is a work of fine art. We sleep in bunks in two rows, and the puzzle is, how to get into your boots without stepping on the floor, which, has or three inches of mud. It’s Wonderful how clever one gets at standing on one leg. The trenches are of course, very often waist deep in water, and it is often a choice between staying in and getting wet through, or jumping, out and risking a bullet. All the same we manage to keep merry and bright.”

WOLSTON.

AT CONTALMAISON.—Pte T Webb, writing to a friend says : “ Just to let you know I and the Wolston boys are still in the pink after a few days with the Germans. No doubt you have been having good news of the ‘boys’ this last few days. I shall never forget it. Talk about the Loos and Neave Chapelle battles, this was the worst I have ever been in. It was on July 8th when we had orders to get ready and stand-to. For five hours our artillery, with all sorts of shells, bombarded the village of Contalmaison, till there was hardly a wall or house left standing. The time came, and over we went with fixed bayonets and bombs. We had about 250 yards to go. We got there, and what a game we had chasing the Germans in and out of cellars and dug-outs. After holding on to the village a little time we had to retire owing to shells and machine gun fire from the Germans, but a little later on we made again for the village, and secured it this time. It was a sight to see the Germans lying about. We made 60 prisoners, and they seemed glad to be taken. One of them, who could speak rather good English, said they had just come from Verdun for a rest, and then the English started on them. One chap had the chance to get back to his lines, but refused to do so. They were rather tall, but only old men and boys, 16 or 50. We were up to our knees in mud and water, but they could not shift the Worcester sauce, which was a bit too strong for them. We hung on until we got relieved by another division the next night. We have pushed them back a few miles this time. It was a treat to look round their dug-outs. One I went down was about 40ft under the ground, fitted up with several compartments. It was more like an hotel, with spring beds, tables, and everything for use. On the walls were all sorts of photos and picture postcards from relatives and friends from Germany. The kitchen took our eye most ; it was fitted up with cooking stoves, boilers for making soup, and pots of all sorts. I think they were there, as they thought, for the duration of the War ; but we caught them napping, and use their hotel for ourselves now. We are having a quiet rest, and hope to be with them again very soon.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Evan Percy Biddles, of Clifton, who has been in Paraguay, South America, for four years, his given up a good post there, and has returned home to serve his country.

Second-Lieut S A Miller-Hallett, South Wales Borderers, killed on July 11th, was in the Rugby School Cricket XI in 1908 and 1909. He was the second son of Mr A Miller-Hallett, of Chelsfield, whose XI provided very good club cricket in Kent some years ago.

Lieut A H Hales, Wiltshire Regiment, killed on July 5th, was a versatile athlete. Educated at Rugby and Corpus, Oxford, he gained his rowing Blue, and was at No. 3 in the Varsity crews of 1904 and 1905. As a Rugby footballer he was in his School XV in 1900, and afterwards played for the Harlequins and Monkstown. He was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in March, 1915.

Tuesday was the last day for unattested men who had not received calling up papers to report under the Military Service Act, but, probably owing to the thorough manner in which the calling-up process has been gone through locally, only one man reported at Rugby Drill Hall.

Mr Harry Hoare, so well known a few years ago in connection with the Rugby, Football, Cricket, and Hockey Clubs, now holds the rank of Major in the Army Service Corps, and Acts as Senior Supply Officer to the 38th Welsh Division.

SERGT J SOMERS, V.C, WOUNDED.

Sergt James Somers, of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, formerly billeted with Mrs Burns, Corbett Street, Rugby, who gained the Victoria Cross in the Dardenelles, was wounded for the third time in the great advance, and is at present in hospital at Newcastle.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following Rugby men, belonging to the Rifle Brigade, have been reported wounded :—Rifleman J F Earl (5556), Rifleman J Hughes (235), Rifleman F P Liddington (751), Acting-Corpl A Packer (1283), Rifleman H Fulham (8), and Rifleman T C Smith (2426).

Corpl P Hammond, of E Co, R.W.R, son of Mr W D Hammond, 1 Kimberley Road, was wounded in the face on June 19th, but has now recovered and returned to the firing line.

Mr and Mrs W Aland, of 30 Arnold Street, received news on Sunday that their son, Pte Roy Aland, of the Warwicks, had been severely wounded by gun shot, the head, shoulders, back, and both arms and both legs being involved. The parents went over to France to see their son without delay. Pte Aland was employed as a foreman at Rugby when he enlisted, and has spent sixteen months in the trenches.

William Ewart Davenport, only son of Mr and Mrs A Davenport, of Harborough Magna, was killed in action on July 19th. Deceased was 18 years of age, and previous to the war was employed by the L & N.-W Railway as a cleaner. In a letter to the bereaved parents, his officer says : “ An officer and three telegraphists, including your son, were engaged on telephone work. The shelling was so severe that they took shelter in a dug-out. Immediately a shell dropped on this dug-out, killing all the occupants. The bodies were recovered and buried in a cemetery back of the lines.” The officer adds : — “ He was always cheerful, kind, obliging, and willing to do anything to help and further his work. Your son was a hard-working telephonist, who took a keen interest in his work, and was not afraid to go into the danger zone if it was necessary in the course of his duty.”

Flags were flying half-mast at the L & N.-W Stations and at sub-stations to Rugby, early in the week, as the result of the news that two of the late employes—C W Standish, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, and C A Jeeves, of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry—had been killed in the general advance in France. Standish was a cleaner, whose home is at Peterborough. He had a leg amputated in France, and was brought to a hospital in England, where gangrene set in, and he died. Jeeves came from Bedford. This makes six men connected with the Rugby Engine Shed who have been killed, and, in addition, nineteen have been wounded.

Mrs Ward, of 170 Lawford Road, New Bilton, received on the 7th inst. an official communication that her son, Pte Thomas Walter Ward, who has been reported missing since August 6, 1915, is now regarded as dead. Pte Ward, who enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks Regiment in September, 1914, was home on sick leave in June of last year, and, re-joining his regiment, was shortly afterwards transferred to the Hampshire Regiment, and left England for the Dardanelles. Pte Ward was a prominent member of the New Bilton Rugby Football and Cricket Clubs, and was very popular with all who knew him. Previous to the War he worked at Willans & Robinson’s. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward in their great loss. They have a younger son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Ward, serving in France.

Lieut J Greenwood, of the Northampton Regiment, the well-known Rugby and Newbold footballer, is in hospital at Birmingham suffering, from wounds. Lieut Greenwood, who before the War was a teacher at Eastlands School, took part in the fighting at Fricourt during the first stage of the advance, and was wounded by a sniper in a tree on July 12th. His collar-bone is badly fractured, and he is also suffering severely from shock ; but his many friends will be pleased to hear that he is now making good progress.

CORPL A M BLADES, OF BROWNSOVER.

On Thursday Mr. Tom Blades, of Brownsover, received the sad news that his son, Corpl Albert Moisey Blades, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has died of wounds received during the recent fighting in France. Deceased, who was 21 years of age, enlisted early in the war.

B.T.H MEN KILLED.

Acting Sergt C F Miller, R.E, and Pte Pearson, Siege Co, R.E, two employes of the B.T.H, have been killed in the recent advance. Sergt Miller, who was an Irishman, was formerly in the Test, and Pte Pearson was employed in the Generator Dept.

A BRAVE SOLDIER.

Corpl Doyle, whose death was reported last week, lost his life under the following circumstances :—After the attack on the German trenches volunteers were called for to bring in the wounded. Corpl Doyle was one of the first to volunteer. He brought in one wounded soldier safely, and was bringing in another when he was shot dead. His Commanding Officer (Capt Lucas) says : “ His conduct was beyond all praise. A better or braver soldier never lived.”

RIFLEMAN JOHN LAMBOURNE, OF CLIFTON.

The death took place, as the result of founds received in the great offensive on July 9th, of Rifleman John Lambourne, Rifle Brigade, son of Mr Wm Lambourne, of Clifton. Rifleman Lambourne, who was only 17 years of age, joined the Army when he was 16, and had been in France since last December. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H Works.

DUNCHURCH

PTE J HUGHES, of the K.R.R, has arrived in Birmingham suffering from wounds. Of two companies of his regiment, in one of which he was fighting, there were only seven men left. He it the eldest son of Mr and Mrs J Hughes, Daventry Road, Dunchurch.—Pte R Elkington, Mill Street, who has been in many engagements, is home for a few days before going to Egypt.—Lieut J W Barnwell, R.W.R, Daventry Road, is suffering from wounds in France. Mr Barnwell has gone to see him.— Pte Carter, of the Territorials has also been injured, and is in London.

BRINKLOW.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—The parishioners of Brinklow extend their deepest sympathy to Mr and Mrs T Kenney and family in their grief at the loss of their son, Roland Kenney, who has been killed in action during our great offensive. Roland joined the Territorials just prior to the War, and like many others, volunteered for service abroad, where he has been for over twelve months. He was of a particularly lively nature, and was always a prominent figure in all the outdoor sports the village. He undoubtedly made a good soldier, and was accordingly promoted to the rank of sergeant.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

MONTAGU PEARSON KILLED.—On Monday morning the news was officially confirmed of the death of Lance-Corpl Montagu Pearson (South Staffs Regiment), eldest son of Mr and Mrs W J Pearson. He was killed while fighting in France on the 1st inst. Previous to the War he had been employed at the B.T-H Works at Rugby, and enlisted from there on August 17, 1914. He took part in the operations in Gallipoli, where he was wounded on August 9, 1915. Last January he paid a short visit home. He was 23 years old. Lance-Corpl Pearson was of fine athletic build and a keen lover of sport. For several years he had done good service for the local Football Club, of which he latterly held the position of captain. He will be greatly missed by many.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—On Sunday the Vicar (Rev W E Ellis) made feeling reference to the three deaths which have, within the past three weeks, occurred in the ranks of our local soldiers—Rowland Evetts, Montagu Pearson, and Sutton Russell. The loss of the latter he particularly instanced as one which touched himself very keenly. From the time when a very little lad he attended the Church Schools he found Joseph Sutton Russell a very regular attendant there, and also as a member of the Church Choir. From the time of his confirmation he had always been a devout and regular communicant. The sermon was followed by the singing of Dr Neale’s hymn, “ They whose course on earth is o’er.”

SOUTHAM.

KILLED IN ACTION.—News was received on Friday last week of the death in action of Pte Arthur Adams, of the Manchester “ Pals ” Regiment. Deceased, who was highly respected in Southam, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs H Adams, of Oxford Street, was of a bright and cheery disposition. Before the War Pte Adams was a grocer in Manchester. He leaves a widow, for whom much sympathy is felt.

DEATHS.

DAVENPORT.—On July 19th (killed in action), William Ewart, R.F.A, only son of Mr and Mrs. A. Davenport, Post Office, Harborough Magna. Aged 18 years.
“ He sleeps not in his native land.
But neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving mother, father, and sisters Jess and Della.

LENTON.—In loving memory of William Henry (Will), dearly beloved son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Lenton, Wood Street, who died from wounds in France, July 19,1916, aged 36 years.
“ Lord, ere I join the deadly strife,
And battles terrors dare ;
Fain would I render heart and life
To Thine Almighty care.
And when grim death in smoke wreaths robed,
Comes thundering o’er the scene,
What fear can reach a soldier’s heart
Whose trust in Thee has been.”

MANNING.—On July 11, 1916, died of wounds in France, Thomas Manning, Northants Regiment, of Braunston, beloved husband of Georgina Manning, of Leamington Spa.

SEENEY.—Killed in action in France, July 2, 1916, Signaller W. Seeney, R.W.R.,of Bourton, aged 18.
“ We loved him—oh! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well ;
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldiers grave.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

TOMLINSON.—In loving Memory of William Tomlinson, K.R.R.’s, killed in action at Hooge, July 30,1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving father, mother, sisters, and brothers.

PRESTON.—In loving Memory of Rifleman Jack Preston, 7th K.R.R., killed in action, July 30, 1915.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Father, mother, and sisters.

REDFEARN.—In loving Memory of Rifleman Joseph Charles (Tim) Redfearn, 7th K.R.R., died of wounds, July 21, 1915.
“ Had he asked us, well we know
We should cry, ‘ O spare this blow.’
Yes, with streaming tears should pray,
‘ Lord, we love him ; let him stay.’”
—His wife and daughters, High Street, Thame.

SMITH.—In loving memory of Herbert, the dearly loved son of Frederick Smith. Killed in action in Flanders, July 30, 1915.—“ We loved you well ; God loved you best.”—FATHER, SISTER and BROTHERS.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

A BRITISH SOLDIER.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—I was talking to a wounded boy of the Hampshire Regiment on the platform of Rugby Station the other day. I asked him what his wounds were ? He replied : “ My right arm is shattered, three fingers off left hand,” and he also had a large gash across one cheek. He had been at Loos, Hulluck, and Ypres ; and, as he termed it, had had the biggest part of a shell. He added : “ I am no more use, sir; but I am glad I went.” A little thing like this, I think, helps to show the spirit of our men and the stuff they are made of.—I am, yours faithfully,

CORBET SMITH.
July 26, 1916.

EGGS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—At Rugby Railway Mission a collection of eggs was made on Sunday afternoon, and no fewer than 250 were received, including 64 from the men working in the Locomotive Department at Rugby Station, to whom a special appeal had been made. Mr J J Thompson gave the address at the service, which was well attended, and the eggs, having been received by Mr Frank Ward, were placed in a large nest, made of hay and decorated with the national colours by Mrs Beard. The eggs were afterwards distributed between the three local Red Cross Hospitals.

PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The usual monthly meeting of the Executive Committee of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held on Wednesday.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J R Barker) reported that to date the subscriptions amounted to £545 13s 10d, and the expenditure on food parcels &c, was £432 11s 5d, leaving a balance in hand of £113 2s 5d, sufficient for six weeks’ parcels. During the week subscriptions amounted to £18 17s 4d, including the sum of £8 3s collected at the V.T.C Sports on Saturday last. This was the first week for some time that the receipts exceeded the expenditure.

All outstanding accounts were passed for payment, and as this would be the last meeting of the financial year, the Secretary was instructed to prepare the accounts for audit, so that a balance-sheet could be issued early next month.

This week’s parcels contained ¼-lb tea, jar of marmalade, one large tin salmon, one large tin fruit, one tin of cafe au lait, one tin potted meat, one tin condensed milk, tin cocoa, tablet of soap, ¼-lb sugar.

RAILWAY CONCESSION TO MUNITION WORKERS.—For the convenience of munition workers who have to go from Rugby to Coventry in the early morning the L & N-W Railway have arranged to run a train from Rugby at 5.5 a.m, and arrive at Coventry at 5.20 a.m. It will commence on Monday, July 31st, and be continued for a fortnight to see whether the number of passengers justifies permanent running of the train.

Ward, Thomas Walter. Died 6th Aug 1915

Private Thomas Walter Ward

Private Thomas Walter Ward, Service Number 17168 was killed in action 6th August 1915 at Gallipoli aged 24 years.

WARD,  Thomas Walter pic

Thomas Walter Ward was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire 1891 to Thomas and Anne Ward. They all appear on the census of 1891 with Thomas’s two elder sisters Anne and Beatrice.   By 1901 the family are living in Rugby at 63 New Street, New Bilton with 5 more children. By 1911, from the census, they are living at 170 Lawford Road New Bilton and Thomas Walter is working as a powder cleaner.   Thomas Walter Ward, according to The Rugby Advertiser above, 18th September 1915, was working for Messrs. Willans & Robinson as a coremaker. He was a fine athlete and played both cricket and rugby football. He played rugby football with New Bilton St. Oswald’s XV and played cricket with Messrs. Willans & Robinson and was a fine bowler, as in one match against New Bilton he bowled out 4 players and 5 others were bowled by him and caught by other members of the team.

He enlisted at Rugby and joined the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, 2nd September 1914 and was transferred to the 2nd Hampshire Regiment in June 1915 and taken to the Dardenelles. In August 1915 he wrote to his parents saying that he was well.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM