27th Apr 1918. Can a Greengrocer Substitute a Blacksmith?

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

At a sitting of this Tribunal on Wednesday there were present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, W Johnson, jun, A Craig, and S J Dicksee. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

CAN A GREENGROCER SUBSTITUTE A BLACKSMITH ?

The appeal of Thomas White (18, general service), Dunchurch, blacksmith, assisting his father, which had been adjourned to see whether a substitute could be found, was next heard ; and addressing the father, the Chairman said : “ Whether you have a substitute or not, the boy will have to go.”—Mr Meredith explained that Major Neilson, who knew the case very well, was of opinion that, although the man was passed for general service, he should not be taken without a substitute being provided, because the firm did a good deal of agricultural work.—The Chairman said, as Mr White’s family had such a patriotic record, one son having been killed and another was serving, they wished to help him, but were they to keep this boy out of the Army until the National Service Department found a substitute ?—Mr Meredith : It is hardly our job ; it is for the Labour Exchange.—It was mentioned that the next appellant—Howard James Allkins, greengrocer (39, B2), Wolston—had been suggested as substitute.—Allkins, however, said he went to see Mr White, who expressed doubt as to whether he would be of any use, because he knew nothing of the business. It would be twelve months, he added, before he could put nail in a shoe.—Mr White explained that shoeing was a funny job. Some of the big horses he had to shoe might injure, if they did not kill, a man who was not used to the work.—The Chairman : we realise that.—Mr White : It would be a case of me picking his pocket and he picking mine.—Mr Meredith : I cannot see how a greengrocer can substitute a blacksmith. He might lame a horse for life.—The Chairman said but for the fact that Mr White had lost a son in the service of his country this man would have had to go a long time ago. They would adjourn the case for a month, but he had been asked to point out that whether Mr White was successful or unsuccessful in finding a substitute, there was no doubt as to what would happen then. Therefore, in his own interests and in the interest of the country, he urged Mr White to do his best to get someone. The Labour Exchange would help him very materially.—The case of Allkins was adjourned for a re-examination.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte A E Palmer, Royal Warwicks, of 11 Adam Street, New Bilton, was wounded at La Bassee on april 15th with a bullet wound in his left thigh.

Pte G E Higham, Royal Warwicks, of New Bilton, has been severely wounded in the buttock. He was formerly employed by the G.C Railway.

Pte Albert Coaton, Machine Gun Battalion, son of Mr C Coaton, Grosvenor Road, has been wounded by a bullet in the left knee.

Gunner Norman Atkinson, H.A.C, second son of Mr J H Atkinson, of 37 Windsor Street, has been reported wounded and missing. Prior to joining the Army he was an apprentice at the B.T.H. He was an O.L. And Old Murrayian.

Mr & Mrs J Haggar, of 10 Alexandra Road, Rugby, have received news that their son, Corpl W Haggar, Worcestershire Regiment, has been missing since March 21st. Corpl Haggar was, prior to joining the Forces, employed at the B.T.H.

Gunner A E Moore, R.F.A, has been badly gassed, and is in hospital at Etaples. This is the second time he has been gassed, and last Christmastime he was buried for a time by debris thrown up by a shell. He is the only son of Mr and Mrs E Moore, 100 Grosvenor Road, and was an apprentice at the B.T.H when called up.

Pte Alfred Elson, Hampshire Regiment, who enlisted at the out break of the war, giving up a position at the B.T.H Works, Rugby, has died of wounds received in action. He had been previously wounded, and returned to France last year. He was again due for leave when the offensive started, in which he received severe gunshot wounds, from which he died on April 6. He was of a bright and cheerful disposition, and will be missed by a large circle of friends.

The death from wounds received on April 12th of 2nd Lieut R V Wilson has now been confirmed in a letter from his commanding officer to Mr J G Wilson of York Street. The letter states that Lieut Wilson “ was a most gallant officer, and showed promise of becoming a good leader ; in spite of his youth he had command of a company in action under difficult conditions, and was one of the most capable officers in the Battalion. His brother officers loved him.” The deceased officer was educated at the Elborow and Lower Schools. Intending to become a member of the scholastic profession, he became a student teacher at Eastlands Boys’ School. In May, 1916, he joined the H.A.C, and served in France. Later he accepted a Commission with the 1/7 R.W.R. The news of his untimely end was keenly felt by boys and staff of Eastlands School and by all who knew his cheerful personality. It seems that his battalion was attached at 6 a.m, and at 7 a.m he was sent forward to relieve another officer, and reached the post alright, but was almost immediately wounded by machine gun fire. When being carried back he was full of cheerfulness and of regret that he had to leave the field.

Capt G Gray, Lancashire Fusiliers, who was reported missing on March 26th, is a prisoner of war in Minden.

L-Corpl H Warland, 23rd Royal Fusiliers, son of Mr W Warland, Crick, who was reported as missing on   March 25th, is now known to be a prisoner of war. Prior to joining the Army two years ago, he was employed at the B.T.H.

Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth Home, Poplar Grove, has received official intimation that his son, 2nd Lieut A G Cox, reported missing 23rd March, is a prisoner of war. The camp in which he is interned is not known.

HONOURS FOR RUGBY MEN.

L-Cpl B Holmes, R.W.R, of Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M. He has acted as a company runner for over two years, and he has been in the majority of actions in which his battalion has taken part. He has always proved himself most reliable, and on many occasions has taken messages through very heavy fire, displaying singular devotion to duty.

Bombardier (Acting Corporal) W E Stay, R.C.A, of Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M for “ showing great ability on all occasions in supervising the maintenance of the Battery lines, frequently carrying out repairs fearlessly in face of very severe bombardment by high explosive and gas shells.”

THE WAR IN PICTURES.

Those who are interested in war films will have an opportunity of seeing a free display of actual war films in the Market Place, Rugby, on Monday, May 16th. The show, which is arranged by the Ministry of National Service, will be explained by men who have fought, and will take place at 8.30 p.m.

LOCAL MAN IN ZEEBRUGGE AFFAIR.

W GILBERT, son of Mr T Gilbert, was one of those who volunteered to take part in the naval raid on Zeebrugge. He was engineer on one of the motor boats engaged. Although several missiles passed through the little craft none of the crew was hit, and all reached the base safely.

THURLASTON.
FIVE TIMES WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Hedgcock have been informed that their only son, Sergt Hedgcock, has been wounded in the shoulder, which has been fractured. This is the fifth time Sergt Hedgcock has been wounded.

BIRDINGBURY.

THE sad news was received here last week of the death of Corpl G W Wall, grandson of Mr & Mrs Matthew Wall. He was badly wounded in France, and died soon afterwards in hospital. He had lately been home on leave. He enlisted soon after the War broke out, and joined the Coldstream Guards. At the beginning of December, 1914, he was sent to France. He was wounded in September, 1916, and was for a time in Coventry Hospital. In May, 1917, he was sent back to the firing line, and saw active service. On March 28th he spent an hour at his old school, where he was gladly welcomed by scholars and teachers. Before commencing his sermon on Sunday afternoon, the Rev A E Esau spoke very touchingly of him.

BROADWELL.
MISSING—Official intimation has been received by Mr Frank Goode of Broadwell that his son, Pte William Goode, of the M.G Corp, is a prisoner of war in Germany, and wounded. Before joining up he was the Secretary of the local lodge of Oddfellow.

PAILTON.
MILTARY MEDAL.—The Military Medal has been awarded Pte Augustus Horne, Northumberland Fusiliers, for conspicuous bravery in the field at Hargicourt on September 11,1917.

THE MEAT SUPPLY.

The supply of fat stock in Rugby Cattle Market on Monday was very short, but on representations being made to the Area Meat Agent a load of beast and two loads of sheep were sent from Stourbridge Market. The difference, as usual, will have to be made up with imported meat.

RUGBY SCHOOL & HELP IN POTATO PLANTING.

In explanation of the notice in your last week’s issue on the subject of the Rugby School “ farming ” squads, Dr David wishes me to say that the terms mentioned had reference to potato planting. For this work a large number of boys have had some training in the working of their own potato fields last year and this spring and the Army Canteen fields in Devonshire. Terms and conditions for help in other agricultural work, such as hoeing, &c, can be arranged later on.

In case a farmer needs a planting squad within a radius of six miles from Rugby School during the next fortnight or so will he, in applying to me, please state : (a) The exact locality of his potato field ; (b) the number of boys required ; (c) whether the squad should bring knives for cutting ungraded seed and a few bucket, if available ?

In working our own School potato field I have found it best to organise a large squad in the morning, say 9.30 a.m to 1 o’clock, so that the boys can pick out twitch from the rows (already opened), cut up potatoes, when ungraded, and plant, and so leave the horses plenty of work for afternoon ; but, no doubt, each farmer has his own method and convenience.

C.P. HASTINGS.
“ Mayfield,” Rugby.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—Sec.-Lieut. G. W. BARNWELL, K.O.Y.L.I., dearly-beloved husband of Mrs. Barnwell, 97 Grosvenor Road, killed action in France, April 13th.

BURTON.—In loving memory of ALFRED JOSEPH BURTON, aged 30 ; killed in action on April 5, 1918.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother and Family, and fiancee, Alice Kennard.

NOBLE.—Killed in action on March 29, 1918, Gunner JOSEPH WILLIAM HARRISON NOBLE, aged 27 years, beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. J. F. Noble, Braunston. Deeply lamented.

THOMPSON.—On April 12th, at Dar es Salaam, East Africa, Pte. FREDERICK THOMAS THOMPSON, A.S.C., dearly beloved and eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. H. Thompson, of 7 Albert Street, Milverton (late of Rugby). Died of dysentry.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from those who loved him best,
In hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sisters, and fiancee, Nellie.

IN MEMORIAM.

BIDDLES.—In ever dear and affectionate remembrance of EVAN PERCY BIDDLES, 50th Brigade, R.F.A. (late of Estancia Loma-Pora, Republic del Paraguay), who died in the 103rd Field Ambulance from Gas poisoning received during night of April 22nd, 1917. Buried next day in the little Military Cemetery at Haute Aveanes, Aubigny-en-Artois, 6 miles N.W. of Arras.—“ Pro patria mori.”

BULL.—In loving and affectionate remembrance of Bombardier BULL (TOM), the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Bull, Southam Road Farm, Napton ; killed in France on May 3, 1917 ; aged 18.
“ A loving son and faithful brother,
One the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered duty’s call,
And gave his life for one ans all.”
—From his loving Father, Mother & Sisters.

CLEAVER.—In loving memory of Pte. W. T. CLEAVER, R.W.R., eldest son of J. Cleaver, 17 East Street, who died of wounds in France on April 25th of last year.
“ One year has passed since that sad day.
I often sit and think of him, think of how he died.
To think he could not say ‘ Good-bye ‘ before he closed his eyes.”
—From his sorrowing Father and Mother, Brother and Sister.

DAVIS.—In loving memory of Pte. R DAVIS (ROLAND), who was killed in action in France in the Battle of Arras on April 27, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving Father, Mother, Brother and sisters.

GREEN.—In loving memory of my dear husband, WALTER GREEN, killed in France April 27th, 1917, aged 29 years.
We think of him in silence,
His name we oft re-call ;
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his dear photo on the wall.
—From loving wife and child.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. WALTER GREEN, youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Henry Green, Broadwell, killed in action in France April 25, 1917. “Until we meet.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Brothers and Sister.

GREEN.—In memory of Pte. JOHN HENRY GREEN, the loving husband of Elizabeth Green, who died April 26.1915.
“ Sleep on, beloved, and take try rest ;
We loved you well, but God loved you best.”
—Sadly by all. From his loving Wife and Children, Mother, Father, Sister and Brothers.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of our dear Son and brother, HERBERT, who was killed in action on April 27, 1915, at Ypres.
“ We think of him in silence,
His name we oft recall ;
But there nothing left to answer
But his photo the wall.
We have lost him, we who loved him ;
And, like others, must be brave,
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.
—From Parents, Brother and Sisters (Kilsby).

JONES.—In ever-loving memory of Corpl. D. J. JONES who was killed in action in France on April, 29, 1917.
Loved one gone but not forgotten,
And as dawns another year,
In our lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of him are always dear.
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brother & Sisters, and Mill.

OWEN.—In loving memory of Pte. GEO. ERNEST (TOS), Wolston, 1st R.W.R., who was reported missing, since presumed killed, at Ypres, April 25th, 1915.
Though he was only a private soldier
He died a British son ;
He died on the field of battle,
His duty was nobly done.
The hardest part in yet to come,
When the other lads return,
And we miss among the cheering crowd
The face of him we love.
—Sadly missed by all.

WELCH.—In loving memory of our brother-in-law, Pte. E. WELCH, Oxford and Bucks L.I., who was killed in France on April 29, 1917.—Never forgotten by Erne and Ethel Lenton, 64 Wood Street.

WELCH.—In loving memory of ERNEST EDWARD WELCH, who fell in action on April 29, 1917 ; aged 36.
“ We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting ;
It will be in the Better Land.”
—Not forgotten by his Mother and Sisters.

WELCH.—In remembrance of Lance-Corpl. E. E. WELCH who was killed in action on April 28, 1917. “ Gone but not forgotton.”—From his loving Wife and Daughters.

YOUNG.—In loving memory of our dear and only son, Pte. W. C. YOUNG (BILLY), who was killed in action in Salonika on April 24, 1917, in the 25th year of his age. Dearly loved and deeply mourned.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of our dear son and soldier brave.
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better land.
—From his Father and Mother and Sisters (Pinfold Street, New Bilton).

 

Advertisements

22nd Sep 1917. Seats for Soldiers.

SEATS FOR SOLDIERS.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—As a visitor to the town, I learn that Rugby has already done a good deal for wounded soldiers, so that it must be from want of thought, and not from want of heart, that one arrangement has not been made that I have seen in many towns. I refer to the placing of garden seats and chairs in the public streets for the use of soldiers. One sees these poor fellows sitting on the kerbs and other uncomfortable positions. There are many patriotic-spirited inhabitants who might loan their garden seats ; also probably many who would see their way to put a notice on their garden gate, inviting the men enter the garden and use the seat therein, and thus confer both rest and pleasure. Surely these men have done enough for their country to deserve these little attentions.—Yours sincerely, VISITOR.
September 13, 1917.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt A Goode, of the Machine Gun Company, son of Detective-Insp Goode, of Rugby, who was recently reported missing, has written to his father stating that he is a prisoner and at a Red Cross Hospital at Neuminster, in Germany.

Pte W J Boyce, Royal Warwicks. son of Mr J E Boyce, a member of Long Lawford Parish Council, has sent to his father a certificate from his Colonel to the effect that he “ has been specially noted for gallantry and good work in the trenches during the last tour, and notice has been inserted in the battalion orders to that effect. This is the second mention has received within the last week.”

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

APPOINTMENT OF AN EXECUTIVE OFFICER.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Wednesday evening Mr Frank Middleton Burton was appointed executive officer at a salary of £200 a year. Mr Burton is secretary of the Rugby Liberal Association, and also clerk to the Military Advisory Committee. In the latter capacity he has done much to forward recruiting locally. He is also a member of the Rugby Board of Guardians and Rural District Council, the Rural District Food Control Committee, and Bilton Parish Council.

WILL OF THE LATE LIEUT HART-DAVIES.—Lieut Ivan Beauclerk Hart-Davies, of Rugby, Warwick, late of the R.F.C, son of the late Rev John Hart-Davies and Mrs. Hart-Davies, of Southam Rectory, Warwickshire, aged 39, who was killed in an aeroplane accident in England on July 27th, left estate valued at £8,679. Testator leaves £500, his dog Jock, effects in his office and residence, and motor-cycle to his late clerk, Arthur Douglas Miller ; £20 to his cashier, John Griffin ; £10 each to other persons in his employ ; and the residue to his sister, Blanche Violet Hart-Davies, if a spinster, or should she be married, then to Arthur Douglas Miller.

RED INDIAN PAGEANT AT HILLMORTON.

Arranged primarily for the amusement of the patients of the local V.A.D Hospitals, a unique entertainment, taking the form of a Red Indian pageant, was given in a field kindly lent by Mr Busby, near Hillmorton Wharf, on Saturday afternoon last. The entertainment was arranged by Mrs Price, with whom the idea originated, and she was assisted by an enthusiastic company of ladies and gentlemen of the district. The weather was all that could be desired, and there was a good number of the general public present at the hour the entertainment was timed to begin. Unfortunately, however, an inspection of the V.A.D Hospitals was also fixed for Saturday, and none of the soldier guests had arrived at this time. The commencement was postponed until four o’clock ; but as none of the soldiers had arrived then a start was made. The first brake load of soldiers arrived half-way through the performance, and others at brief intervals until some time after the entertainment had concluded, and in consequence the performers kindly agreed to repeat the entertainment after tea.

The pageant was admirably enacted, and was full of humorous as well as blood curdling incidents. . . .

A ventriloquial entertainment was also given by Mr Wal Sutton, of Rugby, and this proved very popular among the juvenile members of the company.

Horses were kindly sent for the pageant by Mrs Balding, Mr Crane, and Mr Kendal. The treasurers were Col F F Johnstone and Mr Tom Lever, and if there is a balance after paying expenses it will be devoted to the local Nursing Fund. Valuable assistance was rendered by the Hillmorton Scouts, under the direction of Mr Tom Lever.

WITHYBROOK.

SCENE IN A GIPSY CAMP NEAR COVENTRY.—Coventry county magistrates on Friday last week had before them a gipsy hawker, Hugh Fury, on a charge of obstructing the police. P.C’s Knight and Walker having reason to suppose there were two young men liable for military service in prisoner’s camp at Withybrook, went there. They found a couple of youths, but difficulties were put in the officers’ way of obtaining information as to who the young men were, and prisoners and others appeared with various weapons and assumed a threatening attitude. The result was that the lads got away.—Prisoner pleaded guilty, and said he had “ about 16 children,” of whom some were the Army, and both he and his wife promised to give information to the police if and when the wanted sons were heard of.—The Bench imposed a fine of £5 on the prisoner.

 

IN MEMORIAM.

BURTON.—In loving memory of EDWIN THOMAS BURTON, New Bilton, who died September 20,1916.
“ We have lost one earthly treasure ;
Death has snatched him from our side.
Life has been so sad and dreary
Since that day our loved one died.”
—From his loving Wife and Daughter.

COURSE.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Sergt. A. L. COURSE, who was killed in action on September 16, 1916.
“ Farewell, dear son, in a soldier’s grave
A grave we shall never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

DRAKE.—In loving memory of ALFRED HURST DRAKE, who was killed in action in France on September 25, 1916 ; eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. B. Drake, Lutterworth.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. FREDERICK FRANKTON ; killed at Loos, September 27, 1915. —“ They miss him most that loved him best.”—From his loving Wife and Children.

GREEN.—In ever-loving memory of EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who fell at Battle of Loos, 25th—27th September, 1915.—From is ever-loving Wife and Children.

GRIFFITH.—In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, Rifleman L. GRIFFITH, K.R.R., who died of wounds September 18, 1916.—“ Gone from sight, but to memory ever dear.”—From ever-loving Brothers and Sisters, 74 South Street.

JEFFS.—In loving memory of my dear husband, HENRY EDWARD JEFFS, who died September 16, 1915.
“ I miss and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memories of days that have been ;
Not thought of or forgotten by some he may be ;
But the grave that contains him is sacred to me.
Those that loved him best miss him most.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

MEADOWS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner C. H. MEADOWS, R.F.A., who died on September 4th, 1917, at 11th Stationary Hospital, Rouen, of wounds received in action on July 17th, and was buried in St. Seven Cemetery, Rouen, after much suffering, borne patiently ; aged 26 years.—At rest.
“ Had we been asked, how well we know
We should say, ‘ Oh, spare this blow ‘
Yes, with streaming tears would say,
‘ Lord, we love him, let him stay.’
He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but his loved ones ever know.”
—From his sorrowing Mother and Father, Brothers and Sister, and Fiancé.

NEAL.—In loving memory of my pal, Bombardier F. G. NEAL (Birdingbury), of D Battery, 46th Brigade, who was killed in action September 9, 1916.
“ One year has passed, my heart still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face,
No pal on earth can fill his place.”
—FRED REEVE (somewhere in France).

NEAL.—In ever-loving memory of Bombardier FRANK NEAL, R.F.A., who was killed in action on September 19, 1916.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ‘neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best :
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his Sister.

SHONE.—In loving memory of Rifleman TOM SHONE, who was killed in action at Loos on Sept. 25, 1915.
“ Two years have passed, and friends around us
Think perhaps the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—From Father, Mother, and Sisters.

SHONE.—In loving memory of our dear brother TOM, who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in your far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From FLO & HORACE.

21st Jul 1917. The House Famine in Rugby

THE HOUSE FAMINE IN RUGBY.
NO BUILDING SCHEME TILL AFTER THE WAR.

An interesting discussion on the Dearth of Houses in Rugby took place at the meeting of the Urban District Council on Tuesday, as a result of which it was reluctantly decided that no further steps towards remedying the shortage should be taken at present.

The discussion arose out of the reply from the Local Government Board to a letter from the Council on this question. The Board stated that they were still unable to sanction any loan for the erection of new dwellings, except where additional housing accommodation was urgently necessary in connection with War requirements, and where this was certified by one of the Government departments concerned. If the Urban District Council could furnish evidence of the need for the immediate erection of dwellings from the point of view of the War, the Board would consider whether the case should be submitted to the Ministry of Munitions. The Board also enquired whether, if sanction was given for a loan, which could be raised at the current minimum rate of interest of 5½ per cent., the District Council considered that they could carry out the scheme on an economical basis. Apart from these questions, there would probably be difficulties arising out of the shortage of labour and materials, e.g. timber.

Mr Robbins urged that the matter be referred to the Joint Plans and Estates Committee.—Mr Stevenson supported, and pointed out that practically every county in the country was suffering from a dearth of houses, and even if the War finished at once it was questionable whether the percentage charged for loans would be reduced.—Mr Wise : Is it possible to produce an economically sound and paying scheme at a rate of 5½ per cent ? If it is not it is no use going any further.

Mr Stevenson contended that most house property was paying a rate of 25 per cent, on the original capital outlay. The house in which he lived was formerly let at 4s 6d per week, but he now had to pay 7s 6d rent.—Mr Loverock : What did it cost to erect ?—Mr Stevenson : If 4s 6d per week paid a percentage on the original capital-Mr Loverock (interrupting) : Probably it did not pay.—Mr Stevenson : Certainly it must have done so. You will not find builders building for the sake of building.

Mr Robbins said, in consequence of the interest paid on the War Loan, the interest on money borrowed would remain at the present percentage for some time after the War ; but Mr Seabroke contended that they had not only to consider the high rate of interest, but the also the enormous cost of all building material. In these circumstances he did not see how it was possible to let new houses at a rent which would pay.—Mr Loverock asked if there was any immediate demand for houses at the present time ? They knew that when the War was over people were prepared to build in large quantities, and they also had plans for over 100 houses. If there was no immediate demand, what was the use of considering the matter, especially when they knew that no economical scheme could be produced.—Mr Robbins replied that there was a great demand for houses, and he said last week one of his tenants went to look over a house. She had not given notice to him, but the next day he had had 35 people asking for her house. — Mr Yates supported the motion to refer the matter to the Joint Committee, and said the reason that he had raised the question was that he wished to know in what position they stood with regard to obtaining a loan. He had heard it suggested that other towns were more favourably considered than Rugby, and that in some cases subsidies were being paid. If that was so, he thought Rugby might make a claim for a subsidy, but the Local Government Board did not seem disposed to consider their case favourably. With interest at 5½ per cent, and the high cost of material, it seemed impossible for any scheme to be economically successful. It was a primary consideration that any housing scheme should not be a drag upon the rates, and he for one would not wish to subsidise house building at the expense of other sections of the community. He thought under normal conditions the Council could build better houses than any private individual was disposed to build ; but be did not think at present the Council could put up a good enough case to induce the Ministry of Munitions to sanction a building certificate. Even if such a certificate was sanctioned, he would not be inclined to support the scheme under the present terms, because when the housing scheme was initiated he wished it to have some reasonable prospect of success. — Mr Linnell agreed, and said it would be impossible for some years to build houses at much less than 30 per cent. more than pre-war cost. To build houses similar to those now let at 8s per week they would have to charge 12s per week rent ; and though they might be able to let them at present, he asked what would become of the house after the War was over ?

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte T Kirby, Machine Gun Corps, son of Mrs Kirby, of 24 Sun Street, was wounded in action on July 10th.

After being twice mentioned in despatches, Pte J Hickman, of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. Pte Hickman is the son of Mr & Mrs John Hickman, of Harborough Magna.

Sergt Steve Ward (Kilsby), of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. The official record states : “ This N.C.O has done consistent good work during the period of preparation for the operations for the offensive near Hill 60. He has on several occasions had charge of detached parties digging assembly trenches under heavy shell and machine fire, and has always succeeded in completing his task. On the night of the 7th-8th June, 1917, his platoon was detailed to dig a strong point near Hill 60, He set a good example by his coolness and great courage, and was of great assistance to his platoon officer.” Before the War Sergt Steve Ward was employed in the B.T.H Tool Stores.

Squadron Sergt-Major J R Tait, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry in Egypt, has been mentioned in despatches by General Murray. In the same despatches the name of his cousin, Capt W I Tait, of the Suffolk Regiment, also appears. The latter is the son of the late Mr William Tait of Rugby, who afterwards resided at Leicester.

Miss Child, of Higham-on-the-Hill, has this week received news that her brother, Trooper Child, who was reported wounded and missing since April 11th, has been killed.

Pte Oliver Hipwell, of the Warwickshire Howitizer Battery, an old St Matthew’s boy, whose home is at 73 King Edward Road, has been wounded in the shoulder and thigh, and is now at a hospital at the base.

Sergt F Claridge, instructor at the 1st Army School, France, and son of Mr W Claridge, of 57 Manor Road, has been awarded the Military Medal for “ conspicuously good service in an isolated and heavily bombarded trench ” near Ypres. He held this position for 48 hours without rations. Before enlisting in September, 1914, Sergt Claridge was employed by Messrs. Lavender and Harrison. For nine years he was a chorister at the Parish Church.

Driver S Lamb, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been wounded in France. Driver Lamb is the son of Mrs Lamb, 17 St Marie’s Terrace, and although he is only 19 years of age, he has been in the fighting line two years. His father (who went through the South African war), and his elder brother, are also serving at the front.

AN OLD ELBOROW BOY WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Lance-Corpl W Haggar, son of Mr and Mrs J Haggar, of St Cross, Alexandra Road, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct on June 7th. He is at present in hospital suffering from wounds received in action on that date, and has received a congratulatory letter from his commanding officer, 3rd Worcestershire Regiment. Lance-Corpl Haggar, joined up at the outbreak of war, and, after serving in the 11th Hussars, was transferred to the 3rd Worcesters, being attached eventually to the Machine Gun Section. He has been in the fighting at Ypres, Hooge, Loos, Neuve Chapelle, Vimy Ridge, the battles of Somme, Arras, and Messines. At the battle of Somme he was wounded and received his first stripe for bravery. Previous to the war he was a painter at the B.T.H. and was educated at the Elborow School.

A GOOD RECORD.

The three soldier sons of Mr & Mrs John Wheeler, 135 Abbey Street, have recently been promoted from corporals to sergeants. Sergt E Wheeler, who has served 22½ years in the Army and is now in the 4th Royal Warwicks, has been appointed an instructor in musketry. Sergt A J Wheeler (17 years’ service) has been transferred from the Oxfordshire Light Infantry to a Cycle Division in Salonika as a gymnastic instructor ; and Sergt W B Wheeler (six years’ service), 1st Warwicks, is now a bomb instructor. Sergt W B Wheeler has served in France for two years and seven months. He took part in the first and second Battles of Ypres, and was wounded at Zonebeke in October, 1914. He was subsequently wounded again during the Battle of the Somme, and was also gassed on Whit-Monday of this year.

SERGT. A. GOODE MISSING.

Detective-Inspector Goode, of Rugby, has received news that his youngest son, Sergt A Goode, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been missing since July 10th. The news was contained in a letter from an officer, who wrote : “ The Germans attacked successfully and took a number of our men prisoners, your son amongst them. He was an excellent sergeant, well liked by his officers and men, and from information I have been able to obtain he did everything that could be done before he fell into the hands of the enemy.”

A RUGBY OFFICER’S DECORATIONS.

At an investiture at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday his Majesty conferred the Distinguished Service Order and a bar to the Military Medal on Capt H H Neeves, M.C, Northumberland Fusiliers. Capt Neeves received the D.S.O for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in handling his company during an attack of the enemy position. His skilful leading and determined courage enabled him, in spite of enemy flanking and reverse fire, to get his men to within a few yards of the enemy’s rear position. Owing to many casualties, however, he was compelled to withdraw. On his return he gave his battalion commander a full and lucid report on the situation—the only accurate one received. It was subsequently found that he had been wounded in the lungs early in the attack, and had remained with his men under fire 23 hours after being wounded. He was awarded the Military Cross on January 1, 1917, and the bar to this has been conferred for not only maintaining his own company during a long and difficult advance, but also taking command of another company involved in the front line attack. He set a splendid example throughout. Capt Neeves is the son of Mr S Neeves, of Murray Road, and was employed at the Rugby Post Office. At the commencement of the War he was called up as a trooper in the Yeomanry.

MARTON.

The death has occurred in action of Pte L J Young, Section, R.W.R, in France on July 2rd. The deepest sympathy is felt with the widowed mother in her sad bereavement. The deceased, who was 21 years of age, joined up in March, 1916. Pte Young, who was a general, favourite with everybody, was for some time in the employ of Major Hicks Beach, late of Eathorpe Hall, as gardener, and was very keenly interested in the social side of the Marton Recreation Room, being sport secretary in 1915[?].

DUNCHURCH.
CASUALTY.—On Tuesday morning Mr and Mrs H Pearce, of Coventry Road, received news that Sergt H Pearce was killed or missing. He and two others failed to return after a raid, and their fate is unknown. Sergt Pearce was the youngest sergeant from Dunchurch, and was much liked by everyone.

EASENHALL.

Mr and Mrs Alfred Smith have received news that their son Pte Percy A Smith, Hants Regt, was killed in action on April 23. He had previously been reported as missing and hope was entertained that he might have been taken prisoner. Previous to joining the army he was in gentleman’s service near Bournemouth, where he won the affection of all with whom he worked by his bright and genial disposition and cheerful service. He joined the army in May, 1915, and went to France in July, 1916.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE.

The usual monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Wednesday evening last week.

Mr William Flint, c.c (who presided), extended a very cordial welcome to Mrs Blagden, remarking how pleased the committee were to see her with them once again and to know that she had completely recovered from her long illness.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that the donations continued to come in well, and since his previous statement in connection with the recent War Prisoners’ Day effort he had received further sums on behalf of same, amounting to over £50, bringing the total up to over £800. In addition to this, he had received since July 1st 30 individual subscriptions, amounting to £42 8s 5d, and they had now a balance in hand of nearly £700. The cost of the food parcels for July amounted to £91 16s, after allowing for guarantees from Regimental Care Committees, and for August the committee would have to provide over £100 owing to the additional men that had been added to the Rugby list during the past fortnight.

The Chairman remarked that the financial position was most satisfactory, Mrs Blagden observing that, in spite of the recent effort, the interest on the part of the public in the welfare of the local men who were prisoners of war showed no abatement.

Mr Barker informed the meeting that Sir Starr Jameson (chairman of the Central Prisoners of War Committee) had recently issued a statement with reference to criticisms that had been made regarding the administration by the Central Committee. The report of the Joint Committee appointed to enquire into the work carried out at that great establishment at Thurloe showed clearly that most of the discontent aroused throughout the country was due to the rigid War Office regulations, which interfered everywhere with private effort. “ There is no question,” says Sir Starr Jameson, “ that these regulations were necessary to remedy the evils which had grown up, and, where possible, the Central Committee had tried to get them modified.” Then, too, when the first few weeks’ parcels under the new scheme reached Germany there was a breakdown of the German railway and postal services, causing long delays in the deliveries. Thousands of our prisoners, wrote home to complain, and their friends very naturally laid the blame on the Central Committee. It was hardly just to criticise them for what was beyond their control.

NEW SCHEME WORKING WELL.

The Central Committee and the Care Committees all over the country have ample evidence, consisting of reports from the prisoners themselves or their relatives, which all go to show that the scheme has been working well for months past, and that the prisoners’ wants are fully supplied, without overlapping or waste. This statement was, Mr Barker felt sure, very encouraging to the committee ; but it only bore out what he had maintained during the past few months. He had repeatedly brought forward evidence to prove that most of the men who were being cared for by the Rugby Committee were receiving their food parcels safely. The acknowledgments from the men continued to come through splendidly. There was, of course, the inevitable delay between the time a man was taken prisoner and when the acknowledgment was received that he had had his first parcel. It was frequently the case that some weeks would elapse, and during this time the man would be writing home complaining that he was getting no parcels, causing his relatives to think that he was getting neglected or his parcels being stolen.

Mrs. Blagden reminded the committee that since the new scheme came into force last December practically the whole of the work fell upon the hon secretary. There was a very great amount of clerical work involved, and in this Mr Barker has received most valuable help from Miss C M Judd, to whom the committee passed a vote of thanks.

WAR CHARITIES.

The Rugby Master Butchers’ Association wrote asking the Council to register their Bath Chair Charity under the War Charities Act.—Mr Wise drew attention to the fact that a raffle was being held in connection with the fund, and he asked whether the Council were in order in supporting a raffle, seeing that such things were absolutely illegal.—M. Ringrose : It comes within the Lottery Act, doesn’t it ?—Mr Stevenson said he believed this was so, but such things were winked at in Rugby, providing the authorities knew the person who was managing it. The question was, however, was not the Council lending themselves to something which they might wish to get out of later.—Mr Yates pointed out that the Council were not authorising a raffle, but registering a charity. It was no business of the Council how the money was raised, and if the promoters committed an offence they would be amenable to the Common Law.—Mr Robbins expressed the opinion that if the Council made themselves responsible for all these things they would be busily employed. It was difficult to go to any effort on behalf of charity without taking part in a raffle, a “ dip,” or a draw (laughter).—It was decided to register the charity.

RUGBY INFIRMARY V.A.D. HOSPITAL.—Through the kindness of the Commandant and staff, the female inmates of the institution were entertained to supper, and afterwards invited to a soldiers’ concert, on Saturday, under the presidency of Miss Walrond. A very enjoyable programme consisted of songs by Miss F Shilittoe and Sergt Till ; children’s play, “ Brownikins,” by King’s Mssengers ; sailor’s hornpipe by Misses C & H Rushall ; muff dance by the Misses Norris, Squires, and Hazelwood ; and an amusing sketch, “ Mechanical Jane,” in which the characters were taken by Miss Morsen, and the Misses Walrond.—On Wednesday evening Sergt Evans presided over a concert arranged by Mr Hickman, Songs, duets, and part songs were given by Mrs Hickman, Mrs Ward, Mrs Painter, Miss Spencer, Messrs Hickman, Lovett, Bowell, Allison, and Sergt Till ; also two solos on the banjo and mandoline by Mrs Bostock. Every item was heartily appreciated by all present.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Sunday evening members of the Rugby Brotherhood gave a concert to the patients at the St Johns V.A.D Hospital. Mr J Chisholm presided, and the programme consisted of selections by the Orchestra, under the conductorship of Mr A E Alneham ; songs, “ When you come home ” and “ Monarch of the woods,” Mr Phillips ; piccolo solo “ Silver birds,” Mr W Rowley. Cigarettes were distributed amongst the patients, and the concert was much appreciated.

The current Issue of the “ Murrayian,” a smart little paper issued by members of the Murray School, contains several interesting items, including an appreciation of Pte James Irving, London Scottish, formerly an assistant master at the school, who was recently killed in action.

A RUGBY SCHOOL WAR MEMORIAL.—A service of communion plate-the gift of Mr & Mrs W B Gair—in memory of Old Rugbeians who fall in the War was dedicated at Rugby School Chapel on Sunday last. It consists of thirteen pieces, and with one exception the patens are exact reproductions of Seventh Century originals either at St Peter’s, Cornhill, or in possession of the Goldsmiths’ Company. On the obverse of the alms paten appears the motto of Rugby School, “ Orando Laborando,” surmounted by the date of the foundation, 1567, and the coat of arms of the founder, Lawrence Sheriff, flanked by his initials.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

“ PEACE.”

SIR.—Many Rugby residents have had leaflets, printed in London, pushed slyly under their doors these last few days, apparently on behalf of the Society of Friends, asking whether it is “ necessary ” to go on with the War.

While respecting that Society’s Christian efforts one detects a connection between this premature peace pamphlet—for it is little else—and the pro-German elements that Rugby and district unhappily still shelters.

The very method of circulating this leaflet is un-English, and reminds one of the pre-war meetings at odd corners, calling for a reduction in the Navy, and similar pro-German tricks.

It must surely disgust the overwhelming majority of Rugby folk that these same people are supporting anything which tends to encourage a premature peace.-Your obedient servant,

July 13, 1917.            F R DAVENPORT.

BILTON HALL HOSPITAL.

DEAR SIR,—To prevent any misconception among those who have subscribed so liberally or worked so hard in the interests of the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Hospital, I should like to state that, in response to my offer to lend the house until the end of March, 1918, I have this week received a letter from the County Director of the Warwickshire Branch of the B.R.C.S, saying that they do not intend carrying on the hospital beyond September.—Yours truly, WALTER BARNETT.

THE COUNTY OF WARWICK MOTOR VOLUNTEER CORPS.

SIR,—I regret that the account of the efforts being made to form a County Motor Volunteer Corps and a reference therein to the supply of petrol, which have appeared in the Press, has led to misconception as to the intention of the promoters on the part of those who are engaged in the wholly admirable work of transporting the wounded under the Red Cross Society.

Nothing can be further from the intention of the promoters than to hamper or restrict the excellent work of those owners of motor-cars who have so generously taken part in this errand of mercy. But I would point out that there is nothing incompatible to those so engaged in joining the Warwickshire Motor Volunteer Corps. Large numbers of members are already giving their services to the Red Cross Society ; and, indeed, we lay it down as one of our duties that, when not employed on military service, we shall place our organisation at the disposal of those who require assistance in the removal of wounded soldiers.

Mr F van den Arend may, therefore, rest satisfied that the representations that are being made as regards the renewal of petrol licenses are not intended to affect the supply of petrol for the Red Cross Society, or for cars already engaged in work of national importance.

In the event of national emergency the Government may decide to commandeer all private cars which, in their opinion, might be used to better advantage elsewhere. It is the object of the Motor Volunteer Corps to organise this Corps before such an emergency arises in order that they may be available at once for the service of the Government.

Therefore, I repeat that the fact of a private car being engaged in Red Cross Society work, or any similar work, should not debar the owner from joining the Motor Volunteer Corps.

Permit me to add that Lord Leigh has allowed himself to be nominated for the command of the Corps, which already embraces two heavy sections and two light sections, consisting of over 300 lorries and cars, collected from Birmingham and the county, and that the scheme has the entire approval of the Regimental Commandant, Colonel D F Lewis, C.B.-Yours faithfully,

(Signed) FRANK GLOVER, Major,
Headquarters : 2nd Batt. Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment, Clarendon Place, Leamington.

DEATHS.

COPE.-In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner PERCY LESLIE COPE, who died of wounds in France on June 21st.—“ Sleep on, dear one, till we meet again.”—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER.

WHITE, ALBERT J., aged 31, the beloved eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. White, Murray Road, Rugby, and dearly beloved husband of Ethel M. White. Killed in action in France, June 30th.

WILSON.—Killed in action, in France on July 10th, THOMAS, third son of Mr. & Mrs. Wilson, Gate Farm, Bourton ; aged 25.

IN MEMORIAM.

BERRY.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl HARRY BERRY, 2/7 R.W.R., who died (prisoner of war) from wounds received in action on July 19, 1916.—Not forgotten by his pals, T. ADAMS, D.G. and T.H.

DICKEN.—In ever-loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, who died of wounds in France on July 20, 1916,—“ We miss him most who loved him best.”—From his loving FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS, BROTHERS, and ELSIE.

DICKEN.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, 14th Gloucester Bantam Regiment, who died of wounds on July 20, 1916 ; aged 22 years.
“ A little time has passed, and friends around us
Think the wound is almost healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Fondly remembered by BROTHER and SISTER, WILL and AMY.

HIPWELL.—In ever-loving and sweetest remembrance of our dear son, Pte JOHN HIPWELL, Lilbourne, M.G.C., who died of wounds on July 23, 1916. Interred in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt, France.
“ He fought for his country,
He answered duty’s call ;
His home, his friends, his comforts,
He sacrificed them all ;
But he won the admiration
Of Britain’s glorious name.”
“ Peace, perfect peace.”
—Never forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, SISTER and BROTHERS.

LENTON.—In loving remembrance of our dear brother, Pte. W. H. LENTON, who died of wounds in France on 19,1916.—Ever remembered by FRED in France, and ERNE, ETHEL and FAMILY, 64 Wood Street.

LENTON.-In loving memory of WILL, dearly beloved son of the late Mr. & Mrs. T. Lenton, Wood Street, who was killed in France on July 19, 1916.
“ Greater love hath no man than this,
That he lay down his life for his friends.”

SMITH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. T. W. SMITH, of Swinford, who was killed in action at Beaumont Hamel on July 21-22,1916.

WHITE.—In loving memory of Sergt. WILLIAM HARVEY WHITE (2/7th Batt., R.W.R.), dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Geo White, Dunchurch, who died a prisoner of war in Germany on July 19,1916 ; aged 19.

12th Jun 1915. A Fierce Struggle

A FIERCE STRUGGLE.

Pte A Goode, attached to the machine gun section of the 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, “ somewhere in France,” in a letter his father, 173 Cambridge Street, Rugby, says :-

“ I suppose by this time you will have read about the great fight we had on May 9th. I shall never forget it. We have named it “ The bloody Sunday.” We went into the trenches at ten o’clock on the Saturday night, and lay there during a bitterly cold night. At five o’clock on Sunday morning the big guns commenced their music, which was terrible, and it lasted an hour. Then came the order to advance to do or die. We had to go over five lines of breastworks, 200 yards of open ground between each. All the time the enemy were raining upon us shrapnel shells, “ coal-boxes,” and lead from machine guns ; but we never faltered, and as chum after chum went down we set our teeth and gripped out guns tighter. When we had passed the last breastwork we took a breather for two minutes ; then for the German trenches 350 yards in front—is was hell itself, I can tell you. We charged them with the bayonet, but it was beyond the power of man to get through their barbed wire fences. Blood, however, flowed like water ! But our time will come when we will avenge our brave chums who gave their lives on that field for home and country. The fight lasted through 24 hours, until the Monday. It was a terrible sights after we had finished to see dead and wounded. Never mind ; we are all ready and willing again when wanted ; but we are getting less in numbers—I mean we who came here first. Will the young men of England pluck up and come out and give us a hand ? It is about time some of them threw away the tennis bats and golf clubs and learn to use a rifle, and come out and help us. We have a very stubborn enemy, and he will take some shifting ; but by the help of men, guns, and ammunition, we shall do it—for we are still British and have the hearts of men. Pluck up, slackers, and give us a hand.”

IMPUDENT GERMAN SNIPERS.

Drummer W Newman, of the 7th Battery Royal Warwickshire Regiment, brother to Mr C J Newman, architect, of Rugby, in a letter from the front says:—“ The weather out here is grand, but it is enough to roast us as we do our sentry duty, which is nothing but standing and watching through a periscope at the enemy’s lines. They have been rather cheeky this time. For instance, during Saturday night one of their patrols must have been very near to ours, for in the morning, when we looked over the parapet, we saw fastened on a willow tree, about 200 yards away, a board with the words painted on it: ‘Przemysl Zunicherobert.’ The last word we take to mean ‘re-taken.’ However, if they come out doing those tricks too many times they will find a ‘pleasant surprise’ waiting for them in the way of a bomb or a shot from one of our patrols.”

CASUALTIES IN THE SEVENTH WARWICKSHIRE BATTALION.

The following casualties in the Warwickshire Territorial Battalion are reported under dates May 19th and 22nd :-

KILLED.—Brooks, 1168, Sergt E.

WOUNDED.—Evans, 2785, Pte R O ; Hobbs, 2632, Pte W R ; Shearsby, 2741, Pte A ; Tuggey, 2578, Pte W ; Ball, 1621, Pte R ; Blundell, 2452, Pte R ; Coltman, 1814, Lce-Corpl W C ; Cook, 2269, Pte J ; Dolman, 2649, Pte ; Dunn, 2511, Pte W ; Fowler, 2064, Pte W H ; Hughes, 1755, Pte J ; Mence, 1802, Pte F ; Ramsden, 2377, Pte J A ; Sadler, 1287, Lce-Corpl J ; Sale, 1674, Pte J ; Savage, 909, Pte W ; South, 1986, Sergt G ; Taylor, 1071, Corpl H A ; Ward, 2762, Pte E ; Wormell, 2536, Pte J

 

LOCAL CASUALTIES OF THE WAR.

“ E ” COMPANY’S CASUALTIES.

A member of “ E ” Company (now merged with “ C ” Company of the 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion), writing under date June 6th, says :-

“ The weather here is glorious ; we are all brown as berries and in the very best of health. On Tuesday last I paid the Company a visit. They were off to the trenches that night ; but, to judge by the interest displayed in an inter-company cricket match, you would never believe that within an hour or two they would be doing their whack in the trenches. The news, I’m sorry to say, is by far the worst since our arrival in France, and concerns members of the old ‘E’ Company. On Thursday, May 27th, Lance-Corpl R Clowes and H Rogers were wounded. The former, I regret to say, died on June 2nd. On Friday night, May 28th, there was a most exciting episode, in which the Rugby lads came through with flying colours, but with further loss. The following are, as far as I could gather, the details :—A party, including Corpl W Bromwich, Ptes L Hill, L Eaton, and P Hall, were out on the listening post, when a party of Germans came out and tried to surprise them. The enemy opened fire, killing L (Bleb) Hill, a Newbold lad, and wounding L Eaton. The latter stuck to his post, and continued firing until help arrived, consisting of a party under Sergt G Ward. I expect the enemy gave it up for a bad job, and upon examination by our chaps we found they had left one dead. Our men brought him in, and he proved to be an iron cross man. His rifle has been despatched to England, and will some day repose in the Rugby Drill Hall as a war trophy. The Company has been congratulated by the Colonel, as undoubtedly by their watchfulness and presence of mind they saved an awkward situation. Corpl Bromwich has since been promoted lance-sergeant. Some of this news may be stale by now, yet I think the Rugby people should learn what their lads are doing. At the request of several I have been asked to point out that what they consider to be an insult to them is the booming of the troops who were billeted in Rugby as “ The Rugby Soldiers, &c.” The sentiments expressed to me are that only the Battery and ‘E’ Company, &c, really come under that nomenclature. We appear to be off the picture. We were the original ‘ Rugby soldiers ’ long before this war broke out, and still claim that honour ; and, what’s more, refuse to allow any other troops—no matter what splendid work they have done, sacrifices they have made, and losses suffered—to step into our rightful position in the hearts and sympathies of the people of Rugby. The Rev B McNulty conducted a service a week last Wednesday. He was quite pleased to drop across Rugby men.”

LOCAL WAR CASUALTIES

CAPT RENNIE WATERHOUSE KILLED.

Capt Rennie Waterhouse, of the 7th Lancashire Fusiliers, who is reported as having been killed in the Dardanelles on May 10th, was formerly a member of the B.T.H Company’s staff as an engineer in the contract and turbine sales department. He was the third son of Mrs T C Waterhouse, of Lomberdale Hall, Bakewell, and of Thorncliffe, Kersal Edge, Manchester, and all his brothers are serving with H.M Forces. Capt Waterhouse, who during his residence in Rugby lived at Epworth, Clifton Road, owned a textile mill at Rheims, which has been destroyed by the Germans.

BILTON.

MUCH regret has been caused in this village by the death of Gnr. Harold Freeman, of the Royal Field Artillery, son of Mr H Freeman ; and the greatest sympathy is felt for the bereaved relatives. Harold, a strong, well-built young fellow, was a painter and plumber by trade, and his unassuming manner and genial disposition made him a general favourite in the place. He was a member of the Cricket and Football Clubs, and also of the Working Men’s Club, for which he did a great deal of useful work when it became necessary to renovate the club premises last summer. He also belonged to the Foresters’ Court, and in all respects his conduct was exemplary. When the war broke out he at once realised that it was his duty to obey the call to arms, and enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery. He quickly made himself an expert artilleryman, and was several times offered promotion, but preferred to remain a private. His Battery was daily expecting orders to go to the front; everything was in readiness, and he was looking forward to the opportunity of seeing active service, when some time last week he was taken ill with pneumonia, complications developed, and he passed away on Monday at the age of 26. The body was brought to Bilton on Wednesday night and placed in the Memorial Chapel, near his home at The Magnet, to await burial yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

THE DEATH OF PTE. HILL.

Mr and Mrs Hill, parents of Pte Hill, of the Rugby Territorial Company, who, as reported last week, was killed in action, have received a letter from Sergt Ward, who says :—

“ I wish to express my deepest sympathy with you all in the loss of such an excellent soldier as your son, who was killed whilst doing his duty on Friday, May 28th, at about 1 a.m. We are all sorry at the loss of his services, for he was one of our best men. Whenever he was called upon to perform any duty, no matter what it was, he did it with a cheerful spirit. This time he was out on the listening post, which is in front of our lines between 50 and 60 yards, when a party of Germans attacked them. Every man performed his duty splendidly. His comrade by his side was also wounded, but kept on firing until a party reinforced them, and made it possible for us to get his body and retire to the trenches. His death was avenged by a German’s death, whose body was fetched in. There is not a man in the Company that will not miss him, for a good many times when on the march he has made the march go easy by singing a song. He was in my section, and there is no one out hero who will miss him more than I shall. I must express to you the deepest sympathy on behalf of the section to which he belonged, also the whole platoon. Louis was buried by the side of our other unfortunate comrades. He suffered no pain or agony, for death was instantaneous.”

To the letter is appended the following note by Capt Mason :—

“ Unfortunately no time to write a letter, but the above expresses the opinion of officers as well as men. On behalf of the officers I most deeply sympathise with you in your bereavement.”

Q.M.S A C Tomlinson also writes:-

“ It is with deepest regret and sincere sympathy that we have to tell you of the death of your son, Pte L Hill. He met his death gallantly, fighting in defence of the post entrusted to him. His memory is proudly established in the hearts of all his comrades. He was always cheery, always happy, and every man in the Company was his friend, and we all miss his bright presence. It may be a comfort for you to know that his death was instantaneous and without pain. He died fighting for his King, his country and his home, and no man can wish for a prouder death.”

Mr and MRS J HIPWELL received a notification from the War Office on Sunday last that Corpl William Hence, C Company, 2nd Border Regiment, was killed in action on May 16th. He was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and joined the regiment soon after the war commenced. He was 25 years of age, and has made his home with Mr and Mrs J Hipwell (Newbold) from a boy. He had been previously wounded, and was away in hospital for seven weeks, but returned to the firing-line again a short time ago.

WOLSTON.

MR AND MRS A OWEN, of Wolsten, have now heard definitely that their son is amongst the missing and they have received official intimation that he has been missing since an action near Ypres on the 25th of April last. Since that date no information has come to hand as to his whereabouts.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt G T Seabroke, of the East Lancashire Regiment, son of Col Seabroke, Rugby, has been gazetted major.

Mr P G Chamberlain, M.A, of No. 3 Market Place, Rugby, has joined the H.A.C (Infantry Battalion).

The French Military Authorities have requested Dr Frances Ivens (formerly of Harborough Parva) to start a Field Hospital between the firing line and Royaumont. With the approbation of the Scottish Committee, Dr Ivens agreed to do so and to have it ready at 48 hours’ notice.

Brev-Col R A Richardson, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, whose gallant conduct on the occasion of the torpedo attack on the Wayfarer was referred to in an Army Order, published last week, is a brother of Mrs Mulliner, of Clifton Court.

Mrs H R Lee, of 78 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received official intimation that her husband, Pte Lee, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, a former employee of the B.T.H, is in a hospital at Rouen suffering from a slight scalp wound.

It is gratifying to learn that the complaints which have been made in certain quarters of slackness among workmen employed in the manufacture of munitions do not apply to Rugby, and that the local representatives of the allied engineering trades are rendering every assistance. In accordance with Press regulations we abstain from giving further details.

TWO RUGBY CLERICS JOIN THE FORCES.

We understand that the Rev S M Morgan, curate-in-charge of the Church House, and the Rev R W Dugdale, curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church, have been appointed by the Chaplain-General as chaplains to H.M. Forces in the 63rd and 64th Brigades, now stationed at Tring, and that they will be leaving Rugby shortly. We are sure that they will carry with them the hearty good wishes of all Rugbeians.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Eighteen recruits have been accepted at Rugby Drill Hall during the past week, as follows :- S W Wareing, J E Burnham, and T Batchelor, R.W.R ; T Jennings, 13th Gloucesters : G B Cox, Leicesters ; F Southam, Rifle Brigade ; F Gardner, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; H Bishop, A.S.C (H.T) ; W R Seaton, Welsh Guards ; J Clarke and W H Moseley, Army Vet. Corps ; H Bate, F C Woodhouse, S C Hobbs, W R Davis, E W Ellson, and S H Oswell, Rugby Fortress Company. R.E ; F Morrey, Household Cavalry.

HAIRDRESSERS’ CHARGES.

A meeting was held on Monday last by the Rugby hairdressers to discuss the advisability of increasing their saloon charges. It will be remembered that about twelve months ago the Rugby Hairdressers’ Association fixed a minimum price of 1½d for shaving and 3d for haircutting, which abolished 1d shaving in Rugby. The better-appointed shops have decided that, owing to the rapid increase of expenses—both business and domestic—and the flourishing state of the labour market they will increase their charges to the following prices:—Shaving, 2d; hair-cutting, 4d; ditto (boys under 14), 3d; singeing, 4d; shampooing, 4d. The new prices are to come in force on Thursday, June 10th.

It was mentioned that a great number of their customers had joined his Majesty’s Forces, and were now in training or at the front, and those who were serving his Majesty in the local works were working so many hours that they are unable to attend the saloon, and therefore cause a considerable fall in the saloon takings. It was decided by those who have adopted the new prices to attend the Warwickshire Reservists at the old prices, and the same privilege will be extended to those customers who have donned the khaki when they come home on furlough.

NOTICE TO WARWICKSHIRE LICENSED VICTUALLERS.

The Chief Constable of Warwickshire (Captain J T Brinkley) has issued the following notice to licensed victuallers under the Intoxicating Liquor Laws :- “Complaints being received from Red Cross Hospitals in the county that wounded soldiers are being supplied with drink in the public-houses, and, in some instances, return in an intoxicated condition, license holders are requested not to serve them with intoxicants. The Brigadier-General commanding this district informs me that unless this request is observed as far as it is possible to do so, it will be necessary to put the premises complained of out of bounds for all troops, with the further liability of being closed altogether under the Defence of the Realm regulations if further complaints are received.

 

 

 

 

6th Feb 1915. Narrow Escapes and an Opinion of the German Troops

RUGBY RAILWAYMAN WOUNDED AT THE FRONT.

Thursday’s papers contained in the list of soldiers wounded at the war the name of Pte H Goode, of the Lancashire Regiment. Pte Goode is the son of Detective-Inspector Goode, of Rugby, and when the war broke out was called up as a reservist, being at the time foreman cleaner in the locomotive engine-sheds. He went through several of the earlier engagements of the war, and his friends in Rugby hope his wounds are not serious.

NARROW ESCAPE OF A RUGBY MAN.

Driver F H Johnson, 115th Heavy Battery R.G.A. of West Leyes, Rugby, who enlisted in Lord Kitchener’s Army at the outbreak of the war, is at present in a hospital at Sheffield, suffering from wounds received at the front. In a letter to his friends he states that he got up last week for the first time since he was wounded-eight weeks ago. His hand and arm are nearly well, but he cannot use his fingers yet. At the time he was hurt his horse had its head blown clean off. Driver Johnson had a marvellous escape, as the horse fell before he could clear himself from the saddle. The horse rolled right over him, injuring his hand and back terribly. He really thought he should never see Old England again.

NEW BILTON DISPATCH RIDER IN A WARM CORNER.

Bombardier W Hudghton, Royal Field Artillery, of 21 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, who is at present in Lincoln Hospital suffering from injuries received while acting as a dispatch rider about a fortnight ago, passed through a very unpleasant experience, from which he was only extricated by his own coolness. From a letter written to his wife, it appears that he was carrying a message from one General to another, and while he was galloping across a ploughed field his “ old friend,” his horse, received three shots, and “ the poor beggar died.” Bombardier Hudghton was pinned under his horse, and two Germans, observing this, and presumably thinking that he was incapacitated, advanced towards him. They, however, failed to perceive him take his carbine from its place, and he managed to shoot one. The “ other bloke ” then pointed his rifle at the New Bilton man, but the latter got his shot home first, thus accounting for the pair. Bombardier Hudghton is now suffering from injuries to the knee caused by his horse falling with him.

RUGBY POLICEMAN HOME FROM THE WAR.

SOME INTERESTING EXPERIENCES.

A member of the Rugby Police Force, who was called up to his regiment on the outbreak of hostilities, paid a brief visit to Rugby this week, and in an interview gave a few of his experiences to our representative. He took part in the initial fighting round Mons and the glorious retreat, and also in subsequent engagements, and thus has an interesting story to relate.

AN IRON CROSS HERO.

He saw a very brave act performed by a German. The Company to which he belonged charged a German natural trench and took the enemy by surprise. The bulk of the Germans threw up their hands in token of surrender, while others ran away, but were immediately shot down. One man, however, fought on, and an Englishman went for him with a bayonet. The German seized the bayonet with one hand, and when another man went for him he took hold of his bayonet with the other hand. A third man came up, however, and with a well-directed thrust accounted for him ; the German, grinding his teeth, made use of a few choice expressions as he fell. Upon searching this man they found him to be in possession of the Iron Cross.

TREACHERY OR ACCIDENT ?

As has already been reported, the opposing troops fraternised together on Christmas Day at various parts of the line, but at one point an exceedingly unfortunate incident occurred. The Rugby man, thinking he had some friends in the Monmouthshire Regiment, walked along to their trenches, and there saw a sergeant who had been mortally wounded while trying to fraternise with the Germans. It appears that the sergeant had advanced unarmed towards the German trenches, carrying a box of cigarettes, and motioned to the enemy to come the remainder of the distance, but they refused to do so. He, therefore, returned to his trench, but shortly afterwards started off again, intending to go the whole way this time. When he got half across, however, a shot was fired, and over he went, but, although he was mortally wounded, he managed to get up again and run to his own trench, not, however, before one of his mates had accounted for one of the Germans, who were sitting outside their trenches, so that it was “ a life for a life.” Firing went on as usual then for a time, but, subsequently a better spirit prevailed, and the Germans apologised to the Monmouths for shooting their sergeant, explaining that it was an accident.

The Rugby sergeant’s Christmas dinner consisted of chicken, boiled cabbage, and potatoes and splendid plum-pudding. He explained that it was only with the Saxons that the English fraternised. These men were far more gentlemanly than any other German race, in fact, they “ played the game.” The Prussians, who, with the Uhlans were mainly instrumental for the outrages, did not believe in that sentiment

FIRST-CLASS SOLDIERS.

The sergeant’s opinion of the German troops was that they were first-class soldiers ; they were very clever and had their share of pluck. One advantage the British had ; the Germans were not so good at pushing home an attack as the British were. As an illustration he stated that on one occasion the Germans were massed in preparation for an attack, but they were observed by the British just in the nick of time, and a heavy rifle and Maxim fire was directed upon them. They could hear the German officers, who were at the rear of the men, urging them on in very strong terms, but without avail, and the enemy soon turned and fled, whereas the British would have pushed the attack home at all cost. At the commencement of the war they leaned to the opinion that the German infantry were not good shots, but they had since learned, differently ; and they had discovered that the Germans had corps of snipers who were deadly. While the German officers were fine men, who knew their work, the British officers were the bravest men in the world. As an example of coolness and pluck, he stated that he was one day in a building with a captain, when a shell came hurtling through the roof. They both escaped via the window, and almost before the masonry had ceased to fall, the captain had whipped out a camera and obtained a snap-shot. Speaking of the German artillery, the sergeant’s experience was that its bark was worse than its bite. Whereas the British only fired when they had a target, the Germans were continually blazing away whether there was a target or not, and they must have wasted a great quantity of ammunition in this way.

FIRING ON THE RED CROSS.

After relating to our representatives stories of outrages on women, and the manner in which three British cavalrymen were done to death and mutilated by the Uhlans, the sergeant stated that the British had had a great number of there stretcher-bearers shot by the Germans. At the commencement of the war they always put the Red Cross flag in a prominent place upon the buildings, which were used for treating the wounded, but it was found that the flag only drew fire, and the hospitals were invariably shelled. Now, instead of putting the flag in a prominent place it was simply stuck in the ground near the hospital, to show the troops where to take the wounded.

 

WARWICKSHIRE WAR RELIEF FUND COMMITTEE.

EMPLOYMENT OF REFUGEES.

A meeting of the Warwickshire War Relief Fund Committee was held at the Shire Hall, Warwick, on Wednesday, Lord Algernon Percy presiding.

The Organising Committee reported that the conditions of trade throughout the area of the County Committee seemed good, and very little distress existed up to the period ending January 30th, the number of civil cases of distress dealt with by the local committees was 66, the total sum thus expended in relief being £112 12s 9d. Further grants amounting to £185 had been made to local committees. This brought the total amount of the grants made to local committees to £325.

The Hon Treasurer reported that the balance at the bank was £6,083, including £500 already ear-marked for the Warwickshire Branch of the Red Cross Society. It was decided to send £3,275 to the Prince of Wales’s Fund as a second instalment.

Mr Batchelor, the chairman of the Belgian Refugees’ Sub-Committee, reported that the number of refugees at present in the county area was about 1,300, excluding the large towns. The question of employment had proved to be a most difficult problem. A few farmers had applied for agricultural labourers, but in most cases they could not undertake to find accommodation for the families, which was essential. The question of whether refugees, receiving hospitality and earning wages, should contribute towards their maintenance, had been much discussed, and finally the Birmingham Committee, in conjunction with managers from various homes, had agreed to recommend that refugees should be asked to contribute one-third of their wages towards their maintenance, and that they be advised to bank as much as possible of the remainder for the day of repatriation.

BELGIAN REFUGEES FOR NEWTON AND CLIFTON.

On Saturday, Mrs H H Mulliner and Mr F van den Arend visited the Alexandra Palace, London, to select more refugees for Newton House and “ The Beeches ” Clifton. From the 4,000 refugees in this building they chose the following :- Aloysuis Ogiers, cabinet-maker, Buoght, and his wife and seven children ; and Andrie Avaerts, coachman, Antwerp, and his wife and four children. They also brought away a tailor and his wife and child, for the Welford Refugees’ Committee ; and Sidoni Buylaert, the wife of a soldier, her five children, and brother, Henri Torfs (who has volunteered for service but been rejected), for the Barby and Kilsby Committee, who have provided an excellently furnished house for their reception.

On Wednesday, Mr Van den Arend fetched another family, Edward Hoeyendonck, railway worker, his wife and four children, for “ The Beeches.” This family comes from the neighbourhood of Malines, and left on August 24th, since when they travelled from place to place, reaching London a fortnight ago.

We are informed that there are now 83 Belgian refugees working in the town, who are not receiving the hospitality of any committee, and these are all registered by the Board of Trade at the office of the Newton House War Refugees’ Committee, which is regarded by the authorities in London as the official committee in Rugby. We understand that the Newton House Committee only provides funds for the refugees there, which, with those at “ Beeches,” now number 102, and that they will shortly apply for financial assistance from the residents of Rugby. Money has been sent by several people, including a very acceptable cheque for £75 from Mr W Wiggins, part of the proceeds of the sale of a sheep in Rugby Market.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The past week has been one of the slackest experienced at the Drill Hall for same time. The following have been attested :- A.S.C : F H West, E S Watts, A Turrall, and A V Brown. R.W.R : W F Woolfe, A F Brown, W Warland, and E W Nicholls. Oxon and Bucks L.I : R Megson. Coldstream Guards : C R Lee. 16th Lancers : J H Toomey. R.F.A : W F Hessey. R.M.A.C : John Clarke.