6th Apr 1918. Women’s Work on the Land

WOMEN’S WORK ON THE LAND.

At the Empire, Rugby, on Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons, stirring appeals were made to women to volunteer for work on the land. As an introduction to brief addresses, a film was shown depicting the procession of Warwickshire land-workers at the Birmingham rally.

On Tuesday Mrs Neville, of Stratford-on-Avon, said the picture showed that a certain number of women had done what they all ought to have done—viz, to have come out from ease and comfort at home to work on the land, and thus take the place of men who had gone to fight for them. They must have more women to do this work. If they did not come forward, they were not worthy to be the mothers, wives, and sisters of those who fighting for them. She could not imagine during this critical period any man or woman, having good wages, and living at home in comfort, threatening to lay down tools in order to get more money or for some trivial cause. What was that compared with what those brave fellows at the front were doing for them ? Let them do their best for those heroes, and if they could not put in full time work, let them join a part-time gang, who could do a great deal. In Stratford about twenty of them put in three or four thousand hours on the land during a year by giving up their afternoons ; whilst others in business gave up their half-holidays and did good work. Did they think they had at this critical period any right to spare time for holidays ? To older people, like herself, she appealed to them to put enthusiasm to make up any loss in years.

The speaker on Wednesday was Miss Peers, travelling inspector to the Board of Agriculture. At the present time she said the Women’s Land Army consisted of between 7,000 and 8,000 whole-time workers ; but the need of the country was so great that they wanted another 30,000. Could the women of Rugby find any recruits for this army ? They knew how splendidly their Army was doing its duty at the Front, and they wanted another splendid army behind. They wanted the women of England to fight in the British fields. Women of 18 years and upwards who were not doing national work should come and fight for their country, if only for six months, although they would rather that they came for a year. They must fight in the English fields to keep off starvation, to feed the men at the Front and the little children, and to take the place of the men who had made the great sacrifice for their country. They should remember Kitchener’s Army and how the men came forward. They did not ask what the wage was ; they came to fight for their country, and chucked up their jobs, saving : “ Here I am ; I am ready.” They now wanted the women of England to do the same. It they were not doing anything particular in the national interest or for their country they should think twice before they refused to fight for England (applause).

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SCHOOLBOYS AND HARVEST.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR.—I understand the Warwickshire County Council are desirous of making it as easy as possible for farmers to employ school children in the hay, corn and potato harvest, and with that object the Education Committee have asked the managers of all the schools in the county to fix the summer holidays at a period which will best suit the farmers in the locality of each school.

In writing to suggest to farmers that they should at once see the managers of their local schools, and let them know the date which will best suit their own interests, and therefore the interests of the country, to have the schools closed, so that the boys can help with the harvest. The holidays may be arranged to be taken at one time, or to be divided, as best suits the harvest operations.

I urge that farmers should take action in this matter without delay, as some time will be necessary to make suitable arrangements.—Yours faithfully,

R LEAN,
Secretary, Warwickshire Farmers’ Union.
27 Bridge Street, Stratford-on-Avon.

 

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Colonel H H Mulliner has this week returned from France.

We regret that news has come through that Capt G Gray, 1/5 Lancashire Fusiliers, is reported missing as from March 26th.

Sergt A T Barnett, 1 Temple Street, Rugby, was wounded in France on March 21st. Before joining up he worked as a painter for Messrs Linnell & Son for 15 years.

Lieut C K Steinberg, M.C, of the Machine Gun Corps who was before the war was a member of the B.T.H office staff, was killed in action on March 22nd.

Pte Fred Summers, 2/7 R.W.R, has been killed in the recent fighting. He had spent practically all his life at Clifton, and was formerly employed by Mr M R Trower, and afterwards by Mrs Twells, as a groom-gardener. He was 31 years of age, married, a Sunday School teacher, and member of the choir.

Sergt J Sacree, Rifle Brigade, who was taken prisoner of war a few weeks ago, writes to a friend in Rugby that now his food parcels are arriving from England he is able to have fairly decent meals, and is just beginning to feel himself again. His many friends in Rugby will be glad to know he has nearly recovered from his wounds.

The following New Bilton men have been wounded : Pte Oswald Sydney Houghton, Welsh Regt, son of Mr C Houghton, 6 Bridle Road, mustard gas and pneumonia ; Pte Stanley Williams, R Berks Regt. son of Mr J H Williams, 64 Pinfold Street, groin (severe) ; and Pte W T Kettle, Somerset Light Infantry, machine gun bullet in left leg.

An official telegram has been received by Mrs Pengelly, who resides in Leamington, that her husband, Captain E A Pengelly, M.C, 213th Army Troops Company, has died of gun shot wounds sustained in the recent severe fighting in France. Deceased had previously been a non-commissioned officer in the Warwickshire Yeomanry. He was several times mentioned in despatches, and short time ago was awarded the Military Cross. He was the eldest son of Mr W E Pengelly was extremely popular with his men, and held in high esteem by his superiors, and his speedy advancement was assured.

RUGBY POSTAL OFFICIALS HONOURED.

Major H Neeves, D.S.O, M.C, son of Mr S Neeves, 13 Murray Road, has been promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in the Northumberland Fusiliers.

Another employee at Rugby Post Office, Second-Lieut T H Healey, signalling officer of the 19th Royal Welsh Fusiliers, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Captain Eric Rose, only son of the former Vicar of Norton, Daventry, and grandson of Lieut-Col Rose, of Northampton, has been killed in action.

SECOND-LIEUT EDDIE WILSON KILLED.

Mrs E Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, has received information that her youngest son, 2nd Lieut Edwin Thomas (Eddie) Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regt, was killed in action during the heavy fighting on March 23. He was 23 years of age, and when he enlisted in the Hussars at the commencement of the war was an apprentice at the B.T.H. In 1915 he was given a commission, and shortly afterwards proceeded to the front. He was invalided home, suffering from trench fever, but returned to France early in 1918. Of a bright and cheerful disposition, he was a prime favourite with all who knew him. He was an old St Oswald’s boy and a member of St Oswald’s Tennis Club. Five of his brothers are still serving with the colours.

DUNCHURCH.

MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, have received official news that their son, Sergt B Pearce, of the 10th Bedford Regiment, who was posted as missing on July 12th, is now reported killed on that date. This makes the third son they have lost in the War.

THE inhabitants of Dunchurch very much regret to hear of so many Dunchurch young men who are at the War being wounded. Among them are Pte W Collins, Pte T Shaw (seriously), Pte A Amos, Pte G Elkington, and Pte J Cleaver (who has his leg broken).

LONG ITCHINGTON.

WOUNDED.— Mrs Frank Lane has received news that her youngest son, Pte Herbert W Lane (R.W), is in a base hospital suffering from a badly fractured leg. Her second son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), whose leg was amputated after a severe wound last November, is now in Leyton College Hospital.

FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.
LOW FLYING OVER THE TOWN.

The inquest on Lieut H N Van Duzer, a Canadian attached to the Royal Flying Corps, who, as reported last week, died at, the Brookfield, Nursing Home at the result of a flying accident, was held at Rugby by Mr E F Hadow on Thursday in last week.—Mr [ ] Patchett was foreman of the jury.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that deceased had been attached to the Royal Flying Corps for instruction about six weeks, and he was a very promising pupil. On Sunday afternoon he was called to a field off the Lower Hillmorton Road, where he saw deceased, who had received first aid from Dr Crookes and two other men. Deceased was quite unconscious and his breathing was heavy, showing that his brain was injured. At the Nursing Home afterwards he found the young officer had sustained a fracture of the skull, a compound fracture of the left leg, and a fracture of the left wrist. For twenty-four hours he appeared to do well, but early on Tuesday morning more serious symptoms suddenly developed, and he died within three hours. Death was due to meningitis caused by septic poisoning. The fracture of the skull was at the most vital part. He believed that these injuries were caused through the pilot being thrown against the bar or some other portion of the machine. Dr Collins explained how the accident was possible, and he recommended the use of a padded shield as some protection for this part of the head.

2nd Air Mechanic Pickering and 2nd Air Mechanic Leach, deposed that the engine and rigging of the machine were in good order before the deceased officer started on his flight, and this was confirmed by 2nd Lieut Francis Kenneth Laver, who had flown in the machine earlier in the afternoon.

Lieut Smallman deposed that he examined the machine shortly after the accident, but could find nothing to explain how the accident occurred. Deceased was seen spinning to the ground, and it was possible that he might have turned giddy ; but he was a strong young fellow, and he did not think this was probable. If this evolution was practised below a certain height it would be impossible for him to recover himself.

Dolf Farn, mechanic, deposed that he watched the deceased officer flying over the Eastlands Estate. He had been flying very low, but had commenced to climb. When he was about 1,000 feet up he commenced a spiral dive, and when he had come down about 500 feet the machine turned over. Deceased seemed to be trying to right himself, and had he had another dozen feet witness believed he would have done so, because by the time it cleared the hedge the machine was right side up.—By Captain King : Deceased did about six spins before reaching the ground.

In reply to the Coroner, Captain King, the Commanding Officer, said this evidence did not explain the accident, except that it suggested that deceased might have been spinning too low down and misjudged the height.—The Coroner expressed the opinion that the suggestion of Surgeon-Major Collins was a valuable one, and although he thought the jury could not include it in their verdict, Captain King and other commanding officers might take note of it.—Captain King expressed the opinion that a pad would obstruct the pilot’s view with the present goggles. He had had a pad placed on the machines.— The jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death,” and associated themselves with the Coroner’s remarks concerning the pad. The Foreman also inquired of the Commanding Officer whether it was necessary for the pilots to fly so low over the town.—Captain King replied that it was not. Since he had heard of the practice he had issued instructions that it must be discontinued.—It was stated by jurymen that messages had been dropped to people in the town, and complaints had been made as to the low flying, which many people considered to be very dangerous.

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Wednesday evening in last week. Present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), P G Loveitt, W Johnson, jun. and S Dicksee. Col Moore was the National Service representative.

The Military appealed against the exemption till June 1st granted to Thomas White (single, 18, Grade I), blacksmith, employed by his father at Dunchurch.—It was contended that it was essential, if the business was to be maintained, that a strong young man should be employed. Two other sons were now serving, and a third had been killed.—Mr J E Cox, the agricultural representative, spoke as to the importance of the work— from an agricultural standpoint—which Mr White was doing ; but Col Moore expressed the opinion that a man of respondent’s age and fitness should be in the Army.— Adjourned for the War Agricultural Committee and the National Service Department to try to substitute the man.

Mr H Eaden represented Howard Harold Allkins, greengrocer and small-holder (39), Wolston, who exemption was appealed against.—Col Moore said this case was brought to relieve the National Service Department of a responsibility. They had promised the Miners’ Unions to comb out all post-war miners, but he supposed the man was as useful employed there as anywhere.—Mr Eaden said that Allkins was exempted to take up work of national importance. He went into the Binley Pit so that he could carry on his market garden after working hours.—The Chairman said the Tribunal were unanimously of opinion that the man could not be left in the mines and the case was adjourned for a month to see if he could be used to substitute the man in the previous case.

Harry Wallis (39, C2), boot maker and repairer, 117 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, who was represented by Mr H W Worthington, asked for a renewal of his exemption and, on the suggestion of Col Moore, he was given till July 1st.

George Francis Harris, licensed victualler, Newbold (C3, 41), asked for a variation of an order whereby he had been exempted upon working 30 hours a week in agriculture. He explained that it was very difficult for him to get agricultural work, and he asked for a full time munition order.—This was agreed to.

Mr H Eadon represented John Edward Pateman (C3), farmer, Monks Kirby, and said his client had been ordered to work 30 hours a week in agriculture, but his physical condition was such that this was impossible The man occupied 50 acres of land, and was feeding 30 beast and two milch cows.—Adjourned for the agricultural representative to inspect the farm. Col Moore stating that if the report was not an adverse one he had no objection to exemption.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE AND MILK PRICES.

The rationing section of Rugby and District Food Committee, having conferred with representatives of the Retailer Dairymen’s Association on the question of the future price of milk, the Food Committee has accepted their recommendation that the April price shall be 2s 4d per gallon, and for May, June, July, August and September 1s 8d a gallon. There is also a proviso that if the retailers produce evidence that the price fixed for after April is unreasonable that price may be re-considered.—The Chairman of the Food Committee (Mr T A Wise) explained that the retailers brought no figures with them, and they thought that if they produce books they could satisfy the committee that they were not getting enough. It would, however, require very strong figures to convince the committee.—Mr W A Stevenson asked if it was not peculiar that the winter price of 2s 4d continue through April, and that there should then be the big drop of 2d a quart.—Mr T Ewart thought it quite consistent. April was as expensive a month to produce milk as any in the year. In May there was all the difference.—Mr G Cooke submitted that milk ought to be cheaper at Rugby in view of railway freightage being avoided.—The Chairman remarked that the producers’ price fixed by the Government was 1s 8d in April and 1s for May.—Mr J Cripps thought the retailers would be well off in May, June, and July with 8d a gallon for retailing.—The Chairman said he thought it a very fair bargain, and that there was not to much to complain of.—Mr A Appleby remarked that when it was admitted that on the figures the retailer was making a fairly large profit, his winter expenses had been exceptionally heavy.

Mr Cooke pointed out that on pre-war prices, if the retailer made 4d on a gallon it was reckoned he was making a very fair profit. They proposed now to give him 100 per cent. advance. The consuming element were only averaging 50 per cent. increase in wages, and some of them not that. There should be the same amount of sacrifice all round whilst we were at war, but the degree of sacrifice was not equal. He regarded 6d a quart for April as affording a very fair margin of profit, and he proposed as an amendment that that should be the price fixed.—Mr C Gay seconded.—Mr Cripps said that 4d a gallon margin would be too low.—Mr H Tarbox : You have to remember that they will get 8d next month.—Mr Ewart thought 100 per cent. Advance quite reasonable. He estimated that the cost of retailing had gone up 100 per cent.—Three votes were recorded for the amendment and 10 against.—The committee’s report was then adopted.

DEATHS.

BOTTERILL.—On March 18th, at Arras, Pte. A. W. BOTTERILL, 2nd Batt. Coldstream Guards, the very dearly beloved husband of Alice Botterill, also second beloved son of Henry and Mary Botterill.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a dear voice that is still.”—Heart-broken wife, Alice Botterill.

WILSON.— Second-Lieut. E. T. WILSON, 10th Batt. R.W.R., son of the late Mr. Ellis Wilson and Mrs. Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, Rugby ; killed in action March 23, 1918.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASHWORTH.—In memory of Sergt. ASHWORTH, killed in action on April 9, 1917. B.E.F.
“ One sigh perchance for work unfinished here ;
Then a swift passing to a mightier sphere.”
—From All at Home.

COLLEDGE.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, WALTER EDWARD COLLEDGE, who was killed at the Vimy Ridge on April 9, 1917, in France.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved gave his all.”
—From his sorrowing Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

21st Jul 1917. The House Famine in Rugby

THE HOUSE FAMINE IN RUGBY.
NO BUILDING SCHEME TILL AFTER THE WAR.

An interesting discussion on the Dearth of Houses in Rugby took place at the meeting of the Urban District Council on Tuesday, as a result of which it was reluctantly decided that no further steps towards remedying the shortage should be taken at present.

The discussion arose out of the reply from the Local Government Board to a letter from the Council on this question. The Board stated that they were still unable to sanction any loan for the erection of new dwellings, except where additional housing accommodation was urgently necessary in connection with War requirements, and where this was certified by one of the Government departments concerned. If the Urban District Council could furnish evidence of the need for the immediate erection of dwellings from the point of view of the War, the Board would consider whether the case should be submitted to the Ministry of Munitions. The Board also enquired whether, if sanction was given for a loan, which could be raised at the current minimum rate of interest of 5½ per cent., the District Council considered that they could carry out the scheme on an economical basis. Apart from these questions, there would probably be difficulties arising out of the shortage of labour and materials, e.g. timber.

Mr Robbins urged that the matter be referred to the Joint Plans and Estates Committee.—Mr Stevenson supported, and pointed out that practically every county in the country was suffering from a dearth of houses, and even if the War finished at once it was questionable whether the percentage charged for loans would be reduced.—Mr Wise : Is it possible to produce an economically sound and paying scheme at a rate of 5½ per cent ? If it is not it is no use going any further.

Mr Stevenson contended that most house property was paying a rate of 25 per cent, on the original capital outlay. The house in which he lived was formerly let at 4s 6d per week, but he now had to pay 7s 6d rent.—Mr Loverock : What did it cost to erect ?—Mr Stevenson : If 4s 6d per week paid a percentage on the original capital-Mr Loverock (interrupting) : Probably it did not pay.—Mr Stevenson : Certainly it must have done so. You will not find builders building for the sake of building.

Mr Robbins said, in consequence of the interest paid on the War Loan, the interest on money borrowed would remain at the present percentage for some time after the War ; but Mr Seabroke contended that they had not only to consider the high rate of interest, but the also the enormous cost of all building material. In these circumstances he did not see how it was possible to let new houses at a rent which would pay.—Mr Loverock asked if there was any immediate demand for houses at the present time ? They knew that when the War was over people were prepared to build in large quantities, and they also had plans for over 100 houses. If there was no immediate demand, what was the use of considering the matter, especially when they knew that no economical scheme could be produced.—Mr Robbins replied that there was a great demand for houses, and he said last week one of his tenants went to look over a house. She had not given notice to him, but the next day he had had 35 people asking for her house. — Mr Yates supported the motion to refer the matter to the Joint Committee, and said the reason that he had raised the question was that he wished to know in what position they stood with regard to obtaining a loan. He had heard it suggested that other towns were more favourably considered than Rugby, and that in some cases subsidies were being paid. If that was so, he thought Rugby might make a claim for a subsidy, but the Local Government Board did not seem disposed to consider their case favourably. With interest at 5½ per cent, and the high cost of material, it seemed impossible for any scheme to be economically successful. It was a primary consideration that any housing scheme should not be a drag upon the rates, and he for one would not wish to subsidise house building at the expense of other sections of the community. He thought under normal conditions the Council could build better houses than any private individual was disposed to build ; but be did not think at present the Council could put up a good enough case to induce the Ministry of Munitions to sanction a building certificate. Even if such a certificate was sanctioned, he would not be inclined to support the scheme under the present terms, because when the housing scheme was initiated he wished it to have some reasonable prospect of success. — Mr Linnell agreed, and said it would be impossible for some years to build houses at much less than 30 per cent. more than pre-war cost. To build houses similar to those now let at 8s per week they would have to charge 12s per week rent ; and though they might be able to let them at present, he asked what would become of the house after the War was over ?

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte T Kirby, Machine Gun Corps, son of Mrs Kirby, of 24 Sun Street, was wounded in action on July 10th.

After being twice mentioned in despatches, Pte J Hickman, of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. Pte Hickman is the son of Mr & Mrs John Hickman, of Harborough Magna.

Sergt Steve Ward (Kilsby), of the South Staffordshire Regiment, has been awarded the Military Medal. The official record states : “ This N.C.O has done consistent good work during the period of preparation for the operations for the offensive near Hill 60. He has on several occasions had charge of detached parties digging assembly trenches under heavy shell and machine fire, and has always succeeded in completing his task. On the night of the 7th-8th June, 1917, his platoon was detailed to dig a strong point near Hill 60, He set a good example by his coolness and great courage, and was of great assistance to his platoon officer.” Before the War Sergt Steve Ward was employed in the B.T.H Tool Stores.

Squadron Sergt-Major J R Tait, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry in Egypt, has been mentioned in despatches by General Murray. In the same despatches the name of his cousin, Capt W I Tait, of the Suffolk Regiment, also appears. The latter is the son of the late Mr William Tait of Rugby, who afterwards resided at Leicester.

Miss Child, of Higham-on-the-Hill, has this week received news that her brother, Trooper Child, who was reported wounded and missing since April 11th, has been killed.

Pte Oliver Hipwell, of the Warwickshire Howitizer Battery, an old St Matthew’s boy, whose home is at 73 King Edward Road, has been wounded in the shoulder and thigh, and is now at a hospital at the base.

Sergt F Claridge, instructor at the 1st Army School, France, and son of Mr W Claridge, of 57 Manor Road, has been awarded the Military Medal for “ conspicuously good service in an isolated and heavily bombarded trench ” near Ypres. He held this position for 48 hours without rations. Before enlisting in September, 1914, Sergt Claridge was employed by Messrs. Lavender and Harrison. For nine years he was a chorister at the Parish Church.

Driver S Lamb, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been wounded in France. Driver Lamb is the son of Mrs Lamb, 17 St Marie’s Terrace, and although he is only 19 years of age, he has been in the fighting line two years. His father (who went through the South African war), and his elder brother, are also serving at the front.

AN OLD ELBOROW BOY WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Lance-Corpl W Haggar, son of Mr and Mrs J Haggar, of St Cross, Alexandra Road, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct on June 7th. He is at present in hospital suffering from wounds received in action on that date, and has received a congratulatory letter from his commanding officer, 3rd Worcestershire Regiment. Lance-Corpl Haggar, joined up at the outbreak of war, and, after serving in the 11th Hussars, was transferred to the 3rd Worcesters, being attached eventually to the Machine Gun Section. He has been in the fighting at Ypres, Hooge, Loos, Neuve Chapelle, Vimy Ridge, the battles of Somme, Arras, and Messines. At the battle of Somme he was wounded and received his first stripe for bravery. Previous to the war he was a painter at the B.T.H. and was educated at the Elborow School.

A GOOD RECORD.

The three soldier sons of Mr & Mrs John Wheeler, 135 Abbey Street, have recently been promoted from corporals to sergeants. Sergt E Wheeler, who has served 22½ years in the Army and is now in the 4th Royal Warwicks, has been appointed an instructor in musketry. Sergt A J Wheeler (17 years’ service) has been transferred from the Oxfordshire Light Infantry to a Cycle Division in Salonika as a gymnastic instructor ; and Sergt W B Wheeler (six years’ service), 1st Warwicks, is now a bomb instructor. Sergt W B Wheeler has served in France for two years and seven months. He took part in the first and second Battles of Ypres, and was wounded at Zonebeke in October, 1914. He was subsequently wounded again during the Battle of the Somme, and was also gassed on Whit-Monday of this year.

SERGT. A. GOODE MISSING.

Detective-Inspector Goode, of Rugby, has received news that his youngest son, Sergt A Goode, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been missing since July 10th. The news was contained in a letter from an officer, who wrote : “ The Germans attacked successfully and took a number of our men prisoners, your son amongst them. He was an excellent sergeant, well liked by his officers and men, and from information I have been able to obtain he did everything that could be done before he fell into the hands of the enemy.”

A RUGBY OFFICER’S DECORATIONS.

At an investiture at Buckingham Palace on Wednesday his Majesty conferred the Distinguished Service Order and a bar to the Military Medal on Capt H H Neeves, M.C, Northumberland Fusiliers. Capt Neeves received the D.S.O for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in handling his company during an attack of the enemy position. His skilful leading and determined courage enabled him, in spite of enemy flanking and reverse fire, to get his men to within a few yards of the enemy’s rear position. Owing to many casualties, however, he was compelled to withdraw. On his return he gave his battalion commander a full and lucid report on the situation—the only accurate one received. It was subsequently found that he had been wounded in the lungs early in the attack, and had remained with his men under fire 23 hours after being wounded. He was awarded the Military Cross on January 1, 1917, and the bar to this has been conferred for not only maintaining his own company during a long and difficult advance, but also taking command of another company involved in the front line attack. He set a splendid example throughout. Capt Neeves is the son of Mr S Neeves, of Murray Road, and was employed at the Rugby Post Office. At the commencement of the War he was called up as a trooper in the Yeomanry.

MARTON.

The death has occurred in action of Pte L J Young, Section, R.W.R, in France on July 2rd. The deepest sympathy is felt with the widowed mother in her sad bereavement. The deceased, who was 21 years of age, joined up in March, 1916. Pte Young, who was a general, favourite with everybody, was for some time in the employ of Major Hicks Beach, late of Eathorpe Hall, as gardener, and was very keenly interested in the social side of the Marton Recreation Room, being sport secretary in 1915[?].

DUNCHURCH.
CASUALTY.—On Tuesday morning Mr and Mrs H Pearce, of Coventry Road, received news that Sergt H Pearce was killed or missing. He and two others failed to return after a raid, and their fate is unknown. Sergt Pearce was the youngest sergeant from Dunchurch, and was much liked by everyone.

EASENHALL.

Mr and Mrs Alfred Smith have received news that their son Pte Percy A Smith, Hants Regt, was killed in action on April 23. He had previously been reported as missing and hope was entertained that he might have been taken prisoner. Previous to joining the army he was in gentleman’s service near Bournemouth, where he won the affection of all with whom he worked by his bright and genial disposition and cheerful service. He joined the army in May, 1915, and went to France in July, 1916.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE.

The usual monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Wednesday evening last week.

Mr William Flint, c.c (who presided), extended a very cordial welcome to Mrs Blagden, remarking how pleased the committee were to see her with them once again and to know that she had completely recovered from her long illness.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that the donations continued to come in well, and since his previous statement in connection with the recent War Prisoners’ Day effort he had received further sums on behalf of same, amounting to over £50, bringing the total up to over £800. In addition to this, he had received since July 1st 30 individual subscriptions, amounting to £42 8s 5d, and they had now a balance in hand of nearly £700. The cost of the food parcels for July amounted to £91 16s, after allowing for guarantees from Regimental Care Committees, and for August the committee would have to provide over £100 owing to the additional men that had been added to the Rugby list during the past fortnight.

The Chairman remarked that the financial position was most satisfactory, Mrs Blagden observing that, in spite of the recent effort, the interest on the part of the public in the welfare of the local men who were prisoners of war showed no abatement.

Mr Barker informed the meeting that Sir Starr Jameson (chairman of the Central Prisoners of War Committee) had recently issued a statement with reference to criticisms that had been made regarding the administration by the Central Committee. The report of the Joint Committee appointed to enquire into the work carried out at that great establishment at Thurloe showed clearly that most of the discontent aroused throughout the country was due to the rigid War Office regulations, which interfered everywhere with private effort. “ There is no question,” says Sir Starr Jameson, “ that these regulations were necessary to remedy the evils which had grown up, and, where possible, the Central Committee had tried to get them modified.” Then, too, when the first few weeks’ parcels under the new scheme reached Germany there was a breakdown of the German railway and postal services, causing long delays in the deliveries. Thousands of our prisoners, wrote home to complain, and their friends very naturally laid the blame on the Central Committee. It was hardly just to criticise them for what was beyond their control.

NEW SCHEME WORKING WELL.

The Central Committee and the Care Committees all over the country have ample evidence, consisting of reports from the prisoners themselves or their relatives, which all go to show that the scheme has been working well for months past, and that the prisoners’ wants are fully supplied, without overlapping or waste. This statement was, Mr Barker felt sure, very encouraging to the committee ; but it only bore out what he had maintained during the past few months. He had repeatedly brought forward evidence to prove that most of the men who were being cared for by the Rugby Committee were receiving their food parcels safely. The acknowledgments from the men continued to come through splendidly. There was, of course, the inevitable delay between the time a man was taken prisoner and when the acknowledgment was received that he had had his first parcel. It was frequently the case that some weeks would elapse, and during this time the man would be writing home complaining that he was getting no parcels, causing his relatives to think that he was getting neglected or his parcels being stolen.

Mrs. Blagden reminded the committee that since the new scheme came into force last December practically the whole of the work fell upon the hon secretary. There was a very great amount of clerical work involved, and in this Mr Barker has received most valuable help from Miss C M Judd, to whom the committee passed a vote of thanks.

WAR CHARITIES.

The Rugby Master Butchers’ Association wrote asking the Council to register their Bath Chair Charity under the War Charities Act.—Mr Wise drew attention to the fact that a raffle was being held in connection with the fund, and he asked whether the Council were in order in supporting a raffle, seeing that such things were absolutely illegal.—M. Ringrose : It comes within the Lottery Act, doesn’t it ?—Mr Stevenson said he believed this was so, but such things were winked at in Rugby, providing the authorities knew the person who was managing it. The question was, however, was not the Council lending themselves to something which they might wish to get out of later.—Mr Yates pointed out that the Council were not authorising a raffle, but registering a charity. It was no business of the Council how the money was raised, and if the promoters committed an offence they would be amenable to the Common Law.—Mr Robbins expressed the opinion that if the Council made themselves responsible for all these things they would be busily employed. It was difficult to go to any effort on behalf of charity without taking part in a raffle, a “ dip,” or a draw (laughter).—It was decided to register the charity.

RUGBY INFIRMARY V.A.D. HOSPITAL.—Through the kindness of the Commandant and staff, the female inmates of the institution were entertained to supper, and afterwards invited to a soldiers’ concert, on Saturday, under the presidency of Miss Walrond. A very enjoyable programme consisted of songs by Miss F Shilittoe and Sergt Till ; children’s play, “ Brownikins,” by King’s Mssengers ; sailor’s hornpipe by Misses C & H Rushall ; muff dance by the Misses Norris, Squires, and Hazelwood ; and an amusing sketch, “ Mechanical Jane,” in which the characters were taken by Miss Morsen, and the Misses Walrond.—On Wednesday evening Sergt Evans presided over a concert arranged by Mr Hickman, Songs, duets, and part songs were given by Mrs Hickman, Mrs Ward, Mrs Painter, Miss Spencer, Messrs Hickman, Lovett, Bowell, Allison, and Sergt Till ; also two solos on the banjo and mandoline by Mrs Bostock. Every item was heartily appreciated by all present.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Sunday evening members of the Rugby Brotherhood gave a concert to the patients at the St Johns V.A.D Hospital. Mr J Chisholm presided, and the programme consisted of selections by the Orchestra, under the conductorship of Mr A E Alneham ; songs, “ When you come home ” and “ Monarch of the woods,” Mr Phillips ; piccolo solo “ Silver birds,” Mr W Rowley. Cigarettes were distributed amongst the patients, and the concert was much appreciated.

The current Issue of the “ Murrayian,” a smart little paper issued by members of the Murray School, contains several interesting items, including an appreciation of Pte James Irving, London Scottish, formerly an assistant master at the school, who was recently killed in action.

A RUGBY SCHOOL WAR MEMORIAL.—A service of communion plate-the gift of Mr & Mrs W B Gair—in memory of Old Rugbeians who fall in the War was dedicated at Rugby School Chapel on Sunday last. It consists of thirteen pieces, and with one exception the patens are exact reproductions of Seventh Century originals either at St Peter’s, Cornhill, or in possession of the Goldsmiths’ Company. On the obverse of the alms paten appears the motto of Rugby School, “ Orando Laborando,” surmounted by the date of the foundation, 1567, and the coat of arms of the founder, Lawrence Sheriff, flanked by his initials.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

“ PEACE.”

SIR.—Many Rugby residents have had leaflets, printed in London, pushed slyly under their doors these last few days, apparently on behalf of the Society of Friends, asking whether it is “ necessary ” to go on with the War.

While respecting that Society’s Christian efforts one detects a connection between this premature peace pamphlet—for it is little else—and the pro-German elements that Rugby and district unhappily still shelters.

The very method of circulating this leaflet is un-English, and reminds one of the pre-war meetings at odd corners, calling for a reduction in the Navy, and similar pro-German tricks.

It must surely disgust the overwhelming majority of Rugby folk that these same people are supporting anything which tends to encourage a premature peace.-Your obedient servant,

July 13, 1917.            F R DAVENPORT.

BILTON HALL HOSPITAL.

DEAR SIR,—To prevent any misconception among those who have subscribed so liberally or worked so hard in the interests of the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Hospital, I should like to state that, in response to my offer to lend the house until the end of March, 1918, I have this week received a letter from the County Director of the Warwickshire Branch of the B.R.C.S, saying that they do not intend carrying on the hospital beyond September.—Yours truly, WALTER BARNETT.

THE COUNTY OF WARWICK MOTOR VOLUNTEER CORPS.

SIR,—I regret that the account of the efforts being made to form a County Motor Volunteer Corps and a reference therein to the supply of petrol, which have appeared in the Press, has led to misconception as to the intention of the promoters on the part of those who are engaged in the wholly admirable work of transporting the wounded under the Red Cross Society.

Nothing can be further from the intention of the promoters than to hamper or restrict the excellent work of those owners of motor-cars who have so generously taken part in this errand of mercy. But I would point out that there is nothing incompatible to those so engaged in joining the Warwickshire Motor Volunteer Corps. Large numbers of members are already giving their services to the Red Cross Society ; and, indeed, we lay it down as one of our duties that, when not employed on military service, we shall place our organisation at the disposal of those who require assistance in the removal of wounded soldiers.

Mr F van den Arend may, therefore, rest satisfied that the representations that are being made as regards the renewal of petrol licenses are not intended to affect the supply of petrol for the Red Cross Society, or for cars already engaged in work of national importance.

In the event of national emergency the Government may decide to commandeer all private cars which, in their opinion, might be used to better advantage elsewhere. It is the object of the Motor Volunteer Corps to organise this Corps before such an emergency arises in order that they may be available at once for the service of the Government.

Therefore, I repeat that the fact of a private car being engaged in Red Cross Society work, or any similar work, should not debar the owner from joining the Motor Volunteer Corps.

Permit me to add that Lord Leigh has allowed himself to be nominated for the command of the Corps, which already embraces two heavy sections and two light sections, consisting of over 300 lorries and cars, collected from Birmingham and the county, and that the scheme has the entire approval of the Regimental Commandant, Colonel D F Lewis, C.B.-Yours faithfully,

(Signed) FRANK GLOVER, Major,
Headquarters : 2nd Batt. Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment, Clarendon Place, Leamington.

DEATHS.

COPE.-In loving memory of our dear son, Gunner PERCY LESLIE COPE, who died of wounds in France on June 21st.—“ Sleep on, dear one, till we meet again.”—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER.

WHITE, ALBERT J., aged 31, the beloved eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. White, Murray Road, Rugby, and dearly beloved husband of Ethel M. White. Killed in action in France, June 30th.

WILSON.—Killed in action, in France on July 10th, THOMAS, third son of Mr. & Mrs. Wilson, Gate Farm, Bourton ; aged 25.

IN MEMORIAM.

BERRY.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl HARRY BERRY, 2/7 R.W.R., who died (prisoner of war) from wounds received in action on July 19, 1916.—Not forgotten by his pals, T. ADAMS, D.G. and T.H.

DICKEN.—In ever-loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, who died of wounds in France on July 20, 1916,—“ We miss him most who loved him best.”—From his loving FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS, BROTHERS, and ELSIE.

DICKEN.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Lance-Corpl. SIDNEY HAROLD DICKEN, 14th Gloucester Bantam Regiment, who died of wounds on July 20, 1916 ; aged 22 years.
“ A little time has passed, and friends around us
Think the wound is almost healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Fondly remembered by BROTHER and SISTER, WILL and AMY.

HIPWELL.—In ever-loving and sweetest remembrance of our dear son, Pte JOHN HIPWELL, Lilbourne, M.G.C., who died of wounds on July 23, 1916. Interred in Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt, France.
“ He fought for his country,
He answered duty’s call ;
His home, his friends, his comforts,
He sacrificed them all ;
But he won the admiration
Of Britain’s glorious name.”
“ Peace, perfect peace.”
—Never forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, SISTER and BROTHERS.

LENTON.—In loving remembrance of our dear brother, Pte. W. H. LENTON, who died of wounds in France on 19,1916.—Ever remembered by FRED in France, and ERNE, ETHEL and FAMILY, 64 Wood Street.

LENTON.-In loving memory of WILL, dearly beloved son of the late Mr. & Mrs. T. Lenton, Wood Street, who was killed in France on July 19, 1916.
“ Greater love hath no man than this,
That he lay down his life for his friends.”

SMITH.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. T. W. SMITH, of Swinford, who was killed in action at Beaumont Hamel on July 21-22,1916.

WHITE.—In loving memory of Sergt. WILLIAM HARVEY WHITE (2/7th Batt., R.W.R.), dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. Geo White, Dunchurch, who died a prisoner of war in Germany on July 19,1916 ; aged 19.

16th Jan 1917. Rugby Officer gains the Military Cross

RUGBY OFFICER GAINS THE MILITARY CROSS.

Capt H H Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers, elder son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, “ Langdal,” Murray Road, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross for bravery in the fighting on the Somme during July last. Capt Neeves was at the same time promoted to his present rank. In the early days of the War the gallant young officer, who had been on the staff at Rugby Post Office, went out to the Dardanelles as a corporal in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. He was afterwards invalided home, suffering from the effects of dysentery ; and then, securing a commission, he was attached as a second lieutenant to the Northumberland Fusiliers, and went out to France in June. The gratification at his quick promotion and the honour he has won will be shared by his many friends and acquaintances in Rugby and district.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Sergt A E Dodd, Leicestershire Regiment, one of the earliest recruits from the B.T.H Works, is in hospital at Ipswich suffering from wounds. Sergt Dodd has been wounded three times—at Monchy, Guillemont, and Combles, The last time he received four different wounds at once, and has undergone 14 operations. Before the War he was employed in the B.T.H Wiring Department.

DR RELTON’S SON WOUNDED.

Dr and Mrs Relton, of Rugby, have received intimation that their son, Second-Lieut B C Relton, of the Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded. Before the War he showed promise as a footballer, he having played half-back both for Rugby School and the Town Club. As a cricketer, too, he gained his colours in the School XI., and later on assisted the Rugby Club, being a very useful fast bowler.

BRETFORD.

DEATH OF PTE TIMMS.—Mr Wm Timms, of Bretford, has received the sad news that his brother has succumbed to wounds in Rouen Hospital. He was injured rather dangerously in France, but it was thought at one time he would recover. He belonged to the Middlesex Regiment. Before joining the Colours he was employed on the railway dining cars. Mr Timms has another brother in the 2nd Leinsters, who has been on foreign service for a long time. Much sympathy is felt for the relatives.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut Wilfred H Parker, son of the Hon E W Parker, Westfeild House, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross for distinguished service in the field.

From “ London Gazette ” of Monday, January 1st :—Gordon Highlanders, Sec Lt F Hunter resigns his commission on account of ill-health contracted on active service.

Capt R N O’Connor, of the Scottish Rifles, son of Mrs O’Connor, Overslade Manor, Rugby, has been mentioned in despatches by Sir Douglas Haig. This is the third time Capt O’Connor, who has already gained the Military Cross, has been mentioned in despatches, and he has recently been gazetted Brevet-Major.

The parcels sent this week on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to the local men in prison camps in Germany contained: ½-lb sugar, ½-lb milk, 1 tin herrings, ½-lb dripping in tin, ½ lb biscuits, 1 tin oxo cubes, 2ozs tobacco, pepper, salt, mustard, ½-lb cooked ham in tin, ¼-lb tin of cocoa, 1 tin sausages.

COUNTY COUNCIL CLERK’S SON HONOURED.

In Tuesday’s honours list is the name of Second-Lieut (temp Lieut) Edward Hubert Field, R.F.A, who has been awarded the Military Cross. He is the son of Mr Edward Field, clerk of the Peace for Warwickshire and clerk to the County Council.

MENTIONED IN DESPATCHES.

In special lists connected with his recent descriptive despatches on the operations on the Somme, General Sir Douglas Haig mentions :

Temporary Lieutenant-Colonel H J Nutt, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who commands a Coventry Territorial Battalion, and has been associated with the Territorial Force for many years.

Temporary Major A Welch, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has already been decorated for his services as a Volunteer officer. He is serving with a Territorial Battalion, and was promoted to the rank of Major in October, 1914.

NEW RED CROSS HOSPITAL OPENED AT RUGBY.

The new Red Cross Hospital at the Rugby Union Infirmary was opened on Monday, when thirty wounded soldiers arrived from the First Southern Hospital, Birmingham. There was no formal opening, but on Friday the hospital and staff were inspected by General Quayle Jones, the Countess of Denbigh, and Mr E K Little, County Director of the Warwickshire British Red Cross. General satisfaction was expressed at the admirable equipment, etc. Mrs Brooke Michell, Vice-President of the Rugby V.A.D, was also present at the inspection.

The building, which was built for an infirmary, is a very commodious one, and admirably adapted for its present uses. It has accommodation for sixty men. There are three large wards, each capable of containing 18 beds, and two smaller ones. There is a surgical room, but not an operating theatre, and minor operations are performed in the wards. There is also a spacious day and recreation room. The staff is provided by Warwick 40 and Warwick 66 V.A.D, and the principals are :—Mrs H P Burdekin, commandant ; Miss M Townsend, assistant commandant ; Mrs C O Wharton, quartermaster ; Miss Townsend, assistant quartermaster. Mrs Thomas, who has worked at Te Hira for the past twelve months, is the matron, and the trained sister is Sister Gordon. Dr Crooks and Dr Wardrop comprise the medical staff.

The hospital staff is receiving instructions in fire drill, in order that they may be prepared for any eventuality. Visitors desirous of visiting the Hospital will be welcomed on Wednesday afternoons.

CHANGED TIMES.

Some of the many social changes which have been foreshadowed during the last few weeks came into operation with the New Year. The most noticeable changes were those affecting railway travel. Monday was the first day of the new order resulting in fewer and slower trains and a general increase of 50 per cent, in fares. The baking of standard bread also became general in accordance with the new Order. A separate Food Production Department has been set up at the Board of Agriculture to organise schemes for increasing the home-grown food supplies. It is understood rather under 10,000 German prisoners are available for work on the land. There is still too much evasion of the drink control regulations in some quarters, and the need of more stringent penalties for offences is under discussion. An Order was issued on Tuesday making it illegal to sell spirits unless reduced to 30 per cent. under proof, and a further reduction to 50 per cent. under proof is permissible.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Held on Friday (Dec 29) at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry. Present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), H W Wale, S J Dicksee, and K Rotherham. Military representative : Mr M E T Wratislaw. Agricultural representative : Mr F W Channing.

WELCOME TO RUGBY REPRESENTATIVE.

Before taking the Rugby cases the Chairman welcomed Mr Dicksee on behalf of the Tribunal. He said they felt from the first they were very much handicapped with the Rugby cases because they had no Rugby representative. It was not the fault of the Tribunal, because they strove very hard to get a Rugby representative, but could not find anybody to act ; but when the numbers were extended they asked for one, and were very pleased to have Mr Dicksee with them.—Mr Harold Eaden also offered a welcome to Mr Dicksee, and said he was sure his assistance would be of value to the Tribunal.

ALLEGED “ NOTORIOUS POACHER ” AS A SUBSTITUTE.

The substitute offered by the Military to John Smith Cockerill, Pailton, for his son, Thos John Cockerill (20, single), was described by Mr Harold Eaden, representing the farmer in question, as “ a notorious poacher in the district.” He added that on the first two days the man was ill, and when he presented himself on the third day and was called upon to do the ordinary work, for which he was there—that of a cowman and stockman—he could not milk a cow and understood nothing about stock. Mr Cockerill tolerated him for two days, but at the end of the fourth day gave him his week’s money. The Military seemed to have offered a substitute without satisfying themselves that he could do the work- They must send a man who could do the work, and not a man whose principal qualification was poaching.

Mr Wratislaw contradicted the statement that the substitution officer did not satisfy himself as to the man he was sending. Mr Livingston (who had tried the substitute) said he was a most capable man and a very willing worker. Mr John Harrison, of Pailton, described him, as “ a capable farm labourer and willing worker,” adding : “ I have employed him several times, and have always been satisfied with him ” ; whilst Mr Davy, who had also had the man in his employ, said if he had a man of Military age for whom he required a substitute he was exactly the man he would wish for. The man said he did some thatching and milked, and worked out the full week ; and, in the opinion of the local Tribunal, until young Cockerill was taken away his father was not going to have a substitute.

Mr Eadon replied that Mr Cockerill was quite willing to let his son go if a reasonable substitute could be found.-The Chairman : This man does seem to be reasonable.—Mr Cockerill said it took the man half-an-hour to milk a cow, and he sat down on the wrong of the animal to milk her (laughter). He said he had never milked a cow in his life.

Mr Wale said he did not see any reason why an advocate should come into that Court and suggest that a substitute, whatever his previous character had been, was a poacher. He objected to that.—Mr Eaden said the man might be a very good labourer, but he was useless to Mr Cockerill, particularly in the winter.

The Chairman said in a case like this the man ought not to have been dismissed ; the employer should have first communicated with the Military.

Mr Eaden : If the man was no good the Military could not make him any good.—The Chairman : You know the whole point is : These men have got their sons, and do not want to part with them. They will take no substitute if they can help it.

The appeal was dismissed, and Mr Eaden said his client would try and find a substitute independently of the Military Authorities.

Mr Eadon asked for his client to be allowed 28 days, but Mr Wratislaw objected, and it was not granted.

“ CREATING SLAVERY.”

Chas Oakes, Kirby Lane Farm, Monks Kirby, appealed for Edwin Lowe, cowman and farm labourer, Monks Kirby.—Mr Wratislaw stated that conditional exemption was granted to Lowe whilst in the employ of Mr S Hodgetts, but the man left that employ, and the Monks Kirby Tribunal upheld the view that Mr Oakes could not possibly appeal for him.—Mr Wale : certainly he could. He claims as the employer. It does not mean that a man is to be bound for ever to that particular employer. You are creating slavery.—The Chairman said the Tribunal had to decide that the was in order ; and then, according to the new Army Regulations, adjourn the case sine die.—This course was adopted.—The Chairman (to Mr Wratislaw) : You had better pass on the poacher.—Mr Eaden : We do not want him again.

The appeals for John Bryson, stockman and shepherd, Manor Farm, The Grange, Wolston, and Geo Wilson, wagoner. Gate Farm, Bourton, were also adjourned sine die.

APPLICATION FOR LEAVE REFUSED.

Mr Worthington represented Ernest Jinks, grocer, clothier, and beer retailer, 104 Cambridge Street, Rugby, who asked for leave to appeal for an extension of the temporary exemption, to January 1st.-The appeal had been made on the ground of domestic hardship ; and Mr Worthington said the man had four young children.—The Chairman said they knew the position very well. They could not make a practice of granting leave to appeal, or they would have everybody coming back and asking for leave. There must be further facts.-The application was refused.—Appellant : Give me time to clear my stuff off ?—The Chairman : No ; there is no more.

SUBSTITUTION EFFECTED.

With respect to the appeal for Francis John Bucknill farmer and wagoner, Marton, Mr Wratislaw said they had effected a substitute, and Mr Bucknill, sen, expressed himself as satisfied, it transpired that a man from Broadwell, who had been passed in a low category was the substitute, and Mr Bucknill said his son was going into the Army on the following Monday.—The Chairman : I think you ought to be congratulated on the course you have taken.

WHEELWRIGHTS WANTED IN THE ARMY.

The case of John George Bennett, wheelwright, &c, 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, in the employ of Mr F Sharpe, of Rugby, had been adjourned for enquiries to be made to see if the man could still be enlisted in his trade, and Mr Wratislaw said their information was that the Royal Engineers were appealing for wheelwrights.-The employer’s appeal was, therefore, dismissed.

STILL HANDLING SUGAR.

The Home and Colonial Stores, Ltd, appealed for their Rugby manager, Alfred Wm Elsley, 70 King Edward Road, paused for garrison duty abroad.—Mr Wratislaw said the man was not in a certified occupation, because he was not a manager in the strict sense of the word. Whatever he required for the shop was supplied from the head office.—Mr Sharman, who represented the firm, said that point had been decided in their favour by the Central Tribunal.—Mr Wratislaw : You do not handle big sides of bacon, do you ?—Mr Sharman : We have 2½ cwts of sugar to handle.—The Chairman :   You are very lucky.—Given till May 1st.

ANXIOUS TO DO WAR WORK.

An appeal as a skilled man who wished to be placed on war work was made by Wm Thos Scrawley (28, married), general fitter, 15 James Street, Rugby.—The appeal was at first dismissed, the Chairman remarking that the man would be very useful in the Army ; but appellant then produced documentary evidence that he was badged ; and the Chairman remarked that the Military could not touch him ; and Mr Wale advised applicant, in his own interests, to get into a controlled establishment.

BUILDER’S APPEAL FOR AN ELECTRICIAN.

Messrs Linnell & Son, builders, Rugby, appealed (through Mr Worthington) for Horace Walter Gilbert, electrician, 56 New Street, New Bilton.—It was pointed out that this was the only man left in the electrical, department, and his going would mean closing the department, which had taken seven years to build up, and this would be a most serious financial loss to the firm.-Mr Wratislaw said Mr Linnell, jun. had gone into the Army ; and in the circumstances Col Johnstone suggested that Gilbert might remain till March 31st.—This course was approved.

ANOTHER CASE FOR SUBSTITUTION.

The Military appealed against the exemption that had been granted to George Mascord White (22, single), shoeing and general smith, Dunchurch, in the employ of his father.—Mr Wratislaw said they offered as a substitute a man named Loydall, of Long Lawford.—The Chairman informed Mr White, sen, that he could not keep a young man of 22, passed for general service, and told him he had better “ collar on ” to the substitute, and consider himself lucky.—Mr White said he was afraid the substitute named would not suit him, and asked for a month or two to try him, as he had very valuable horses to shoe.—The Chairman said they could not keep a young man of 22 back to shoe valuable horses, and the Military appeal was upheld.

QUITE OPPORTUNE.

“ All the pipes in the parish are burst,” said Mr Eaden, adding that it was an opportune moment for the appeal of Wm Walter Heap, (37, married), builder, plumber, and undertaker, Dunchurch.-The Tribunal offered till March 1st.-Mr Eaden said he should want to ask for further time. Mr Wale : You must pray for the frost to continue.-March 1st.

“ WOULD SOONER PUT KHAKI ON ”

Edwin Edwards, carter, &c, appealed for his son, Wm Edwards (24, married, and passed for general service), 56 Railway Terrace, Rugby, engaged in the delivery of parcels and helping in the business.-Mr Eaden said a substitute was offered, but when he looked at the job he admitted he was not strong enough for it.—Mr Wratislaw said the substitute refused the job because the wages offered were only 25s a week.-Mr Edwards : He said he would sooner put khaki on.—Mr Wale : I should say so. He would be better off.-The Chairman said it could not be suggested that the work was of high national importance.-Appeal dismissed.

A POSITION OF A FOREMAN BAKER.

An appeal by the Military was made with respect to George Brown (37, single), foreman baker, 32 James Street, Rugby, on the ground that, although the man was in a certified occupation, he spent only six hours a day in bread baking, and the other part in confectionery.—The employer said he used five sacks of flour a week for broad, and he was also under a contract to supply cake to the Military.—March 1st.

A CURIOUS CASE.

There were unusual circumstances connected with the case of John Frederick Woodford, slaughterman and butcher, 82 Craven Road, Rugby.—Mr Wratislaw said the Master Butchers met the Advisory Committee extremely fairly, and until they could substitute Woodford they thought he ought to stay ; but the moment they got a substitute the master butcher employing the man offered to release him for general service. They found a substitute, but when the case came before the Rugby Tribunal, who had given a certificate of exemption, they promptly refused to go into the matter, and said they would not interfere with their previous decision.—Mr Nelson (clerk to the Tribunal) said he had a letter from Mr Smith, the man’s employer, stating that he was quite prepared to assent to the question raised by the Military.—Appeal allowed.

INNKEEPER TO JOIN UP.

An application by Ernest Shepherd (38, married), Clifton Inn, Rugby, for a munitions order to enable him to keep his business together was opposed by Mr Wratislaw, who contended that the father, aged 75, who previously held the license, was quite capable of supervision.—Mr Worthington represented appellant, who was given till January 28th.

HORSE TRAINING FOR 23/- A WEEK.

John E Wilkins, horse trainer, Bretford, appealed for Arthur Edwin Taylor (28, married), assistant horse trainer and farm hand, stating that it was necessary in his business to have a young man used to the work, as a good many of the horses sent to be trained were spoilt, and of bad character.—Mr Wratislaw : It is rather a dangerous job.—A : Yes.—Mr Wratislaw : And for that risk and skill you only pay 23s a week, without a cottage ?—Mr Wilkins replied that he paid more than most of the farmers in the neighbourhood, and the man had a garden in which to grow potatoes and other vegetables. He would give him more wages if he stayed. Mr Wale : I do not think 23s a week constitutes indispensability.-Mr Wratislaw : Do you consider for a man to whom you pay that wage it is in the national interest he should be retained ?-Mr Wilkins : I am paying a good deal more than my father used to pay.—Mr Wratislaw : We say it is not in the national interest the man should be retained.—Applicant : Is is not in the national interest that horses should be trained ? Could not you find me a substitute ?—The Chairman : Not at 23s a week. They are not to be had.—Applicant : What wages do you think I ought to pay ?—The Chairman : That is for yourself to decide.-Appeal dismissed.

BIRDINGBURY SMALLHOLDER ALLOWED TIME.

A long letter was put in by Chas Barfoot (33, married), joint smallholder and carrier, Birdingbury, in support of his application.—He was given till March 31st, with the hint that he had better be ready to join up by then.

HELPING A NEIGHBOUR.

On the understanding that he helped a neighbouring farmer, who last week met with an accident, breaking his leg on the ice, Sidney Strong, farmer and wharf manager, Royal Oak Inn, Hillmorton Wharf, was given a temporary exemption till March 31st.

DEATHS.

DONALD.—On December 31, 1916, at Aldershot, of pneumonia, Bombardier CHAS. DONALD, the beloved husband of Alice Donald, 16 Wood Street ; aged 38.—“ Peace, perfect peace.”

7th Oct 1916. Lieut-Colonel West Killed in Action

LIEUT-COLONEL WEST KILLED IN ACTION.

The news, which came to hand on Friday last week that Lieut.-Colonel F C B West, R.F.A, of Bawnmore, Bilton, had been killed in action was received with the deepest regret in Rugby and neighbourhood. The unfortunate event happened on September 29th. While riding, as he had often done before, down a section of road which was much subjected to the enemy’s artillery fire, a shell burst close to him, killing him instantly, and wounding his orderly, Driver Barlow, who had been with him since before Christmas, 1914. Both their horses were killed. Col West was buried in the cemetery in which the remains of Lieut Wyley, Major Brown, and Major Stone, who had been killed only a few days previously, were laid to rest.

When at Baddow, before going out to France, and also for some time afterwards, Col West, Capt Kidd—subsequently promoted Major—and Lieut Wyley were working together on the Head-Quarter Staff. Then they were separated, and it is a sad coincidence that all three of them were killed within a period of ten days in different parts of the line.

Lieut.-Colonel West was the only surviving son of the late Rev C F C West, Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, and Vicar of Charlbury. He was educated at Cheltenham College & St John’s College, Oxford, where he rowed for his college in 1904 and 1905, both in Torpids and Eights. He took his degree in 1905, and was called to the Bar in 1907, but never practised. On the formation of the Territorial Force he received a commission in the R.F.A, and went to the front with his brigade as commanding officer in March, 1915. He married, in June, 1909. Agatha Mary, elder daughter of William Dewar, of Rugby. He leaves a widow and four daughters, to whom the deepest sympathy is extended.

Lieut-Col West took a very great interest in the Territorial movement, and always preferred to be regarded as a “ Territorial.” He did his utmost to prove that the term was synonomous with proficiency, and, being keen himself on gunnery, he spared no pains to ensure the effectiveness of the officers and men in his command and to explain technical details to them.

He was the first Captain of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, when it was formed some years ago through the instrumentality of Col Mulliner, and was afterwards promoted to Major and transferred to the Coventry Battery. In August, 1914, as Lieut-Colonel, he succeeded Col Mallock to the command of the Brigade.

Polo and hunting were his favourite sports and for a season he acted as master of a pack of hounds in the South of Ireland.

Col West was a member of the Lawrence Sherriff Lodge of Freemasons, and for a time served on the House and Finance Committee of the Hospital of St Cross. He took the greatest interest in the Working Men’s Club at Bilton (of which he was a vice-president), and generously assisted in the provision of the new Club premises a few years ago.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson (Gordon Highlanders), of Rokeby House, Rugby, who was killed in France on July 20th, has left estate of the value of £8,929, the whole of which he gave to his mother, Mrs. Anne Rose Anderson.

SECOND-LIEUT HORACE NEEVES PROMOTED.

Second-Lieut Horace Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers (the Old Fighting 5th), son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, of Murray Road, Rugby, has been promoted to the rank of captain. The gallant young officer was formerly in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. On returning home he received a commission with the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been at the front since June, and has seen a lot of fighting.
The second son of Mr and Mrs Neeves is serving with the Australian Light Horse.

INTERNATIONAL O.R KILLED BY A BURSTING SHELL.

The Rev R E Inglis (Rugby and Oxford), whose death occurred, at the age of 53, from shell-burst while tending wounded, was an old English Rugby International. After getting his XI and XV colours at Rugby, he played against Cambridge in 1883 and 1884. He played for England in all three matches of 1886. His club football was identified with that of Blackheath. Mr Inglis was the youngest son of the defender of Lucknow, Major-General Sir John Inglis, and we believe we are correct in stating that his son was the googlie bowler of this year’s Rugby XI. Mr Inglis volunteered to join the Forces as a chaplain, and went to the front in July, 1915. During the time he was at Rugby School as a Town boy, his mother, Lady Inglis, lived at The Lawn, Newbold Road.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mr T Reynolds, builder, Dunchurch Road, Rugby, received official intimation on Thursday that another of his soldier sons, Corpl J Reynolds, of the Grenadier Guards, had been seriously wounded and was in Chichester Hospital. Prior to joining the army Corpl Reynolds was in the Metropolitan Police Force, and was expecting early promotion. Mr Reynolds had four sons in the army. Two have been killed and two wounded.

PTE J R BRADLEY.

Pte J R Bradley, of the Northumberland, Fusiliers, who was killed in action on September 1st, was prior to the War employed by the B.T.H Company on the outside construction staff.

PTE H LEE KILLED.

Mrs Lee, of 34 Sandown Road, Rugby, received a letter from Sergt Burton, of Hillmorton, this week, informing her that her son, Pte H Lee, of the R.W.R, was killed in action on September 3rd. The writer said he was in command of the platoon, and saw him struck by a piece of shell in the head, and he died in a very short time. He was a brave and noble soldier, and highly respected by all N.C.O’s and men of his Company, for he always did his duty well, “ and feared nothing.” Deceased was 25 years of age, and before, the war was employed as a labourer in the Test Department. He was in the reserve, and was mobilised at the commencement of the war. He had already been wounded. Mrs Lee has four other sons at the front, two of whom have been wounded, and a son-in-law was killed 12 months ago.

HILLMORTON.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening a memorial Service was held in the Parish Church for Reginald Bartlett and Joseph Barnett, who have fallen in France. The Vicar preached an impressive and comforting sermon from St John xiv 27.

Mr J W Barnett, 264 Western Road, Leicester, has received official information that her husband, Pte J W Barnett, Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment, was killed in action on September 11th. Deceased was the second son of Mr and Mrs J Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox. He was 27 years of age, was called up in February, and sent to France early in July. Prior to his enlistment he was employed by the Leicester Tramway Company.

CHURCHOVER.

KILLED IN ACTION.—Quite a gloom was cast over this village on Friday when it was known that Pte Frank Sutton, of the Grenadier Guards was killed in action on September 15th. Frank was liked and respected by all who knew him. He was working in Coton House gardens when he answered his country’s call. Mrs Sutton’s three sons have all joined the colours, and the deepest sympathy of the parish is extended to her in the great loss that she has sustained. A memorial service was held in the church an Saturday by. the Rev L J Berrington. All the parish was represented. The xe Psalm and Hymns 536 and 537 were sung, and the service was very impressive.

DUNCHURCH.

On Sunday, Sept 10, the collections at both Dunchurch and Thurlaston Churches were devoted to the Lord Kitchener National Memorial Fund. The satisfactory sum of £32 7s 6d was sent up to headquarters.

Sergt W J Constable, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable, late of Dunchurch, has gained the Military Medal for bravery.—Private Fissard, of the R.E, who has been home on sick leave, has gone to Bletchley to a rest camp for three months.

The Dunchurch Girls’ and Infants’ School have sent £2 to St Dunstan’s Hostel for Blind Soldiers, £2 to the Jack Cornwell Ward in the Star and Garter Home, £1 to Bilton Red Cross Hospital, and 11s to Mrs Neilsen for egg fund. The money was the proceeds of the entertainment held in the spring, and also includes contributions by the children for the Jack Cornwell Memorial Fund during the month.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, that their youngest son, Percy, was wounded in action at the Battle of Thievpal. He received shrapnel wounds in both arms and hands. He is going on well in hospital in Cambridge. This is the second son wounded in action.

WEARING NAVAL UNIFORM WITHOUT AUTHORITY.

Claude Henry Hammond, aged 21, formerly of New Bilton, and of Rugby, charged at Lancaster with giving false information to Morecambe boarding-house keepers and wearing a naval uniform at Morecambe without authority, was committed for six months. Accused stayed at three places in Morecambe, and registered in false names. He described himself as a graduate of Pembroke College, Cambridge, and gave the name of a relative at Nottingham. All the statements were false. He was a deserter, and was wanted at Sheffield and Blackpool for false pretences.

DEATHS.

BARNETT.—Killed in action, September 11th, 1916, Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399, Queen’s London Regiment, second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again ;
Here life to us without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could we have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard
For us who loved you well.”
—From his sorrowing WIFE, FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

GREEN.—On September 7th, RFN. FREDERICK JOHN GREEN, King’s Royal Rifles, died of wounds in France, the dear son of Frederick and the late Louisa Greenfield Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, aged 25.—Sadly mourned by his Father, Brothers, Sisters, and Minnie.

WARD.—On September 3rd, Rifleman C. WARD, 10th Rifle Brigade, second son of Thomas and Mary Ward, of Brandon. Killed in action in France.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

IN MEMORIAM.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. Frederick Frankton, Grenadier Guards, of Lawford Road, Rugby, killed on 27th September, 1915, at Loos.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
A light is from the household gone,
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Wife, Children, and Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds.

RUSSELL.—In loving memory of Gunner PERCY EDGAR RUSSELL, R.F.A., who was killed in action, October 3, 1915.—“ He gave his life that others may live.”— Never forgotten by FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

25th Sep 1915. Local War Notes

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Sydney Hall and Mr J Hoare, servers at St Andrew’s Mission Church and members of the Brotherhood of St Ardan, have enlisted in the R.W.R.

Capt A D Coates, of the 9th Warwickshire Regiment, which has figured prominently in the Dardanelles fighting, has recovered from his illness, and is now at Cairo in charge of the Turkish officer prisoners.

Sergt Donnithorne, of the 1st Border Regiment, who was billeted with Mr and Mrs Lane, 79 Manor Road, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, for ‘ a bit of work I have done out here ’ (the Dardanelles), as he puts it in a letter to his friends in Rugby.

On Monday afternoon the wounded soldiers from Ashlawn Hospital were entertained at the picture matinee at the Empire through the kindness of Mr B Morris, the proprietor. Cigarettes, &c, were handed round to the visitors, who spent a highly enjoyable time.

Mrs Stokes, wife of Farrier Q.M Sergt Stokes, informs us that the rumour which has been circulated regarding her husband’s supposed death is quite untrue. He is in hospital suffering from a general breakdown, which has affected his eyesight. A letter received from him on Wednesday, however, contained favourable news.

Pte James Plumb, of the 10th Royal Warwicks, and an old scholar of St Matthew’s Schools, has written to his mother, who resides at 21 Union Street, Rugby, to state that he has been wounded, but not seriously. He was out sniping on September 13th, when he was struck in the calf of his leg by a bullet, which passed out at the knee. He is now in a base hospital at Boulogne, where he is very comfortable and going on well. When Pte Plumb enlisted he was working at the Rugby Gas Works. He joined in September, 1914, and went over to France about three months ago. His father is also serving in 2/7th Royal Warwickshire.

NEWS OF A RUGBY YEOMAN.

Included in a number of wounded soldiers from the Dardanelles who arrived at “ Ashlawn ” Red Cross Hospital on Monday, was Trooper Ambrose Cole, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who brought cheering word to Mr Albert White, chief clerk at the L & N.-W Erecting Shop, respecting his son, Trooper Cyril White, whom he left quite well and in the best of health.

LETTER FROM AN OLD MURRAYIAN.

Sapper Tuckey, of the 78th Field Co, R.E, an Old Murrayian, has sent a number of interesting views showing Ypres before and after the bombardment to his old schoolmaster. We give a few extracts from his letter :—“ It is a terrible sight to see glorious architecture, such as the Cathedral of St Martin, the Cloth Hall, and other such places lying in heaps of ruins ; but still, one takes little notice of such things, for human nature gets surprisingly hard-hearted out here. . . . . No one will ever be able to say that the Old Murrayians were found wanting. I receive the local paper every week, so naturally I am well acquainted with the news, and watch with great interest everything concerning Old Murrayians. I met some of the old-timers a few days ago while behind the lines, and I do not think any of us look the worse for our Continental tour. There is rather a strange thing in a desolate village ‘somewhere in Belgium ’—a small church in ruins, but the crucifix is standing untouched and the inscription on the remains of the tower, ‘Suceedo Combustis,’ which is rather appealing to the passing troops, don’t you think ? ”

RUGBY SAWYER CONGRATULATED BY THE KING.

Mr Frederick Branston, a sawyer, in the employ of Messrs Travis & Arnold, of Rugby, and living in Chester Street, has this week received the following letter from the Privy Purse Office at Buckingham Palace, dated September 20th, 1915 :-

“ SIR,—I have the honour to inform you that the King has heard with much interest that you have at the present moment four sons and two sons-in-law serving in the Army and Navy.

“ I am commanded to express to you the King’s congratulations, and to assure you that his Majesty much appreciates the spirit of patriotism which prompted this example in one family of loyalty and devotion to their Sovereign and Empire.—I have the honour to be, sir, your obedient servant,

“ F M PONSONBY,

“ Keeper of the Privy Purse.”

We may explain that Mr. Branston has five sons serving with the colours (not four, as mentioned in the letter), and that he is himself employed on Government contracts.

OLD MURRAYIAN GASSED WHILE AT RESCUE WORK.

Driver S G Smith, 41, 3/4th Warwickshire Battery, an Old Murrayian, has written to his old schoolmaster, informing him that he has been gassed, and adding the following particulars :— “ I thought I would like to see a little more life than I did with the Battery, so I went to do a bit of mining and sapping under the German first line trenches, and found what I went for. For about a week all went well, but we could hear the Germans working over the top of us ; therefore it was a case of who should get there first. We could hear them talking when everything was quiet. One Sunday evening at about five o’clock I was in the dug-out, when all of a sudden the whole place was shaken ; and, knowing something was the matter, we jumped up. We were ordered to fall-in and hurried to the firing trench. Then we found that the Germans had blown our sap in. We could not go down for a time because there was so much gas ; but after we had worked and had got some air in, they asked for men to try to get our comrades out. I was one who volunteered, and we went down, but could not stand it long. -We found five dead at the bottom of the shaft. We worked hard for about four hours, and then there was a big rush of gas, and I don’t remember any more until I came round in the dressing station.” Driver Smith adds that he has been in several hospitals, and is now nearly well again.

A LAWFORD MAN KILLED.

Mr Henry Hopkins, of the Sheaf and Sickle Inn, Long Lawford, has received intimation that his son, Pte Frank Hopkins, of the 6th Dorsets, has been killed.

Capt Courtenay Dutton, writing to convey the intelligence, says :” I regret to have to inform you that your son was killed early this morning by a shell bursting on the parapet. His death was practically instantaneous, and he suffered no pain. Curiously enough his own officer was killed by a bullet about two hours previously in the same place. Your son was a good soldier, and in expressing my sincerest sympathy, I would add that you may be to a certain extent comforted in your grief by the knowledge that your son died the most honourable death a man can die.”

Sergt J Jeacock, of the same Company, has also written to inform the parents, and adds :” He was at his post when he was hit. We had a hot time of it for about a quarter of an hour. I am very sorry to lose my old chum like that. We used to work together and we joined together. He was one of the best we had out here.”

Pte Hopkins was employed at Bluemels when he enlisted about twelve months ago. He was an active member of the Lawford Football, Cricket, and Rifle Clubs, and was much liked and respected in the village.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS’ OUTING TO STANFORD PARK.

Recently, when Lord and Lady Braye entertained wounded soldiers from Leicestershire hospitals at Stanford Hall, the men at the Ashlawn Hospital, Rugby, although invited, were unable to be present because, his Lordship was informed, vehicles were not available to convey them to the rendezvous.

Lord Braye kindly repeated his invitation, and Mr F van den Arend undertook to arrange the motor transport. The Leicestershire men have had several successful tours, and one of the features that has contributed largely to the success of the outings has been the enthusiasm which has been shown to the gallant men when passing through the different places. The villagers decorated their houses, and showered cigarettes, chocolates, and fruit upon the wounded in the cars.

The Ashlawn men are going to Stanford Hall to-day (Saturday), September 25th, and we are asked to mention that they will start from the hospital at 2.0 o’clock, pass through Dunchurch, down the London Road to Stretton-on-Dunsmore, then turn off through Wolston and Church Lawford to New Bilton.

The cars will line up opposite the Rugby Portland Cement Works. Here they will be met by the B.T.H Military Band about 2.35 p.m, and will pass in procession through New Bilton, Warwick Street, High Street, Market Place, Church Street, Clifton Road, Clifton, by St Thomas’ Cross (Newton), Catthorpe and Swinford to Stanford Park.

On the homeward journey they will start at 5.30 p.m, and travel via Yelvertoft, Crick, and Hillmorton.

We have so doubt people on the routes indicated will be glad of the opportunity of showing enthusiastic appreciation to these gallant defenders of the Empire.

HOW THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY FOUGHT AT THE DARDANELLES.

LOCAL MEN WOUNDED, BUT NOT SERI0USLY.

“ I am writing this from my little ‘ hole ‘ in the hill,” says Sergt-Major Tait, of C Squadron of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, now at the Dardanelles. ” We left our base on August 17th, and arrived here ‘somewhere at the front’ on the 20th or thereabouts. I have lost count of time since we have been in the real thing. We had our baptism of fire as soon as we landed, being shelled by the Turks for about five minutes. Fortunately no one was hit, and we reached our bivouac without mishap. We had a few casualties while in bivouac, as we had to go to the shore for water, and the Turks or Germans, knowing or being able to see when the men went to draw water, sent some shrapnel over them, and succeeded in bagging one or two. They used to send us one or two ‘haters ’ at meal times just to pass the time of day—sometimes they burst and sometimes not. They seat 14 at us one morning, but did no damage. We are on the side of a hill about — miles from the coast, and when our ships shell the enemy the shells come right over us, and make a terrific noise. It was funny at first to see the men ‘ duck ‘ when one came over ; but it was only natural, and I suppose I was one of the ‘ duckers.’ They are getting used to it now.

“ Our shells have been making terrible work in the enemy’s camp trenches, according to reports of men who have been in the first lines. They say they found Tucks or Germans mixed up together in heaps of 10 or 15. They asked for an armistice to bury their dead, but this was refused, because the last time they had one they did not bury the dead, but moved their big guns to the rear and set them up in other positions ; so our fellows had the job of burying their dead when they had taken their trenches. Since we landed they have been pushed back about —— miles. Perhaps you will have heard of our doings by the time you get this, but you may not have got details.

“ We left our base at 4.20 p.m. on Friday, the 20th. with orders to join the Division by 7.30 p.m. All went well until we got about two miles on our journey. We had cross a large extent of perfectly flat country to our objective and covered with patches of gorse. We must have made a good mark for the enemy’s guns, for as soon as we got to the edge of the gorse they opened fire on us with shrapnel, high explosives, and incendiary shells. They had got the range, and officers and men began to drop. For three-quarters of an hour they rained shrapnel upon us, and it is marvellous how any of us came through the storm alive.

“ My squadron lost 27 killed and wounded. We were the luckiest of the lot, and lost the least men being on the right of the column. Men were going down in one’s and twos every time a shell burst, and, to make matters worse, the devils set fire to the gorse.

“ After being under fire for about a quarter of an hour we had the order to double, but we could only go about 100 yards, and had to walk the rest. This was the time the casualties were heaviest.

“ We eventually reached the foot of the hill to the accompaniment of the cheers of those who had watched us from the hillside. When the roll had been called we found we had lost about 70 in the regiment, but several walked in afterwards only slightly wounded.

“ When we reached our objective we thought we had finished, but after half-an-hour’s rest we were told, to advance to the reserve trenches one and a-half miles to the front. Fortunately by this time it was getting dark. We were taken over the top of the hill and down the other side, where we again came under fire—this time from machine guns and snipers. We had a few more casualties, but only wounded, no one being killed and finally we got to the trench where we threw of our packs, said a fervent prayer, and tried to go to sleep. But the excitement of the past events made this impossible.

“ We have since heard of fellows having marvellous escapes. One officer had the back of his helmet shot away, and also the collar of his coat, but did not get wounded. Several men can show holes in their clothes and helmets. I was hit with a bullet on one of the pouches, and it knocked three clips of cartridges out, but did not hurt me. I came through without any other mishap, so I offered up a prayer of thankfulness to the Almighty for bringing us through what can be literally called ‘ hell on earth.’

This is the only time any troop have been brought across the open since operations commenced in this part of the seat of war, and everyone who saw our advance says that the Yeomanry have earned a name for themselves.

“ The only thing that is a bit of a trouble is the water. It is only issued twice a day. and as bully beef and biscuits make one thirsty, it is trying—put the water is good when we get it. The men in the firing line are looked after first, which is as it should be—the men in the reserve trenches forming fatigues for getting food and water to the first line, and they do it cheerfully day and night. It is really wonderful how the fellows have adapted themselves to circumstances.

“I am feeling quite fit and well, with the exception of a slight cold. It is very hot in the day, and gets cold towards early morning. We expect the rainy season to commence shortly.

“ When you see Mr J E Cox tell him his two sons are in the next dug-out to me. They are both all right, and came through without a scratch. Bert White’s son was left at — camp to look after the horses—if he only knew what a lucky fellow he was.

“ We do not get a very good service post here, and have had no letters since we left the base. We are now pretty ‘cosy,’ not over-worked, and plenty of bully and tea.

“ I hope you will be able to read this, as it is written in rather an uncomfortable position, lying on my back in the dug-out whilst the shells are coming over.

“ We are rather troubled with snipers, but the Australian bushmen are dealing with them. One chap lives close to me, and he says he has shot 17 since he has been on the job. They got three yesterday—one dressed in a K.O.S.B uniform. They say the snipers are principally Kurds.”

“ A LIVING SHEET OF FIRE & BULLETS.”

Corpl Horace Neeves, of the Signal Troop of the 1st South Midland Mounted Brigade, has written to his parents, Mr and Mrs S Neeves, of Murray Road, Rugby, giving an interesting account of his experiences in the fighting on Hill 70, following the landing at Suvla Bay at the Dardanelles. He was working on the staff at Rugby Post Office, when at the outbreak of war the Rugby Troop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, of which he had been a member for six or seven years, was mobilised. Having been for, some months at Alexandria, he went with the South Midland Mounted Brigade (with which his troop is incorporated) to the Dardanelles, and experienced some heavy fighting in the advance from Suvla Bay, the last stage of which, he says, was “like going through a living sheet of fire and bullets.” He felt one or two bits of stuff, probably dirt, thrown up by shrapnel, hit him in the face ; but he remarks that otherwise he came through quite safely. However, on returning to hospital, suffering from a severe attack of dysentry, it was found that Corpl Neeves had had a narrow escape. A shrapnel bullet had entered his haversack, had passed through four folds of the housewife it contained, and had become embedded in a thimble which was crumpled up and possibly saved his life. We understand that Corpl Neeves has been invalided home, and is now on a transport ship on his way to England.

 

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been attested at the Rugby Drill Hall this week :—E Imeson and S O’Donnell, Gloucester Bantams ; K W Smallwood R.E, Telegraph ; W Courtman, R.G.A ; W E Hughes, T W Hughes, and H Panter, R.F.A ; T Cleaver and J E Newman, 220th Fortress Co, R.E.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

MORE PROCEEDINGS.

A sitting of the Coventry And District Munitions Tribunal was held at the Labour Exchange offices, at which Mr F Tillyard, of Birmingham, presided. There were also present : Mr T Clarke (employers), Mr J G Chater (employees), together with the Clerk (Mr P E Wilks) and Mr D G Bolland {assistant clerk).

SLEEPY WORKER.

The allegation against James Cullen, turner, of 93 Winfield Street, Rugby, an employee of the British Thomson-Houston Co, Ltd, was that he had been found asleep on two separate occasions whilst engaged on important Government work.

Prior to the hearing of the case Cullen asked for an adjournment on the ground that his trade union secretary, and a witness were not present, but the Court decided to proceed with the case.

Mr J Bale, foreman, stated that at 4.25 a.m on the 8th inst. he found Cullen asleep by the side of his machine. After taking his name and number he walked down the shop, and when about half-way down he heard Cullen’s machine running again. Cullen’s explanation was that owing to the nature of his work the breakfast half-hour had been re-arranged, and that the time when the foreman came up was his breakfast time, 4 a.m to 4.30, half-an-hour later than usual.

Launcelot Wakelin, in charge of the shop, said that on the 9th inst. he saw Cullen lying full length across the floor near the machine, fast asleep. When asked for his name and number Cullen was abusive, and refused to give them. He had watched Cullen for fully ten minutes to make sure he was asleep.

Cullen admitted lying down, but emphatically denied being asleep, and stated that it was customary for men to lie down and watch the material running through.

After consideration, the Chairman announced that the Court had come to the conclusion that Cullen was not “diligently attending to his work,” which was an infringement of the Munitions Act. The first case had been withdrawn, and a fine of £1 was inflicted for the offence on the 9th inst.—Cullen : If I did wrong once I did wrong twice.—The Chairman : You are being fined on your own admission that you were lying down at your work.—Cullen : I refuse to pay a halfpenny until see my solicitor.—The Chairman : There is no appeal to this decision.

GOVERNMENT CARRIER PIGEONS.

A WARNING.

The Press Bureau issues the following announcement :—

“ Notice is hereby given that carrier or homing pigeons are being used for certain purposes in connection with his Majesty’s Service, and attention is called to the fact that anyone who shoots or kills a carrier or homing pigeon whilst on passage renders himself liable to prosecution.”