Mann, Lander George. Died 19th Sep 1918

Lander George Mann was the 2nd of eight children born to George Mann, a blacksmith, and Elizabeth Ann (nee Raven) who married in 1897, in Southam. He was born in 1899 in Long Itchington, Warwickshire and was baptised at the local church on 10th Sep 1899.  In the 1911 census the Mann family lived in Elm Row, Stockton, Warwickshire.

Lander enlisted at Rugby into the 3rd Royal Warwick Regiment as a private, no: 41717. It is not known when he joined up but according to the Medal Rolls he served abroad with the Royal Warwicks from 4th to 18th August 1918, then the 2/4th London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers, service number 85158 until 11th September, before moving to the 2/2nd battalion.

By early September 1918 the British advance had reached The Hindenburg Line. After the losses of the previous few months, 180,000 in the last six weeks, Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig was reluctant to order any offensives, but allow the men to rest. When he received news of the British Third Army’s success at the Battle of Havrincourt on 12th Sept, he changed his mind and approved the plan to clear German outpost positions on the high ground before the Hindenburg Line.

In order not to give warning of the attack, there was no preliminary bombardment and the guns would fire concentration shots at zero hour and then provide a creeping barrage to support the infantry. The attack started at 5.20 am on 18th September and comprised all three corps of the fourth army, with V Corps of the Third flank and the French First Army on the right.

The promised French assistance did not arrive, resulting in limited success for IX Corps on that flank. On the left flank, III Corps also found difficulty when attacking the fortifications erected at “the Knoll”, Quennemont and Guillemont farms, which were held determinedly by German troops, the village was however captured by the British 12th Eastern Division [7th Norfolk, 9th Essex and 1st Cambridge]. In the centre, General John Monash’s two Australian divisions achieved complete and dramatic success. The 1st Australian Division and the 4th Australian Division, had a strength of some 6,800 men and in the course of the day captured 4,243 prisoners, 76 guns, 300 machine-guns and thirty trench mortars. They took all their objectives and advanced to a distance of about 3 miles (4.8 km) on a 4 mile (6.4 km) front. The Australian casualties were 1,260 officers and men (265 killed, 1,057 wounded, 2 captured.)

The Battle of Epehy closed as an Allied victory, with 11,750 prisoners and 100 guns captured. Although not a total success, it signalled an unmistakable message that the Germans were weakening and it encouraged the Allies to take further action with haste (with the offensive continuing in the Battle of St. Quentin Canal), before the Germans could consolidate their positions.

It is not clear what part the 2nd battalion of the Royal Fusiliers took in the Battle of Epehy, but Lander George Mann died of wounds the following day, the 19th September and was buried in Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery, in plot number 1.G.19 a row away from Harold John Russell at 1.F.17 who had probably enrolled in Rugby on the same day

It was reported in an October 1918 edition of the Rugby Advertiser:
Stockton: Our Men – The sad news has reached the village that Lander Mann, formerly a choir boy in Stockton Church, has made the great sacrifice on the Western Front.  The family, who now live at Rugby, have many friends in the parish, the great sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Mann in their sorrow.  The lad was 19 years old.

Lander was awarded The Victory and British War Medals (ref: T P/104 B34 Page 4162)

The family were living at 22 Rowland Street, Rugby when the following words were engraved on his gravestone:
In the Midst of Life,
We are in Death

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

28th Jul 1917. Rugby School Farming Squads

RUGBY SCHOOL FARMING SQUADS.

From “ The Meteor ” (the journal of Rugby School) we gather that this year the farming squad season extended from May 16th to July 24th ; 75 squads (comparing with 55 last year) have been sent out to assist the neighbouring farmers. Most of the work took the form of hoeing and spudding, which is a little tedious after a bout of four or five hours.

In the last month many parties have rendered assistance in the hay harvest. The earnings of the squads were allocated as follows :—Hospital of St Cross, £15 ; Y.M.C.A, £8 13s ; Mine-Sweepers’ Fund, £5 ; Blue Cross, £5 ; Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, £3, total, £36 13s.

“ The Meteor ” also records the experiences of one of the squads in the Evesham district—at Pensham, near Pershore :—

On Monday, July 2nd, a squad of 21 started off for a fortnight’s work on the land—an entirely new experiment. After a long journey, during which we seemed to do nothing but change from one train to another we reached Pershore Station at about 1.30 p.m. The cyclists of our party went ahead into the town (1½ miles from the station) to find where Pensham was. Having found the farm, they returned to guide the weary “ labourers,” who found three miles in the blazing heat quite sufficient. After doing the first natural thing—ordering tea—we all went for a bathe in the river Avon, which was only two or three hundred yards from the farm. All the squad except four slept in a fairly capacious barn, with as much straw as they wished ; but the quartet preferring the open air and chancing the rats slept on a straw rick, in which they made great havoc by digging themselves in.

For the next three days we only did six hours a day, 9 a.m—1 p.m, 2 p.m—4 p.m. After work was over we were allowed to do anything we liked—in moderation. Our first day in the field made us all feel that 6 hours in the form room would be infinitely preferable to the work we were doing, which consisted of weeding mangolds with pen-knives! But fortunately as the days went on the work became better. On Friday and for the rest of our stay we did eight hours a day, after which most of us felt we should never be able to straighten our backs again. . . . We were very fortunate in having fine weather all the time, except on Sunday, when it really did not matter.

The work chiefly consisted of picking broad and French beans, “ topping ” runner beans, pulling docks and hoeing. It was generally considered that a fortnight is just about the right length of time for work of that sort.

The chief amusements were bathing, boating, fishing (for pike which would not bite), riding horses (if they could be caught), chasing pigs, and, on the last night, strafing beans.

COMMANDEERING OF HAY AND STRAW.
FARMERS’ AND DEALERS’ MINDS RELIEVED.

The Secretary of the War Office announces that two new Army Council Orders are being gazetted dealing with hay and straw, one taking possession of all hay and straw, and the other regulating the price of these commodities. There are one or two points in which they differ from previous Orders of a similar nature, and one in particular will relieve the minds of farmers. Under the new Order wheat straw may now be used for bedding and other than feeding purposes. A point which will also commend itself to dealers in straw is that the difference between “ producers’ ” and “ retailers’ ” prices is now £2, instead of 30s. Further, the retailers’ prices for lots of 10cwt and less for both hay and straw are somewhat increased.

POSSESSION WANTED.—Henry Webb, Gipsy Row, High Street, Hillmorton, was sued by Mrs Emily Forrest, Stoke Newington, for possession of cottage and premises.—Mrs Webb attended, and said that her husband was a prisoner of war in Germany.—For the plaintiff it was stated that the rent was £3 18s in arrears.—Mrs Webb said that she had not paid her rent because the agent had insulted her, and he had also refused to do any repairs. He had threatened that he would take the roof and doors off. She was willing to pay the arrears, and should leave the house as soon as she could get another one.—Plaintiff was non-suited because the notice had been served on the wife, whereas the husband was the tenant.

INSPECTION OF RUGBY V.C. AND VOLUNTEER MOTOR TRANSPORT.

Brigadier-General T C P Calley, C.B, M.V.O, of the Southern Command, made a tour of inspection of the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Volunteer Regt on Saturday and Sunday last. The inspection of the Rugby Corps, B Company, took place on Sunday afternoon at the Howitzer Battery Headquarters. There was no ceremonial parade, the inspection being for the purpose of seeing squad work. The Inspecting Officer was accompanied by Lord Leigh (Lord Lieutenant of Warwickshire), Colonel F F Johnstone (O.C. the Regiment), Major Glover (Second in Command), Captain Johnson (adjutant), and Lieut Stranger Jones (Transport Officer) and others.

There was a good parade, under Capt C H Fuller. The Company was inspected in bayonet fighting, trench warfare and bombing, and an infantry attack across adjoining land, under command of Lieut M W Yates.

THE INSPECTING OFFICER AND UNIFORM.

General Calley, after congratulating the squads on the good progress they had made, addressed those who had taken part in the attack, and said he was very pleased with what he had seen. The attack was very well done, and it showed they had been well taught and that they had used their brains, and meant to learn and understand what they were doing. Presently they might have to do this in the open, and in this connection he gave them a little advice with regard to firing orders and the words of command. The attack was carried out as well as any he had seen, and great credit was due to their commanding officer and instructors. Evidently the members of the Company had paid attention to what had been said to them, and they had brought both their brains and their bodies to bear on it. He would be very happy to report to the General that he had seen a very good body of men. He wished them every success in their patriotic effort, and said he hoped to come and see them again when they had their uniform, adding he could not understand how it was they were not provided with it, and that he was going to make enquiries about the matter on his return, as most of the Battalions in the country had now got uniform and equipment, and he hoped the Rugby Corps would have them very soon.

COUNTY OF WARWICK MOTOR VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The inspection of the Rugby Section of the County of Warwick Motor Volunteer Corps was made on the arrival of the General. The cars, lorries, and motor cycles present, capable of transporting upwards of 50 men and four tons of supplies, were drawn up in line on the smaller parade ground. The General inspected each motor in turn and afterwards addressed the members of the corps, expressing his gratification at the manner in which Rugby motorists had responded to the appeal for volunteers, and stated that after what he had seen in this and other towns he was of the opinion that the Government should recognise the Motor Corps as a body and make provision for the necessary petrol supply, etc, for conducting the work of the Corps. He said that Lord Leigh had consented to be nominated for the command of the Corps.

Major Glover afterwards addressed the members present, explaining the object of the movement, and stated that over 500 private motorists had already been enrolled in Birmingham and the County of Warwick.

In a short address given by Lord Leigh, he expressed great pleasure in being nominated for the command of the Corps.

Further motor volunteers with either cars, lorries, or motor cycles, are urgently needed. There are also a few vacancies for experienced motor mechanics capable of undertaking repairs. Application for full particulars as to enrolment should be made to Mr Bernard Hopps, Thurlaston, near Rugby.

DISTRESSING FATAL ACCIDENT.

Co-Sergt-Major Charles John Simpson, Motor Cycle Section of the R.E, second son of the late Mr John Simpson and Mrs Simpson, 28 Craven Road, Rugby, met with his death under exceptionally sad circumstances at Houghton Regis recently. The deceased was a valuable and highly esteemed non-commissioned officer, and it was stated at the inquest that he had been shooting at a tin with a miniature rifle in the yard of the camp. Deceased was showing his little boy, aged 4½ years, how to use the rifle, and on one occasion he held the rifle while the boy pulled the trigger and fired at the tin. At the same time some men came up to speak to deceased, and while he was talking he brought the rifle down to the ground. The boy said, “ Let me shoot it, daddy ” ; and deceased pulled the rifle, which was pointing to another sergeant, towards himself. The boy then bent down, touched the trigger, and discharged the rifle. The bullet entered deceased’s mouth, and caused practically instantaneous death.—A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned.—The funeral was witnessed by a large number of sympathisers. The coffin was placed on a gun carriage, drawn by six horses, with three sergeants as outriders. Six company sergeant-majors acted as pall bearers. The chief mourners were : Mrs Simpson (widow), Mrs Simpson (mother), Mrs N Brevig, Miss Winnie Simpson, Mr Bert Simpson (sisters and brothers), Mrs Walker (mother-in-law), Miss Walker (sister-in-law), Mr N Brevig (brother-in-law), and Mrs H Simpson (sister-in-law). Deceased was a Freemason, and a number of members of the craft attended the funeral, as well as a numerous contingent of the Motor Cyclists Co., under the command of Capt W F How, R.I Rifles, and a large number of deceased’s fellow N.C.O’s from the Signal Depot. Amongst those present were Lieut-Col E H Leaf, R.E, Commandant Army School of Signalling ; Lieut-Col W F Danter, R.E, Camp Commandant, and Capt O P Edgcumbe, D.C.L.I, Adjutant. The floral tokens were so numerous that it was found necessary to have a party from the Motor Cyclists’ Co. to carry the wreaths which could not be accommodated on the gun carriage. The three brothers of deceased, who was 33 years or age, are still on active service.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr H J Beddow has left the town to take up a commission in the R.A.M.C.

Mr W J W Gilbert, Blandford House, has gained a commission in the Army Service Corps (Horse Transport). He joined the Royal Gloucester Hussars (Yeomanry) in May, 1916 as a trooper.

The Rev G A Studdert-Kennedy, C.F (formerly of Rugby), vicar of St Paul’s, Worcester, has just gained the Military Cross for bravery on the Western front. Whilst in charge of a temporary dressing station, he found the supply of morphia was exhausted, and went under heavy shell-fire to procure more. He also brought two severely wounded men into a place of safety. He was chosen to preach the National Mission to the troops in France, and gave addresses in all the base camps and at the front.—“ Church Times.”

The Military Medal and bar has been awarded to Pte J Enticott, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, for acts of gallantry on the field in carrying out his duties as a stretcher bearer in December, 1916, and May, 1917. At the time of enlistment Pte Enticott worked at the B.T.H, and previously for some years on the L & N-W Railway.

R V Wilson (Old Laurentian), late H.A.C, son of Mr J G Wilson, York Street, has been gazetted Second-Lieutenant, and has received a commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Parkhurst, Isle of Wight.

A tale that is going the round and causing some amusement among our boys is that of a Tommy on one of our Eastern fronts, having his photograph taken in the regulation shorts and thin vest, a copy of which he sent home. His mother, in thanking him for his photo, remarked : “ But, dear me, you should have let me know before that you were so short of clothes, and I would have sent you some on !”

WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.—On Wednesday afternoon Mr B Morris, of the Empire, entertained about 250 wounded soldiers, together with their nurses and assistants, from Rugby Town V.A.D, “ Te Hira,” Bilton Hall, St John’s, and Pailton Red Cross Hospitals, to a garden party at the Manor House, Bilton. An excellent programme was given by the artistes appearing at the Empire this week : Black and White, The Pallangers, The Deldees, Wolfland (comedian), Miss Danby (soloist), “ One of the Boys ” (ventriloquial sketch), and Rolando Martin. A sketch was also performed by Misses Morson, A Pratt, Walrond, and F Shillitoe. A substantial tea was provided for the visitors, and at the conclusion Mr and Mrs Morris and their family were cordially thanked by the guests, who evidently appreciated and enjoyed the entertainment.

BLIND SOLDIERS AND SAILORS.—A meeting of the workpeople was recently held at Willans & Robinson’s Rugby, which was addressed by Mr F R Davenport and Mr Macaulay (a blind representative) on the objects of the Institute for the Blind, and particularly on the training of blinded soldiers and sailors at St Dunstans Hostel. The appeal was sympathetically received, and a committee of the workpeople was at once formed to put in operation a scheme to enable all employees of the company to contribute weekly, for a period of 12 weeks, to this most deserving object.

MARTON.

PTE L J YOUNG.-In connection with the death in action, on July 3rd, reported in our last issue, a letter has been received by his mother, Mrs J Young, of Church Street, from the Commanding Officer, stating that her son was wounded in the front line trenches by a shell on July 3rd.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

NEWS OF MISSING HUSBAND WANTED.—For many months Mrs Richard Fell has been anxiously awaiting news of her husband, and after fruitless enquiries from the authorities and other likely sources, she asks us to make known the following facts, in the hope that she may obtain tidings through returned soldiers or comrades who have known him. He had served 12 years in the Royal Warwicks on the outbreak of the war, and joined up in November, 1914. In November, 1915 he was transferred to the Rifle Brigade, and proceeded with his regiment to India. Here he was on duty in the Punjaub, and corresponded regularly with his wife. His last letter was posted in Bombay, and received on December 21st, 1916. He then believed he was about to sail for Salonica or Mesopotamia, but no further tidings of his whereabouts have come to hand. His wife also has three little children dependent upon her, and is, naturally, in great anxiety.

BRAUNSTON.

KILLED IN ACTION.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Clarke have received news that their son, Driver Thomas Clarke, Royal Garrison Artillery, was killed in France on July 11th. He enlisted shortly after the outbreak of war, previous to which he was employed at the B.T.H, Rugby.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—A gloom was cast over the village when it became known that Mr Arthur Clarke had received official news that his other son, Pte Lucas Clarke, had been killed in action on July 8th. They have received letters of sympathy from two of their sons’ officers, in which it is stated that he was a splendid man, and is missed by all ranks in his Company. He was killed instantaneously by a shell which burst in the dug-out where he was sleeping.

DEATHS.

COPE.—In loving memory of Gunner PERCY LESLIE COPE,
who was killed in action in France on June 21st, 1917, aged 22.
Not dead but sleepeth.
Somewhere there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file—he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all,
—From his Wife and Son, 62 Lawford Road, New Bilton, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

ALLSO.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Lance-Corpl PERCY ALLSO, who was killed in action in France on July 27, 1916 ; aged 23.—
“ Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.”—From his
loving FATHER MOTHER, and FAMILY.

DUNKLEY.—In loving memory of our dearly-beloved son, Pte. HARRY DUNKLEY, who was killed on July 30th, 1916, somewhere in France.—Also in loving memory of our dear beloved son, Pte. PERCY JOHN DUNKLEY, who was killed somewhere in France on July 25th, 1916.—15 Chester Street, Rugby.

HOWARD.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. STEVEN HOWARD, who died of wounds in France, August 1st, 1916, age 28.
“ A little time has passed, and friends around us
Think the wound is almost healed ;
But they little know the sorrow
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Never forgotten by his loving MOTHER and FATHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS, and also from A. CROFT, Long Lawford.

PRESTON.—In loving memory of Rifleman JACK PRESTON, 7th K.R.R,,who was killed in action on July 30, 1915.—“ Loved and lost awhile.”—From MOTHER, FATHER, and SISTERS.

REFEARN.—In loving memory of Rifleman JOSE (Tim) REDFEARN, 7th K.R.R., who died from wounds on July 21, 1915. Buried in Lyssenthock Cemetery.
“ He sleeps not In his native land,
Bur ‘neath a foreign sky,
And far from those who loved him best,
In a soldier’s grave he lies.”
—From WIFE and DAUGHTERS.

SHAW.—In loving memory of Pte. J. C. SHAW (JACK), R.W.R., who was killed in action on August 1, 1916.
“ The midnight stars are gleaming
On a grave I cannot see,
Where sleeping without dreaming
lies one most dear to me.”
—From his loving WIFE and CHILDREN.

SIMS.—In loving remembrance of HARRY SIMS, the dearly beloved elder son of LOUIE SIMS JENKINS, who was killed in action in France, July 30th, 1915, aged 19.
Sweet be thy rest, thy memory dear,
‘Tis sweet to breathe thy name ;
In life I loved thee very dear,
In death I do the same.
—From his still sorrowing Mother.

SIMS.—In ever sweetest remembrance of our dear brother HARRY SIMS, killed in action, July 30th, 1915.
Gone from our sight, but to memory ever dear.
—From his Brothers Bert, George, and Trevor ; Sisters Daisy and Mabel.

SMITH.—In loving memory of HERBERT, the dearly-loved son of FREDERICK and the late SARAH J. SMITH ; killed in action July 30th, 1915.
“ We miss and mourn thee in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memories of days that have been.”
—From FATHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory, of my dear husband, Pte. ALFRED HENRY THOMPSON, who died of wounds in France on July 17th, aged 34.—“ Sleep on, dear one, till we meet again.”—From his loving WIFE and CHILDREN.

WAREING.—On July 23rd, 1916, STANLEY, the only son, of JAMES WAREING, of Lilbourne Farm, reported missing—now reported killed. Aged 18.
I often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say “ Good-bye,”
Before he closed his eyes.
-Mother, Father, and Sisters.

 

16th Dec 1916. Dr Hoskyn Recommended for the Albert Medal

DR. HOSKYN RECOMMENDED FOR THE ALBERT MEDAL.

Capt C R Hoskyn, R.A.M.C, of Rugby, has been recommended for the Albert Medal of the First Class—the highest medal for saving life outside the fighting line. The act for which Dr Hoskyn has been recommended was on the occasion of a serious railway accident at Gezaincourt on the 24th November, 1916, and it is referred to in the general orders issued to the Fifth Army by the General commanding in the following terms :—

Capt C R, Hoskyn, R.A.M.C.—In addition to other plucky acts he crawled under some burning debris at great risk and commenced to amputate the leg of a man who was pinned down. In doing so he loosened the man’s body, and he was got out alive.

The Commanding Officer wishes to express his appreciation of the gallantry and initiative displayed by the officers and N.C.O.’s mentioned in the report.

The Director-General of Medical Services, British Armies in France, also mentions Dr Hoskyn and others in his orders, and adds : “ I wish to express to you the greatest admiration which I feel for your splendid conduct under conditions calculated to try the courage of the bravest. You all showed courage, resource, and coolness, and I consider that your behaviour is an honour to yourselves and a credit to your Corps.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr F Turner, of 6 West Street, has this week received official news that his son, Pte J L Turner, who has been posted as missing since September 25th last year, was killed in action on that date. Before the war Pte Turner was in the Machine Shop at the B.T.H., and was only 19 years of age.

Corpl Harold Orchard, youngest son of the late Councillor Joseph Orchard, formerly of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field. He was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch of April 30, 1916. Corpl Orchard enlisted in the Royal Engineers in December, 1914.

Major J L Baird, M.P, C.M.G, D.S.O, has been appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Air Board in the new Ministry, and Mr Steel Maitland, M.P, a former Unionist candidate for the Rugby Division, is to be Under-Secretary for the Colonies.

The war is now costing the country upwards of 5½ millions per day.

THE parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : 1 tin fruit, 1 tin salmon. ½lb ration biscuits, 1 tin syrup, ½lb tin cafe au lait, 1 tin beef, 3 soup squares, 1 tin prunes, ¼lb chocolate, ½lb figs. ½lb margarine.

STRETTON-UNDER-FOSSE.
DEATH OF A SOLDIER HERO.—Deep sympathy is extended toward the parents of Pte Fergus Benson, of the 7th Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action last week. Pte Benson went out to France with the second draft of the 7th Warwicks, and was very popular with his fellow-soldiers.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.
CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR THE TROOPS.—At a meeting held recently the Whist Committee decided to arrange a house-to-house collection to provide funds for sending a Christmas parcel to each of the thirty-five soldiers from the parish. The following school girls—Lizzie Hickman, Lily Isom, Edith Davenport, Evelyn Thompson, Nancy Lane, Edith Neal, Olive Gamble, Kate Lane, and Maggie Ritch—acted as collectors. The sum collected, with the balance from the last whist drive, amounted to £5 1s 11d, and this was expended on the parcels and postage (£1 4s 3d). The parcels contained oxo cubes, cocoa and milk tablets, chocolate and cigarettes or tobacco, with a note of good wishes from the parishioners.

BRANDON.
PTE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward have received news, that their son, Pte J. Ward 4th Worcesters, has been wounded in the eye and thigh rather severely, and is now in hospital in France. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, as it is only recently that they lost their son, Charles Ward. They also have another son in the Army.

CATTHORPE.
In order to provide parcels for the men who have joined H.M Forces, two whist drives have lately been promoted for that purpose, and have been very successful. The proceeds were further augmented by gifts, and altogether £5 10s was collected for providing the 25 parcels which have been sent off this week.

CHURCHOVER.
A SUCCESSFUL whist drive and dance was held in the School to raise money to provide Christmas parcels for Churchover soldiers. Twenty-four tables were occupied. Mrs Arthur James and Col Forkus came down from Coton House, and took part in the drive. Mr E W Berrington was M.C. The prize-winners were :—Ladies : 1 Miss L Grundy (148), 2 Miss D Davis (145), 3 Miss A Skeet (142). Gentlemen : 1 Mr F Leatherland (144), 2 Mr C Whitehead (143), 3 Mr F Gibbs (143). Messrs Whitehead and Gibbs cut for second prize. Mrs James gave the prizes away, and said that Mr James had asked her to tell them how sorry he was that he could not be with them. He sent £1, and hoped the effort would be a success. About 150 then commenced dancing to the strains of Mr Ash’s band. Mr W W Mathews and Mr W Sutton were the M.C’s. The arrangements were admirably carried out by the following committee :— Mrs B Berrington, Mrs Semple, Mrs Rimmington, Miss M Beesley, Rev L G Berrington, Mr E Berrington (hon secretary and treasurer), Mr W W Mathews, Mr W Sutton, and Mr A Daynes. The sum of £22 12s 6d was cleared, so that each soldier will be able to have a nice parcel.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR BRAVE SOLDIERS.—Pte Arthur Priest, Coldstream Guards, who was wounded on September 8th is now in the King George’s Hospital, Stamford Street, London. His wounds consist of a bad fracture of the right leg and flesh wounds in the left leg, hip and side. His parents, who have visited him, found him in good spirits.—This week-end Pte Tom Hunt has paid a visit home. He and his brother Richard are both in the Rifle Brigade. They are sons of the Kandahar veteran, Mr Richard Hunt.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains 159 names of local soldiers. Of these ten have given their lives for their country, one is missing, one is a prisoner of war, and over thirty have been wounded.

DUNCHURCH.
P.C Cox, who was formerly stationed at this village, and who is now in the Army, paid a visit to Dunchurch, on Tuesday, and was warmly welcomed by the villagers, amongst whom he was always very popular.

GERMAN PRISONERS TO WORK ON THE LAND.—Warwickshire Chamber of Agriculture at Warwick on Saturday passed a resolution approving the employment of prisoners of war in agriculture. A letter from the officer commanding the Southern Command, which was read to the meeting, stated that only selected men of good character would be sent—with an interpreter. The Government would find rations, and charge the farmers the average rate of wages for the prisoners’ services.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

OTHER CASES.

An appeal was made by Mr F Sharpe, of Bath Street, for John George Bennett, carriage builder and wheel[wright] 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton.—Adjourned for the Military representatives to find out whether the Army is in need of wheelwrights.

On behalf of Mr Chas Wilson, Three Horse Shoes Hotel, Mr Eaden appealed for Bertram Henry Waring (36, married), shepherd and stud groom, 13 Earl Street.—The Military having offered a discharged soldier as a substitute, the Tribunal allowed 28 days for the exchange to be effected.-The appeal of Leonard Page (33, single), butcher and farmer, Wolston, for a long term of exemption was dismissed, but he was given 28 days.-Mr W Howkins, farmer, Hillmorton Grounds, desired to retain the services of Fred Shaw (36, married), cowman, &c.—The Chairman said he would get to April 1st in any event, and an exemption was given to that date.

A letter was read from Joseph Evan Walters, fruiterer and fishmonger, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, asking for his exemption to be extended until his wife had gained her strength.—Mr Wratislaw offered no objection, and he was given 28 days.

With respect to an application by Mr Robt Bucknill, threshing machine proprietor, Marton, for his son, Francis John Bucknill (19, single), described as a stockman and wagoner, Mr. Wratislaw said appellant had refused a substitute to go with his threshing machine because he could not patch a boiler, so he did not deserve any consideration at all.—Mr Bucknill said this statement was not correct.—The Chairman said they could quite see appellant’s attitude—he wanted to keep that boy—and if he was going to take that line there was a very easy way of dealing with him.—Mr Worthington submitted it was a case for substitution, and the case was adjourned till the next meeting for the Military to see what they could do.

Henry James Hopkins (31, married), thatcher and manager of the Co-operative Stores at Broadwell, had been granted an exemption by the local Tribunal, the Military appealing.—Mr Wale said he was a grocer, but he had never heard of a grocer and thatcher.—Mr Worthington : It is rather a peculiar combination.—Adjourned for medical examination.

DEATHS.

GLENN.—On the 7th inst., in France, of asthma and bronchitis, Pte. JOHN GLENN (Warwicks), beloved husband of Nellie Glenn, 35 Rowland Street, aged 40 years.

MAYES.—On December 6th, at Bristol Hospital (died of wounds received in action), Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, of the 3rd Oxford and Bucks L.I., the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Mayes, 28 Abbey Street ; aged 20 years.
“ One less at home, one more in heaven ;
Our Saviour has taken the bloom He has given.
Flowers may wither and die of decay,
But the love of our son will for ever stay.”

IN MEMORIUM.

TURNER.—In affectionate and loving remembrance of our dear son, Pte. Joseph Lewis Turner ; killed in action on September 25, 1915 ; aged 19 years.—From Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters, & Gladys.

22nd Jul 1916. Helping the Prisoners of War

HELPING THE PRISONERS OF WAR.

A meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held on Wednesday evening. Mr Wm Flint, C.C, Chairman of the Committee, presiding. Also present : Mrs Lees, Rev Father Jarvis, and Messrs A E Donkin, W H Clay, C J Newman, G W Walton, J Mellor, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J R Barker. Apologies for absence were received from Mrs Blagden, Mr F R Davenport, and Mr S H Weobley.

The Chairman, in reviewing the past work of the Committee, said that, starting with a list of 13 prisoners of war, the work had grown to such an extent that the Committee were now looking after the welfare of 55 men from Rugby and the villages. The expenditure had increased so very considerably that the Executive thought the Committee should meet to consider what steps should be taken to maintain the weekly parcels to the prisoners of war.

The Hon Secretary presented a statement of accounts to date. Subscriptions and donations amounted to £526 16s 6d, and the cost of food parcels and other expenditure was £417 8s 2d, which left a balance in hand of £109 8s 4d. He was glad to be able to report that during the past week there had been a slight improvement in the subscriptions, and although the money in hand would only provide for a few weeks parcels, he was glad to be able to report that several local efforts were being made to raise funds. It was, however, very necessary that, without delay, the Committee made arrangements to secure sufficient money to carry on the work for several months ahead, especially in view of the possibilities of further names being added to the list.

Various schemes were suggested and agreed upon, the first effort to be a Flag Day, Mr Newman and Mr Barker agreeing to carry out the arrangements as early as possible.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

The following local cases were heard before Mr Carmichael at the Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Friday in last week.

Alick J Tabor, Woolscott, near Rugby, applied for a leaving certificate from the B.T.H.—The case was adjourned from a previous Court. Another adjournment for four weeks was granted ; and the Court instructed the lad to return to work.

G North, 113 Railway Terrace, Rugby, was fined 10s for absenting himself from work at the B.T.H without leave for the whole of the week ending July 8th, the fine to be paid in four weekly instalments.

A King, 385 Clifton Road, Rugby, was charged by the B.T.H Company with being absent from work without leave on Saturday, July 8th, for 8¾ hours on Monday, and the whole of Tuesday, July 11th. The man’s previous time-keeping had been bad, and he was fined 15s and ordered to pay in weekly instalments of 2s 6d.

F H Shorthose, 19 Market Street, Rugby, was summoned for refusing to work overtime at the B.T.H on Saturday afternoon, July 8th, thereby delaying skilled men.—He was fined 10s (2s 6d per week), and was warned by the Chairman regarding his defiant attitude before the Court.

J Asquith, Shawell, Rugby, employed at the B.T.H, was charged with failing to work diligently on the morning of July 8th, and the case was dismissed owing to the conflicting evidence. Asquith asked for expenses ; but, in reply, the Chairman informed him that he was lucky to get off.

POST LETTERS EARLY.—The Postmaster-General calls attention to the fact that in view of the restricted number of postal collections and deliveries now afforded throughout the kingdom, it is particularly desirable that letters should be posted as early in the day as possible. In many rural districts there is only one delivery, and letters for such districts, unless posted in time for early evening mails, will not be delivered until the second day after posting. Early posting also facilitates the work of the Post Office sorters, and on account of the great depletion of staff for military purposes this assistance will be much appreciated.

PUBLIC BATHS.

The Baths Committee reported the receipt of an application from the Officer Commanding a Squadron, Royal Flying Corps for facilities for his men to attend the Baths at a reduced rate. They had informed him that free use of the swimming bath was granted to all soldiers or sailors in uniform on condition that they provided their own towels and drawers, or paid the regulation price for same. The numbers attending the baths and the amounts received for the month of June as compared with the same month in 1915, were as follows :—Baths, &c : Swimming bath, 1916, 5,511 ; 1915, 6,008. Slipper baths, 1916, 1,455; l915, 1,074[?]. Receipts, 1916, £54 10s 2d ; 1915, £56 10s 7d.-Approved on the motion of Mr Walker.

RESERVOIR GROUNDS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

The Water Committee had decided that the grounds at Brownsover Mill be opened during the summer from noon to 8.30 p.m (Sundays included) so long as no damage was done.—Adopted.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt the Earl of Clonmell, of the Warwickshire R.H.A, is transferred to the Territorial Force Reserve.

The Rev C T Bernard McNulty, M.A, vicar of Holy Trinity, Leamington, has recently been promoted from 4th to 3rd Class Chaplain, with the rank of Major, and has been appointed Senior Chaplain of his Division.

We are pleased to note that Capt G T Hilton, of North Street and Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has been mentioned in despatches for distinguished conduct in the field.

George E Middleditch, 1st Lieutenant, Oxon and Bucks L.I, was wounded at Ypres, France, some four weeks ago. Before the War Lieut Middleditch was an apprentice (premium) in the L & N-W Rly Erecting Shop. At the outbreak of the War he joined up at once as a private. He soon got promotion—first a lance-corporal, then a corporal, next a sergeant, then a commission as 2nd lieutenant, now 1st lieutenant ; and, we understand, has been recommended for a captaincy. He was wounded in the leg and back at Ypres, and is now well again. He visited the shop on Tuesday, and received a splendid ovation from his fellow-workmen and a very hearty send-off.

CASUALTIES TO RUGBY MEN IN THE GREAT ADVANCE.

Pte J F Holmes, East Surrey Regiment, son of Mr J Holmes, of Union Street, has been seriously wounded during the recent fighting.

Capt S Morris Bickersteth (O.R), a brother of the Rev Julyan K F Bickersteth, formerly of Rugby, was killed during the attack on Serre on July 1st. He was 23 years of age.

Mrs Greenwood, Kirstall, Lower Hillmorton Road, has received news that her son, Lieut J Greenwood, Northants Regiment, the well-known Rugby and Newbold footballer, has been wounded.

Other Rugby casualties reported recently are : Diver W Elkington (11137) killed ; and F H Warden (2168), F Burberry (275), and Sapper H Barrows, R.E. ; Ptes J Varney (Rugby), A Welsby (New Bilton), and T Lee (Swinford), wounded.

LANCE-CORPL W J COOPER OF HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

Lance-Corpl W J Cooper, R.W.R, son of Mr Jack Cooper, of Harborough Magna, was killed in action on June 26th. Lance-Corpl Cooper was a native of Newbold, but had spent most of his life at Harborough Magna. He was 30 years of age, and was called up as a reservist in August, 1914, and had been in France from the beginning of the war. Prior to the outbreak of hostilities, he was employed in the Cement Works at Newbold.

NEWBOLD SOLDIER REPORTED MISSING.

Mr Tom Smith, of Newbold, has received official intimation that his son, Rifleman Tom Smith, of the Rifle Brigade, was wounded on June 1st, and has been missing since that date. Rifleman Smith, who was about 23 years of age, was employed at the Cement Works before he enlisted at the commencement of the War.

Pte Wm Curtis, Leicester Regiment, another employee of the Cement Works, and son of Mr A Curtis, has written informing his parents that he has been wounded, and is now in hospital.

BRAUNSTON.

LOCAL CASUALTY.—Mrs J Manning received news last week that her son, Pte Thomas Manning, was wounded and in a base hospital in France ; and on Tuesday notification came that he had died. Mrs Manning has three other sons serving in the Army, two in France, and one at Salonica. Much sympathy is felt with the family in their bereavement.

HILLMORTON.

MRS CASHMORE of Lower Street, has received information that her youngest son, Pte F Cashmore, of the 1st Royal Irish Fusiliers, died of wounds received in the great push on the 6th inst. Previous to this Pte Cashmore had taken part in much fighting both at the Dardanelles and Egypt.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

CORPORAL CONSTABLE WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Ernest Constable have received an intimation from Corporal Harry Constable, stating that he is lying wounded in Firdale Hospital, Sheffield. The wounds are in both legs, right arm, and head, but he writes cheerfully, and it is hoped that he may effect a good recovery. It is barely six weeks since he was sent to the front.

DEATH OF PRIVATE SUTTON RUSSELL.-The sad news was received on Tuesday of the death of Private Joseph Sutton Russell in hospital of malarial fever on the 14th last. Private Russell enlisted in the Army Ordnance Corps in December, 1914, and was with the contingent in Mesopotamia. It was known that he had been in hospital, and only on Tuesday morning a post card was received from him, dated 6th June, on which he stated that he was out of hospital, and that his health was improving. So the shook caused by the news of his death was very great to all his relatives and friends, and, indeed, to the whole village. Before he joined the army, Private Russell had been for some years a clerk in the office at Messrs Kaye & Co’s Cement Works. He was also the Clerk to the Parish Council, assistant overseer, tax and rate collector, and Secretary to the Co-operative Society. He was of a genial temperament, and always ready to make himself useful. As a member of the Parish Church choir, and in many other capacities, he will be greatly missed. Private Russell was the life and soul at the Cricket Club in the pre-war days, and it was always a pleasure to witness his performance either as a bats man or a bowler. The deepest sympathy is felt for his widowed mother, brother and sisters, and for his fiancée, Miss Hilda Jeacock. His brother, Lance-Corpl Arthur Russell, is now in training in the Royal Warwicks.

FRANKTON.

KILLED IN ACTION.-News was received on Tuesday of the death of another of our brave village lads. Corporal Frank Doyle, a bright young fellow, was attached to the Berkshire Regiment. He enlisted early in the war. He was shot down at his post, with three more of his comrades. The sad news was conveyed to his widowed mother by the Rev R S Mitchison, of Barby, who motored to tell her. Much sympathy is felt throughout the village with Mrs Doyle in her sad loss. Mr Mitchison’s son-in-law is an officer in the same soldiers Company, and has been severely wounded.

WOLSTON.

Mr and Mrs John Orton have received news that their son, Pte H Orton, of the 1st Worcesters, has been wounded in the left hand. He is now in hospital in England, and progressing favourably. He has seen many months of fighting in France.

RIFLEMAN R B BUTLIN KILLED.—Mr J Butlin has received news of the death of his son, who was shot through the heart. He was one of Kitchener’s Army, who joined the King’s Royal Rifles. His death occurred on the 10th inst., and he was laid to rest at Potijze Military Cemetery, near Ypres. The inscription on the tomb was : “ He tried to do his duty.” Much sympathy is felt for Mr Butlin, who has lost his wife, a grandchild, and son in the space of a few months, and is himself an invalid. He has also received a sympathetic and comforting letter from the chaplain.

 

BISHOPS ITCHINGTON.

FROM THE FRONT.—Pte Thomas Thacker, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was slightly wounded in the latest attack on the West. Pte Thacker, who had previously been wounded, received some shrapnel in the ankle. He has been at his home since July 13th, and has made such good progress that he will return to his depot in the course of a few days.

DUNCHURCH.

SERGT W E CONSTABLE, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable (formerly of Dunchurch), who joined the Royal Engineers early last year, has been mentioned in despatches by General Sir Douglas Haig, dated April 30th. He is to be warmly congratulated upon his distinction.

DEATHS.

CASHMORE.—Died of wounds in France,. Private F. Cashmore, 1st R.I.F., aged 24 years.

CHATER.—In loving Memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. Chater, Machine. Gun Section, 12th R.B. Killed in action in France, June 30th, 1916, aged 31 years.
“ Sleep on, beloved, and take thy rest,
We loved you well, but God loved you best.”

COOK.—Died of wounds on July 8th, Cyril Edward, Second-Lieutenant, Royal Sussex Regiment, elder son of Sam Cook, Wargrave, Berks, and grandson of the late Mrs. Cook, of Hillmorton House, aged 23.

DOYLE.—In ever-loving memory of Corporal Frank Doyle, the dearly loved son of Betsy and the late Joseph Doyle, of Frankton. Killed in action at No Man’s Land, July 13, 1916.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But ’neath some foreign skies,
And far from those that loved him best ;
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving MOTHER, BROTHERS, and only SISTER (LIZ).

Gartenfield, Charles Reginald. Died 25 Apr 1915

Charles Reginald Gartenfield was baptised on 3 March 1878 in Long Itchington. His father was Henry Goodrich Gartenfield, a police constable, who had married Charlotte Amelia Mary Ann Sullivan in Birmingham in 1872. In 1881 Charles was living with his parents in Long Itchington and elder brothers Henry and George. By 1891 Charlotte was a widowed nurse, living at 8 Chapel Street, Rugby. Charles R, aged 13, was a scholar at Ratcliffe Industrial School for Boys in Bath. (The 1857 Industrial Schools Act was intended to solve problems of juvenile delinquency, by removing poor and neglected children from their home environment to a boarding school.)

In July 1895 he joined the army, the Shropshire Light Infantry. He gave his age as 18 years 5 months, in fact he was a year younger. He was 5ft 6in tall, with a fresh complexion, grey eyes and light hair. The start of his service was troubled, as he was tied for various offences: striking a superior officer (1896), wilfully injuring property belonging to a comrade and using insulting language to his superior officer (1898) and drunkenness (1899). He served in India for 5 years and in 1904 applied to extend his service to twelve years. He returned to India for nearly four years and was then discharged on 12 Nov 1907, on termination of period of engagement.

By 1911 he was back in Rugby, boarding at 9 Lago Place. Aged 36 (actually 33) , he was a labourer at the B.T.H. works.

Sometime after the start of the war he was back in the army, this time in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He entered France on the 7 April 1915. Less than three weeks later he was killed in the second battle of Ypres.

Charles Reginald Gartenfield, Rugby Advertiser 29 May 1915

Charles Reginald Gartenfield, Rugby Advertiser 29 May 1915

Private Charles Reginald Gartenfield, service no. 3274, 1st Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment is listed on the Ypres, Menin Gate Memorial, panel 8. He was aged 37.

He is listed as Charles R Gartenfield on BTH memorial, but as C R Gardenfelt on Rugby Memorial Gates.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM