Wise, Arnold Vincent Denys. Died 15th May 1917

Arnold Vincent Denys Wise was born in Rugby according to various census. His birth was registered in Rugby registration district in September quarter 1893 and he was baptised at St Matthews church on 23rd July 1893.

He was the son of Thomas Arnold Wise and Fanny Estelle Shortland, she was born in India and the marriage took place in the Isle of Wight in September quarter 1891. AVD Wise was at home in the school “Oakfield” at 21 Bilton Road, Rugby, where his father was a schoolmaster. According to the 1901 census he is aged 7, born Rugby.

In the 1911 census he was at Leconfield school, Cheltenham, now Cheltenham College aged 17 born Rugby, Warwickshire.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Engineers with the rank of 2nd Lieutenant and was posted to the 2nd Field Squadron. He was later promoted to the rank of Lieut on 25 June 1915. He was awarded the Military Cross.

The CWGC states that Capt AVD Wise was killed in action on 15 May 1917 aged 23 of Royal Engineers( 2nd Field Squadron)and is commemorated at XA9 in Tincourt New British Cemetery , on the Memorial Gates in Rugby and on the Oakfield memorial in St Matthew’s Church, Rugby. Awarded MC and is son of Thomas Arnold and Estelle Wise of Oakfield, Rugby

Medal Roll has ranks 2nd Lieut and Captain Arnold Vincent Denys Wise , awarded Victory Medal, British War Medal, 15 star. Theatre of war: France. Father TA Wise, Oakfield, Rugby

Army service record not found at Kew, though Long number 20807 found.

Using Army Lists, the following found:

Date of birth: 6 June 1893, Appointed 2nd Lt 17 July 1914 in Royal Engineers

Appointed Lieutenant Royal Engineers 9 June 1915, Appointed Acting Captain 20 August 1916

Rugby Advertiser of 26th May 1917 records the death of Captain Arnold Vincent Denys Wise of the Royal Engineers on 15th May 1917. He was killed by a fluke shot from the burst of an automatic at some 800 to 1000 yard, living for about half an hour afterwards. He was mentioned in despatches in January 1916 and awarded a Military Cross in February 1916. The Advertiser has more detailed information about his career.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Golby, George Arthur. Died 22nd Mar 1917

George Arthur GOLBY, was born in Paddington, London, in about early 1895, the son of Arthur John Golby, a painter, and his wife, Emma née Hamer, who was born in Marylebone, London. Arthur and Emma’s marriage had been registered in Greenwich in Q2 1894. Whilst George was born in Paddington, it seems likely his mother had been visiting her parents.

The family seems to have been established in Rugby, where Arthur John Golby had been born in about 1868 in Hillmorton, his father in turn having come to Hillmorton from Oxfordshire, before the 1880s, to work as a bricklayer.

George was christened at Hillmorton on 14 April 1895 and his sister was born in Rugby in about 1897.   By 1911 the family were living at 5 Paradise Street, Rugby.

George attended Murray School, where he was the ‘… winner of the Over Prize – which is offered annually to the boy who, in the opinion of his fellows, shows the best example of true manliness – in 1907.’[1] By 1911, when George was 16, he was a Clerk for an Electrical Engineers, and living with his parents and younger sister. He is not mentioned on the British Thompson Houston memorial, so must have worked for another firm in Rugby.

There is some confusion over George’s military service. His death notice suggested that he was a ‘…L-Corpl … of one of the Rifle Corps …’, however, his Medal Card and the CWGC describe him as Sapper No.95858 in the 89th Field Company Royal Engineers [RE]. His Medal Card also stated that he went to France on 30 October 1915, although there is no specific mention of reinforcements arriving with the 89th around that date in the War Diary.

The 89th Field Company were attached to the 14th Division which had been in action in August and September 1916 at Hooge, Delville Wood and Flers-Courccelette. It seems likely that George was part of the general reinforcement during the ‘quieter’ winter period as between 30 October and George’s death on 22 March 1917, the 14th Division and hence the 89th were not in any major actions, although they would later be actively involved in the battles at Scarpe in April 1917.

George wrote a letter to W T Coles Hodges which was published in the Rugby Advertiser in January 1916.[2]

OLD MURRAYIAN’S LETTER

Sapper Geo A Golby, a former scholar at the Murray School, and an “Over” Prize man, in a letter to Mr W T Coles Hodges[3] from the front says: “I have been out here since early in October, and have got quite used to the shells, etc, screaming over my head … I look forward to receiving the Rugby Advertiser every week, and am always pleased when I see the name of one of my old school chums in the list of recruits. I think by the number of names I have seen that our school is doing its share to free the world of these barbarians, and I am sure that if those who have not enlisted could just have a glimpse of this country, they would not hesitate for a minute. Only this morning we passed about a dozen old people (all between 60 and 70 years of age, I should think) whom the Germans had shelled out of their homes. It is a sight such as these that make us so anxious to get at the Huns. … I am pleased to say we are having a spell of fine weather just now, and goodness only knows we want it, as we are nearly up to our knees in mud in some places. This is the only thing to complain of out here; the food is extra.”

However, George was killed ‘… by a stray shell …’ on 22 March 1917 which was a month before the battle of Arras, when he was involved in work just to the south of Arras making the preparations for that battle.

The 89th Field Company’s War Diary[4] relates that in later February 1917 the Company had been strengthening defences in Arras, working to prepare Advanced Dressing Stations, strengthening cellars, preparing Trench Mortar positions and signal stations. From 18-20 March 1917 they were working on bridging trenches and were subjected to heavy shelling by the Germans. Then on 21 and 22 March …

21 March – … Nos. 3 and 4 Sections with two parties of 80 men each from 41st Bde, clearing main road through Beaurains.

22 March … Work the same as 21st. … No.4 Section caught by shellfire in Ronville … casualties, Lce Cpl Mitchell, Lce Cpl Golby, Saprs Anderson, E Durston, J Jones, Little, killed, …

Three more of the Engineers in that working group were wounded and two concussed.

George was buried at Beaurains Road Cemetery, Beaurains in grave ref: 1 C 21. His mother chose the inscription, ‘Lord we asked of thee life. But thou hast given him life everlasting’. The cemetery was near where he had been working on the southern outskirts of Arras. The five other men from his Field Company who were killed by the same shell were buried beside him in graves C18 to C23.

The cemetery was only begun a few days before Beaurains was captured by Commonwealth forces on 18 March 1917 [just four days before George’s death]. It was a month before the Battle of Arras began, and the Germans were still in nearby Tilloy-les-Mofflaines. The cemetery was used (sometimes under the name of Ronville Forward Cemetery) until the beginning of June by the 14th (Light) Division Burial Officer and by fighting units.[5]

George was awarded the Victory and British medals and the 1915 Star. He is remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gate. The Rugby Advertiser noted that ‘… all the Over prizemen, who are of military age are actually in the firing line, and that two have made the great sacrifice, the other being Corpl Barnwell.’[6]

After the war, his mother was writing to the CWGC from 202 Ducane Road, Shepherd’s Bush, London, and it seems that Emma and George had moved to London – George’s death was registered in Hammersmith in 1927.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

This article on George Arthur GOLBY was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, February 2017.

 

[1]       From a notice of death in the Rugby Advertiser.

[2]       Rugby Advertiser, 8 January 1916.

[3]       Wm Thos Coles Hodges of 17 Gainsborough Street, Rugby, was headmaster of Murray School from at least 1906.

[4]       Royal Engineers, 14th Division: Piece 1889/3: 89 Field Company Royal Engineers (1915 May – 1919 Jun). Also available at www.ancestry.co.uk.

[5]       CWGC, http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/…

[6]       Lance Corporal George Thomas BARNWELL, No.3026, 1st/6th Bn South Staffs, was killed on 15 July 1915. He was the son of J and E Barnwell of 35 Claremont Road, Rugby and buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery. See https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2015/07/15/barnwell-george-thomas-died-15th-jul-1915/.

12th Aug 1916. Down With Diphtheria But Not Depressed

DOWN WITH DIPHTHERIA BUT NOT DEPRESSED.

A Rugbeian has this week received a letter from his brother, who is now in a hospital in France suffering from diphtheria :—

“. . . Many thanks for sending on the dictionary. I lost mine, and as my spelling deteriorated 50 per cent without a dictionary, a dictionary becomes a very important part of my equipment. I wanted a dictionary to find the meaning of the word ‘ scabies.’ It was not in the aforesaid—that’s the right word, isn’t it ?—book. I don’t think I need refer to the dictionary for that. Sit on a box of itch-he-coo powder, it will soon explain itself . . . As you remark, diphtheria is not to be treated lightly, but it’s not thought so serious as it used to be, thanks to the injection of an anti-toxin which consists of 4,000 germs which they inject in your chest. This little army proceeds in marching order and makes a rear attack on the enemy’s trenches. After repulsing a severe counter-attack, they succeeded in opening the lines of communication again, thus enabling me to talk to Nurse and also to partake in the jellies and custards, etc. A nice soft bed to lie on—the first bed for 15 months. I made a fuss of it, too, for eight or nine days. Sister daily takes your temperature, and feels your pulse, makes the bed, and tucks you up. Dear, dear. . . . who wouldn’t have diphtheria ? Now I am stage number two, making myself generally useful washing up pots and pans, laying tables, cutting bread-and-butter, etc. I have had one swab taken since being in hospital. They take a swab every week. If you get three negatives, you are free of the germ ; but if you have positive, you are a germ-carrier, and they keep you a bit longer. My first swab was a negative.

MILITARY MEDAL FOR A RUGBY HOWITZER MAN.

Battery Sergt-Major George Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, writing to Mr A Adnitt, as hon secretary of the Rugby Territorials Comforts Association to thank him for parcels of comforts received, adds :—

“ You will be pleased to know that one of our boys, Gunner Bosworth, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field on July 21st, going out under heavy fire several times to repair the telephone wire in order to keep up communication with the battery. He was also mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch for distinguished conduct in the field.

“ We have been in the thick of the fighting since July 1st, but have been very fortunate as regards casualties, as we have had only five wounded—Corpl Hipwell, Bombardiers Smith and Rixom, and Gunners Seaton and Packwood.

“ I dare say you read in the papers about our Division, together with the Anzacs, taking one of the most important points along the front on July 23rd. They were congratulated by the Commander-in-Chief and the Corps Commander on their performance.”

Gunner Bosworth is the son of Mr G Bosworth, who formerly worked as a painter for Messrs Linnell & Son, but has now removed to Essex. His grandfather resides at Lutterworth.

In a letter to his old schoolmaster, Gunner Bosworth, an Old Murrayian, says :- “ On the morning of the ‘ big push ‘ I was on duty at our observation station, and had occasion to go out on the line and repair breakages caused by the shelling. The O.C. was good enough to bring the incident to the notice of the General, and I have since heard the good news of being granted the above medal.”

HIGH PRAISE FOR THE HOWITZER BRIGADE.

The following letter from the Brigadier Commanding the Artillery Division to the O.C’s of the Batteries and Ammunition Columns, will be of much local interest :—

“ Will you please convey to all ranks my appreciation of the excellent work performed by the batteries and D.A.C during the last five weeks. The preparation of gun positions for the July offensive entailed continuous and very hard work on the batteries, but this labour was well repaid in the fewness of the casualties suffered at the guns. The Division subsequently taking over reported that they were the best positions they had yet seen.

“ The continual night firing has been particularly trying, but the shooting was consistently good, which reflects great credit on all ranks, and the successes gained by the Infantry were, in the words of the Divisional Commander, largely due to the effective support rendered by the Artillery. I hope during this week all ranks will be able to get the rest which they all deserve.

DEFEAT OF THE TURKS.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY DO WELL.

The Turks on Friday last week made another and disastrous attempt to reach the Suez Canal. The point chosen for the attack, which was made by 14,000 troops, was Romani, 18 miles east of Port Said. While holding the frontal attack the British, on the southern flank, retired until the enemy had become involved in the sand dunes. A counter attack was then made with all arms, which was completely successful, and at dawn on Saturday the enemy was in retreat, with our troops in vigorous pursuit. The Turks suffered heavily, and so far the British captures comprise 45 officers and 3,100 men, including some Germans, four mountain guns, and a number of machine guns. The British Commander-in-Chief pays warm tributes to the Anzac troops, the Territorials, the Royal Flying Corps, and the monitors, which, firing from the Bay of Tina, gave valuable assistance. During the day the temperature was 100 degrees in the shade.

“ The Times ” correspondent says :— “ The brunt of the fighting was borne by Anzac mounted troops. Of the British troops, the Scottish and Lancashire Territorials and the Warwickshire and Gloucester Yeomanry fought splendidly, and amply avenged the previous loss of comrades by taking over 300 prisoners and two camel guns, and inflicting very heavy casualties. From Territorials of average quality in peace times they have improved into a brigade of veterans. They left the railway at a place within sound of heavy rifle fire, and light-heartedly marched away to attack through ankle-deep sand, and thoroughly proud that their time had come. A little later, from a different spot, I saw Warwickshire and Gloucestershire Yeomanry marching over flatter country, with flankers advanced and rear guards and squadrons as well alined as on parade.”

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Sergt H Lee, R.W.R, until the War employed in the gardens of Dunsmore, and Pte H T Gardner, of the same regiment, whose home is at Clifton, have been reported wounded.

Mr W W College, 9 Church Street, Rugby, has received official intimation that his youngest son, Pte W F College, Royal Warwicks, was reported missing on July 19th. He only joined up in November last year, and had been out in France about three months.

LIEUT E A R SMITH, of CLIFTON.

News has been received that Lieut Eric Arthur Ray Smith, R.W.R, son of Mr A E Smith, of Enfield, was killed in action on July 22nd. Lieut Smith, who was 27 years of age, and was married, occupied the Manor Farm, Clifton, until he was given a commission in the R.W.R last year, and was well known locally.

PTE ARTHUR REYNOLDS MISSING.

Mr W A Reynolds, of 26 West Leyes, Rugby, has received news that his son Arthur, a private in one of the Territorial Battalions of the R.W.R, has been posted missing since July 19th. Pte Reynolds was 20 years of age, and joined the army 12 months ago. He has been in France about two months. Before joining the army he was employed in the tailoring department of the Co-operative Society.

LANCE-CORPL EDWARD HARVEY.

Information has been received by Mrs R Harvey, Windsor Street, Rugby, that her son, Lance-Corpl Edward Harvey, of the Hampshire Regiment, was killed in action on July 1st. Lance-Corpl Harvey enlisted at the beginning of the War, prior to which he worked at Newbold Cement Works. He had been in France 15 months. He was 35 years of age and a native of Rugby. Before the War he lived in Bridget Street, Rugby. He leaves a widow and four children. Mrs R Harvey has two other sons at the front.

SECOND-LIEUT P A MORSON WOUNDED.

Mr and Mrs A Morson, of The Chace, on Monday received news that their son, Second-Lieut P A Morson, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, had been wounded on August 1st. Lieut Morson joined the H.A.C as a private, and proceeded to France on July 1, 1915. He saw much of the fighting round Ypres and Hooge, and then in April of this year he received his commission. He went all through the recent big advance until wounded on August 1st, and he is now in the Second General Western Hospital at Manchester. He received six wounds in the left hip and thigh and one in the left shoulder. An operation has been successfully performed, and his friends will be pleased to hear that he is now going on well.

PTE M E CLEAVER REPORTED MISSING.

Mrs Cleaver, of 28 Plowman Street, has been notified by the War Office that her husband, Pte M E Cleaver, of the R.W.R (T.F), has been posted as missing after an engagement on July 19th. Pte Cleaver, who was a native of Rugby, lived in the town till a year or two ago, but at the time of enlistment he was residing at Banbury. He has four young children.

In the same platoon as Pte Cleaver was an old Rugby footballer, well known as “ Zooie ” Batchelor. He is now in hospital near Liverpool, suffering from shell shock, which has rendered him deaf and dumb.

LANCE-CORPL BROMWICH, of PAILTON PASTURES.

News has been received by Mrs Bromwich, of Pailton Pastures, that her son, Lance-Corpl E J H C Bromwich, of the Northants Regiment, was killed in action on July 18th. Her husband was killed in the Boer War, and Lance-Corpl Bromwich entered the Duke of York’s School for soldiers’ sons at the age of 14. Although he was only 20 years of age, he had, therefore, served six years in the Army. He was wounded last autumn, but recovered, and was drafted to the front again.

SECOND-LIEUT E A R SMITH.

Second-Lieut Eric Arthur Rae Smith, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who, as recorded in our last issue, was killed in action on July 22nd, was the youngest son of Mr Arthur K Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, and was 27 years of ago. For some years before the War he was in the H.A.C, and in April, 1915, obtained a commission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, proceeding to the front last May. His Commanding officer writes : “ He was killed whilst leading with the utmost gallantry his platoon into action on the night of July 22-23. In him the Battalion has lost a truly gallant officer of great promise, who had already endeared himself to all ranks.” When Lieut Smith joined the Forces he was occupying the Manor Farm at Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

SERGT-MAJOR WILLIAM J BRYANT KILLED.

Considerable regret will be felt locally at the confirmation of the rumour, circulated in the town last week, that Sergt-Major William John Bryant, of the Rugby Infantry Company, had been killed in action. The news was conveyed to Mrs Bryant, the widow, who lives at 98 York Street, in a letter from the O.C of A Company to which Sergt-Major Bryant was attached on his promotion from the rank of sergeant. The writer says :— “ His death came as a great shock to us all. When such men as he go from us a sort of despair follows, and we feel one of our great supports has gone. He was for some time the quartermaster-sergeant of the company—a post which does not entail so much danger as that of sergeant-major. But as soon as his predeccessor (Sergt-Major Wood) was wounded he lost no time in stepping into his place, and I always remember how eager he was to be right up in the trenches, as close to the enemy as possible. His long service with the regiment, his good character and capacity for doing honest sound work, will ensure that his memory will always remain with those who have known the regiment. His loss is one that it will be hard to replace, and the sympathy of all of us goes out to you.” Sergt-Major Bryant, who was killed while leaving the trench on July 26th, was the second son of Mr Wm Bryant, of Rugby. He was 43 years of age, and leaves a widow and eight children, six of whom range from 15 to 4 years of age. He had been connected with the Rugby “ E ” Company for 25 years, and in 1914 he won one of the company challenge cups. He was a builder by trade, and was highly respected by all who knew him.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

On Wednesday last Mr and Mrs Neal received official intimation from the War Office that their son, Pte W H J Neal, of the Royal Berkshire Infantry Regiment, was killed in action on July 30th. Pte Neal was 19 years of age on the day he was killed. He only enlisted on the 13th of April last as a Driver in the Royal Field Artillery. He had been transferred about a week to the Royal Berkshire Infantry Regt and sent out to France, when he met with his sad end. On enlistment he was being employed by the Sparking Plug Co, but had previously worked at the Rugby Portland Cement Co at Newbold for a considerable time. He was a bright youth, and much sympathy is expressed with his parents in their sad bereavement.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

We regret to learn that Major Darnley is lying very ill in hospital in Malta.

Lieut-Col F F Johnstone is returning to the command of the 2nd Battalion the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment.

Temporary Lieut W C Muriel, of the 9th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been promoted Captain as from the 1st of July.

Capt E R Hopewell, of the 7th Worcestershire Regt, who was wounded in the recent fighting in France, has been awarded the Military Cross. He is a son of Mr E W Hopewell, formerly of Rugby.

MOTOR LORRY FATALITY.

Attempting to board a motor lorry in motion, Corporal Edgar Percival Haddock, of the Royal Engineers, stationed at Welford, Rugby, fell and sustained severe internal injuries, from which he died soon after admission to Northampton Hospital, on Friday last week. At the inquest, held at the hospital on Saturday evening, a verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned. Corpl Haddock, who was 19 years of age, was a son of Mr Edgar Augustus Haddock, the director and principal of the Leeds College of Music and the director of the Mayfair School of Music. He was a motor engineer, and at the time of the accident was working with other members of his Company on the telegraph wires on the main road between Northampton and Rugby. He was located at Rugby for a time.

FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT NEAR RUGBY.

TWO OFFICERS KILLED.

As the result of a collision between two aeroplanes near Rugby on Thursday afternoon one of the machines crashed to the ground, and the occupants, Lieuts Rogers and de Frece, of the Royal Flying Corps, were killed instantly. The other machine made a safe descent, saw the occupants were uninjured.

In consequence of the accident a concert, which was to have been given on behalf of a Soldiers’ Comforts Fund, was postponed.

LETTERS FROM “ E ” COMPANY MEN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—As one of the old “ E ” Company Terriers, I am writing a few lines to let you know that some of us are still plodding along.

Since we came out to France some 17 months ago we have been practically under shell fire the whole of the time, with the exception of about a fortnight, when we were going to have a rest, but were recalled to have another spell in the trenches. Although up till the present time we have not been what we called “ over the top,” we have done some excellent work, for which we have been greatly praised by the various commanders. For one to say that he had not been away from the Battalion an hour during this long period of trench life hardly seems credible, but this is the case with the majority of us. All through the winter we had to keep pumps going, as the water was very often up to our thighs, and overflowed into the tops of gum boots, which we were provided with for winter trench work. Then, again, we had wiring to do at night. Doubtless, if our neighbour across the way could not find us sufficient work one way, he would do so by shelling our wire and trenches. During our tour we have experienced shell of all calibre. Among those we received there was one which we named “ Gommy Lizz ”— a most objectionable neighbour, for when it exploded it would throw pieces of metal with razor-like edges. The largest of these bombs weighed about 200lbs.

I must not forgot to tell you of the things that happen behind the lines in the way of amusements. There are three Pierrot troupes, who used to give us some splendid turns. Then, again, there is the cinematograph. This we must thank the B.S.A for. It is a splendid machine, and included engine and dynamo for lighting purposes.

Now we have the Divisional Band, which plays to our Battalion in turn. It is composed of all the best musicians in the Division. When hearing this it makes us wish we were in the Park at Rugby instead of this place.

I must now return to the trench life, as I think this is our most important work. We have been in the great offensive, for which we were highly praised, and I might also say we have been in the great advance, but am very sorry to say we lost some of our best pals. The work of our guns, both large and small, has been excellent at this point. I will now close, leaving us all in the best of spirits and health,—I remain, yours sincerely, A. V. A.

August 2, 1916.

A TREACHEROUS GERMAN.

DEAR —-— Just a few lines in haste to let you know I am all right. No doubt by now you will know we have been in for it. We have lost very nearly all of the Company. I am the only sergeant left. We have no officers ; they are all wounded or killed. We thought none of us would get through alive. We smashed them up with a seven hours’ bombardment, and then went for them. We got into their second line, and stopped there for about two hours. The slaughter was awful ; there were heaps of dead. Captain — was killed going over, two lieutenants were wounded, and the others we do not know anything about. We sent about 35 prisoners back from their front line to ours. I stood talking to the sergeant-major at the time, and one of the Germans asked for a drink of water. One of our men gave him one, and as soon as he had had a drink he snatched up a rifle that stood by the trench and shot our Company sergeant-major through both legs. I need not say what became of him. I am glad I am all right, thank God ; but their are a good many that have gone. Just fancy, it took two years to train the Battalion, and they were cut up in about two hours. But I will not say any more about it ; I want to try and forget it. GEORGE.

To Employers

Employers are reminded that it is an offence under the Munitions of War Acts 1915 and 1916, punishable by Fine not exceeding £50, for any person to Employ anyone who has been engaged in a Controlled Establishment within Six Weeks from the date of leaving unless he or she can produce a Leaving Certificate (Form M.T. 23), or a Certificate issued by the Chairman of a Munitions Tribunal.

The attention of Employers is directed to Statutory Rule No. 121 relating to Certificates, also to M.M. 14, being a Memorandum for the guidance of Employers in regard to Leaving Certificates which can be obtained upon application at any Labour Exchange.

The British Thomson-Houston Co. Ltd.
Willans & Robonson Limited.

PROSPETS OF DEARER BREAD.—There has recently been a substantial advance in the price of flour. Within three weeks it has risen by 8s a sack, and it is very possible that the effect will be that householders will have to pay more for their bread in the near future. Sugar continues to be scarce and dear, and the Sugar Commission has just issued posters urging economy in the use of this very essential article of food.

DEATHS.

HARVEY. Killed in France on July 1st, 1916, Lance-Corporal Harvey, 1st Hampshire Regiment, son of Mrs. R. Harvey, Windsor Street, Rugby, aged 35.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

LEACH.—In loving memory of our dear son, Percy John Leach, who was killed at Sulva Bay, Gallipoli, on August 6,1915.
“ A light is from our household gone,
A voice we loved is still;
A place is vacant in our hearts
The world can never fill.
He went away to a distant land,
And fought his country’s foes;
He there was kept by Death’s grim hand :
To return to his home no more.”
—From his FATHER & MOTHER, BROTHERS & SISTER.

ROWBOTTOM.—In loving memory of Corporal S. Rowbottom, Oxford and Bucks L.I., who died of wounds received in action at Ypres, August 12, 1915. Buried near Poperinghe.
“ There isn’t much we did not share since our school-days begun ;
The same old work, the same old play, the same old sport and fun,
The same old chance that laid you out, but winked and let us through,
The same old life, the same old death, ‘Good-bye’ and ‘God bless you.’ ”
—From FRANK and ALBERT (B.E.F.).

WORMLEIGHTON..—In loving memory of Frederick James Wormleighton, R.E., killed August 9th, 1915 (In France).
“ In the midst of life we are in death.”
—From his loving mother, brothers, and sisters.

Harrison, Alfred Abram. Died 29th Jul 1916

Alfred Abram Harrison was born in Northend/Burton Dassett, near Leamington Spa, in about 1871. He was the son of Thomas and Hannah Harrison of Northend, Leamington.

By 1891, when he was 20, he had moved to Crewe where he was in lodgings with the Moseley family at 56 Gresty Road, and working as a ‘railway porter’.   It was there that he met his future wife, Elizabeth Ann Moseley, who was then the eldest daughter of the family, aged 18.

Alfred Harrison’s Service Records exist, indeed two sets of Records exist, as he had two separate periods of military service.

There was a formal request for him to be enlisted in the ‘RE Railway Reserve’ on 22 February 1894 and he joined up on 17 August 1894, at Chester, as a Sapper No.28186, when he was 23 years and 6 months old. He was then a railway ‘fireman’, a Wesleyan, and joined the ‘2nd CRVRE’. He transferred to the Reserve the next day. He was apparently on ‘Home Service’ from 17 August 1894 to 13 March 1901.   However, it also seems that he was recalled to Army Service under Special Army Order of 20 December 1899 and then re-enlisted on 26 December 1899. The service dates may have been entered incorrectly as it suggests that he served in South Africa only from 14 March 1901 until 23 August 1901.   However, it seems that he took part in the South Africa 1899 campaign, and was awarded the Queen’s South Africa 1899 – 1902 medal and clasps for Cape Colony, Orange Free State, and South Africa 1901. He was discharged at Chatham on 21 September 1901. His next of kin was then his mother, Hannah.

In about early 1902, very soon after his return from South Africa, he married Elizabeth Ann Moseley in the Nantwich registration area. She had been born in about 1873 in Crewe, Cheshire and perhaps they had been engaged since he met when lodging at her mother’s home in the early 1890s.   They moved to Rugby and lived at 45 Claremont Road, Rugby, where in 1911 he was enumerated with his wife, and was working as an ‘Agent Oil Trade’, indeed, he was the local agent for the Anglo-American Oil Company. They had been married nine years but had had no children.

Having been in the army, Alfred signed up again on the outbreak of WWI and his ‘Army Reserve, Special Reservists, One Year’s Service’ (or the duration!) attestation papers in Rugby on 14 September 1914, showed that he had lived ‘out of his father’s house for three years continuously’, and had served in the ‘RE (Railway Reserve) time exp.’.   He re-enlisted as a Sapper, No.51892 in the 87th Field Company, Royal Engineers. He was 5foot 8½ inches tall; weighed 156lbs, with grey eyes, brown hair, and now declared that he was Church of England.

87th Field Company, The Royal Engineers joined 12th (Eastern) Division in January 1915 as the Engineers were in training at Hounslow and final training was undertaken near Aldershot from 20 February 1915. They proceeded to France between 29 May and 1 June 1915, landing at Boulogne, they concentrated near St Omer and by 6 June were in the Meteren-Steenwerck area with Divisional HQ being established at Nieppe. They underwent instruction from the more experienced 48th (South Midland) Division and took over a section of the front line at Ploegsteert Wood on 23 June 1915.[1]

Alfred Abraham Harrison’s Medal Card states that he went to France on 30 August 1915, so would have probably been serving as an engineer during the Battle of Loos.

They were in action in The Battle of Loos from 30 September, taking over the sector from Gun Trench to Hulluch Quarries consolidating the position, under heavy artillery fire. On the 8th they repelled a heavy German infantry attack and on the 13th took part in the Action of the Hohenzollern Redoubt, capturing Gun Trench and the south western face of the Hulluch Quarries. During this period at Loos, 117 officers and 3237 men of the Division were killed or wounded. By the 21st they moved to Fouquieres-les-Bethune for a short rest then returned to the front line at the Hohenzollern Redoubt until 15 November, when they went into reserve at Lillers. On 9 December, 9th Royal Fusiliers assisted in a round-up of spies and other suspicious characters in the streets of Bethune. On the 10th the Division took over the front line north of La Bassee canal at Givenchy. On 19 January they began a period of training in Open Warfare at Busnes, then moved back into the front line at Loos on 12 February 1916.[2]

Alfred’s records show that he was admitted to hospital on 29 April 1916 and discharged on 2 May 1916; he was then readmitted to 25 General Hospital on 9 May 1916 and discharged on 20 June 1916, although there was no indication on his record as whether he had been wounded or had been ill. However, his obituary[3] noted that, ‘… he had been at the front for twelve months. Some time ago he was slightly wounded, and on leaving hospital was transferred to another company, in which he had served only 15 days when he met his death’.

In June they moved to Flesselles and carried out a training exercise. They moved to Baizieux on the 30th June and went into the reserve at Hencourt and Millencourt by mid morning on the 1st of July. They relieved the 8th Division at Ovillers-la-Boisselle that night and attacked at 3.15 the following morning with mixed success. On the 7th they attacked again and despite suffering heavy casualties in the area of Mash Valley, they succeeded in capturing and holding the first and second lines close to Ovillers. They were withdrawn to Contay on the 9th July

His record confirms that on 14 July 1916, he joined ‘another company’, ?‘103 Co?’, which was it seems in the same area, Ovillers – la Boiselle. He was probably retained in the area because of his local knowledge. However, just two weeks later on 29 July 1916, he was ‘Killed in Action’, and his record stated that he was

Buried close behind British Front Line North of Ovillers – la Boiselle, Sheet 57D – X2G 2663.

It seems that his body was then lost as he is listed by the CWGC, as one of those killed or missing, on 29 July 1916 and whose body was not found or identified. He is remembered on Pier and Face 8A and 8D of the Thiepval Memorial.

The Thiepval Memorial, the Memorial to the Missing of the Somme, bears the names of more than 72,000 officers and men of the United Kingdom and South African forces who died in the Somme sector before 20 March 1918 and have no known grave. Over 90% of those commemorated died between July and November 1916. The memorial, designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens, was built between 1928 and 1932 and unveiled by the Prince of Wales, in the presence of the President of France, on 1 August 1932.

Alfred Abraham Harrison was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal. He was also awarded the 1915 Star. Alfred is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates.

His widow and sole legatee, Elizabeth A, received £11-10-1d on 2 October 1916, and £8-10-0d on 13 September 1919. Administration (with will), was granted at London to his widow on 14 November 1917 in the sum of £173-2-8d.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

– – – – – –

 

This article on Alfred Abraham Harrison was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the Rugby Family History Group, July 2016.

[1]         http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/allied/royalengineers87fldcoy-gw.php

[2]         http://www.wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/allied/royalengineers87fldcoy-gw.php

[3]       Rugby Advertiser, 26 August 1916

4th Dec 1915. Interesting Letter from an Old Murrayian

INTERESTING LETTER FROM AN OLD MURRAYIAN.

AN INSPIRING PICTURE FOR SLACKERS.

The following letter has been received by a young lady in Rugby, whose brother, an Old Murrayian, is at the front :—

“ I am in a dug-out about 15 feet under the ground, and the only illumination available is a novel one. It is a piece of rag dipped in vaseline ; but tomorrow our fresh supply of candles arrive, so I shall look forward to a ‘ bright ‘ future. I will try and describe to you what my vision of the scenery is like. To do that I shall have to gain a point of prominence ; but there are plenty of them here—namely, brickstacks—as at present my home is in the trenches which are situated in the brickfields. This district has figured in General French’s despatches a good many times, and has been the scene of some severe fighting. Evidence of this is still scattered around. It is noted for being a hot quarter, and it lives up to its name. The first thing you notice is the maze of trenches as far as the eye can reach. Some of them were demolished, and others intact, having stood the brunt of it all. The intervening ground between the firing lines, called “ No Man’s Land,” is completely ploughed up by the enormous number of shells that have burst there. One would think it impossible to get through the barbed wire entanglements. Certainly now they are intact, but you should see them after the high explosive shells have played their part and blown them to bits, and the case is altered. The chasm that one can just discern is a blown-up mine crater, and whichever side holds these craters, makes strong efforts to retain them. This is where bomb throwers shine, as parties are organised at night to try and capture them. It is very dangerous work, as there is generally a maxim gun in the crater. In the distance one can see ruined chateaux and buildings, which have tasted the power of a “ Jack Johnson,” also the coal mines (called ‘ Fosses ‘ here), which mark the vicinity of some desperate fighting. These brickstacks are the delight of the sniper, as concealment is so easy, and such a commanding view can be obtained of the surrounding country. Eleven are in our possession, and two are in the hands of the Huns, so we have a great advantage over them. The stacks, being so conspicuous, get their full share of shells, and one is very lucky if, when looking from them, he does not get a greeting of shrapnel. This is the place where Mick O’Leary won his V.C, when the Guards captured the trenches from the Huns. There are plenty of graves which contain dead Germans ; also broken rifles and equipment which once belonged to them lying about. It gets very cold at night, but we have plenty of clothes. We had a bit of sun this morning. It was the signal for the aeroplanes to make their appearance, and what a reception they had from the anti-aircraft guns. We have had a good bombardment, and I think the Huns sent over everything that Krupps manufacture. . . .“ As we pass down the road to —-, we pass several graveyards, with hundreds of wooden crosses. What an inspiring picture to place before the slackers at home. One lives and learns, and I would not exchange positions with anyone in England at the present moment. With all the hardships, everything is so jolly, and when the war is over I hope to be able to take you all for a nice trip round here and act as your guide, because I pride myself upon knowing a little bit of France now from Ypres to Arras.”

In another letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, F.E.I.S, the same writer, after describing the scenery near where he is stationed, says:—

“ The intervening ground between the firing trenches, called ‘ No Man’s Land,’ is dotted with dead bodies, and here friend and foe lie side by side. The rain makes everything so miserable and muddy, and it is a picture to see the men come out of the trenches, covered with mud, and knowing what it is to be strangers to a wash for a couple of days ; but still one can always bet upon having an accompaniment on the mouth organ to march with.” The writer describes the cemeteries on the La Basse-Bethune Road, and says: “ Each contains many trim little crosses, and in some cases evergreens and flowers have been planted among the graves by comrades who cherish the memory of a chum so much. Large crosses are generally erected when a considerable body of men belonging to the regiment get killed. For instance, there is one here which has the following inscription : ‘ To a platoon of Guards,’and as a platoon is from 50 to 60 strong, this goes to show what severe fighting has taken place in this vicinity. Sometimes I come across an old school chum, and then the conversation generally drifts to what is a memory to me, and a very pleasant one at that—our schooldays at Murray Road School.

NARROW ESCAPE OF AN OLD MURRAYIAN.

Pte Horace Anderson, of the 2nd Warwicks, son of Mr W Anderson, 102 Winfield Street, Rugby, is in hospital at Torquay with a shattered thumb and slight wound in the side. He was also gassed, and for a time he was in a critical condition. His mother has been to Torquay to see him, and he gave her a Testament which he was carrying in his breast pocket at the time he was acting as bomb carrier at the battle of Loos. A bullet had struck the Testament, smashing away a portion of one corner, but the missile was evidently diverted by contact with the book, otherwise it would have passed through, or dangerously near, his heart. His cap also had a bullet-hole, which entered just over the right temple, passed along the side, and out at the back, so that he evidently had two very narrow escapes from direct rifle fire ; and after being gassed he was lying in the trenches for come hours.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The third son (William Harry) of Mr Chas Packwood, of, Warwick Street, Rugby, has joined the 2nd Battalion of the Honourable Artillery Company (Infantry). Mr Packwood now has three sons serving with the Colours.

A LUCKY BATTALION.

Driver Philip Strongitharm, of the 25th Battalion R.F.A. has this week been on leave to his home at 8 Fasy Lane, New Bilton. after about 16 months at the front. The battalion to which he belongs has seen a lot of fighting, having been at the war since August last year, but they have come through so far with comparatively few casualties amongst the men. The loss of horses has been rather serious, and in the engagement at Ypres, when taking part in the withdrawing of guns from an untenable position, Driver Strongitharm had three horses shot under him in quick succession. He has had a number of hairbreadth escapes, but has not sustained the slightest injury, and appears none the worse for his spell of active service. Like so many others who have had personal knowledge of the actual fighting in France, he believes that the German resistance is weakening and that circumstances will in time compel them to evacuate Belgium, though they have got such a firm footing in the country that it will not be an easy matter now to expel them.

TEN DAYS’ LEAVE.

Sapper T Lord, of the Royal Engineers, whose home is at 28 Bennett Street, came to Rugby on Tuesday for 10 days’ leave, after being for a while at Leicester Hospital. He was wounded in the thigh, and retains the bullet as a souvenir. He has also undergone an operation for varicose veins, so may not be fit for work in the trenches for some time. When he leaves Rugby next week he has to report himself at Newark.

Sapper T Lord was attached to the 15th Scottish (New Army) Division, which played such a distinguished part in the advance at Loos, and when Lieut Johnson of that company gained the Victoria Cross for rallying the Scottish detachment at a critical moment at Hill 70. Most of the other officers in his company were either killed or wounded. On the Thursday following the advance, Sapper Lord, with a party of ten men, under Corporal Overill, of the B.T.H, were burying the dead between the old lines, when the enemy threw over a couple of shrapnel shells, a bullet from one of which wounded Sapper Lord in the thigh. Corporal Overill also sustained a slight scalp wound. While Sapper Lord was on a hospital barge on the canal at Bethune, a German aeroplane bombed the railway station, and during the unwelcome visitor’s stay our informant says he spent the most uncomfortable minutes of any he experienced in France, Sapper Lord was conveyed to England in the Hospital ship Anglia, which has since been sunk in the channel, and is full of praise for the excellent treatment which the wounded receive from the R A.M.C, the Red Cross, and Hospital workers generally.

ANOTHER RUGBY MAN AWARDED THE D.C.M.

Amongst those who have recently been awarded the D.C.M is Bombardier J R Handyside, D Battery, 71st Brigade Royal Field Artillery. He received the distinction for conspicuous gallantry from the 26th September to the 14th October, 1915, during which time his battery was in the open and constantly under a very heavy fire. He frequently volunteered to mend telephone wires under heavy fire, thereby successfully maintaining communications. Bombardier Handyside had been previously brought to notice for coolness and bravery on the 25th September near Loos, when he repeatedly volunteered to repair wires under very heavy fire, although he was suffering from the effect of gas fumes at the time.

Bombr Handyside hails from Newcastle, but when war broke out he was working at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and lodged at the house of Mrs Hayward, 43 Lodge Road. Rugby. He enlisted as a gunner on September 3rd, 1914, and has now been promoted to the rank of Corporal. In addition to the D.C.M he has been awarded the French Medal Militaire.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL,

SATURDAY.—Before T Hunter, Esq.

AN ABSENTEE.—James Crosier, 27 Newbold Road, Rugby, of the 3rd Lancashire Fusiliers, pleaded guilty to being an absentee from his regiment.—Supt Clarke stated that he had received a communication from the commanding officer of the Battalion, asking him to arrest defendant.—Remanded to await the arrival of an escort.

COVENTRY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL

MONDAY.

LOST IN A FIELD.—Walter Crofts, a Rugby crane driver, explained that during a night walk he got lost in a field, encountered some barbed wire, and tore his hand. This was in answer to a summons by Willans and Robinson, Ltd., Rugby, alleging that he absented himself without leave.

“ Were you practising for the front ?” asked the Chairman, “ No, I was walking with my brother,” he replied. He explained other losses of time by stating that he attended a wedding on one occasion, and at another time he had his jaw fractured by a man in the shop. The Chairman said defendant seemed to find a good deal of trouble, and should be a little more careful at week-ends. He would be fined 15s.

A WORKER’S PROTEST.—That he refused to do work he was engaged upon, and stood by his bench for four and a half hours, were the complaints against Leonard J Hopkins, 99 Victoria Street, New Bilton, by the B.T.H, Coventry. His reply was that he went to enlist, and after that was put on assembling instead of his proper job as a driller. He could not earn a living, and stood idle as a protest. He was fined 2s 6d.

CHURCH LAWFORD.

THE WHITE FEATHER.—Some little stir has been caused during the last week in this village. It would seem that quite recently a young man residing in the village was the recipient of a white feather, which came to him through the post, and of course made him very angry. Being a Territorial, he at once wrote a long letter to his commanding officer expressing his willingness and readiness to fight for his country, etc, and also accusing a tradesman’s wife (whose son has been in the trenches for twelve months) in the village of sending the obnoxious article and of insulting him in various ways. As a result of this letter, the lady in question has had a visit from the local police officer on the subject, and as she and her family are, absolutely and entirely innocent of the charges made against them, they in their turn are highly indignant, and are making inquiries which may possibly result in an action for slander.

BOOKS & PERIODICALS WANTED FOR SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

SINGLE COPIES GRATEFULLY ACCEPTED AT THE POST OFFICE.

As is now generally known, there has been for some months past a scheme in operation under which magazines and books which have been given by the public for the use of soldiers and sailors, have been forwarded by the Post Office to the men free of charge.

The scheme so far has proved a great success, but with the growth of the Army the demand for literature has increased, and the Agencies recognized by the War Office and Admiralty for the distribution of literature have to face a demand to satisfy which a supply of over 100,000 items every week is required from the Post Office.

At present only about half that amount is being sent, owing to a recent falling off in the supplies handed in by the public.

It is possible that it is not known to everyone who may have books or magazines for which they have no further use that by merely handing them in loose at any Post Office, they will be at once forwarded to the distributing centre in London.

This is a good work in which almost everyone can participate with the pleasant thought that, at little or no cost or trouble, every article so given will afford much pleasure to many of the soldiers and sailors who are sacrificing so much for the nation and the common cause.

It is difficult, of course, to make this fact fully known, so that anyone will be doing a good service by merely talking about the matter to their friends.

Throughout the Rugby district during the Christmas season there will no doubt be a very large number of magazines and light literature purchased, to be lightly thrown aside when read. These are the books the soldiers and sailors are eager to get, to help them to lighten the monotonous periods of their present kind of life, so that it is earnestly hoped every person who becomes acquainted with this scheme will do all he or she can to assist.

If you have only one book or magazine you can spare, hand it in at any Post Office in the town or country district just as it is. The Post Office will tie the articles in bundles and despatch them without delay.

WHAT AN ENEMY NEWSPAPER THE SAYS OF US.

“ We see that the Englishman—unlike the good business man he is so persistently deemed—upon noting that his Eastern ally is being slowly but surely driven back, will, instead of making the best of it, do his utmost to settle down for a three year war, or four year war, working with bull dog tenacity to crush his enemy in the end. When the end will be is no concern, of his. He began the business. He will see it through. In this strange phase of the English character there is enormous strength. We may be sure that if all the belligerents are beaten into insensibility, he will still hammer away with bleeding fists, tired and exhausted. England, in her persistence, will never stop, even if she knows that the longer the war lasts the more she will bleed—even if she knows that all possible gains at the finish will not make good half of what she has lost. . . .

“ Those Germans who look forward to an early peace in this world with longing hearts must turn their eyes on England hopelessly, for as long as the sun of peace is not rising in the isles to the west of us, there is no hope of peace. And England, secure in her citadel, behind the bulwark of her fleet, can go on and on and on.”— AZ EST, (Budapest) “ Sphere.”

GRAMOPHONE NOT GONE ASTRAY.

In the Advertiser of November 20 we inserted a paragraph under the heading “ Gramophone Gone Astray,” asking for the name and address of the person who left a letter at our Office purporting to be sent from the boys at the front with reference to a gramophone which had been sent out to them. There was no response to that invitation, but Miss M Evans, of James Street, Rugby, who collected subscriptions and sent out an instrument of this kind about a month ago has received a letter from a member of E Company, stating that it came duly to hand. It sustained some damage in transit, but was put in order again, and has since been used by each platoon of C Company (in which E Company is now merged) in turn, when off duty, and, he adds, “ I can assure you many happy hours have already been passed away with it.” Each platoon can use it as often as possible, but those in the firing line do not have it, because that is impossible.

RUGBY TOWN V.A.D. AUXILIARY WAR HOSPITAL.

The Hospital is now almost completely furnished and is expected to be opened on Wednesday, the 8th December.

16th Oct 1915. A Romance of the Battlefield

A ROMANCE OF THE BATTLEFIELD

WEDDING OF A RUGBY SOLDIER.

The sequel to a romantic meeting of an English soldier with a French lady behind the firing-line in France was provided at Holy Trinity Church on Monday, when Sapper Charles Batty, R.E, son of Mr T B Batty, 82 Grosvenor Road, was married to Mdlle Gabrielle Louise Vermeersch, of Armentieres, Nord, France. The ceremony was performed by the Rev C M Blagden, Rector, in the presence of a large congregation. Miss Violet Batty, sister of the bridegroom was the bridesmaid. A reception was held after the ceremony at the house of the bridegroom, and the Rector and a number, of friends were present.

The meeting between the happy couple was of a somewhat romantic nature. The occupants of a humble dwelling at Erquinghem sur la lys, near d’Armentieres, were aroused at 10 p.m one evening in January last by a knock at the door. The father of the lady of the house immediately went to the door, and seeing a man in uniform, standing there, exclaimed in anguish that their visitor was a German. Pte Batty, the visitor in question, however, assured him that he was an Englishman, and asked for a cup of coffee. He was immediately invited inside, and at the entreaty of the lady of the house gladly accepted an invitation to remain there for the night. During the course of the evening he met the hostess’s sister, Gabrielle, who smilingly informed our representative that his subsequent visits became very frequent. The town where this lady dwelt was bombarded by the Germans on several occasions, and in June last, at Sapper Batty’s request, Mdlle Vermeersch agreed to come to England for safety, and await such time as he should be able to obtain leave to come over to marry her. Arrangements Were made for the wedding to take place seven weeks ago, but Sapper Batty was unable to obtain leave, and the wedding was accordingly postponed. On Thursday in last week, however, he arrived at his home, and the wedding took place by special license on Monday, the bridegroom returning to the front on Wednesday.

Sapper Batty, who possesses a number of interesting trophies, obtained on the field of battle, has been in the army for nine years. He originally enlisted in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, and spent several years in England. His regiment returned to England in March, 1914, and on the outbreak of war he was drafted to the front, and a short time ago he obtained a transfer to the Royal Engineers’ telegraphic section. He has been in 10 engagements, including the recent offensive.

THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY AT BURNT HILL.

Corpl Jack Fortnam, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who was wounded in the charge at Hill 60, Suvla Bay, and is now in hospital at Netley, writes:-

“ We were all cosy in our little dug-outs, basking in the sun, some writing, some watching our navy barely half-mile away sending shells to the Turks, in exchange for their heavy artillery shells. Everyone seemed greatly amused, and in the best of spirits, taking but little notice of the shells and shrapnel, that occasionally fell amongst our boys. About three o’clock in the afternoon, we had rumours going round that we were going to move. Later on we found the rumour was official. We had our rum issue, and extra rations, ready to fall in at 7 o’clock. It was now getting dark. We moved off along zigzag paths, stumbling over rocks and small bushes, and, making a right-hand wheel around Sulva Bay till we reached Lala Baba, our reserve position, about 2 p.m. Our orders were then to get a little sleep till morning. We were all pleased when morning came. We were nearly perished with cold, but soon got fit again when the sun came out. Making tea was out of the question, so we breakfasted on bully and biscuits, and a limited supply of water. At 2.10 p.m a terrible bombardment began from our battleships, and artillery, which kept up the fire until four o’clock, sending their shells immediately over our heads. The ground fairly shook. Hundreds of shells were sent up to greet the Turks. It must have been absolute death for them in their trenches. No wonder it took the name of “Burnt Hill.” This hill had a fine main fighting position, and caused a great deal of trouble to the V-shape new landing of troops and transport. About four o’clock we had to fall in. We moved off in extended order. On our right were the Gloucester and Worcester Yeomanrys, followed by the Bucks, Berks, and Dorset.

As soon as we come in sight across the open country, on the right of Salt Lake, the enemy opened a deadly shell fire, with shrapnel and explosive shells. One could see nothing but shells bursting around them. We lost many of our boys wounded with shrapnel, and it was quite marvellous to find any alive, as the shells set fire to the small bushes and dry grass where they had fallen, but our stretcher-bearers did fine work there. Onward we pressed, steadily, but firm, as if on parade, taking cover behind Chocolate Hill, where we rested a while and called the roll. Up till now, I had lost half my section of ten—Lce-Corpl Coleman, Lce-Corpl Baulman, Lce-Corpl Wormall, Tpr Luggar, and Tpr Hayward. One shell falling against me knocked over six of the troop, but I was lucky enough in only losing the heel of my boot.

A division of infantry on our right had made a rush for Hill 70, but owing to the enemy’s guns at a short range they had to retire with heavy losses. By this time it was getting dusk. Our division of yeomanry then had orders to move forward, along the northern slope, until we came to advanced trenches. Here we had a check for a few minutes. Then came the order to advance, and every man, alert and eager as one body, charged fearlessly up the hill. Here my officer, Lieut Yorke, was wounded, but on we went straight into the jaws of the enemy’s machine-guns and rifles, losing many boys, but never wavering ; nothing could stop them, finally the top was reached, when the yell wept up that Hill 70 had been taken. This was where I was wounded. It was now quite dark, and I found it a difficult job dragging myself back to a dressing station, only to find that and other stations massed with wounded and lit up by the fires, that burned furiously for miles. I decided to march on, eventually reaching the beach, a distance of four miles, for dressing, at 5 a.m. It was a most awful night, with guns and thousands of rifles keeping up an incessant roar, and groans and cries from the wounded. Since then I find it was advisable for our boys to retire, on account of the enemy’s severe enfilading fire from a northern hill. The country will be proud of the charge by England’s gallant yeomanry.

THE BRITISH ADVANCE.

GRAPHICALLY DESCRIBED BY A RUGBY SOLDIER.

Corpl Herbert Reynolds, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr T Reynolds, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, in a letter to Mr J W Faulkner, captain of the 2nd Rugby Company of the Boys’ Brigade—in which the writer was formerly Colour-Sergeant—gives a realistic account of the recent capture of German trenches by the British. He says :—

“ On Friday night we went into the assembly trenches, 100 yards behind the fire trench, and lay there all the night. It rained hard all night, so it was a bit uncomfortable crawling around in the mud. At about four o’clock the ‘ fun ’ started. We had to keep our heads pretty low to escape the shells. At six o’clock it really began, The earth trembled and shook, and up went a mine and half of the enemy trench ! My word, it did shift some earth ! Immediately the bombardment started. It was hell itself—one continual burst of high explosives and shrapnel. Then we threw out a smoke screen, and the “ Scotties ” and the Indians charged, capturing the trenches easily. Next our turn came to go over. We lined the fire trench and watched our Captain for the order. He jumped up, waved his stick, ‘Come on,’ he said, and as one man we got over the parapet to face a perfect hell of rifle, machine-gun, and shrapnel fire. At the foot of our barbed wire we lay down in extended order and waited for the next advance. Up and on again ! Down again ! The fire is terrible and we must advance by short 15 yards rushes. The German trench is about 300 yards distant. When we get within about 30 yards we crawl, and then finish up with a rush, and into the trench.

“It is in the hands of our troops, but all the time we are subjected to a terrible enfilade fire. We held the trench for about eight hours, but we could not get our bombs across, so had to give ground before their bombing from the flanks. Men were being blown to pieces, and we were powerless. We hung on to the last and then got the order to retire. You cannot possibly imagine what the shell fire was like, but, believe me, when once you’ve seen in it, well, you are not keen to go again for a bit. The return journey was worse than the outward one, and how I came back whole I don’t know. Just outside the enemy’s trench a piece of shell caught me in the back and ripped a hole in my trousers and pants. It knocked me flying, but it only bruised me a bit. We came back all right though, and lined the support trenches. Then it rained in torrents and we got wet through to the skin. When the news came that we were to go out that night, you can bet we were thankful. The communication trench was knee-deep in water, but we did not mind that so long as every sight of that terrible scene of carnage was left behind.”

LETTERS FROM OLD MURRAYIANS.

Mr W T Coles Hodges, F.E.I.S, headmaster of the Murray School, has received the following letters from old scholars :-

Sapper Alf Brett, R.E., writes :-“ I take this opportunity of a lull in the fighting to describe how things are progressing out here. Of late the fighting has been very heavy. The general offensive was commenced with a vengeance. Previous to September 25th the bombardments were numerous, increasing in severity as the days rolled on. Our guns literally raised a sheet of flame over the German trenches. Shells of various calibre were hurled at their trenches, until in places one could hardly discern their front line. At night it was a glorious spectacle, to see shells bursting, throwing out a brilliant white light, mingled with the star lights, the latter being used for observation purposes. The German losses must have been enormous, and how human beings could live through such a hell of fire is a mystery. Luckily the Germans did not retaliate to a great extent on our trenches. They seem to have a great love for shelling towns and villages. Every place in our neighbourhood is absolutely destroyed ; fine buildings and churches charted and in ruins. Only a short time ago was looking over the remains of a church ; statues of our Lord were lying about in pieces, even a lead coffin from a vault had been hurled into the middle of the church. The roof had fallen in, half of the tower was gone, and one wall had collapsed. Until you actually see such things you cannot realize what a state the country is in. But they are getting full reward for this now. Since the offensive started everyone has been very busy. . . . In the five months I have been out here I have seen a good deal of fighting, although not actually fighting myself. My duty as a telegraphist plays a most essential part in any operation, and very often it brings one into great danger. To sit in a dug-out operating with shells bursting all round you, and expecting one at any minute, to knock the roof in is not a pleasant, position. If one could retaliate, a little satisfaction would be gained. . . . . Although it is a rough and ready life with plenty to do, we can find time for a game of footer or cricket, and we have had a number of exciting games of football. Unfortunately, no one cares for Rugger, the general opinion being that it is far too rough. At headquarters we have a comfortable time. Our dwellings consist of a bivouac built up with sandbags, which serves as dining-room, bedroom, and smoke-room. You can bet we make them as comfortable as circumstances permit. Fights in the air are now a daily occurrence. Our airmen never seem happy unless they are endeavouring to bring down a German Taube, although exposed to the fire of anti-aircraft guns. I have had the pleasure of seeing one German ’plane crash to the ground. . . . I wish all the boys would don the khaki quickly and help their comrades to terminate this business, with Germany crushed and crumpled.

Armr-Staff Sergt H Clarke, A.O.C, attached 7th Kings Shropshire L.I, writes :-“ It is nearly six months since I left the Warwicks to transfer to the Ordnance Corps, and my work now is to look after all the rifles, machine guns, range-finders, and anything in the mechanical line belonging to the battalion. It suits me down to the ground. I don’t think you could beat the team that won the shield without having a point scored against them a few years ago for fighting men, and I hope you still have a team of fellows who will turn tut like they have done, and ready to play the game on a different field to the “ Rec.” The weather out here is getting very cold ; we don’t mind the cold at all, it’s the rain that is the trouble. Things are very funny out here if one has a sense of humour. The best part of all is to hear our chaps trying their French on the people out here. The food is extra so far, and looks like keeping so. The men will fight anything and anybody so long as they have good food.”

Rifleman L Griffith, 7th K.R.R Corps, has also written to Mr Hodges, and states that the Rugby boys remaining in the Battalion are quite well. He adds : I am glad to see that the Old Murray Boys have responded well to the call. The Old Boys have not disgraced the school’s name.

FIVE SONS IN THE ARMY.

Mr and Mrs. Charles Robinson, of Catthorpe, have received the King’s congratulations on the patriotic spirit which has prompted their five sons to give their services at the present time to the Army.

  1. Gunner Arthur Robinson, Garrison Artillery.
  2. Driver Alfred Robinson, A.S.C.; in France.
  3. Gunner Owen Robinson, R.F.A.
  4. Trooper Sidney Robinson, Derbyshire Yeomanry; at Dardanelles.
  5. Driver Percy Robinson, A.S.C.; in France.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Temporary Second-Lieutenant W G Muriel has been promoted temporary lieutenant.

Two collective letters from the Market Place Wesleyan Sunday School have been sent to the soldiers in the trenches who were formerly connected with the school.

The War Office has notified that Pte W G Attenburgh, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who previous to enlistment was assistant to Mr Trillo, Station Road, Rugby, was killed in the great advance on September 25th. He was a native of Hinckley, and was 26 years of age, and was much respected by Mr Trillo’s patrons.

LIEUT DUNN MISSING.

Second-Lieut R I Dunn, Royal Engineers, son of Mr W Dunn, of Kings Newnham, has been missing since September 25th. He was last seen in the front trench, in company of two officers of the Cameron Regiment.

OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY WOUNDED.

The Old Boys of St Matthew’s School serving with the Colours are reported to have been wounded : Corpl Frank Jarvis, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, and Pte Arthur Coles, of the Sherwood Foresters.

Capt and Adjutant A H A Vann, 12th Yorkshires, the Cambridge University hockey player, who recently received the D.S.O, is officially reported to be suffering from gas poisoning and missing. Before the war, Captain Vann was engaged as an assistant master at Mr C G Mallam’s School, at Dunchurch. At that time he played fairly regularly for the Rugby Hockey Club, and also assisted Warwickshire on several occasions. He was also quite a good cricketer.

LATE BOOKING CLERK RECEIVES A COMMISSION.

Corporal Leo Tompkins, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, who was formerly a booking clerk at the L & N.-W. Railway Station at Rugby, has just received a commission as second lieutenant in the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry. Whilst with the Northamptons, he saw a good deal of service in the Ypres district last winter, and was wounded in four places, but is now convalescent.

MR C MARRIOTT LOSES ANOTHER SON.

Mr Charles Marriott, J.P, of Cotesbach Hall, has received information that his son, Second Lieut Digby Marriott, was killed in action recently in France. The sad news was brought by Pte Phillips, who came home on leave on Wednesday. This is the second son Mr Marriott has lost in the war within a few months.

A CLIFTON PATROL LEADER KILLED.

News reached Mr J Lintern, of Clifton, from the War Office, on Wednesday last of the death of his son, Bugler Wilfred Lintern, of the 12th Battalion Rifle Brigade, who fell in action on September 25th, at the great advance. Deceased was employed before he enlisted as a turner at the B.T.H Works, and was a Patrol-Leader of the Clifton Court Scouts.

A STRANGE MISTAKE.

Mr and Mrs E Sleath, of Manor Farm Cottages, Clifton, on Tuesday received official intimation from the Record Office that their son, Rifleman Richard William Sleath, was killed in action on September 25th. This is evidently a mistake, because since that date Mrs Sleath has heard three times from her son, the last letter being written on October 10th ; but the family have been rendered very anxious, inasmuch as another son. Rifleman Fredk Walter Sleath, of the same battalion, has not been heard of since the advance ; although his brother, who is reported killed, has written to say that he has heard that he was wounded in the leg during the charge, would be sent to England. In view of the fact that nothing more has been heard, the family have been forced to the conclusion that there is simply a mistake in the name and number, and that it is Frederick who has been killed. The two brothers enlisted in the 12th Battalion Rifle Brigade, on September 7th, 1914, with Rifleman Lintern, whose death we record this week.

[note: CWGC records the death of Frederick Walter Sleath on 25th Sep 1915]

Lance-Cpl Arthur H Hunt, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, whose parents live at 172 Cambridge Street, Rugby, was wounded in the thigh and knee during the great charge at Loos. He is now in hospital at Lincoln, going on satisfactorily. Lance-Corpl Hunt, before enlistment, was employed at the B T H, and was a playing member of the Park Albion Football Club.

LONG LAWFORD.

WOUNDED IN ACTION.—The following men from this village are reported to be wounded :— Pte G Loydall, E Cox, and G Adams.

Haines, Charles Lionel Richard. Died 10th Oct 1915

Charles Lionel Richard Haines was born on 9th September 1891 in Otterbourne, Hampshire. His father, Charles James, was an engineer at the waterworks there. Charles James had been born in Bermondsey, London and married Amelia Emma Adams on 14th July 1888 at Newington Parish Church. Charles Lionel Richard had a younger sister, Millicent Ethel Haines

By 1911 Charles Lionel Richard was living in Balderton, Nottinghamshire. He had been apprenticed to James Simpson and Co of Newark, a manufacturer of steam engines and pumps for waterworks. He was a student and then teacher at Newark School of Science and Art. He was a member of Newark Hockey Club and the Rowing Club there.

By the start of the war he was working in the drawing office at Willans and Robinson in Rugby and signed up at the start of September 1914, together with many other staff members and men from the company. He joined the Royal Engineers as a sergeant (No. 43159). He arrived in France on 10th July 1915 and took part in the Battle of Loos, where so many Rugby men lost their lives. He was hit by shrapnel and died in Netley Hospital two weeks later of pneumonia. He was buried in Putney Vale Cemetery.

Haines memorial, Putney Vale Cemetery

Haines memorial, Putney Vale Cemetery

By this time his parents had moved back to London and lived at “Rogate, 76 Worple Road, Wimbledon. Charles Lionel Richard Haines was aged 24.

As well as Rugby Memorial Gates, he is remembered on the Willans & Robinson plaques. In Newark he is listed on the Rowing Club Memorial, Newark Cemetery War Memorial and the Borough of Newark Roll of Honour at St Mary’s Church.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM