Coleman, Duncan Reginald. Died 11th Nov 1918

Duncan Reginald COLEMAN was born in Wardington, Oxfordshire on 27 August 1894, and baptised there on 2 December 1894.  He was the second son of George Henry Coleman [a plasterer, b.c.1856 in Warmington, Warwickshire] and Emily, née Treadwell, Coleman [b.c.1864 in Wardington, Oxfordshire].

In 1901 the family were living at the ‘Red Lion Beer House’, in Wardington, probably following in part the family trade – as George Henry’s father had been an innkeeper in Milcomb.  George Henry was however still working as a ‘plasterer’.

At some date before 1911, the family moved to Rugby and in 1911 were living at 102 Lawford Road, which seems to have been later defined as 102 Dunsmore Terrace, Lawford Road, Rugby.  George Henry was now 55 and his wife Emily was 45.  They had had nine children, but one had died and it seems that one had already left home.  However, seven children were still living at home: Muriel Blanche Coleman was 24; Mary Olive Coleman, 21; Albert Victor Coleman, 18; Duncan Reginald Coleman, was now 16 and already working as a moulder in an Iron Foundry; Ida Cerise Coleman was 12; Stanley Winston Coleman, 11; and Lena Emily Coleman, was 8.

A somewhat complicated set of Service Records survives for Reginald, as it seems he had a number of postings and was also wounded.  Together with various other surviving documents it is possible to provide an outline of his military career.

In summary he was:                                                                                        Days
Home              17 – 4 – 16 to 15 – 7 – 16                         90
BEF France     16 – 7 – 16 to 10 – 5 – 17                      299
Home              11 – 5 – 17 to 22 – 12 – 17                    226
BEF France     23 – 12 – 17 to 11 – 11 – 18                  324
Total    2 years 209 days

He was living at 102 Lawford Road, Rugby, when he first signed up at Warwick[1] for General Service, posted to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and then posted on 18 April 1916 as a Private, No.18102 in the 11th Battalion, the Royal Warwickshire Regiment (RWR).  He was 21 years and 7 months (or 210 days!) old, 5ft 6¼ inches tall, single and working as a ‘moulder’.

He was transferred as a Private to the ‘Expeditionary Force France’ on 16 July 1916 and embarked for France on 19 July 1916.  On 24 July 1916 he was posted to 11th Bn. RWR, ‘In the Field’.

He was wounded in action with a ‘GSW chest sev’ [Gun Shot Wound to the Chest Severe] on 23 April 1917, and on 3 May 1917 he was ‘adm 4 Gen H’ [Admitted to 4th General Hospital] at ‘Dannes Camier’.[2]  He was then transferred to England on the ‘HS [Hospital Ship] Cambria’ two days later on 11 May 1917, being transferred to the Home Depot that day.

He was admitted to the Eastern General Hospital, Edmonton for 21 days from 11 May to 1 June 1917 and this was extended for a further 10 days from 1 June to 11 June 1917 for the same ‘GSW Chest’ at the Edmonton Military Hospital – probably the same hospital, but with different stamps!!  After these periods, he was pronounced ‘Cured – No FB prelit? or disability – furlough thence CD’ [probably ‘Command Depot’].

On 22 October 1917, he was posted to the Essex Regiment, and on 28 October 1917, he was re-posted as a Private, No.45263 to the 17th Battalion, Essex Regiment at Dover.  On 22 December 1917 he went overseas again from Weybourne, by way of Folkestone on 23 December, arriving in Boulogne to join the BEF on the 24 December 1917.  On the same day he was transferred ‘in the field’ to the Royal Engineers, as a Pioneer, No.358639 and on 27 February 1918 to the Royal Engineers, No.4 Foreway Company, ‘at RE Rates’ from 28 February 1918.

Later that year, on 19 September 1918, he was ‘temporarily and compulsorily’ transferred to the Railways sub-unit in the Transportation Branch RE and from 20 September became a Pioneer with the 234th Light Railway Field Company and allotted a new regimental number: WR/358639.  The letters ‘WR’ stood for ‘Waterway and Railways’.  The 234th (Forward) Company was formed in France and operated there.

The formation of the RE Light Railway Companies in early 1917 was an innovation that was one of the factors that transformed the operational abilities of the army.  Goods and men could now make the last leg of the journey to the front by light rail.  Until that time, ammunition supply in particular had been subject to delays and required vast numbers of men and horses, and the light railways helped overcome both problems.  Traffic and wear on the roads and tracks leading up to the front was eased, and fewer men were required to repair them. … The Company consisted of approximately 200 men, … Drivers, Brakesmen, Guards, Wagon Repairers, Repair Shop Engineers, Traffic Controllers and Storesmen.   There were few officers among this number … The job … was to run the trains, with the tracks being laid by RE Railway Construction Companies – often with the assistance of whatever Labour Corps Company or ‘resting’ infantry were at hand.[3]

At some stage, presumably in early November, he became unwell and was transferred to No. 29 Casualty Clearing Station, which was then stationed at Delsaux Farm.  It was from there that his death was reported, ‘Died – Influenza – 11.11.1918’.  He died of Pneumonia on ‘Armistice Day’, 11 November 1918, aged 25, at ‘29 CCS’.  A confirmatory report in his Service Record, from the Captain RAMC, Medical Specialist, 29 CC Station, read,
358639 Pnr Colemen DR, 234 Light Forward Railway Co. RE
The a/m man died from Influenza followed by Broncho-Pneumonia & heart failure.
The disease was brought about by exposure whilst on military service in France.

Duncan was first buried in the Beugny Military Cemetery No.18, which had been made by the Germans after their Operation Michael[4] advances in March 1918 near the village crossroads.

Later, the German graves were removed, and in 1920, the British burials were exhumed and reburied at the Delsaux Farm Cemetery, adjacent to the Casualty Clearing Station.  Duncan was reburied  in grave reference: III. A. 17.  His gravestone bears the family message ‘Greater Love Hath No Man’.

A draft and copy of a letter sent to Duncan’s father is with his Service Record.

Royal Engineers, Record Office, Chatham  –  16 June 1920

Sir, 

I beg to inform you that in accordance with the agreement with the French and Belgian Governments to remove all scattered graves, small cemeteries containing less than 40 graves and certain other cemeteries which were situated in places unsuitable for permanent retention, it has been found necessary to exhume bodies buried in certain areas and re-inter them, therefore the body of your late son, No. WR/284262, Pioneer, D. R. Colemen, R. E., has been removed and re-buried in DELSAUX FARM BRITIH CEMETERY, 3 ¾ miles E. of BAPAUME.

The necessity for removal is much regretted but was unavoidable for reasons stated above.

The removal has been undertaken with every measure of care and reverence and special arrangements have been made for the appropriate religious services to be held.

I am, Yours faithfully,          for Colonel i/c R. E. Records.

The cemetery is near the village of Beugny, in Pas de Calais, France, some 19 kilometres south-west of Cambrai.

Delsaux Farm was a point on the German defensive system known as the Beugny-Ytres line, which was reached by Commonwealth troops on 18 March 1917, and passed on the following day. The farm was lost on 23 March 1918 after the gallant defence of Beugny by the 9th Welsh Regiment and their withdrawal, but it was retaken by the 5th Division on 2 September 1918, and on the next day the same division occupied Beugny village.  After their advance in March 1918, the Germans made a cemetery (Beugny Military Cemetery No.18) at the cross-roads, and in it buried 103 Commonwealth and 82 German dead.  The site was extended in October-November 1918 by the 29th and 46th Casualty Clearing Stations, which came to Delsaux Farm and made the present cemetery.  A little later, the German graves of March 1918 were removed and the 103 Commonwealth dead reburied in Plot I, Row J, Plot II, Row A, and Plot III, Rows B, C and D.  The rest of the cemetery was made when graves were later brought in from the battlefield. … The cemetery was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens.[5]

Duncan Reginald COLEMAN was awarded the British War and Victory Medals.  He is remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates and on his CWGC gravestone at Delsaux Farm Cemetery, Beugby. 

Duncan’s outstanding pay of £24-3-8d was paid to his ‘Fa[ther] & Sole Leg[atee] George H’ on 12 April 1919, and note stated that this was ‘Including War Grant £14-10-0’.  On 17 April 1919 his property was returned to the family: ‘Letters; Shaving brush; Badge; Photos; Wallet’.

His elder brother Albert Victor Coleman, signed up on 12 December 1915, and also served initially in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, as No.3098, and later in the Royal Berkshire Regiment as No.44920.  He survived the war.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Duncan Reginald COLEMAN was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, October 2018.

 

[1]      UK, Soldiers Died in the Great War, 1914-1919.

[2]      The No 4 General Hospital was at St Nazaire in September 1914; at Versailles from September 1914 to January 1916; at Camiers, when Duncan Coleman was admitted, from January 1916 to April 1919; and at Dunkerque from April 1919 to November 1919.

[3]      https://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/army/regiments-and-corps/the-corps-of-royal-engineers-in-the-first-world-war/light-railway-operating-companies-of-the-royal-engineers/.

[4]      https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/03/20/the-1918-spring-offensive-operation-michael/.

[5]      Edited from: https://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/23600/delsaux-farm-cemetery,-beugny/.

21st Sep 1918. Suggested Memorial to Rugby Men

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

Several matters of more than ordinary intent, including a suggestion for Rugby a memorial to local soldiers killed and maimed in the War, was discussed at the monthly meeting of the Urban Council on Tuesday, when there were present : Messrs J J McKinnell (chairman), W Flint (vice-chairman), T A Wise, W H Linnell, R Walker, W A Stevenson, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, C J Newman, F E Hands, S Robbins, and H Yates.

WELCOME TO LIEUT NEWMAN.

Before proceeding to the formal business, the Chairman, on behalf of the Council, welcomed Lieut C J Newman on his return from active service, and also conveyed to him the sympathy of the Council in the death of his wife. The circumstances were peculiarly sad, and he wished Lieut Newman to realise how deeply his colleagues felt for him in his deep sorrow.—Mr Newman said he was pleased to be back again to do his duty for the public of Rugby, and especially the electors of the Central Ward.

SUGGESTED MEMORIAL TO RUGBY MEN.

An interesting discussion took place on the consideration of a letter from the Rugby Branch of the National Association of Discharged Sailors and Soldiers, asking the Council to assist them in providing an institute (where they could hold their meetings), a library, &c, for men discharged from the various forces.—The Chairman suggested that the letter be referred to the Estates Committee.—Mr Newman said he desired to raise the question of a war memorial to their local men. So far nothing had been done, except to arrange for a collection of photographs to be placed in the Library.—The Clerk (Mr A Morson, M.B.E) explained that other steps had been taken. Some time ago, at the suggestion of the Council, he invited the relatives of soldiers killed in the War to forward the names to him, and he now had a very long list.—Mr Newman contended that this was not going far enough. They should now consider the question of providing a fitting memorial to those who had been killed or maimed in the War, and a list of their names should be suitably preserved. Rugby did not lend itself to statuary ; and, after all, a statue was only a nine days’ wonder after it was unveiled. He therefore suggested that they should go further than this, and erect some houses, with all the modem conveniences and improvements for discharged soldiers who had been maimed in the War. In connection with this it might also be possible to erect an institute for the discharged soldiers.—The Chairman : It is a huge job.—Mr Robbins supported Mr Newman’s suggestion, and said if they did not aim at something big they would not get anything. Houses for discharged soldiers would be much more useful than a monument.—The Chairman suggested that they should deal with the subject matter of the letter first. If these discharged men had to wait until the Council had raised the money for providing an institute they would have to wait a long time. He proposed that the letter be referred to the Estates committee to see if that body could find suitable premises for them.—Mr Yates said he would like to have more information from the association as to what they had in mind. He had considered the question very carefully, and he was not in favour of providing any institute for setting these men apart from the rest of the civilian population. They wanted these men, when they returned to civil life, to take their part in the reconstruction of society with the rest of the community as far as possible, and they did not wish to set up any class feeling between those men who had been away and those who had not. If they only wanted a place to hold their meetings in it was the duty of the Council to find them one ; but he believed they were well provided for in that respect at present.—Mr Newman said he did not agree with these remarks. A discharged soldier had the right to ask for anything he liked, and why should he not be allowed to do as he liked ? When the War was over the discharged sailors and soldiers would be a force to be reckoned with, and they must do all they could to entertain them and provide them with decent surroundings, and not leave them in the streets to die like dogs, as they had done in the past. This was his sole idea in suggesting the provision of houses and an institute for these men.—The letter was referred to the Estates Committee.

The question of a war memorial was then considered, and the Chairman said he took it that they would desire it to be a Memorial to all who went out to fight for them, whether they came back from the War or not. He thought they would have to set up a special committee to deal with the matter, The first thing, however, was to get the money, and then they could decide what to do with it. He agreed with Mr Newman that Rugby did not lend itself to statuary, and he thought the suggestion that an institute should be provided was a very good one. However, if they had the money now they would not be able to spend it.—Mr Newman : There are ways and means for everything in this world.—The question was referred to the General Purposes Committee.

JAM MAKERS THANKED.

The Chairman said it would be within the knowledge of the members that since their last meeting a committee of local ladies had been very energetic in making jam for the military and the civil population. They had made 7,350lbs. and he believed that, with one exception, the whole of the work had been done voluntarily. He especially mentioned Mr W Barnett (chairman of the committee), Lady Rowena Patterson, and Mrs Nickalls in connection with this work, and a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the committee ; also to the gas Company for lending the premises for making the jam, and Mr Alfred Over for providing storage facilities.

FRANCE’S DAY.

The following message was read from the President of the French Republic in reply to the congratulatory telegram sent to him on the occasion of the celebration of France’s Day, July 14th :—

“ The President of the French Republic is very much affected by the congratulations and good wishes which you have sent on the occasion of France’s Day, and thanks you warmly in the name of the French people, who are closely united to the British people in the defence of right and liberty.—R POINCARE.”

It was decided to have this letter, together with several others, including one from Admiral Beatty, framed and hung in the Council Chamber.

SUGGESTED COLD STORAGE.

A letter was read from the Rugby Food Control Committee, asking the Council to take immediate steps to provide a cold storage for Rugby District—Mr Robbins : Who has got to pay for it ?—Mr Wise pointed out that at present they had nothing of this kind in the town. He thought such a building would be very useful, and it might even be a paying investment. It was a question as to whether they would get permission to erect such a building, even if they decided to do so ; but he thought at present it was important that perishable foods should be stored in the localities where they were needed, and it would be a great boon to the community at large if such a building could be erected.—Mr Yates moved that the letter be referred to the Markets Committee. He believed it was necessary that they should have a cold storage in the town, because one thing they had learned from the shortage of commodities was the sinfulness of waste : and even when they did get more food it would be necessary to have somewhere to store that portion which was not required for immediate consumption.—Mr Wise promised that the Food Committee would assist the Council with any figures they could obtain from traders likely to use the storage.—The Chairman : If the town grows, as it will do sooner or later, we are bound to have a cold storage.—Mr Stevenson suggested that the letter should be referred to a Joint Markets and Plans Committee, and this was agreed to.

THE BATHS.

The Baths Committee reported that in view of the great need for economy in coal and light during the winter, the committee propose to further consider the re-opening of the slipper baths at their next meeting, but their present proposal is to open the baths on Wednesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays only, instead of the whole week.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt T C Vickers, Yeomanry, Rugby, has been officially reported drowned ; and Pte W Everton, Tank Corps, Rugby, has died of wounds.

Rifleman A V Pitham, Rifle Brigade, Rugby has been wounded and captured by the Germans ; and Pte H Lawley, RW.R, has also been reported a prisoner of war.

Capt J Oscar Muntz, youngest son of Mr F E Muntz, of Umberslade, died of wounds on September 4th at the age of 42.

W F W Satchell, son of Mr & Mrs W F J Satchell, 94 Park Road, Rugby, has been granted a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire Regt.

Pte Lewis Lewis, City of London Regiment, son of ex-P.C Lewis, 35 King Edward Road, was killed in France on August 8th. He was nearly 19 years of age, an old St Matthew’s boy, and an employee at Rugby Post Office. He joined the Army in October, 1917, and was drafted to France in April.

Mrs Hutt, 15 Bridget Street, New Bilton, has received news that her son, Pte J H Lines, Royal Berkshire Regiment, was killed in action on August 27th. He of was 19 years of age, and before joining the Army in July 1917, he was employed at the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds. Another son of Mrs Hutt was killed in France last year.

Mr & Mrs N Austin, 3 Oliver Street, Rugby, have received official notice that their youngest son, Pte Cecil Austin, 1st R.W.R, was killed in action in France on August 30th. Pte Austin was only 19 years of age. He joined up on February 14, 1916, and went to France the following year. When he had only been there a few weeks he was invalided back with dysentery, and was in hospital five months. He only re-joined his regiment in July, and was sent to France for the second time the following week. His eldest brother, Wilfred Austin, has been serving in Egypt since January, 1915.

Intimation has been received by Mr H C Samson, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, that his son, Second Lieut O M Samson, died of wounds on the 17th inst. Lieut Samson was an assistant master at Rugby School (Army Class). He was an 0 for Blue at cricket, and also played for Somersetshire. At Rugby he was of great assistance to the Rugby Club, with which he frequently played. He also made one of a very successful Rugby hockey team captained by Mr F J Kittermaster for several years.

Corpl H Rogers, M.M, 1st Royal Warwickshire Regt., has recently been awarded the bar to the Military Medal for gallantry. The Major-General of his Division has also written congratulating him on his fine behaviour. Corpl Rogers, who is a native of Flore, Northants, and nephew of Mrs H Miller, 10 Alfred St, Rugby, has been twice wounded, and before the War was employed at Rugby L & N-W Railway Station.

Driver Jack Hillyard, A.S.C, son of Mr Charles Hillyard, 20 Frederick Street, Rugby, was killed on August 22nd. He was 24 years of age, and before joining up in October, 1914, he was employed as a vanman by Mr J J McKinnell. He served three years and three months in France, and only returned to the front a few weeks prior to his death. He was educated at New Bilton Council School. At one time Mr Hillyard had six sons in the Army ; two have been discharged, and three are still serving.

Mr and Mrs Southern, of 77 Windsor Street, have received a letter from the Commanding Officer of the Regiment notifying the death of their youngest son, Pte S Southern, in action on September 4th. His platoon went forward in the attack over a difficult piece of ground, and when it became inevitable that a message must be sent back he volunteered to carry it. He had very nearly got into safety when a bullet hit him in the head, causing instantaneous death. His loss to the Company (the officer adds) is a very real one. He was doing excellent work, was very popular, and they could ill spare him. Pte Southern was awarded the Military Medal on May 30, 1917. He joined up at the commencement of the War, previously being employed at the B.T.H Works. This is the second son of Mr & Mrs Southern who has fallen in the War.

Pte John James Brookes, R.W.R, eldest son of Mr John Brookes, 41 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was killed in action on August 30th. He was 22 years of age, and was a member of “ E ” Company when war broke out, and was mobilised with them. He had seen a good deal of heavy fighting, and had been wounded three times. Before the War he was a cleaner in the L & N-W Railway Loco Sheds.

Mr William Fleet, 98 Lawford Road, Rugby, has received news that has youngest son, Pte Cyril William Fleet, 6th Dorsets, died of wounds on September 10th. He was 32 years of age, and before joining the Army at the commencement of the War he worked at the Cement Works. He was gassed a short time ago, and only returned to France a fortnight before his death.

Pte Albert Thomas Gibbs, London-Irish Rifles, eldest son of Mr & Mrs A B Gibbs, 14 Kimberley Road, Rugby, has died while a prisoner of war in Germany. Pte Gibbs was employed on the L & N-W Railway. He enlisted about twelve months ago, and had only been in France a short time when he was taken prisoner. He was 35 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children. His younger brother, Flight Cadet David Gibbs, was recently killed in an aeroplane accident.

News has been received at Coombe Abbey that Lord Uffington, the Earl of Craven’s heir, is lying seriously wounded in France, and has had a leg amputated above the knee.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
NEWS has been received that Corpl J Seymour, who in last week’s issue was reported wounded and suffering from enteric, has since died. He belonged to the Rugby Howitzer Battery at the outbreak of war, and has served with them since in France and Italy. He leaves a widow and two children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

WOLSTON.

LIEUT WILFRED COLEMAN WINS THE MILITARY CROSS.—News has just reached Wolston that Lieut Wilfred Coleman has been awarded the Military Cross for gallantry on the banks of the Marne, He is the only son of Mr & Mrs T P Coleman, of Marston Hall. When war was declared he was a member of the 1st, Troop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry. In April, 1916, he went out to Egypt, and from there to Gallipoli where he was wounded. He was afterwards among the Yeomanry in Egypt when so many of them were killed or taken prisoners. He was subsequently sent into training at Cairo for a commission, and was then attached to the 5th Devons with whom he has gamed his present honour. He has now been transferred to the Royal Air Force.

DEATH OF TWO SONS.—Deep sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Robert Clarke, who heard in two days of the death of two of their sons. Pte William Clarke, of the Oxon and Bucks L.I, had been missing since March 21st ; but a friend—Pte Harrison—has written to say that he saw him killed. On the next day a notification was received from the War Office that their youngest son—Pte Joseph Clarke, of the Coldstream Guards—was killed on August 22nd. Both sons were respected employees of Messrs Bluemel, and were well known in the district They had been in France for a long time.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.
KILLED.—Sergt J Major, son of Mr H Major, of Station Cottages, has been killed in action. He joined up at the outbreak of war, being the first recruit from the parish. A memorial service was held in the church on Sunday evening.

DUNCHURCH.
MR & MRS H PEARCE, Coventry Road, learn that their son, Pte W Pearce, K.R.R, who was badly wounded and was a prisoner of war, has been repatriated, and is in London, where he has undergone an operation to his head.

ITCHINGTON.

HARRY COCKERELL KILLED.—On Saturday official intimation was received by Mr & Mrs H W Cockerell that their only son, Pte Harry Richard Cockerell, R.W.R, was killed in action on the 1st inst.  A sympathetic letter from the chaplain attached to the regiment states that Pte Cockerell fell fighting gallantly in one of the most important engagements of the War, and was killed instantaneously by a shell. The rev gentleman adds: “ He will be much mused.” Before he was called up Pte Cockerell had joined his father in his business as plumber and decorator. He had gained the respect of all, and was greatly beloved by many friends. Sincere sympathy is accorded to Mr & Mrs Cockerell and family in their sad loss.

HARRY COOKE GASSED.—Mr & Mrs John Cooke have been informed that their eldest son, Rifleman Harry Cooke, Rifle Brigade, is in hospital in France suffering, from gas poisoning. He was quite blind for three days after the occurrence, but is progressing favourably. His younger brother, Rifleman Reg Cooke, K.R.R, reported missing last May, has not since been heard of.

DR CLAGUE TO REMAIN.—When Dr Clague was medically examined at Coventry in June last he was passed for service in Grade 1. At the end of August he received his orders to join the Army in October. On the 3rd inst. Long Itchington people solemnly protested against being left without a resident doctor. On the 11th inst. Dr Clague underwent a second medical examination at Birmingham, and has now been totally rejected as unfit for military service. His services as a medical man will, therefore, be retained in the village.

STOCKTON.
OUR MEN.—Cecil Wall has been wounded in the thigh, and is making satisfactory progress ; and Ernest Hall has been gassed, fortunately without very serious effects.

THURLASTON.
ON TUESDAY morning, Mr & Mrs W Hirons, Coventry Road, were notified that their fourth son, Pte G Hirons, R.W.R, had been killed. He was formerly in the employ of Mr J Johnson, J.P, Thurlaston, and was the finest young man in the village. He was 6ft in height and well-built, although only 19 years of age, and he was much respected by everybody in the parish. Mr & Mrs Hirons have another son—J Hirons—badly wounded in France. They had four sons in the Army till two of them were killed. The two remaining in the Army are members of the Warwickshire Police Force, one having been stationed at Sutton Coldfield, and the other at Shipston-on-Stour.

RUGBY & DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

THE SHORTAGE OF MILK.
A letter was read from a milk retailer complaining that she was unable to get a proper supply of milk, and pointing out that unless the committee could help her she would be unable to allow her customers the quantity to which they were entitled.—Mrs Shelley said this was a very hard case. The woman was a widow and an invalid, and was dependent upon her business for a livelihood ; whereas some of the other retailers were employed at the works, and were still keeping their businesses going.—Mr Cooke moved that the whole milk question be re-considered by the Rationing Committee. He believed that the town was threatened with a milk Monopoly, and that the situation was very serious.—Mr Humphrey drew attention to the fact that large quantities of milk were used daily in the canteens at the B.T.H and Willans & Robinson’s, and he suggested that they should use instead either dry milk or condensed milk in barrels. The fresh milk could then be distributed amongst the public.—In reply to Mr Gay, the Executive Officer said the committee had no power to commandeer milk ; but. if necessary, they could take over the whole milk supply of the town.—Mr Gay supported Mr Humphrey’s suggestion, and proposed that the two firms be approached on the matter. The Chairman : We do not want to be trouble with the workmen if we do this ?—Messrs Gay and Cooke replied in the negative.—The Chairman : We do not want it to be said that we wish to rob the workman of his milk.—Mr Gay : With the average workman his wife and children come first. They will be quite willing to forego fresh milk in the canteen in order that the children may have it.—It was decided that the executive Officer should approach the two firms on this question. and that the Rationing Committee should meet to consider the whole question of milk supply.—Mr Stevenson : Will they consider the retail price ?—The Executive Officer : The price will have to be revised at the end of September.

OTHER ITEMS.
A quantity of second grade bacon has now been received, and it was pointed out that the price of this was 1s 8d per lb straight from the case, and 1s 10d per lb washed and dried.—Both the Executive Officer and Mr Humphrey remarked that this bacon is very nice, almost as good, in fact, as the better quality bacon.—Mr Cripps : Do not praise it too much, or it will be 2s per lb next week.

DEATHS.

AUSTIN.—In loving memory of our darling boy, Pte. CECIL AUSTIN, 1st R.W.R., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Austin, 3 Oliver Street, Rugby, who was killed “ somewhere in France ” on August 30, 1918 ; aged 19 years. One of the very best.—From Dad and Mother.

FLEET.—Officially reported having died from gunshot wounds in France on September 10th, Pte. CYRIL WILLIAM FLEET, aged 32, youngest son of William Fleet, 98 Lawford Road, Rugby.

LINES.—In ever-loving, memory of my dearest and youngest son, Pte. J. H. LINES, of the Royal Berks., who was killed in action on August 27th “ somewhere in France ” ; aged 19 years.
“ We do not forget him, nor do we intend ;
We think of him daily, and will to the end.
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
“ In the midst of life we are in death.”
—Not forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France on July 29th, Pte CHARLES WHITE, 1st Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regt., second son of the late William White, formerly of Willoughby, and Ann White, Carterton, Clansfield, Oxon ; aged 33.

IN MEMORIAM.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of our dear brother, Pte. CHARLES CASHMORE, 5th Oxon 7 Bucks L.I.
“ Three years have passed,
No one knows
What was this gallant hero’s end
No wooden cross or mound to show
Where he fell fighting against the foe.”
—From his ever-loving Sister, Nell, Violet, and brother George.

CUFAUDE.—In loving memory of No. 40549 EDWARD HENRY CUFAUDE (Yelvertoft) who fell in action on Hill 70 on September 22. 1917.
“ May we in Thy sorrows share,
For Thy sake all peril dare,
Ever know Thy tender care.

GREEN.— In ever loving memory of EDWARD (BERT) GREEN, who fell at the Battle of Loos, September 23-27, 1915.
—Sadly missed by his wife and children.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of LLEWELLYN GRIFFITH, who died of wounds on September 18, 1916.—“ Gone from sight, but to memory ever dear.”—From loving Brothers and Sisters—74 South Street.

HOPKINS.—In loving memory of FRANK, the youngest son of Henry Hopkins, late of Long Lawford, killed in action in France on September 18, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call ;
He gave his life for one and all ;
But thee unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but our aching hearts can know.”
—Never forgotten by his loving Father, Sisters, and Brothers.

NEAL.—In loving memory of Bombardier FRANK NEAL, R.F.A., who died of wounds on September 19, 1916.—Never forgotten by his loving sister Carrie.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of our dear brother LEVI, who was killed in action in France on September 23, 1917.—Not forgotten by his Brothers and Sisters, Will, Tom, Emma, Fanny.

 

10th Aug 1918. Remembrance Day

REMEMBRANCE DAY.
DRUMHEAD SERVICE.

Sunday last, the fourth anniversary of the declaration of war, was observed by special intercession services throughout the country. At the various churches in Rugby and the villages around the congregations, despite the holiday exodus, were good.

In the afternoon a drumhead service, arranged by the members of the Rugby Branch of the Discharged Sailors’ and Soldiers’ Association, was held in the Lower School held, by permission of the Rev S R Hart, and was attended by several thousand persons.  The members of the association paraded in the Recreation Ground, and, preceded by the B.T.H Band, marched via Hillmorton Road, School Street, Sheep Street, and Church Street to the Lower School field. The service was very brief but impressive, and was conducted by the Rev C M Blagden (rector). The hymns, which were accompanied by the band, were :—“ Hark, my soul, it is the Lord ” ; “ Oft in danger, oft in woe,” and “ Eternal Father, strong to save.”

[Note: many other services were reported around the town]

RUGBY VOLUNTEERS.

“ B ” Company at the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Royal Warwickshire, left their headquarters in good strength on the 4th inst, to join their battalion and the other battalions of the Regiment at a brigade camp in the South of England. In the unavoidable absence at the Commanding Officer and the second in command, Capt C H Fuller is in command of the 2nd Battalion during camp and Second-Lieut Wharton is in command of “ B ” Company. Sunday being Remembrance Day, the Rector of Rugby (Chaplain to the Company) attended at headquarters, and conducted a short service before the company moved off.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

A comprehensive programme, including many unique competitions, diversions, and side-shows, has been arranged for the Grand Red Cross Fete at Clifton Manor on Saturday, August 31st.

In a letter to a friend, Gunner S Walton, R.G.A, who before enlisting was employed in the Advertiser Printing Works, says :—“ We arrived at Hong Kong last Tuesday, and, so far as I can see at present, I rather fancy I shall like the place. Any way, it is a pleasant change from the dusty plains of the Punjaub. . . . I found Will Spraggett (a former member of the Old Rugby Volunteers) at Hong Kong Hospital. He was looking very well. He wasn’t half-surprised to see me, I can tell you. He is a sergeant in a London Regiment.”

Pte W Smith, Northamptonshire Regiment (Rugby), has been reported killed in action, and Pte R L S Healey, Gloucester Regiment (Rugby), has been posted as missing.

Pte W E Howard, Northants Regiment, youngest son of Mr & Mrs S Howard, Long Lawford, is a prisoner in Germany. Before joining up in April, 1917, he was employed at the Rugby Portland Cement Works, and he had been in France almost a month when he was captured on June 27th.—Pte J Isham, Devonshire, son of Mr & Mrs F Isham, Leamington Hastings, is a prisoner at Langensalza, Germany, and Pte Bernard Keates, Wiltshire Regiment (Rugby), is interned at Limburg, and is suffering from wounds in the back and stomach.

The following Rugby men have been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry in the field :—Pte E F Head, R.W.R ; Driver F Calloway, F.R.A ; and Sapper J W Bartlett, R.E.

We are asked to state that Mr Bertram Shepherd, who formerly resided at Rugby, is now a prisoner of war.

MILITARY CROSS FOR CAPT LAKIN.

The Military Cross has been awarded to Captain (Acting Major) M L Lakin, D.S.O, Hussars, Spec. Res., for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in operation whilst commanding a company of Tanks. He led his company across most difficult country, and successfully held up the enemy for ten hours. Later, when fighting on foot a rearguard action with Lewis guns, he remained behind the infantry, who had retired, for eight hours, inflicting severe losses on the enemy. Capt Lakin is the youngest son of Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, of Warwick, and is 37 years of age. He entered the Army in 1900, and served in South Africa. He attained his captaincy in 1908, and retired in 1911 ; but on the outbreak of the War he re-joined his old regiment, the 11th Hussars. He has been twice mentioned in despatches, and won the D.S.O in 1915. Before the War he was well known as a polo player and as a master of foxhounds in Ireland.

NEWS OF CAPTAIN T. A. TOWNSEND.

We are pleased to learn that Mr T S Townsend, of Clifton Manor, has, in response to an appeal he inserted in several daily papers for information as to the whereabouts of his son, Capt T A Townsend, M.C, R.A.M.C, received letters which justify the strongest hope that the missing officer is a prisoner of war, and, although badly wounded, still alive.

Pte M S B Shorrock, of the 1/20th London Regiment, writing from hospital in France under date August 2nd, says :—

“ I have read in the Continental edition of the ‘ Daily Mail,’ dated the 1st inst, your notice in respect of your son, Captain T A Townsend, M.C. R.A.M.C, who was medical officer to the battalion to which I belong, and under whom I have served as a stretcher-bearer on several occasions. The last occasion, however, was from the last day of November to December 6, 1917. Owing to illness, I regret I had not the good fortune to serve him during our engagement of last March. Nevertheless, I feel I am in a position to give you information which may prove of interest to you. A friend of mine, Pte Michael Foley, who, like myself, is a stretcher-bearer, and served your son, Capt Townsend, of whom I received a full account of the March offensive immediately on my return to the battalion, was actually with your son within a few minutes of his having been wounded and taken prisoner. The actual date on which Capt Townsend was taken prisoner on being wounded was on Saturday, March 23rd. and not on Sunday. March 24th, which latter date has apparently been officially reported to you. May I respectfully point out that your son could easily have escaped but for the fact that he was an exceptionally brave man and such a grand example for many. My friend has informed me that from the moment of the onslaught Capt Townsend worked most nobly and brilliantly. On the third day, however, both his corporal (Corpl Kelly, one of my dearest friends) and our Commanding Officer, Col Grimwood, were wounded, Capt Townsend immediately dressed each, and remained with them. Capt Townsend was wounded when the enemy was no considerable distance away. Previously to his having been wounded he was seen to perform a most conspicuous act of gallantry in face of the enemy. I am somewhat dubious of giving you details of this particular act owing to the censorship restrictions. Perhaps I may have an opportunity of communicating these details under somewhat pleasanter circumstances.

“ Now comes an item of extreme interest Corpl Kelly, to whom I have referred, states distinctly in a letter which he has sent through to one of our boys, that ‘There are here with me (in hospital) the M.O, Capt Townsend ; Pte Smith, ‘ B ‘ Company ; and Drummers (reserve stretcher bearers) Bridger and Roberts. We are all getting on slowly but surely !’

“ I am afraid that no one knows exactly whereabouts your son was wounded, but, however that may be, so it may not have proved possible for him to unite you.”

After promising to endeavour to obtain further information, the writer adds —

“ Your son proved himself marvellous in ‘ Bourion Wood,’ when he worked unceasingly under awful conditions. I never was able to understand however he managed to escape being gassed. No greater man ever attended the wounded and dying as did he on that never-to-be-forgotten occasion.

“ I fear there is nothing else I can add at present. I will again write you so soon as is possible. Meanwhile may you soon hear from your brave son.”

This statement is substantially confirmed by another letter Mr T S Townsend has received from Capt W T Cave, who was captured on the same day by the Germans, and who reports that Capt Townsend was in hospital at Cambrai on March 27th and 28th, badly wounded.

BILTON.
DEATH OF PTE. FRED BARNWELL.

GENERAL regret is felt in this village at the death of Pte Fred Barnwell, of the Marines, which took place in hospital last week-end. Pte Barnwell, who was 31 years of age, worked for many years at Bawnmore, and afterwards for Messrs Willans & Robinson, till he was called up about nine months ago He went out to France about the middle of July, and had only been there a few days when he was returned to England with serious heart trouble. Other complications set in, his friends were sent for, death taking place not long after their arrival. He was the main support of his widowed mother, Mrs Barnwell, of Lawford Road, Bilton, and was a great favourite in the village, being a member of the Working Men’s Club, the Cricket and Football Clubs, and for many years a chorister at the Parish Church. At village entertainments Fred Barnwell’s songs were usually a feature and very popular, and he was always ready to lend a helping hand to any useful work. The sympathy of the whole parish is extended to his mother and his fiancée, who was making preparations for their future marriage.

The remains were brought home for internment, and the funeral took place at the parish church on Thursday. The coffin, covered with many beautiful floral tributes, was borne by six members of the Bilton Brass Band, of which deceased was formerly a member. The Burial Service was read by the Rector, the Rev W O Assheton, R. D, and hymns were sung by the choir in the church and at the graveside.

Representatives of the various village institutions, to which the deceased belonged, followed the relatives in the cortege, and the church was filled with parishioners and friends anxious to show their sympathy and respect. Blinds were drawn at most of the houses. In the evening a muffled peal was rung on the bells, deceased having been one of the band of ringers.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
PRISONER OF WAR.—Mrs R Collins has received news that her husband, Rifleman R Collins, 2nd Battalion, rifle Brigade, who has been missing since May 27th, is a prisoner of war at Frankfort.

WOLSTON.
LIEUT WILFRED COLEMAN WOUNDED.—Mr & Mrs T P Coleman, of Marston Hall, have been notified that their son, Lieut Wilfred Coleman, has been wounded again. When war was declared he was a member of the 3rd Troop of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and was called up at once. He went out to the Dardanelles in April, 1915, where he was wounded. His next active service was in Egypt, where he soon met with promotion, and afterwards rose to sergeant. Here he saw much fighting. For his good work he was offered a commission, and after training in Egypt went to Palestine, where again he helped to rout the enemy on numerous occasions. His parents were looking forward to his home-coming, but he was sent to France, although he had been fighting for so long. He is now in hospital in France, wounded in the hand, head and neck, but is making good progress.

BRANDON.
PTE G BOSTOCK.—Mr & Mrs Arthur Bostock have received news from the War Office that their son, Pte G Bostock, of the Machine Gun Corps, has been killed. It is now nine months since his parents were notified that he was missing. He joined the Army more than three years ago, and saw a lot of fighting in France, where he was previously wounded. Deceased was a finely built young man, and before joining the Army was a respected employee of Mrs W Eales, grocer, of Coventry. Much sympathy is felt for his parents, who are respected inhabitants, and have resided in the parish for many years.

STOCKTON.
AEROPLANE DESCENDS.—The landing of an aeroplane in the parish on Wednesday afternoon caused considerable excitement, hundreds of people rushing to the spot. Fortunately the pilot was unharmed, though Dr Ormerod was quickly on the scene in case his services were needed. The machine; which sustained little damage, was guarded by volunteers until it could be got away again.

FOR PRISONERS OF WAR.
NEW PARCEL SCHEME.

The limit of weight for parcels for prisoners of war has been raised from 10lbs to 15lbs each. The Rugby Prisoners of War Help committee are now despatching to all Rugby and district men through the Regimental Care Committees of each man’s unit one 15lbs parcel per week, instead at three 10lb parcels every fortnight The weight of food will, therefore, remain the same, but there will be a considerable saving in the cost of parking materials as well as labour. The usual bread parcels will be maintained.

The cost of the new parcels will 15s each, or £3 every four weeks, and an additional 7s 6d per mouth for bread ; thus the cost to provide for each man is now £3 7s 6d every four weeks, or £3 13s per calendar month. The total cost of the food parcels for all the men on the Rugby Committee’s list now exceeds £400 a month, all of which has to be raised by voluntary subscriptions.

This week’s parcel contains : 2lbs of beef, ½-lb vegetables, 1lb tin rations, ½lb tea, 1lb tin milk, ½-lb dripping or margarine, 1lb tin jam, 1½lbs biscuits, 1 packet Quaker oats, grape nuts or milk pudding, 50 cigarettes, 1 tin sardines, 1 tablet soap, 1lb tin herring, 1lb beans, ¼lb cocoa, ½-lb bacon.

Next week’s parcel will consist of : 1½lbs biscuits, ½-lb cocoa, 1lb milk, 1lb Lyle’s syrup, 1lb rice or dates, 1 small potted meat, 1 tablet soap, 1lb tin rations, 1lb tin sausages, 1lb sugar, 1lb suet pudding, ¼-lb chocolate, ½-lb tin veal, ham or beef, 1 packet Quaker oats, grape nuts or milk pudding, 2ozs tobacco, 1lb cured beef.

Relatives and friends who would like a parcel sent in their own names to local prisoners of war should send the cost of same, i.e. 15s, to the Hon Organising Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker, 9 Regent Street, Rugby, who has undertaken this special service in the hope of maintaining the “ home-touch ” with the prisoners.

Correspondents should in every case quote the regimental number, rank and battalion of the prisoner in whom they are interested.

RUGBY FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.

At a meeting of this committee, held on Thursday in last week, there were present : Messrs T A Wise (chairman), H Tarbox (vice-chairman), Mrs Dewar, Mrs Shelley, Mrs Townsend, Messrs A Appleby, J Cripps, G Cooke, T Ewart, R Griffin, A Humphrey, C Gay, W A Stevenson, and A T Watson.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) intimated that the butchers had decided to take all imported meat for the week ended August 10th, and all English meat for the following three weeks.—Mr Cooke : I admire their decision. Everybody will be away next week.

The Executive Officer reported that the work in connection with the new ration books had now been completed, and the committee passed a vote of thanks to Mr J T Clarke and the ladies who had rendered voluntary assistance.

It was reported that the Housewives’ Committee had distributed the cheese handed over to them by the committee.—The Executive Officer stated that the Housewives’ Committee had been accused of making a profit out of the cheese by charging 8½d per lb for it, but that was the price they paid to the Food Control Committee. These accusations had been made, not by the people who had received the cheese, but by those who wanted to buy some and had been unable to do so.—Mrs Shelley said members of the Housewives’ Committee had been insulted by many people, who had said they were liable to be prosecuted for charging the extra ½d per lb.—The Executive Officer : It is not Government cheese.

It was decided to grant facilities to the committee arranging the Rugby Hospital Fete to obtain supplies for refreshments; and the Executive Officer was directed to make the necessary arrangements.

The Education Committee of the Co-operative Society wrote stating that the annual children’s treat was to be held on August 10th, and requesting the committee to allot 40lbs of fat to the Confectionery Department of the Society to make 2,000 small cakes for the children, and also to allow them ½-lb of tea.—The Executive Officer pointed out that all the fat was allotted, so that the committee could not allow the society an extra supply.—A member suggested that dripping should be used ; but the Executive Officer replied that coupons were required for this ; 1lb of dripping could be obtained for one coupon.—Mrs Shelley said the usual tea now had to be dispensed with ; but the committee wished to give each child a small cake, otherwise they would get very hungry.—The Chairman said the New Bilton children had their annual treat in his field the previous day, and he was very much struck by the fact that they all brought their tea with them ; even the smallest infant brought a small parcel.—It was decided that no additional fat could be allotted for this purpose ; but the committee agreed to offer the promoters permission to obtain sufficient tea for each child.

Permission was given to the committee of the Hillmorton Show and Sports to purchase 3lbs of tea for supplying refreshments.

The Executive .Officer reported that 15 licenses for the sale of meat without coupons were granted on the previous Saturday evening in respect of 274lbs of beef and 325lbs of brawn, suet, &c. This showed a decrease of 276lbs of beef and an increase of 225lbs of other meat.

“ WAR BREAD ” AND ITS EFFECT.—A searching enquiry into the effect of the war bread and flour on the general health of the population in typical industrial areas has been made by the Local Government Board, and the results are now under the consideration of the Minister of Food. The general deduction is the war bread and war flour are to be considered as only among the many factors affecting the health of the community. Other elements, such as the diminished supply of fats, the rationing of meat, and the scarcity and enhanced price of fruit and fresh vegetables enter into the calculation, and all have their effect on the general health. As far as bread and flour are concerned, the worst days are over.

WASPS AND FRUIT.—While there have been no general complaints this year as to the presence of wasps nests, reports have been received from one or two districts, in which it is said that nests appear to be rather numerous. It may be well, therefore, to remind leaders to keep a look-out for nests, and to destroy them by any of the well-known methods. There is so little fruit this year that it would be a pity if that little were to be eaten by wasps ; while, further, wasps’ nests in the harvest fields may at any time lead to serious accidents.

ROAD TRANSPORT.
The date for returns of Registration Forms expired on the 31st ult, but a large number of owners of goods-carrying vehicles have failed to register. Another 14 days has, therefore, been granted, but particular stress is laid on the fact that if any owner fails to register he not only becomes liable to serious penalties, but will probably have his vehicles impounded, licenses cancelled, and petrol removed. All goods-carrying vehicles (except horse-drawn up to 15cwt load capacity) must be registered and permits issued for use thereof.

HOLIDAY BOOKINGS FROM RUGBY.

Not since the critical days of August, 1914, has there been such an exodus of holiday makers from Rugby as was experienced during the week-end. Many people, with a patriotism which is commendable, if hardly wise from a health point of view, have dispensed with their regular holidays since the beginning of the War, but the constant strain and stress of war conditions has been such that in many cases the only alternative to a break down in health has been a complete rest far away from all the worries, anxieties, and petty annoyances of business. This being so, a number of local businesses establishments closed on Saturday evening for the week ; while other traders suspended business until Thursday morning. The large works also closed on Friday for ten days, and this afforded many of the workers an opportunity, of which full advantage was taken, of accompanying their families on holiday.

The bookings at the L & N-W Railway were exceptionally heavy, Blackpool and North Wales, with about 250 each, attracting the largest numbers of visitors. Scottish, Irish, and South Coast resorts were also well patronised. Friday and Saturday were the two busiest days, and on Monday and Tuesday the local bookings were very heavy.

“ The busiest time we have had since the War started ” is the report of an official at the Crest Central Station. All the trains were packed to their utmost capacity, and the rush of passengers was reminiscent of pre-war excursions to Cleethorpes and other popular seaside resorts. Bookings to the West of England, London, Yorkshire, and Cleethorpes were exceptionally heavy ; but all through bookings to Scarborough and the North-East Coast watering places were suspended. Owing to the inclement weather, the number of short-distance tickets issued on Bank Holiday was rather below the average.

DEATHS.

BARNWELL.—On August 2nd, at the Military Heart Hospital, Colchester, Pte. FREDERIC BARNWELL, 1st Battalion, R.M.L.I., aged 31 years.—“ Peace, perfect peace.”

IN MEMORIUM.

ARIS.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. MARK ARIS, killed in action on August 6, 1915.
“ There is a link Death cannot sever,
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Fondly remembered by his loving Sisters and Brothers.

PURTON.—In loving memory of my dear son, Lance-Corpl. G. H. PURTON, late Oxon and Bucks L.I., who died of wounds in France on August 6, 1916 ; aged 24 years. Also of my dear husband, HARRY PURTON, who passed away on December 3, 1912 ; aged 43 years.
“ Can we forget them ?
Ah! no, never,
For memory’s golden chain
Binds us on earth
To them in heaven
Until We meet again.”
—From Mother, Ernest, Rose, and Violet.

REYNOLDS.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. HARRY REYNOLDS, who died of wounds received in action at St. John’s Ambulance Hospital, France, on August 12, 1917.—“ R.I.P.”—Sadly missed by his Wife and Children, Spencer and Eva.

10th Jul 1915. News from the front – Missing and Killed

REPORTED MISSING.

News has been received that Pte G W Coleman, of the 5th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr Walter Coleman, a carpenter in the employ of Messrs Foster & Dicksee, living at New Bilton, is missing. The message came from a friend of Pte Coleman, who writing to his own father, asked that Mr Coleman should be informed that his son did not answer to the roll call when the Company left the trenches on a recent date. This is corroborated by another correspondent, who states that when coming out of the trenches Pte Coleman was killed. The young fellow was one of the many who enlisted from the B.T.H Works and had only been at the front a few weeks.

OFFICER FEARS HE IS KILLED.

Writing to the parents, on July 1st, Captain Webb, the officer commanding the Company, states:—“ I very much grieve to say that your son, Pte W G Coleman, is missing since a charge we made on the night of the 22nd. While in the cases of one or two missing men, they have been found wounded in various hospitals which they reached from the battlefield, I think it would not be wise or just to yourself to build on the hope that such is the case of your son. I fear he is killed, and I am more than deeply sorry for you. It is a terrible thing, and the suspense is awful. We made a charge and were driven back. Countless deeds of bravery were done, and all the wounded were brought in and some of the dead. Still, several men are missing, one an officer, and I’m afraid we must give them up for dead. Perhaps, when we again advance we shall be able to clear the matter up, and I will at once let you know if I am spared. The officers and men offer you their deepest and sincerest sympathy, and will do all in their power to put an end to your suspense.”

Mr Coleman has also received a communication from the Infantry Record Office at Warwick, dated July 5th, stating that a report had been received from the War Office to the effect that Pte W G Coleman was posted as “missing ” after the engagement in France on June 22nd.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

ANOTHER NEWBOLD MAN MISSING.

Mr and Mrs Williams, Newbold, have received a communication from the War Office that their son, John Williams, a private in the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, is missing, nothing having been heard of him since the 10th of May. Rifleman Williams joined the army at the commencement of the war, and was drafted to the front about twelve weeks ago. He was 20 years of age, and previous to joining the army was employed at the Newbold Works of the Rugby Portland Cement Company.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another young man, the third from the village, has given his life for his country. News was received by the parents of Charles Hancox, of the London Road, some days ago that he was dangerously wounded, and was lying in the base hospital in France. This was soon followed by news of his death. He was a good-natured lad, and was much liked by his companions. Great sympathy is felt for his parents in their trouble. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Sunday last, at which there was a full congregation. Suitable hymns were sung, and a touching, inspiring address was given by the Vicar.

RUGBY SOLDIER WOUNDED BY SHRAPNEL.

Pte Ernest Tomlinson, son of Mr and Mrs E Tomlinson, of 20 James Street, Rugby, is lying in Norwich Hospital suffering from a scalp wound, caused at the front by shrapnel. He was employed as a fitter at the B.T.H Works, and enlisted on September 2nd in the King’s Royal Rifles. He was sent to France in May, and within three weeks, whilst trench digging, was rather badly injured by a shrapnel shell. He has lost, for the time being at all events, his speech, and the use of his right hand, so that the news received by his parents has come through other sources, a soldier in an adjoining bed having sent particulars. It is gratifying to learn that Pte Tomlinson is improving, and hopes are entertained that in time his speech will be restored. He is understood to be suffering from shock as well as from wounds. Mr and Mrs Tomlinson have a younger son, William, serving his country at the front, also in the King’s Royal Rifles, but attached to a different battalion. He has been in the fighting line for some weeks now, and his last letter, received on Monday, stated that he was quite well.

FORMER MEMBER OF THE BOYS’ BRIGADE WOUNDED.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs Hayward, of 43 Lodge Road, that their son, Pte George Hayward, of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded and having been in hospital for some time is now at a convalescent home at Hampton-in-Arden. Pte Hayward was for 11 years a member of the 1st Rugby Company the Boys’ Brigade, and when he enlisted in August was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinsons Works. He was shot in the fighting in Flanders, one bullet entering his cheek, injuring his jaw and affecting his eyesight, and another lodging in his hip, after passing through the water-bottle that formed part of his equipment.

MEMBER OF RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY ACCIDENTALLY SHOT.

A BROTHER’S PAINFUL EXPERIENCE.

The painful task of travelling from the front to break the news of his brother’s death this week befell Gunner George Sutton (Newton), of the Rugby Howitzer Battery. From what we can gather, the Howitzer Battery recently returned to a rest camp, and on Sunday evening it was reported that a man had been shot. Gunner Sutton, proceeded to the spot to see who was the victim, and was horrified to find his younger brother, William, a driver in the Ammunition Column, lying dead. As the result of an enquiry it was established that death was due to accident, and Gunner Sutton was graded several days’ leave of absence to convey the sad tidings to his parents. The circumstances were detailed in a letter from Capt Saunders, of the Ammunition Column, which Gunner Sutton brought home :-“ It is with much regret that I have to inform you that your son, William Sutton, was found shot at about 10 p.m on the 4th of this month. A Court of officers enquired into the circumstances very carefully, and from the evidence decided that death was due to accident, and that there was no question at all of foul play. The funeral was conducted by an Army Chaplain of the Roman Catholic Church, and a cross is being provided with an inscription suitably worded. The N.C.O’s and men of the Ammunition Column are ordering a wreath and the grave will be well cared for. It has been arranged for your other son to proceed home on leave to-day, and I hope this will help to comfort you in your loss. Please accept the sympathy of officers of the Ammunition Column, in which your son was serving.”

Driver Sutton, who was the second son of Mr Wm. Sutton, was 21 years of age, and had been a member of the Battery about two years. Previous to the war he was employed by Mr Scott Howkins, and was very popular, and highly respected by all who knew him.

NEW BILTON RECRUIT DIES OF SEPTIC FEVER.

Sympathy will be felt with Mr and Mrs Pegg, of 1 Addison Road, New Bilton, in the death, on Thursday, from septic fever, at Felixstowe Military Hospital, of their son Harold, the youngest of three who had responded to their country’s call. Deceased was a printer’s apprentice, in the employ of Mr George Over, and about two months ago enlisted in the Bedfordshire Regiment He was only 19 years of age, and expressed a liking for the military life so far as he had become conversant with it. He was very popular with the men in Mr Over’s printing office, and all have signed a letter of sympathy with Mr and Mrs Pegg in their sad bereavement.

RUGBY HOWITZERS COMPLIMENTED.

Driver C W Packwood, of the Rugby Howitzers, now serving in France, son of Mr C J Packwood, of St Matthew Street, in a recent letter home states that after three months in the firing line the section of which he belongs is now in a rest camp, the change being appreciated, especially the privilege of sleeping once again in a bed. Driver Packwood also says that the Rugby Battery has been very highly complimented on their accurate firing by the officers they have come in contact with, and the word of praise has naturally had a cheering effect upon the men.

VOLUNTEERS FOR THE FRONT.

L J D Pepperday, son of Mr J H Pepperday, of High Street ; P Morson, son of Mr Arthur Morson, of Newbold Road ; and Neville and Roland Bluemel, sons of Mr C Bluemel, of Moultrie Road, were included in a draft of 150 who volunteered for the front to fill up gaps in the 1st Battalion of the Hon Artillery Company. The draft left for France on Thursday last week.

WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY IN EGYPT.

Trooper E Amos, youngest son of Mr W Amos, farmer, Dunchurch, writing home from Alexandria, says :- We go out for bugle practice every morning at 6, mounted. This gives us a good chance to have a look round. We see the corn crops growing, chiefly maise, all in bloom now (middle of June) and six feet high, any amount of tomato fields, and the plants seem loaded ; then you see the fig trees and the banana trees. We also see a tremendous lot of cotton coming down the Nile in barges, pulled by men instead of horses. We have had a job this last week unloading wounded off the ships from the Dardanelles. There are thousands of them, mostly Australians, but there are a lot of soldiers who were billeted in and around Rugby. There are a lot of fine hospitals here, and that is why they keep bringing so many wounded.

PLUCKY RESCUE BY A RUGBY ATHLETE.

The “ Yorkshire Observer ” records a plucky act recently performed by Lance-Corpl Arthur Gibson, now in training with the Royal Engineers at Salisbury Plain, who was until he enlisted on the staff at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Works, being employed in the drawing office. It appears that Lance-Corpl Gibson was on a visit to a sister at Morecambe, when he noticed that a boy, who was bathing, was in difficulties. Promptly divesting himself of his tunic, he plunged into the water ; and although the tide was running strongly, he brought the lad safely to shore. He was complimented on his bravery at the time, but quickly disappeared, and it was not until some time later that his identity was established.

It will be remembered that whilst Mr Gibson was at Rugby he assisted the Football Club as a wing three-quarter. He also took part in Association six aside matches played on Willans’ Athletic Ground, being included in the team that represented the Drawing Office, and assisted Messrs Willans & Robinson’s side in their inter-firm football with the B.T.H representatives. Mr Gibson’s old comrades at Rugby will be interested to learn of his plucky rescue, and glad it has not been allowed to escape public attention altogether.

AIR RAIDS.

RUGBY FIRE BRIGADE.

A preliminary drill took place on Wednesday last, Messrs Baker, Highton, Robbins, and the Central Garage Company lending cars, and a number of Boy Scouts attended. Everything worked smoothly, and it is hoped that fires (if any) caused by a raid will be speedily extinguished.

It is desirable to have motor-cars, because those already engaged may not be available at the moment.

The Chief Officer hopes that at least four more cars will be offered for a preliminary drill on Thursday 22nd inst., at 8 p.m. More scouts are also required, and only one drill is necessary.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Drill Hall, Park Road, during the past week :—W J Hirons and H W Appleton, 220th (Rugby) Fortress Company, R.E ; C A Davis, R.W.R ; G J Smith, Cheshire Regiment ; H J Ford, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; T W Ingram, Royal Inniskilling Fusliers ; F Hawkins, Seaforth Highlanders ; W J Holliday, Royal Berks ; R W Cave, Army Veterinary Corps ; D A Leist, A.S.C ; A Townsend, Military Mounted Police ; J P Betts, Royal Engineers.