25th Apr 1919. Demobalisation Notes: Only 700,000 more

DEMOBILISATION NOTES
ONLY 700,000 MORE.

The total number of men still waiting to be demobilised from the Navy, Army, and Royal Air Force on April 10th was 727,200, composed as follows:
Officers.   Other Ranks     Total.
Navy        10,500       5,000               15,300
Army        45,300       669,200          705,500
R.A.F.      11,000        5,200              16,200
66,800       670,400           737,200

It is noticeable that the rate of demobilisation of officers has been very much slower than that of other ranks. Indeed, both in the Navy and in the Air Force 97 per rent, of other ranks have already been released, while the percentages of officers are 42 and just under 47 respectively. The disparity is not so great in the Army, where the percentages are roughly : Officers, 59 ; other ranks, 75.

It may also be added that nearly 74,000 soldiers and airmen passing through dispersal camps have signed on for the Army after the war, so that they have been deducted from the statements of numbers demobilised, as supplied by the War Office and Air Ministry.

TRADES TO WHICH MEN ARE RETURNING.
I wrote some weeks ago under the above heading, at which time demobilisation figures were available down to the end of February. Now I have before me those down to April 3rd, when 2,399,483 men of all ranks had been demobilised from the Navy, Army, and Royal Air Force. The dispersal certificates of 2,100,275 of these have been analysed, and it appears that the following six industrial groups have received the biggest influxes of labour from the Forces combined : Engineering and Metal Trades, 267,225 ; Commercial and Clerical, 264,324 ; Coal and Shale Mining, 249,285 ; Agriculture, 194,348 ; Brick and Building Trades, 187,477 ; Railways and Transport, 189,731. It is noteworthy that the class Seamen and Fishermen, though it comes low down on the combined list, stands highest of all on the list for the Navy alone—29,060 such men having come out of the Navy, as compared with 20,681 from the Army and Air Force.

CHECKS ON DONATION CLAIMS.
On what grounds are applications for out of work donation most commonly refused? It may surprise the assiduous critics of the scheme, which, by the way, comes to an end on November 25th next, as the Minister of Labour said last week, to hear that “ refusal to accept suitable employment ” is by far the most important count. A very recent summary of five weeks’ sittings of the Court of Referees shows that in nearly 52 per cent, of the cases analysed this was the reason for the stopping of the donation. In over 23 per cent. of the cases the recipient lost the donation because of leaving voluntarily the work found for him or her.

Altogether the Courts of Referees, from the time of their institution to the end of March, have heard over 82,000 cases. Out of the 67,351 of these which have been analysed, it appears that 70 per cent. of the claims have been disallowed—68 per cent. of the men’s claims, 77 of the women’s, 80 of the girls’, and no less than 89 of the boys’.

Lastly, 134 cases of suspected fraud in connection with claims have been referred to the official solicitor, with a view to prosecution ; and, as the reports in the Press have shown, some salutary sentences have been inflicted.

THE THIRTY-FIRST INDUSTRIAL COUNCIL.
By the middle of April the number of Joint Industrial Councils set up under the Whitley Report was brought up to thirty-one, and already 1,800,800 workpeople are covered by these bodies. Mr. Wardle has told the House of Commons that in the near future the total of the workpeople covered will be no less than two millions and a-half ! Engineering, shipbuilding, mining, and railways still stand out against the scheme ; but the great majority of the other well-organised industries are or will soon be in. In the less organised industries the time is not yet ripe for the erection of councils, which can play so important a part in resettlement. In fact, organisation of an industry is a necessary preliminary to setting up a Whitley Council.

OVERSEAS SETTLERS.
There have been many inquiries of late about the prospects of assistance which can be held out to ex-Service men who desire to proceed overseas in order to settle down. It may be useful, therefore, to draw attention to a statement made in the House of Commons recently by the Under Secretary for the Colonies. The Government have had the matter under consideration with the representatives of the Dominions, and the result is a clear-cut, well defined policy. In a word, ex-Service men who are accepted as approved settlers under any settlement scheme of the Overseas Government, or can show that they have assured employment awaiting them, and are otherwise acceptable to the authorities of the Dominion to which they wish to proceed, will be given free passages for themselves and their dependents to the nearest convenient port to their destination overseas.

The same privilege is to be granted to such women as have served in one of the recognised women’s service corps (including the Land Army), and who desire to proceed to an outlying part of the Empire. One must not forget, however, that in view of the prior claims of their own ex-service men for resettlement, the Dominion Government are not likely to be in a position to welcome any British ex-service settlers before the end of the present year, even if shipping should be available for the purpose before that date. A Colonial Office Committee is dealing with the matter in consultation with the overseas representatives.

EDUCATED MEN IN THE ARMY.
The Government is making every effort to solve the problem of the demobilised educated man. The Appointments Department of the Ministry of Labour has been set up to act as “ slip ” down which it is hoped to re-launch the educated roan into happy prosperity. Any educated man who wants employment is interviewed by the department, and particulars of his qualifications and ambitions are elicited. From these particulars lists are drawn up, some of men immediately available and qualified for positions, others of men requiring further training to fit them to compete on promising terms. It is hoped most earnestly that employers of men of higher education will do their share. They can help enormously. These lists are circulated to the Branch Directorates through which the department works. They are situated all over the country, and employers are asked to help them by notifying them of any vacancy they may have on their staffs, and by consulting their lists, which contain many men of the highest aptitude and experience in every branch of business and industry.

A CHANGE OF NAMES.
The Minister of Labour has decided that in future the Divisional Councils and the Local Advisory Committees, which form so important a part of the Employment Exchange system, shall be known as “ Employment Councils ” and “ Employment Committees ” respectively with name of area with which they deal—e.g., “ Yorkshire and East Midlands Employment Council,” “ Brighton and Hove Employment Committee.” The change, which had been in contemplation for some months past, is in every way appropriate, and is not one in name only, for the old term was never altogether a happy one, and gave no adequate description of the work done by these important bodies. The new name shows clearly the functions of these bodies, which are directly concerned with employment and employment exchanges, and indicates their territorial character and their relation to the Ministry of Labour.

DEMOBICUS.

WARWICKSHIRE VOLUNTEER CORPS.
SPECIAL CORPS ORDERS
By Col. D F. LEWIS, C.B., County Commandant, Warwickshire Volunteer Corps.
Birmingham, 24th April, 1919.

DEATH.—The County Commandant deeply regrets to announce the sudden death, at Rugby, on 21st April, 1919, of Lieut.-Colonel F. F. Johnstone (late Bedfordshire Regiment), commanding 2nd Volunteer Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
Colonel Johnstone has been a leader of the Volunteer Movement in Warwickshire since its inception in 1914.
He raised the 2nd Battalion, which he has commanded from start to finish. He also for a prolonged period concurrently commanded the 3rd Battalion
Lieut.-Colonel Johnstone’s influence has been of incalculable good. A gentleman in the highest sense, he brought a personal appeal to all ranks which was invaluable. A finished soldier and firm disciplinarian, he was of infinite value in raising, training, and maintaining a Volunteer Battalion. His death is a great loss to the Corps and above all to the County Commandant and Staff.
(Signed) D. F. LEWIS, Colonel,
County Commandant
Warwickshire Volunteer Corps.

NOTICE. The funeral of Lieut.-Colonel Johnstone will take place at Leamington Cemetery, on Monday, April 28th, at 1.15 p.m.

DEATH OF COL. F. F JOHNSTONE.
A KEEN BUT POPULAR RECRUITING OFFICER.

We regret this week to record the death of Lieut.-Col. F. F. Johnstone, which took place very suddenly at his residence, Hursley, Clifton Road, Rugby, on Tuesday, at the age of 69 years. Despite his age he was a remarkably active man, and enjoyed very good health, and on Monday he cycled to Overslade to take tea with his friend, Capt. M. E. T. Wratislaw.

Lieut.-Col. Johnstone joined the Bedfordshire Regt. as far back as 1868, and served with both the 1st and 2nd battalions, part of his service being in India. After leaving his regiment, he was employed at Sparkbrook factory, Birmingham, as superintendent. He retired from the service in 1899, and subsequently settled down at Leamington, where two of his sisters, Miss Johnstone and Mrs. Riley, reside.

On the outbreak of war he immediately placed his services at the disposal of the Government, and in 1915, when Col. H. H. Mulliner relinquished his post as recruiting officer for this area. Lieut.-Col. Johnstone was appointed his successor, and he continued in office till December, 1918. He was in charge of the recruiting arrangements at the invitation of the Derby Group Scheme, and the passing of the Military Service Acts, and it was largely owing to his energy, allied to a never failing tact, that the recruiting arrangements at Rugby passed off so smoothly. He was very popular with the members of the Advisory Committee, and the genial and obliging manner in which he dealt with applicants for exemption won him golden opinions on all hands. When recruiting passed under civilian control, Col. Johnstone was one of the few Army officers retained by the National Service Department.

When the Volunteer movement was initiated, he was living at Leamington where he took a very keen interest in the local detachment, and helped considerably in forwarding their training, as a result of which they approached a high state of efficiency. On his appointment to Rugby he transferred his active interest to the Rugby Corps. When the Volunteers gained official recognition, he was appointed Commandant of the 2nd Battalion of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regt., which comprised all the units of the county outside Birmingham, duties which he continued to perform with conspicuous success to the end.

He held a very high opinion of the B Company (Rugby), and frequently referred to it as the smartest Company in his Battalion.

It was a great disappointment to him that he was unable through rheumatism to be in command of the Battalion at the Brigade camp on Salisbury Plain last August.

He was very popular with all ranks, who appreciated his keenness on discipline.

The funeral will take place at the Cemetery, Leamington, at 1.15 on Monday. The service will be conducted by the Rector of Rugby, Canon C. M. Blagden, and it is expected that a detachment from the Rugby Volunteer Company will attend.

GEORGE BERNARD GREEN, son of Mr. Frederick and the late Mrs. Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, was reported wounded and missing on November 30, 1917, while in action near the village of Foka, Palestine. He is now believed to have died on that date. This is the second son Mr. Green has lost in the war.

LILBOURNE AERODROME CLOSED

On Monday most of the officers, men, and aeroplanes left Lilbourne aerodrome for Feltwell, a village in Norfolk, about fourteen or fifteen miles from Ely and Cambridge. A few officers and men have remained behind to clear up.

The aerodrome, which was opened in the summer of 1916, has been used as flying school in connection with the Midlands Headquarters of the R A F, and many of the young pilots who received their early training there subsequently achieved considerable renown at the front.

WAR MEMORIALS IN THE CHURCHES.
[At the annual Vestry meetings of the Parish Church and Holy Trinity Church, held at the Church House last (Thursday) evening]

. . . .WAR MEMORIALS.
Mr. Linnell brought forward the question of war memorials. He thought there should be some memorial in the church, if only a tablet. The Rector said this matter had not been lost sight of. He had, however, refrained from bringing it forward till the Town Scheme was thoroughly launched. There should be memorials in all the churches in the parishes. The only thing to do that evening was to appoint a committee. This was agreed to, and the following were appointed :—The Rector, Messrs. W. H. Linnell, G. E. Over, George, W. T. Coles Hodges, Harris, and J. C. Harrison.

IN MEMORIAM.

CLEAVER.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. W. T. CLEAVER, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Cleaver, 17 East Street, who died in France on April 25, 1917.—“ God takes our loved ones from our homes, but never from our hearts.”

CORNISH.—In loving memory of EDWARD LOUIS CORNISH, 11th Royal Warwickshire, of Priors Marston. Killed in action April 23, 1917.

GREEN.—In loving memory of my dear husband, WALTER GREEN, killed in action in France, April 25, 1917.
“ Lost to sight, but to memory ever dear.”
—From his loving wife and child.

GREEN.—In loving memory of GEORGE BERNARD, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and the late Mrs. Green, 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton.
—Sadly mourned by his Father, Brother, and sister.

GREEN.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, WALTER EDMUND GREEN, youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. Henry Green, of Broadwell, who fell in action April 25, 1917.—Never forgotten.
—From his loving Father & Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

GREEN.—In loving memory of Pte J. H. GREEN, dearly beloved husband of Mrs. Green, 3 Sandown Road.—From his loving Wife and Children.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of Rifleman HERBERT GRIFFITH, who was killed in action on April 27, 1915.
“ This day brings back a memory
Of a loved one laid to rest,
And those who think of him to-day
Are those who loved him best.”
—From his loving Mother, Father, and Sisters (Kilsby).

GRIFFIN.—In loving memory of Rifleman WALTER GRIFFIN, beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. Griffin, Welford, killed in action April 24, 1918.
“ One of the dearest, one of the best.
We never thought when he left home
He would never more return ;
That he in death so soon would sleep,
And leave us here to mourn.”
—From his loving Dad and Mother and Sister.

JONES.—In loving memory of our dear father, Pte. F. J. JONES, King’s Royal Rifles, who was killed in action on April 25, 1918.—“ Peace, perfect peace, with loved ones far away.”—Ivy, Leslie, and Muriel.

JONES.—In loving memory of Second-Lieut. EVAN HARRIES JONES, M.C., R.F.A., second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Jones, of Cosford, killed in action in France on April 25, 1918, aged 22 years.

OWEN.—In loving memory of Pte. G. E. (TAS), Royal Warwicks, reported missing, presumed killed, April 25, 1915.
“ Fresh in our hearts his memory clings,
Yet still our grief is sore ;
Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, but gone before.”
—Ever in the thoughts of Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

PYWELL.—In loving memory of Sergt. F. W. PYWELL, killed in action at Gouzecourt Wood, Easter Monday, 1917.
That we might live they died.
Hail and farewell.
Their courage tried by every mean device of treacherous hate,
Like kings they died.”
—Ever mourned by Fathers, Sisters, Wife & Son.

WELCH.—In loving memory of L.-Corpl. E. E. WELCH, killed in action April 29, 1917.
—Not forgotten by his loving Wife and daughters.

WELCH.—In loving memory of our brother-in-law, Lance-Corpl. E. WELCH, killed in France on April 28, 1917.—Ever remembered by Erne, Fred, and Ethel Lenton, 64 Wood Street.

WELCH.—In loving memory of our dear brother ERNEST E. WELCH, who was killed in action in France on April 28, 1917.—Not forgotten by Thos. & E. Lenton.

YOUNG.—In ever loving memory of our dear and only son BILLY, Pte. WILLIAM COTTERILL YOUNG, who was killed in action in Salonika on April 24, 1917, in his 25th year.
“ Father, in Thy gracious keeping
Leave we now our loved one sleeping.
Till the day dawns and the shadows flee away.”
—Dearly loved and sadly missed from his Father, Mother, and Sisters, Pinfold St., New Bilton.

Advertisements

8th Jun 1918. More Prisoners of War

MORE PRISONERS OF WAR.

The list of local war prisoners is still increasing, and the number has now grown to 110, so that increased subscriptions are needed to ensure that they are supplied with food parcels. It will be seen by an appeal from the committee in another column that the sum of £330 is required every month.

Mr J R Barker, the hon organising secretary, has received the badge of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St. John for his work in connection with the relief for local prisoners of war.

The following Rugby men have been reported prisoners of war :—Pte T W Florendine, Hants Regiment, son of Mr James Florendine, 19 Bridget Street (Limburg) ; Rifleman Arthur Lee, K.R.R, son of Mrs E Lee, 34 Sandown Road (Limburg) ; Pte Percy Prior, R.W.R, 20 Wood Street, Rugby, employed at the B.T.H as millwright (Soltau), and Pte W Edwards, Wilts Regt, son of Mr T Edwards, 99 Railway Terrace (Limburg).

£330 EVERY MONTH it now required to Feed the 110 Local War Prisoners.

Proofs are abundant in the assurances of exchanged prisoners that the parcels stood between them and starvation, and they speak not only for themselves but for their comrades who are still in captivity.

READ THESE EXTRACTS FROM SOME OF THEIR LETTERS :—

L.-Crpl. HARWOOD HANCOX (New Bilton), transferred to Switzerland, says : “ If it had not been for the help in food and clothing there would not be many of us alive to-day.”

Pte. A. KING (Napton), repatriated, says he “owes his life to the food you sent.”

Pte. P. G. DAVIS (Dunchurch) transferred to Switzerland, says : “ I do not know how I should have got on without your parcels ; I certainly should not have been in Switzerland now.”

Pte. P. MACE (Hillmorton), transferred to Switzerland, says “ I suppose you know that all we had to live on was the food that you sent us from England.”

FUNDS ARE URGENTLY NEEDED

Will you arrange a Flower and Vegetable Show, Fete, or other effort to raise funds this summer ?

Will you organise Weekly Collections at your place of Employment or amongst your friends ?

DONATIONS or promises of regular weekly or monthly subscriptions, which will be gladly acknowledged, should be sent to Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, Hon. Organising Secretary,

RUGBY PRIS0NERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE,
9 REGENT STREET, RUGBY (Registered under the War Charities Act, 1916)

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut F G Greenhill has been promoted Captain.

Driver F Calloway, 3rd Battery, 45th Brigade, an Old Murrayian, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th last.

Pte J Donovan, of the Gloucester Regiment, who, prior to joining the Army was employed in the carpenters’ shop at the B.T.H, was killed in action on April 26th.

Rifleman H Corbett, 1st Rifle Brigade, who was recently officially reported as having been killed in action on March 26th, is now reported as wounded and missing. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H.

Mr John Jones, of Cosford, has received news that his youngest son, Pte W R Jones, Machine Gun Corps, has been gassed in France—whether seriously or not has not transpired at present. Only recently Mr Jones lost his second son, Lieut E H Jones, who was killed in action.

Capt E G Passmore, son of Mr Passmore, of Ashby St Ledgers, has been awarded the Military Cross. Capt Passmore is Adjutant in the 7th Northants. He was wounded in June, 1916, and again in April, 1917. He was slightly gassed recently, and was granted leave on account of health. He returned to France the week.

Pte Will Clarke, of the Royal Mariners, who took part in the first raid on Zeebrugge, has written a cheery letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles-Hodges, in which he states that although the injury to his spine is making slow progress, he hopes in time to regain the use of his legs and back.

Lieut A J Harris, R.E. now with the Mesopotamian force, has been recently promoted Captain. He is the third son of Mr A Harris, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby. When at Rugby School he gained a place (half-back) in the Football XV ; and in a regimental football competition, which took place last month, his side won the cup.

THE LATE LIEUT G W BARNWELL.

The widow of Second-Lieut G W Barnwell, formerly of Grosvenor Road, who was reported killed a few weeks ago, has received letters from officer friends in reference to the sad event. In one of them Lieut-Col Frurn, K.O.Y,L.I., who conveys the very deep sympathy of every officer and man in the Battalion, adds : “ He died leading his men, who love the ground he trod on.”—A fellow-officer writes :— “ Although I was not with the Battalion at the time of your husband’s death, I can give you certain details which I heard from those who were there. On the 13th of April the enemy attacked our Battalion, which was in the front line near Neuve Eglise, not far from Ypres. Your husband showed a magnificent example of coolness and courage to his men, repeatedly cheering and encouraging them during a short withdrawal. He exposed himself in throwing a field dressing to a wounded man. and received a machine-gun bullet wound in the chest, which proved almost instantly fatal. His body was subsequently carried down to Battalion Headquarters, and was almost certainly accorded there a proper burial. During the whole time I have known your husband, which is ever since he joined the Battalion, he has been a friend whom I respected most highly, and in whom I had the greatest confidence. His perpetual cheerfulness at all times, and his disregard of danger, won the respect of everyone, and he was most sincerely loved by both the officers and men of the whole Battalion. I can assure you that all of us share your loss with feelings of deep personal sorrow. His magnificent example in the field would undoubtedly have won him a decoration had he lived. Only a few days before he died, when some troops of another Battalion during an enemy attack were becoming disorganised, and beginning to retire, he rushed up and rallied them at a critical moment. We are proud of the memory of such a one. . . I am proud to have been considered his friend ; may we profit by the example he showed to us in his life, and in his death alike. We mourn a gallant comrade, and myself personally a close and trusted friend.”

BRAUNSTON.
PRISONERS OF WAR.—Gunner W H Noble, R.H.A, who was officially reported killed about two months ago, has written to say he was wounded in the right shoulder by shrapnel, and is a prisoner of War at Guben, and asks for parcels to be sent. The Rugby Prisoners of War Committee has made arrangements for a parcel to be sent at once.—Pte R G Green, Cheshire Regiment who was reported as missing last week, is now reported as a prisoner of war, sound, and at present at Limberg.

WEST HADDON.
SAILOR’S FUNERAL.—The funeral took place on Thursday last week of Painter Tom Osborne, H.M.S Fisgard, eldest son of Mr & Mrs George Osborne, West Haddon. The fatal illness was due to a long exposure in the water when torpedoed in the Atlantic. Osborne had volunteered in the special service to combat U boats. He was a brave lad, and had performed many gallant deeds. For five days he and several others were at the mercy of the waves on a raft they made out of odds and ends. They encountered some terrible weather, and were without food five days. He died in Haslar Naval Hospital. The body was brought by rail to Long Buckby Station. Twelve sailors, in charge of the Chief Painter, Mr W H Shergold. H.MS Fisgard, came at their own expense to attend the funeral and to carry deceased to his last resting place. The coffin, borne on the shoulders of six of his mates, was covered with the Union Jack. Deceased had just passed his test for P.O, and had been recommended for award for bravery and devotion to duty.

STOCKTON.
SERGT WILLS is home on leave. He has been offered a commission, and will go shortly into training. The honour conferred on the sergeant is greatly appreciated by his many friends in Stockton. A most interesting letter has been received from George Wilks, who is serving on a motor launch in the Mediterranean. He has had the opportunity of visiting Tunis and other spots in North Africa—an enjoyable experience of strange places and people.—Albert Redgrave, who is an R.A.M.C orderly in the hospital at Etaples, had an unpleasant Whit-Sunday, when the hospital was bombed by the enemy. He fortunately escaped injury himself, but one of his chums was killed.—Cyril Sheasby was posted as missing on March 21st, since which date nothing has been heard of him. This is the third man from the village of whom no news has been received, the other two being L Wincott and Lewis Wall.— Bob Bates has been home on leave this week.
THE CHURCH.—So many flowers and wreaths being placed by the war shrine that their disposal has become a difficulty, Mr Knight generously offered to place a shelf in front of the shrine, on which the flowers could be well arranged. The work has been carried out, and is not only a great convenience, but also improves the appearance of the memorial considerably. Owing to the fact that the Rector is taking charge of the parish of Shuckburgh during Mr MacLaren’s absence as Army chaplain, the services at the Parish Church are fewer in number, and the hours have undergone some modification.

EASENHALL.
Mr and Mrs F Varney of Easenhall have received news that their second son, Pte Frank Varney, Coldstream Guards, who was officially reported as missing on April 13, is now wounded and a prisoner in Germany. This is the second time he has been wounded. They have another son, Sergt C Varney, who also belongs to the Coldstream Guards, and has been wounded three times. He is now Instructor of Musketry at the Guards headquarters in France. It may be added that he was in the retreat from Mons, and has seen much active service.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE BURIAL OF SOLDIERS AT RUGBY.
DEAR SIR,—It may be that there are rules and regulations, but the need for some arrangement for the burial of men dying here in the service of their country was pointed out in these columns long ago, and the wish expressed—and it is the wish of the townspeople—that a free burying plot should be provided for those who are giving their lives for this country. I can assure you Rugby residents are feeling very sore about the way these are being treated.

There are at the present time scattered, unkept (because nameless) graves of men about our cemetery. Were they in France they would be well-kept, with at least a wooden cross inscribed with their name.

The “opening ” fee here again debars us from doing this small service. These minor details are of far more consequence to the bereaved away than some monuments erected afterwards.—Yours truly,
May 27th.
A CITIZEN.

MAGISTERIAL.—At Rugby Police Court on Friday in last week—before Mr A E Donkin—Pte Arthur Williams, Royal Defence Corps, Rugby, and Lance-Corpl John Craig, Scottish Rifles, Invergordon, Scotland, pleaded guilty to drunkenness.—P C Holl deposed that both men were very drunk, and Williams was trying to take care of Craig.—Williams, who was given a bad character by his officer, was fined 3s, and Craig 1s 6d. —For a similar offence William Jennings, 4 West Leyes, Rugby, was fined 1s 6d.

ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Wednesday—before Mr A E Donkin—Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was charged with being an absentee from the Army—P.S Hawkes deposed that the previous afternoon he saw defendant enter a common lodging house. He followed him, and enquired whether he had any Army discharge papers or other documents. To this defendant replied, “ No ; I have not been in the Army yet. I have dodged it, and I intend to.”—Defendant informed the magistrate that he had neither been registered or medically examined, and he was remanded for the Recruiting Authorities to be communicated with.

STRUCK BY DESCENDING AEROPLANE.

While working on his garden plot at Lilbourne on Friday evening last week, John Garner, labourer, of Yelvertoft, was struck by a descending aeroplane. He was badly bruised on the left shoulder and arm, and was taken to the Hospital of St Cross at Rugby, where he is making good progress.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

On the first of next month the present ration cards will be superseded by ration books, the application forms for which have already been sent to many householders in the district, and the remainder will be delivered by the end of the week. These forms are returnable to the Ration Officer by June 15th, but already a number—many of which have been incorrectly filled in—have been returned to the Food Office.

Anyone experiencing difficulty in filling in the forms should attend at any of the Elementary schools in Rugby or New Bilton on Monday or Tuesday afternoon next, where the teachers will be in attendance to give advice and assistance.

At a meeting of the Food Control Committee on Thursday Mr H Tarbox drew attention to the paragraph at the back of the application forms with reference to the term “Self-suppliers.” He said a large number of persons were concerned as to whether they ought to describe themselves as self-suppliers, inasmuch as in many cases a householder would kill a pig and cure his own bacon. This, however, in many cases did not last the whole year. Could such a man describe himself as a self-supplier? This, of course, applied not only to bacon, but to people who kept their own poultry.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) said he could not answer this, because he had not received any instructions on the point.—The Chairman said he thought the only thing to be done was for everyone to use his own discretion, and if they were prosecuted to trust to the magistrates dealing leniently with them.—Mr Tarbox said he could understand the position with regard to a case where a man had a country establishment and a town house, and where supplies were sent regularly from the country place in the town residence.—Mrs Dewar asked if they could get a ruling from the Commissioner?

The Executive Officer said his opinion was that a farmer who made his own butter, or who killed a lot of rabbits on his farm, should describe himself as a self-suppler.—Mrs Dewar enquired as to the position of a person who kept sufficient rabbits to kill one per month.—The Executive Officer replied that such a man would not be considered as a self-supplier.

It was decided that an inquiry should be addressed to the Commissioner on the subject.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

THROUGH the efforts of the Food Economy Committee a second instalment of vegetables has been despatched to the Warwickshire Collecting Society, and this week there is a considerable increase in the supply from the villagers—64 eggs, as well as a quantity of cabbages, onions, mint, and rhubarb, being among the contributions.

IN MEMORIAM.

EVANS.—In affectionate remembrance of WILLIAM, the beloved son of W. E, & A. M. Evans (late of Crick), who was killed in action on June 10, 1917. He will never be forgotten by Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.
“ Who through the fiery gates,
Enter thy rest.
Greet them as conquerors,
Bravest and best.
Every white soul of them,
Ransomed and blest.”

GREEN.—In loving memory of Sergt CHARLES GREEN, the dearly beloved son of James and Flora May Green, of Calcutt Farm, Stockton, who was killed in action in France on June 9, 1917.
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
We loved him— ah ! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”

HIPWELL.—In loving memory of Gunner EDWARD WALLACE HIPWELL, second son of George Hipwell, Clifton-on-Dunsmore, who died of wounds in France. Buried at Merville, June 7, 1917.
“ Behind the guns our brave lads stand
To answer for the Motherland.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Arthur, Fred and Reg.

TERRY.—In loving memory of our dear son, AMBROSE JOSEPH TERRY, R.W.R., who died of wounds on June 7, 1917.
“ In a hero’s grave our loved one sleeps ;
Never will we forge t our noble dead.
—From Mother and Father.

1st Jun 1918. Airmen’s Practical Joke

AIRMEN’S PRACTICAL JOKE.

A practical joke was perpetuated on Monday afternoon, when an airman, flying over the town, dropped a dummy man, which fell at the back of some premises in Church Street. The object was recovered and taken away by other airmen, who came along Church Street at the time in a motor-car. It is stated that it bore the inscription: “This man does not wish to be buried at Rugby”—evidently a reference to the controversy between the flying officers and the Urban Council concerning the charge for the burial of an officer recently killed near the town. The falling dummy caused a fright to those who saw it, and many people feared that another fatal accident had occurred. A woman in the Market Place fainted, and had to be conveyed into a neighbouring shop.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE.

The monthly meeting of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee was held at Benn Buildings on Monday evening, the chairman (Mr Wm Flint) presiding. There were also present : Mrs Blagden, Mrs J H Lees, Mrs Anderson, Mr G W Walton, Mr R P Mason, Mr A E Donkin, J.P., Mr J H Mellor, and the Hon Secretary, Mr J Reginald Barker.

The Chairman reminded the committee that at the last meeting the Hon Secretary warned them that there was every reason to expect a big increase in the number of prisoners and in consequence a large increase in the financial burden. His forecast had, unfortunately come true, and they were now faced with a very great expense every month. Thanks to their Hon Secretary and the foresight of the committee in looking ahead in the manner they had done, they were at the moment able to face these additional responsibilities, but it was very necessary that renewed and continued support be given to the fund.

Mr Barker stated that during May the receipts from all sources amounted to £102 16s 9d, whilst the cost of food panels was £218 11s, a deficit for the first time for seven months. The committee would remember that he mentioned at a recent meeting that he was enquiring into the bona-fides of all the prisoners on their list. He found there were a few men, who, whilst they had relatives living in the town, were themselves quite strangers, having lived in other parts of the country before joining up. In one case the man’s wife had only come to Rugby since her husband had been a prisoner. He had proved to the Regimental Care Committees concerned that these men in question, about a dozen in all, had no claim in the Rugby Fund, and they had therefore been transferred to the committees of their own districts. In addition they had been fortunate in having several of their prisoners transferred to Holland or Switzerland, and the numbers were thereby reduced to 60. During the present month, however, 35 men from Rugby and district had become prisoners of war, bringing the total to 95, whilst there were still a number reported missing, some of whom in all probability being prisoners of war. They were now fated with an expenditure of nearly £300 per month, and he regretted to say the Central Committee found it necessary, owing to the increase in the cost of foodstuffs and materials, to raise the price of the standard parcels from 8s to 10s each as from July 11th ; that was six weeks hence, so they had a little breathing space. It would mean that instead of £2 15s 6d per man every four weeks, or £3 per calendar month, they would have to provide £3 7s 6d per man every four weeks, or £3 13s per calendar month. Mr Barker also informed the committee that arrangements had been made to speed up the delivery of the first parcel for newly-captured men. It took at the earliest two months from the time a man was captured until his first parcel reached him from this country, and often as long as three months. In order to bridge over the interval the Central Committee had recently established a large depot in Rotterdam, where a supply is kept of 28,000 emergency parcels, each of which is sufficient to keep two prisoners for a week. The British Help Committees which now exist in all prison camps in Germany, are empowered to draw upon the Rotterdam depot for such parcels as are required for new prisoners until the arrival of the parcels from England.

It was satisfactory to be able to state that although a certain amount of miscarriage was unavoidable, from 80 to 90 per cent of the parcels eventually reached their destination. This, said Mr Barker, was not over-estimated. He kept a careful register of the acknowledgements received from the men on the Rugby list ; the acknowledgements being filed under each men’s initial.

The Chairman said the proof they had that the parcels reached the men would do much to encourage all concerned in their efforts on behalf of their unfortunate townsmen in captivity. With regard to the expense to which they were now committed, he asked the committee to carefully consider the question of additional expense caused by the proposed increase in the price of the standard food parcels.— Mrs Blagden said they had always in the past met the demands and she trusted they would continue to do so without having to ask the Red Cross Society to make good any deficit. She felt sure that Rugby and district would continue its support, and proposed that the committee should, as and when required, provide the funds necessary to maintain in full the value of the parcels.—This was seconded by Mr Walton and unanimously carried.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt P W le Gros, Royal Warwicks, who is reported wounded, was in the Cricket XI and the XV at Rugby. In 1919 he was the most effective bowler in the School and afterwards he played for Buckinghamshire.

Major-General Sir F C Shaw, K.C.B, who commanded the 29th Division during their stay in Warwickshire, has just been appointed Commander-in-Chief of the Forces in Ireland.

Sergt F Turner, 220th Army Troops Company (Rugby Fortress Company), Royal Engineers, has been mentioned in General Allenby’s despatches. He is native of Easenhall.

Rifeman W Griffin, of the Rife Brigade, who before the War was employed in the Illuminating Engineers’ Department at the B.T. H, has been reported killed in action about April 23rd.

Pte H W Fallen, Wiltshire Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs Fallen, 7 Adam Street, and Pte Horace Horsley, Manchester Regiment, son of Mrs McKie, 33 Albert Street, are reported missing. Pte Horsley is a B.T.H employee.

Rifleman Albert Walters, Post Office Rifles, London Regiment, son of Mr & Mrs R Walters, 12 Bennett Street, has written to his friends stating that he has been wounded and taken prisoner. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, and before joining the Army he was employed as a postman at Rugby.

News has been received that Pte E Martin, R M.L.I, son of Mr & Mrs Martin, 103 Wood Street, was killed in action on May 8th. He was formerly employed by Messrs Linnell & Son. He joined the Army two and a half years ago, and had been in France two years. He leaves a widow and two children.

Lieut C W Peyton, formerly of the B.T.H Test Department, has been promoted Captain.

Corpl Joseph Branston, Marine Division, fourth son of Mr & Mrs F Branston, 38 Chester Street, has been severely wounded in the arm and thigh by shrapnel, but is progressing well. He has been in the forces for 9 ½ years, and this is the second time he has been wounded.

Corpl Clarence A Eyden, Royal Engineers, elder son of Mr Alfred Eyden, acting district goods manager, L & N-W Railway, Northampton, was killed in France (where he had been on active service for over three years) on Whit-Sunday. Corpl Eyden was educated at Rugby, where his parents were well-known residents for some years ; and at the time of his enlistment, shortly after the outbreak of war, he occupied the position of private clerk to the present Acting General Manager of the L & N-W Railway. He was 27 years of age, and his great musical abilities, always so readily given in aid of charitable movements, will be long remembered in this town. His brother, Lieut Maurice Eyden, of the 2nd Northants Regiment, is actively engaged with his regiment abroad.

The record of casualties among Old Rugbians in the War up to May 4th was as follows :—Killed 542, wounded 872, prisoners 62, missing 22—total, 1,498.

The following local men, some of whom have already been reported missing, are now known to be prisoners of war :—Pte J C Harris, Royal Scots, son of Mr Samuel Harris, 18 Adam Street, New Bilton. He presented himself for enlistment at the Drill Hall in the early days of the War, and as he was only 16 years of age, he was claimed by his father. He subsequently walked to Coventry, and enlisted in the R.W.R. Before he was 17 years of age he was wounded and claimed by his mother, being transferred to the Reserves. He joined up again on his 18th birthday. His father, Lance Corpl Harris, is serving in Italy.—Pte F Lenton, Oxon and Bucks L.I, 64 Wood Street, Rugby, employed in the Assembly Department at the B.T.H.— Pte W A Bland, Somersetshire L.I, 1 Pinders Lane.—Pte J W Wood, Oxon and Bucks L.I, 28 Chester Street, an employee in the B.T.H Tool Room.—Lance Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs G H Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road.—Pte J Hart, Wiltshire Regiment, The Green, Hillmorton, formerly employed by Mr S Robbins.—Pte A G Shilvock, Gloucester Regiment, 42 Abbey Street.

SECOND-LIEUT F MOLONEY.

Second-Lieut F Moloney, whose parents live at Kilsby was killed in action on April 9th in Egypt. He was employed in the Winding Department at the BT.H, and joined Kitchener’s Army as a private in 1914 at the age of 17, and by his excellent work he soon earned promotion, and was eventually granted a commission. His father, although over military age and recently discharged, joined the Army to be with his son, and Lieut Moloney for a time enjoyed the somewhat unique position of being his father’s sergeant in France. He possessed to a marked degree the typical British traits of restraint and determination, and was described by his Commanding Officer as one of the steadiest and most reliable of his junior officers. He was killed by a high explosive shell while returning from clearing out enemy nests in a captured village. He had previously been wounded in France, where his father is still serving.

DUNCHURCH.
MR & MRS J BROWN, of the Windmill Houses, Dunchurch, have received news that their eldest son, Pte W Brown, of the Warwicks, is a prisoner of war. Mr & Mrs A Gillings, The Heath, Dunchurch, have also been notified that their second son, Pte C Gillings, is a prisoner.—Another son of Mr W D Barnwell, farmer, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, was called up on Thursday. This makes the fourth son Mr Barnwell has in the Army.

BRAUNSTON.
MISSING.—Pte R G Green, Cheshire Regt, has been officially reported missing on April 16th. He is the second son of Sergeant and Mrs Green, Yeomanry House, Braunston. He joined the Northants Yeomanry at the age of 17, in the spring of 1915 ; then transferred to the R.F.C., and went to France, where he remained for over two years. He was then sent to England, transferred to the infantry early this year and returned to France a few months ago.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
MISSING.—Official information is to hand that Pte Arthur Whitehead (R.W.R.) to missing. He is only son of the late Mr and Mrs William Whitehead.

CHURCH LAWFORD.
MR & MRS BEERS, whose only son, Pte C Beers, was reported missing on April 11th, have since heard that he is a prisoner of war in Germany.

A DESERTER.—At the Rugby Police Court on Monday—before Mr J E Cox—Pte John Nolan pleaded guilty to being a deserter from the 1st Border Regiment since March 11th, and was remanded to await an escort.

THE GERMAN ATTACK.
To the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser.

Sir,—I shall be greatly obliged if you will spare me a little of your valuable space, in order to place before your readers a few facts with regard to the situation arising from the recent German attacks.

Since March 21st (the date of the first great German advance) it has been apparent to every British subject that the German Army has been enormously augmented by the collapse of Russia. Great Armies of trained German soldiers, and thousands of guns with ammunition, were transferred to the West for use against the Allied armies. The Military situation was immediately altered and the need for men became and is now urgent.

The County of Warwickshire has already sent thousands of young men to the Army and Navy, but still there remains much to be done.

Two thousand men are needed for the month of June from Warwickshire.

To supply this requirement, there must be a revival of the Voluntary spirit. There are many thousands of men who must necessarily be retained to provide munitions of war, there are, however, many young men who can possibly be spared for service in the field. To these young men this communication is principally addressed, and at the same time there is a need for older and less fit men for service behind the line.

One Volunteer at once may easily prove to be worth two “ called up ” men in three mouths hence, and I appeal for the revival of the time when men freely surrendered their exemption and joined up to fight the enemy in the field.

I shall be glad to give information and advice to anyone desiring it. A railway warrant will be sent to a man living at a distance to Coventry who wishes to Volunteer.

Yours truly, J. W. E. TINGLE,
Assistant Director of National Service,
Ministry of National Service, Warwickshire Area, Union Street, Coventry.

RUGBY AND DISTRICT FOOD CONTROL COMMITTEE.
NATIONAL RATIONING.

Application Forms will shortly be distributed by the Postal Authorities to every Householder to make application for Ration Books, which are to take the place of the Ration Cards which expire on the 13th July next.

The Committee are endeavouring to make arrangements with the School Managers of all the Elementary Schools in the Rugby District for the Schools to be open to the Public, and the Teachers to be available to instruct the Public how to fill up the Forms of Application.

Enquiry must be made locally as to the day and hours the Teachers will be in attendance.

APPLICATION FORMS MUST BE RETURNED TO THE FOOD OFFICE NOT LATER THAN SATURDAY, 15th JUNE NEXT.

F. M. BURTON, Executive Officer.
Local Food Office,
6 Market Place, Rugby.

MARGARINE RATION TO BE INCREASED.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday it was decided to increase the ration of margarine to 5ozs per coupon. The butter ration will remain at 4ozs, as heretofore.

THE SUPPLEMENTARY MEAT RATION.

The work in connection with the supplementary meat rationing scheme locally has now been completed, and practically everyone entitled to the extra ration has received the necessary card. About 6,000 such cards have been distributed, including 300 for women employed on heavy manual labour. The work involved has occupied five weeks, and was very successfully carried out by the Rationing Offier, who received valuable voluntary assistance from a number of ladies.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS VEGETABLES.—At a recent meeting of the Food Economy Committee a proposal was made that a weekly collection of surplus vegetables and garden produce grown in the village should be sold to the Warwickshire Vegetable and Food Collecting Society. This proposal was enthusiastically received by the villagers ; a dumping station was decided upon, and on Wednesday last the first consignment, including spring cabbages, mint, parsley, sage, 416 lbs rhubarb, and eggs were dispatched.

THE PAPER SUPPLY.
No Newspaper Returns.

The effect of a new Order which will come into force early this month will be that no newspapers, &c., may be supplied to newsagents on “ Sale or Return ” ; consequently there will be no copies for sale casually, and only regular customers can be supplied.

Those who desire to have the Rugby Advertiser regularly, and all new subscribers, should therefore place their orders with a newsagent, and when extra copies are required for any purpose, notification should be given in time to enable the Agent to send the order to the head office.

We should like to thank our readers for the loyal and effective help they have given us in meeting the difficulties due to the paper restrictions by adopting our suggestion to pass copies of the Advertiser on to their friends. The result has been that, notwithstanding the necessary reduction in the number of papers printed, the Advertiser is read by as many people as before, and the paper stands pre-eminently the best medium in the district for all classes of advertisements.

DEATHS.

EYDEN.—Killed on active service in France on Whit-Sunday, May 19, 1918, Corpl CLARENCE ALFRED EYDEN, R.E., dearly beloved elder son of Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Eyden, 53 St. Matthew’s Parade, Northampton ; aged 27 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

CONOPO.—In memory of W. D. Conopo, of Kilsby, who lost his life on H.M.S. Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland, May 31, 1916.—At rest.
“ Two years have passed, Oh, how we miss him,
Never will his memory fade ;
Loving thoughts will ever linger
Around his ocean grave.”
Oh ; for a touch of that vanished hand ;
Oh, for a voice that is still.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

MASKELL.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. A. G. MASKELL, killed in action in France on May 30, 1916.
“ days of sadness still come o’er us,
Tears in silence often flow,
Thinking of the day we lost you,
Just two years ago.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”
—Sadly missed by all at home.

Green, George Bernard. Died 30th Nov 1917

George Bernard Green was born on the 24th April and baptised on 12th June 1898 at St Barnabas Church in Oxford. His father Frederick was an iron moulder and lived at 11 St Barnabas Street. He and George’s mother Louisa Greenfield (nee Palmer) had married in Stockbridge RD (Hampshire). Louisa was from nearby Bowerchalke, in Wiltshire and Frederick from Oxford.

The family moved several times, with children born in Oxford, Stoke on Trent and the two youngest, Margaret Ann and John Palmer, five and two in the 1911 census, in New Bilton. George Bernard, aged 12, was still at school at this point and the family was living at 4 Gladstone Street. Frederick was still working as an iron moulder.

George’s older brother, Frederick John, signed up at the start of the war and was wounded in the Battle of the Somme and died in September 1916.

George Bernard would have enlisted later – he was only 16 in 1914 and he received only the British and Victory Medals. He joined the Montgomery and Welsh Yeomanry, part of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. In January 1917, reorganisation caused am amalgamation of regiments and on 4th March 1917 it became 25th (Montgomery and Welsh Horse Yeomanry) Battalion, Royal Welsh Fusiliers and joined the 231st Brigade of the 74th (Yeomanry) Division which took part in the Second Battle of Gaza (17-19 April 1917). Tis was an unsuccessful attempt to capture the town of Gaza. After a summer of stalemate they took part in the Third Battle of Gaza (27 Oct – 7 Nov) which resulted in the Turks abandoning the town and a rapid British advance to capture Jerusalem (8-9 December).

It must have been during this advance that Private George Bernard Green (no 60104) was killed. His body was not identified and he is remembered on the Jerusalem Memorial, which stands in Jerusalem War Cemetery, 4.5 kilometres north of the walled city and is situated on the neck of land at the north end of the Mount of Olives, to the west of Mount Scopus.

He is also remembered, with his brother on the Croop Hill Memorial

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

30th Jun 1917. Lord Roberts Memorial Workshops

LORD ROBERTS MEMORIAL WORKSHOPS FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

RUGBY & DISTRICT TRIBUTE DAY Saturday, July 7th.

At the beginning of the present War it was realised, both by Lord Roberts and by the Committee of the Society, that in order to deal with the numbers of soldiers and sailors returning disabled it would be necessary to greatly extend the original Workshops Scheme. Various plans were discussed, but while the matter was still under consideration the great Field-Marshal passed away in the midst of his troops.

A SUITABLE MEMORIAL.

As the question of a suitable Memorial was raised, it was felt that by using the money subscribed to carry out Lord Roberts’ own suggestions and ideas with regard to the Workshops no greater and more lasting Memorial, could be given to him. After consultation, therefore, with the Countess Roberts, who gave the proposal her warmest support, it was decided to start the Lord Roberts’ Memorial Fund for Workshops for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors, and arrangements were at once made to acquire a large Factory in London, with the idea that from this centre a large manufacturing business could be established, which would give employment to all disabled men who wished to profit by the scheme.

TOY-MAKING the STAPLE INDUSTRY.

After due consideration, the Committee decided to start Toy-making as the staple industry, to this way serving two purposes, for there was no time to lose in setting about the capture of this pre-eminently German trade.

Machinery for making wooden toys was duly installed, and the services of suitable instructors obtained.

By the end of 1915 over 80 different varieties of toys had been produced in large quantities, over 100 disabled men were employed, the public interest was aroused and the future of the Workshops as a manufacturing centre was assured.

So far so good ; but the business men in charge of the work saw much farther. They saw the need of not only providing employment for these men, but of providing a market for their goods—of manufacturing in such a way that the articles made could be sold to the trade at a trade price.

In this way—and in this way only—could they hope to make the Workshops pay their own way in the future, for it was obvious that, as the Society proposed to provide permanent employment a self-supporting industry was the only thing to be contemplated.

A STIFF PROBLEM.

The problem was a stiff one. Almost every day batches of disabled men were arriving, each knowing that good work and good pay were assured him the moment he entered the Workshops. Those who had started early were now becoming experts, and the quantity of toys being turned out was enormous.

It became apparent that London alone could not deal with the constant demands for employment, and it was decided to open Provincial Branch Workshops under the control of London, thus enabling the men to work, if they desired it, in their own localities.

ECONOMIC VALUE OF SPECIALIZATION.

That the foundation of these Branches would require an immense amount of capital—a great deal more than had originally been subscribed—was obvious from the outset, as each one must be thoroughly equipped and suitably prepared before even one disabled man could be sent there. But, on the other hand, as specialisation was to be the keynote of the idea, the centre could eventually save money by arranging to manufacture goods which would assist the other Branches and the Main Workshops, and at the same time manufacturing completed articles for sale. In this way the proposed metal working Branch at Birmingham would not only make lead soldiers and other metal toys, but would provide all metal parts, hinges, bolts, dies, &c., which are wanted in the manufacture of wooden toys in London, Bradford, the Printing Branch, would print all the catalogues, posters, stationery, &c., for all the centres, and at the same time could take outside orders in abundance. And so on with every other branch.

The Workshops would thus avoid paying out to other firms what they would necessarily demand as profit, and at the same time be enabled to build up several quite distinct and important industries.

YOUR HELP IS WANTED-NOW.

The disabled men are applying in large numbers for admission, and we want your help to give them what they ask.

The Workshops provide not for the present only, but for the whole future life of these brave men. They take them as they come, lame and halt, from the battlefield, and make of them efficient, capable workmen—not receivers of charity, but valuable units of a huge industrial and economic scheme.

LOCAL SUPPORT.

Rugby’s Tribute Day is fixed for Saturday, July 7th, Mr. J. J. McKinnell, C.C., chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, being President of the effort, and he has entrusted the organisation to Mr. J. Reginald Barker.

Every penny that can be got is wanted now. The smallest amount is not too small, but big sums are wanted too. Do not let the Workshops be held up and the work curtailed for lack of your help. Send every penny you can spare to the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. R. P. MASON, Manager, London City and Midland Bank, Rugby, and do all you can to assist the Fund in helping Rugby’s effort towards success. These Workshops are the most practical, way of finding work for our permanently disabled men in the War.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut O M Samson, of Rugby, has been gazetted temporary lieutenant in the R.G.A.

M House and P D Stokes, who about two years ago were prominent members of Rugby School XV, have recently been killed in action. M House was also a member of the XI.

Capt Charles H Alexander, of the Trench Mortar Section, Australian Imperial Forces, was killed in action in France on June 8th. For some years Capt Alexander was a member of the staff of the B.T.H Company, and subsequently went out to Australia, where he joined the Australian Forces on the outbreak of war. He was a brother of Mrs John Martin, of Clifton, and brother-in-law of Mr Fred Clough, of Hillcrest, Hillmorton.

Sapper G Smith, Royal Engineers Signals, son of Mr & Mrs Smith, 12 Acacia Grove, has been appointed to a temporary commission as second-lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers, and posted to the 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Mr Smith, who was a member of the Old Volunteer Force, was mobilized at the beginning of the War, and proceeded to France with Rugby “ E ” Company. He is a member of the permanent staff of the Post Office and an Old Murrayian.

AN OLD SCHOOL SERVANT KILLED.

Mr W Evans, of Catthorpe, has received official notice that his son, Pte William Evans, Royal Warwicks, was killed in action by a German shell on June 10th. He was for over two years a footman with Dr David at the School House, Rugby, and a member of the School Servants’ Cricket Club. At the time he joined—January, 1915—he was a butler at Eton College. He was seriously wounded by shrapnel on September 3rd on the Somme at the taking of Ginchy. After being in hospital three months, he returned to France in January, and had seen some severe fighting since then with the Warwicks. The Officer of his Company, writing to the parents, states that Pte Evans was killed while taking stores up to the line. As one of the Company runners, he had always shown a splendid spirit—a fine, brave boy throughout. His straight, upright character was respected and admired by all the men, and all felt his loss very keenly. Mr Evans’ second son, who is in the K.R.R, has been wounded twice and discharged as medically unfit, and his third son is serving at the Front in a Machine Gun Corps.

STOCKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr James Green, of Calcutt, Stockton, has received news that his son, Sergt Charles Green, R.F.A, was killed in action on June 9th. He enlisted in September, 1914, went to France the following July, and straight into action with his Battery. He went through every engagement the Battery took part in, and was wounded at the Somme in August, 1916. Since then he has been slightly wounded three times—once in the thigh by a bullet, which he pluckily extracted with his jack-knife ; once in the check, causing a nasty flesh wound ; and then again on the heel by a shell. He has also been gassed, and suffered from frozen knees, and was temporarily buried with others by the bursting of a shell. This was only a week prior to the hit that ended fatally. Letters from the Major and Lieutenant of his Battery speak highly of him as a brave and fearless soldier, and say his last action, doubtless, saved the lives of several of his comrades.

ANOTHER LOCAL PRISONER OF WAR.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the local committee, viz, Lance-Corpl C J Colley, 7th Royal Fusiliers, who is interned at Wahn. He was reported missing on April 21st, and it was not until Sunday last that he was further reported prisoner of war. His parents live at Coton House. Mr J R Barker, hon. secretary, has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him on behalf of the committee.

The many friends of Pte A E Hirons, of Churchover, will be glad to learn that news has at last been received of him. A letter received from another prisoner of war at Soltan says :— “ All the parcels have turned up ; it was owing to the frequent changes of address that they went astray. As soon as a parcel arrives I acknowledge and thank you for it. The chief difficulty is the address. We cannot let you know, of course, when we move and the parcels go adrift. I work in the post office here, and three weeks ago found no less than 23 parcels for Pte Hirons’ which I immediately sent on. Everything is done in order that the parcels reach their owners.”

CONCERT.—The wounded soldiers of the Rugby Infirmary Hospital gave a most enjoyable entertainment in their mess-room on Thursday last week, under the presidency of Mr W Dickens, The Commandant and most of the staff, as well as several friends from the town, attended. The programme, which was a long and varied one, was sustained throughout by the “ boys,” and every item was deservedly encored. Sergt Till (East Lancs Regiment), a fine baritone singe, was in splendid voice, and his rendering of “ Thora ” (by special request) was especially good. Others who contributed largely to the success of the evening and who deserve a word of praise were : Sergt Evans, Corp Beckett and Bostock, Ptes Heath and Holme, and “ Wee Geordie,” who impersonated Charlie Chaplin.

SPOTTED FEVER.—A fatal case of spotted fever has occurred in the Rugby rural district. All precautions have been taken.

A REGULATION has been published prohibiting an occupier of an agricultural holding in Great Britain selling or parting with possession of any horse used or capable of being used for the cultivation of the holding except with the authority of a license granted by the Board of Agriculture.

DEATHS.

EVANS.—On June 10th, WILLIAM EVANS, the beloved eldest son of W. E. & A. M. Evans ; killed in action by a German shell in France.- “ Greater love hath no man than this that he laid down his life for his friends.”
“ Thy will be done.”

GREEN.—Killed in action in France on June 9th, Sergt. CHARLES GREEN, beloved son of James and Flora Green, of Calcutt, Stockton ; aged 28.
“ Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died of wounds received in action on June 29th, 1915.—From his sorrowing MOTHER and SISTERS.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. ARTHUR COOMBES, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life, is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last,
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son ARTHUR, who died February 26th, 1915. From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In ever-loving memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. Chater, R.B., of Dunchurch, who was killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ No lips need speak where the heart mourns sincerely.”—From FATHER and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In affectionate remembrance of Rifleman W. H. Chater, 12th Rifle Brigade ; killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ They miss him most who loved him best.”—From ADA.

COOPER.—In loving memory of 9178 Sergt. JOHN COOPER, 1st Yorks, and Lancs. Regiment ; killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From MOTHER, SISTER, and BROTHER.

Green, Frederick John. Died 7th Sep 1916

Frederick John Green was born in 1890 at Headington, Oxford, the oldest of five children of Frederick Green (b 1857 in Oxford) and Louisa Greenfield Green, née Palmer (b 1866, Bowerchalke, Wilts and died 1916 in New Bilton), his wife. Frederick sen. was an iron foundry worker who after several moves around the country, was in 1911 residing at 4, Gladstone Street, New Bilton.

Frederick John Green was educated at St Matthews School, Rugby, and followed his father into the foundry business. He was shown in the 1911 census returns as residing with his father and employed as a bore maker in an iron foundry. However by the the time he joined the army he was working with the Humber Motor Company in Coventry.

Frederick John Green enlisted on 2nd September 1914 in the 12th Battalion, Kings Royal Rifle Corps as a rifleman, regimental no. R/1855, and was sent to France on 23 July 1915. During the 1916 Battles of the Somme, he was sent to the No.21 Casualty Clearing Station at La Neuville where he died of his wounds on 7 September 1916. He was buried at the nearby La Neuville British Cemetery where his grave is one of 866 that is maintained by the CWGC. A single man, he was survived by his father and four siblings.

In addition to being remembered on the Memorial Gates, Whitehall Road, Rugby, he also features on the New Bilton War Memorial.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

23rd Oct 1915. Local Territorials do Good Work

LOCAL TERRITORIALS DO GOOD WORK.

Lance-Corporal W J Boyes, of “C” Company, 1/7 Royal Warwickshire (Territorials), writes to the editor :-

DEAR SIR,

Just a few lines to your paper to let the people of Rugby know our battalion is still going strong out here. In the recent heavy fighting we were in the first line trenches. We did not know until the last moment that the advance was to take place all along the line. Our artillery was busy, and the Rugby Howitzer Battery was well to the front with some deadly firing. For days the roar of heavy high explosives were heard, and there was hardly a moment’s silence. For the first time since we have been out here our trench mortars have been used with great success, and altogether we helped to secure what we fully believe to be the first fruits of a crushing victory. We experienced some bad luck the other night, as the Germans sent over some aerial torpedoes, which unfortunately caused some casualties, but only one of these was a Rugby man.

We have just seen a squadron of our aeroplanes pass over the German lines. It was a grand sight to witness the bursting of shells from the enemy anti-aircraft guns, hut not one of our aeroplanes was hit, although there must have been at least twenty of them passing over the German lines.

Everyone is cheerful and confident, and I know when we get orders to drive the Germans back the Warwicks will be ready.

The weather is very rough just now, and there is every prospect of a severe winter.

I know the people of Rugby will not be behind-hand in sending out a few comforts, and the boys are grateful for what they have already done for us. Hoping this will be interesting to the readers of your paper.

Lance-Corpl Boyes has two brothers also serving—one in the Berkshires and the other in the Oxford and Bucks.

THANKS FROM COVENTRY TERRITORIALS.

Pte J Gayton, 2495, “C” Co, 1/7th Royal Warwicks, writes on October 16th as follows :—

“ Dear Sir,— Please spare me a small space in your paper to thank the people of Rugby who so kindly sent out a consignment of cakes to ‘C’ Co of the l/7th R.W.R. I am a Coventry youth myself, and there are a lot more from there in the above Company and the Rugby boys who are with us very kindly shared the cakes with us. They were a treat—absolutely a luxury for us—and I can assure you and all the good people concerned that we fellows from Coventry will never forget the great kindness shown by the people and the Rugby boys here who shared with us. The day will come, I hope, when we can fully repay them.

Well, I am pleased to say our Company are all keeping well and as cheerful as can be expected ; and, of course, all are looking forward to the end and victory. When the time comes I am certain our fellows will be there, and they will give a good account of themselves. We are out of the trenches at present, but close up to the firing line in case we are wanted. Again thanking the good people of Rugby for their kindness shown,— I am, yours respectfully, (Pte) J GAYTON.”

CAKES FOR THE SOLDIERS.

A number of the recipients of cakes from the recent competition have sent acknowlegments. All of them express much pleasure and make it known, if in different words, that they are ready to face anything for us, and that the feeling that they are in the home people’s thoughts gives them much greater heart.

Messrs McDougall, Ltd, London, also write thanking all tradesmen and others who helped to make their competition successful. The helpers and receivers also wish to add thanks.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, who is now at the front in France, has been appointed surgeon to the 24th London Regiment (The Queen’s).

Mr B Whitbread, only son of Mr Charles Whitbread, and Mr Eddy Wilson, youngest son of Mrs E Wilson, have been gazetted to commissions in the 12th Reserve R.W.R.

Two more members of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Association, Mr J Holmes, Advertiser Office, and Mr C Wharton, of Mr Bird’s printing works, enlisted in the R.A.M.C this week.

Sergt D Hamilton, 1st K.0.S.B, who was billeted with Mr and Mrs Haggar, 7 Sycamore Grove, has been recommended for the D.C.M for organising a sniping party which effectively kept back the Turks near Krithia while the British line was being consolidated. He is a native of Clyde Bank, and has been in the Army six years.

The Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee have received the handsome donation of 18gns, the result of a sale of surplus furniture held recently at Te Hira.

Mr Gilbert (Bert) Howkins, son of Mr G F Howkins, of Crick, has obtained a commission in the Royal Engineers. Previous to joining the Army he was in the Government Valuation Department. All three of Mr Howkins’ sons are now serving with H.M Forces, the others being in the Honourable Artillery Company and the Northamptonshire Yeomanry respectively.

Rifleman A Sansom, of 180 Oxford street, Rugby, has been slightly wounded and gassed. He was formerly a bricklayer, and joined the King’s Royal Rifles Corps. He has been in active service nine months.

Victor Cowley, son of Mr W Cowley, 12 Worcester Street, Rugby, an old St Matthew’s boy, employed by the B.T.H Co, Ltd, in the winding department, joined the 7th Battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry early in September, 1914. He went to the front “ somewhere in France ” at the end of last month. While sheltering in a dug-out he was wounded by shrapnel in the face by a German aerial torpedo, which came through the roof and exploded, fatally injuring some. All the platoon were more or less wounded. He is now in hospital at Leeds, and going on satisfactorily.

A KILSBY ATHLETE KILLED.

Although official intimation has not yet been received, from the War Office, Mrs Green, of The Laurels, has been notified by Capt E R Mobbs that her husband, Pte Bert Green, was killed in action some three weeks ago—at the time of the British advance. No letter had been received from him for nearly a month, and, Mrs Green being anxious, communicated with the above-named officer, and received the sad news on Wednesday morning. The sympathy of the village is with his wife and three little daughters. At the beginning of the war he was anxious to enlist, and in January last, unable to resist the call longer, he refused the chance of a commission and joined the 7th Northants Regiment. He was attached to the company of footballers and athletes captained by the famous Rugby inter-national footballer, Capt E R Mobbs. This company is known in the Northampton district ” Mobbs’s lot.” Mr Green was looked upon as a good-natured and genial fellow, both in the village and by his business companions. He was an all-round athlete. Several years ago he used to go on a cricket tour annually with the Yorkshire Gentlemen, and has played for first-class teams. He played for both Kilsby cricket and football teams, at one time captaining the former. He also played for Watford and other village clubs, and was a good asset. For the last two or three years he was a member of the British Thomson-Houston C.C. He made some excellent scores for this club, and for two years headed the batting averages. — Sympathetic reference was made to Pte Green’s death by Mr R Dumas at the meeting of the B.T.H Athletic Club on Thursday evening.

HILLMORTON MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Official news has been received that Pte C Kirby, of the 2nd Worcesters, only son of Mr H Kirby, of School Street, Hillmorton, and nephew of Mrs. F Paxton, 73 Murray Road, Rugby, was killed in action on September 26th in the great advance, at the early age of 22 years. The deceased joined the Army in December, 1911, and went to France in August, 1914. He was wounded in the left forearm on the 3rd of November, 1914, and went into hospital. He was back in the firing line on the 30th January, 1915, and has seen much fighting since that time.—The Vicar (the Rev R Lever) alluded to his death in his sermon on Sunday evening last, he having been a boy in the church Sunday School.

SECOND-LIEUT H D MARRIOTT KILLED IN ACTION.

Second-Lieut Hugh Digby Marriott, of the 8th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade, who, as reported last week, was killed in action in Flanders on October 9th, was a younger son, of Mr and Mrs Marriott, of Cotesbach, Lutterworth, Leicestershire. He was born on August 5th, 1895, and was educated at Temple Grove and at Bradfield College. He was entered at Brasenose College, Oxford, and was about to take up his residence there in October, 1914. Instead of this, however, he obtained a commission in the Rifle Brigade, and after the severe fighting at Hooge on July 30th-in which his brother Frederick was killed—he went out with other officers, and was appointed to the 8th Battalion.

COMMENDED FOR DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT.

Some months ago we recorded an incident in which Pte George Eaton (93 South Street) and other Rugby Territorials were attacked at a listening post by about three times their number of Germans. They defended the position bravely, and succeeded in driving off the enemy. Pte Eaton was referred to by the Corporal as being specially heroic. “ Although wounded, he kept on firing. He was a brick, and stuck to it like a man,” was the comment made upon his action at the time. His friends in Rugby will be glad to learn that for the part he took in this midnight episode he has been commended by the commanding officer “ for distinguished conduct in the field.”

ANOTHER ST MATTHEW’S “OLD BOY” WOUNDED.

Co-Sergt-Major C Favell, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, an old St Matthew’s School athletic championship holder, and well known later as a long-distance runner, has been reported wounded and in hospital.

BILTON SOLDIERS WOUNDED.

SAVED BY A PACK.

Rifleman Tom Reeve, who at the time of enlistment resided with his parents at Bilton, and is now in hospital at Guildford, has written to a friend describing how he received his wound and narrowly escaped being killed outright. He says:—

“ It was a nasty, smack right in the middle of the back—shrapnel wound. There isn’t much chance of dodging them, as they burst overhead for a radius of 200 yards ; but I am pleased to say I have no bones broken. The thing that saved my life was my pack. It went clean through that, and made a big hole in my jacket. I had got about 500 yards from the top of our parapet when I received my share. It knocked me down, but I did not feel it much for a few minutes. I got off my equipment the best way I could, and managed to get back somehow—but only God knows how. One of my pals came to bandage me up, and just as he got to me he was shot clean dead. I was then bandaged up by our doctor and put in a dug-out to await stretcher bearers. The Germans were shelling our trenches, and I thought every minute they would drop one on our dug-out—in fact, one dropped five yards from us and killed several. . . . I am glad to say I am making a wonderful recovery.”

In a subsequent letter he describes the wound as being 7ins long and 4ins wide right across the back, so it will take some time to get healed up.

The parents of Rifleman Reeve (who now live at Holbrook Farm, Little Lawford), have received a letter from E B Kerr, one of his comrades, who says that it happened soon after they started on the big charge. They were sorry to lose him, as he was always a great help. The writer was afraid that several of the Platoon who came from Rugby had suffered.

Mr and Mrs J Stibberd, of Bilton, have received information that their son, Bugler G Stibberd, of the 11th Royal Rifles, has been wounded by a shell while in billets, and is now in hospital at Boulogne. It is not a serious wound, and he is going on favourably. He enlisted in September, 1914, and went out in July.

Pte Alf Day, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital at Sheffield wounded. His parents now live at Bishops Itchington, but at the time of enlistment he had resided with them at Bilton for some time, and worked as a blacksmith at Church Lawford.

BILTON.

MRS CROFTS, of this village has received a letter from her youngest son, John (who is with the 6th Batt Royal Field Artillery), dated from a hospital and stating that he has been in that institution over six weeks suffering from a cracked shin-bone. It seems he was helping to take the horses to water when the horse in front of him suddenly kicked out and caught him. Later reports state that he is progressing as well as can be expected. The unfortunate young fellow had been promoted to sergeant only a few days before his accident. Mrs Crofts’ three sons have all entered the army. Charles came over with the Canadian contingent and is at the front, a letter recently to hand stating that he had been in the trenches about a week at the time of writing. Her eldest son, William, it will be remembered, lost his life while bathing off Sheerness, about three years ago.

WOLSTON.

MR ERNEST CHAMBERS KILLED.—Mr and Mrs Ernest Chambers have been notified from the War Office that their eldest son has died from wounds. He was badly hit in the abdomen. He joined the Royal Field Artillery soon after the war broke out, and was then residing with his parents at Sidon Hill, Brandon. The place of death is not mentioned, but he was fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula. Much sympathy is felt in the district for his relatives.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Mr and Mrs Charles Elliott, of Brook Street, whose son was reported killed in a former issue of our paper, have now received the bad news that two of their nephews have been wounded. One—Fredk Goodwin, of the 2nd Hants Regiment—has four ribs injured, left leg broken, and an injury to his waist, and now lies in a Reading hospital ; while another nephew—Fredk Woolcott—is badly wounded in the arm. Both were fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting at the Drill Hall has been rather better this week, and 21 men have been attested as follows :—D Lilley, C C Wharton, J H Holmes, A Morris, and E G Cloonan, R.A.M.C ; J R Holland, L C Major, and J Stevens, R.F.A ; W Bench, J A Speor, T A Rogers, R J Jackson, A B Webb, E Wood, and J W Wood, A.O.C ; W Richardson, Royal Berks ; W H Gulever and B E Iliffe, R.W.R ; D J Hall R.H.A ; W Southall and D Barnwell, drivers, R.E.

All the units are now open, and men are urgently required for the infantry battalions.

Local arrangements for carrying out Lord Derby’s recruiting scheme are well in hand, and it is hoped that the appeal which is about to be made to the manhood of the town will meet with a ready response. In many towns already the number of recruits had been greatly accelerated, and Rugby, which has so far done exceedingly well, should not now lag behind, as it is clearly understood that any failure in this effort will result in compulsory service. The local Parliamentary Committee is representative of the three great schools of political thought and is composed of the following :- Messrs M E T Wratislaw (chairman), J J McKinnell, H Tarbox, J H Walker W Barnett, L Aviss, C J Newman, G H Rolerts, and Col F F Johnstone, with Mr A Bell and Mr F M Burton joint hon Secretaries.

TOEING THE MARK—A PERSISTENT RECRUIT.

The persistent and patriotic endeavours made by Pte A Seaton, of Old Bilton, to enter the Army should put to shame those who advance all manner of excuses to avoid service. Although barely of enlistment age and having an impediment in his speech, Pte Seaton offered himself at the recruiting office but was rejected on account of deformed toes, one on each foot.

He enquired whether he would be accepted if he had the toes amputated, and on learning that he would be taken if the operation was successful, he entered the Rugby Hospital and has both his toes removed.

He is now serving in the 7th Royal Warwicks.

1/7TH WARWICKS UNDER SHRAPNEL FIRE.

Pte W Rainbow, of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, writing to his parents, says :—“ We had a terrible ten minutes the other night in the village, as the Germans started sending shrapnel over, and about a dozen of us were out on ration party at the time. The shells were bursting over our heads, and some of the chaps were running all over the place instead of taking cover. . . . I believe that all the chaps on that party sent up a short prayer that night, as none of us ever thought of coming out of it safe. . . . God must have seen fit to bring us out safe, for many of Kitchener’s got hit the same night. We have had a worse casualty list this few days than any time before in so short a time. You ought to hear the chaps carrying on over people at home wanting to know if we have been in the firing line yet, with chaps getting killed and wounded every day.”