30th Jun 1917. Lord Roberts Memorial Workshops

LORD ROBERTS MEMORIAL WORKSHOPS FOR DISABLED SOLDIERS & SAILORS.

RUGBY & DISTRICT TRIBUTE DAY Saturday, July 7th.

At the beginning of the present War it was realised, both by Lord Roberts and by the Committee of the Society, that in order to deal with the numbers of soldiers and sailors returning disabled it would be necessary to greatly extend the original Workshops Scheme. Various plans were discussed, but while the matter was still under consideration the great Field-Marshal passed away in the midst of his troops.

A SUITABLE MEMORIAL.

As the question of a suitable Memorial was raised, it was felt that by using the money subscribed to carry out Lord Roberts’ own suggestions and ideas with regard to the Workshops no greater and more lasting Memorial, could be given to him. After consultation, therefore, with the Countess Roberts, who gave the proposal her warmest support, it was decided to start the Lord Roberts’ Memorial Fund for Workshops for Disabled Soldiers and Sailors, and arrangements were at once made to acquire a large Factory in London, with the idea that from this centre a large manufacturing business could be established, which would give employment to all disabled men who wished to profit by the scheme.

TOY-MAKING the STAPLE INDUSTRY.

After due consideration, the Committee decided to start Toy-making as the staple industry, to this way serving two purposes, for there was no time to lose in setting about the capture of this pre-eminently German trade.

Machinery for making wooden toys was duly installed, and the services of suitable instructors obtained.

By the end of 1915 over 80 different varieties of toys had been produced in large quantities, over 100 disabled men were employed, the public interest was aroused and the future of the Workshops as a manufacturing centre was assured.

So far so good ; but the business men in charge of the work saw much farther. They saw the need of not only providing employment for these men, but of providing a market for their goods—of manufacturing in such a way that the articles made could be sold to the trade at a trade price.

In this way—and in this way only—could they hope to make the Workshops pay their own way in the future, for it was obvious that, as the Society proposed to provide permanent employment a self-supporting industry was the only thing to be contemplated.

A STIFF PROBLEM.

The problem was a stiff one. Almost every day batches of disabled men were arriving, each knowing that good work and good pay were assured him the moment he entered the Workshops. Those who had started early were now becoming experts, and the quantity of toys being turned out was enormous.

It became apparent that London alone could not deal with the constant demands for employment, and it was decided to open Provincial Branch Workshops under the control of London, thus enabling the men to work, if they desired it, in their own localities.

ECONOMIC VALUE OF SPECIALIZATION.

That the foundation of these Branches would require an immense amount of capital—a great deal more than had originally been subscribed—was obvious from the outset, as each one must be thoroughly equipped and suitably prepared before even one disabled man could be sent there. But, on the other hand, as specialisation was to be the keynote of the idea, the centre could eventually save money by arranging to manufacture goods which would assist the other Branches and the Main Workshops, and at the same time manufacturing completed articles for sale. In this way the proposed metal working Branch at Birmingham would not only make lead soldiers and other metal toys, but would provide all metal parts, hinges, bolts, dies, &c., which are wanted in the manufacture of wooden toys in London, Bradford, the Printing Branch, would print all the catalogues, posters, stationery, &c., for all the centres, and at the same time could take outside orders in abundance. And so on with every other branch.

The Workshops would thus avoid paying out to other firms what they would necessarily demand as profit, and at the same time be enabled to build up several quite distinct and important industries.

YOUR HELP IS WANTED-NOW.

The disabled men are applying in large numbers for admission, and we want your help to give them what they ask.

The Workshops provide not for the present only, but for the whole future life of these brave men. They take them as they come, lame and halt, from the battlefield, and make of them efficient, capable workmen—not receivers of charity, but valuable units of a huge industrial and economic scheme.

LOCAL SUPPORT.

Rugby’s Tribute Day is fixed for Saturday, July 7th, Mr. J. J. McKinnell, C.C., chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, being President of the effort, and he has entrusted the organisation to Mr. J. Reginald Barker.

Every penny that can be got is wanted now. The smallest amount is not too small, but big sums are wanted too. Do not let the Workshops be held up and the work curtailed for lack of your help. Send every penny you can spare to the Hon. Treasurer, Mr. R. P. MASON, Manager, London City and Midland Bank, Rugby, and do all you can to assist the Fund in helping Rugby’s effort towards success. These Workshops are the most practical, way of finding work for our permanently disabled men in the War.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut O M Samson, of Rugby, has been gazetted temporary lieutenant in the R.G.A.

M House and P D Stokes, who about two years ago were prominent members of Rugby School XV, have recently been killed in action. M House was also a member of the XI.

Capt Charles H Alexander, of the Trench Mortar Section, Australian Imperial Forces, was killed in action in France on June 8th. For some years Capt Alexander was a member of the staff of the B.T.H Company, and subsequently went out to Australia, where he joined the Australian Forces on the outbreak of war. He was a brother of Mrs John Martin, of Clifton, and brother-in-law of Mr Fred Clough, of Hillcrest, Hillmorton.

Sapper G Smith, Royal Engineers Signals, son of Mr & Mrs Smith, 12 Acacia Grove, has been appointed to a temporary commission as second-lieutenant in the Special Reserve of Officers, and posted to the 3rd Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Mr Smith, who was a member of the Old Volunteer Force, was mobilized at the beginning of the War, and proceeded to France with Rugby “ E ” Company. He is a member of the permanent staff of the Post Office and an Old Murrayian.

AN OLD SCHOOL SERVANT KILLED.

Mr W Evans, of Catthorpe, has received official notice that his son, Pte William Evans, Royal Warwicks, was killed in action by a German shell on June 10th. He was for over two years a footman with Dr David at the School House, Rugby, and a member of the School Servants’ Cricket Club. At the time he joined—January, 1915—he was a butler at Eton College. He was seriously wounded by shrapnel on September 3rd on the Somme at the taking of Ginchy. After being in hospital three months, he returned to France in January, and had seen some severe fighting since then with the Warwicks. The Officer of his Company, writing to the parents, states that Pte Evans was killed while taking stores up to the line. As one of the Company runners, he had always shown a splendid spirit—a fine, brave boy throughout. His straight, upright character was respected and admired by all the men, and all felt his loss very keenly. Mr Evans’ second son, who is in the K.R.R, has been wounded twice and discharged as medically unfit, and his third son is serving at the Front in a Machine Gun Corps.

STOCKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr James Green, of Calcutt, Stockton, has received news that his son, Sergt Charles Green, R.F.A, was killed in action on June 9th. He enlisted in September, 1914, went to France the following July, and straight into action with his Battery. He went through every engagement the Battery took part in, and was wounded at the Somme in August, 1916. Since then he has been slightly wounded three times—once in the thigh by a bullet, which he pluckily extracted with his jack-knife ; once in the check, causing a nasty flesh wound ; and then again on the heel by a shell. He has also been gassed, and suffered from frozen knees, and was temporarily buried with others by the bursting of a shell. This was only a week prior to the hit that ended fatally. Letters from the Major and Lieutenant of his Battery speak highly of him as a brave and fearless soldier, and say his last action, doubtless, saved the lives of several of his comrades.

ANOTHER LOCAL PRISONER OF WAR.

Another prisoner of war has been added to the list of the local committee, viz, Lance-Corpl C J Colley, 7th Royal Fusiliers, who is interned at Wahn. He was reported missing on April 21st, and it was not until Sunday last that he was further reported prisoner of war. His parents live at Coton House. Mr J R Barker, hon. secretary, has arranged for the standard food parcels and bread to be sent to him on behalf of the committee.

The many friends of Pte A E Hirons, of Churchover, will be glad to learn that news has at last been received of him. A letter received from another prisoner of war at Soltan says :— “ All the parcels have turned up ; it was owing to the frequent changes of address that they went astray. As soon as a parcel arrives I acknowledge and thank you for it. The chief difficulty is the address. We cannot let you know, of course, when we move and the parcels go adrift. I work in the post office here, and three weeks ago found no less than 23 parcels for Pte Hirons’ which I immediately sent on. Everything is done in order that the parcels reach their owners.”

CONCERT.—The wounded soldiers of the Rugby Infirmary Hospital gave a most enjoyable entertainment in their mess-room on Thursday last week, under the presidency of Mr W Dickens, The Commandant and most of the staff, as well as several friends from the town, attended. The programme, which was a long and varied one, was sustained throughout by the “ boys,” and every item was deservedly encored. Sergt Till (East Lancs Regiment), a fine baritone singe, was in splendid voice, and his rendering of “ Thora ” (by special request) was especially good. Others who contributed largely to the success of the evening and who deserve a word of praise were : Sergt Evans, Corp Beckett and Bostock, Ptes Heath and Holme, and “ Wee Geordie,” who impersonated Charlie Chaplin.

SPOTTED FEVER.—A fatal case of spotted fever has occurred in the Rugby rural district. All precautions have been taken.

A REGULATION has been published prohibiting an occupier of an agricultural holding in Great Britain selling or parting with possession of any horse used or capable of being used for the cultivation of the holding except with the authority of a license granted by the Board of Agriculture.

DEATHS.

EVANS.—On June 10th, WILLIAM EVANS, the beloved eldest son of W. E. & A. M. Evans ; killed in action by a German shell in France.- “ Greater love hath no man than this that he laid down his life for his friends.”
“ Thy will be done.”

GREEN.—Killed in action in France on June 9th, Sergt. CHARLES GREEN, beloved son of James and Flora Green, of Calcutt, Stockton ; aged 28.
“ Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. HERBERT ASTILL, who died of wounds received in action on June 29th, 1915.—From his sorrowing MOTHER and SISTERS.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. ARTHUR COOMBES, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life, is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last,
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son ARTHUR, who died February 26th, 1915. From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In ever-loving memory of our beloved and only child, Rifleman W. H. Chater, R.B., of Dunchurch, who was killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ No lips need speak where the heart mourns sincerely.”—From FATHER and MOTHER.

CHATER.—In affectionate remembrance of Rifleman W. H. Chater, 12th Rifle Brigade ; killed in action at Ypres on June 30, 1916.—“ They miss him most who loved him best.”—From ADA.

COOPER.—In loving memory of 9178 Sergt. JOHN COOPER, 1st Yorks, and Lancs. Regiment ; killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave :
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.”
—From MOTHER, SISTER, and BROTHER.

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Green, Frederick John. Died 7th Sep 1916

Frederick John Green was born in 1890 at Headington, Oxford, the oldest of five children of Frederick Green (b 1857 in Oxford) and Louisa Greenfield Green, née Palmer (b 1866, Bowerchalke, Wilts and died 1916 in New Bilton), his wife. Frederick sen. was an iron foundry worker who after several moves around the country, was in 1911 residing at 4, Gladstone Street, New Bilton.

Frederick John Green was educated at St Matthews School, Rugby, and followed his father into the foundry business. He was shown in the 1911 census returns as residing with his father and employed as a bore maker in an iron foundry. However by the the time he joined the army he was working with the Humber Motor Company in Coventry.

Frederick John Green enlisted on 2nd September 1914 in the 12th Battalion, Kings Royal Rifle Corps as a rifleman, regimental no. R/1855, and was sent to France on 23 July 1915. During the 1916 Battles of the Somme, he was sent to the No.21 Casualty Clearing Station at La Neuville where he died of his wounds on 7 September 1916. He was buried at the nearby La Neuville British Cemetery where his grave is one of 866 that is maintained by the CWGC. A single man, he was survived by his father and four siblings.

In addition to being remembered on the Memorial Gates, Whitehall Road, Rugby, he also features on the New Bilton War Memorial.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

23rd Oct 1915. Local Territorials do Good Work

LOCAL TERRITORIALS DO GOOD WORK.

Lance-Corporal W J Boyes, of “C” Company, 1/7 Royal Warwickshire (Territorials), writes to the editor :-

DEAR SIR,

Just a few lines to your paper to let the people of Rugby know our battalion is still going strong out here. In the recent heavy fighting we were in the first line trenches. We did not know until the last moment that the advance was to take place all along the line. Our artillery was busy, and the Rugby Howitzer Battery was well to the front with some deadly firing. For days the roar of heavy high explosives were heard, and there was hardly a moment’s silence. For the first time since we have been out here our trench mortars have been used with great success, and altogether we helped to secure what we fully believe to be the first fruits of a crushing victory. We experienced some bad luck the other night, as the Germans sent over some aerial torpedoes, which unfortunately caused some casualties, but only one of these was a Rugby man.

We have just seen a squadron of our aeroplanes pass over the German lines. It was a grand sight to witness the bursting of shells from the enemy anti-aircraft guns, hut not one of our aeroplanes was hit, although there must have been at least twenty of them passing over the German lines.

Everyone is cheerful and confident, and I know when we get orders to drive the Germans back the Warwicks will be ready.

The weather is very rough just now, and there is every prospect of a severe winter.

I know the people of Rugby will not be behind-hand in sending out a few comforts, and the boys are grateful for what they have already done for us. Hoping this will be interesting to the readers of your paper.

Lance-Corpl Boyes has two brothers also serving—one in the Berkshires and the other in the Oxford and Bucks.

THANKS FROM COVENTRY TERRITORIALS.

Pte J Gayton, 2495, “C” Co, 1/7th Royal Warwicks, writes on October 16th as follows :—

“ Dear Sir,— Please spare me a small space in your paper to thank the people of Rugby who so kindly sent out a consignment of cakes to ‘C’ Co of the l/7th R.W.R. I am a Coventry youth myself, and there are a lot more from there in the above Company and the Rugby boys who are with us very kindly shared the cakes with us. They were a treat—absolutely a luxury for us—and I can assure you and all the good people concerned that we fellows from Coventry will never forget the great kindness shown by the people and the Rugby boys here who shared with us. The day will come, I hope, when we can fully repay them.

Well, I am pleased to say our Company are all keeping well and as cheerful as can be expected ; and, of course, all are looking forward to the end and victory. When the time comes I am certain our fellows will be there, and they will give a good account of themselves. We are out of the trenches at present, but close up to the firing line in case we are wanted. Again thanking the good people of Rugby for their kindness shown,— I am, yours respectfully, (Pte) J GAYTON.”

CAKES FOR THE SOLDIERS.

A number of the recipients of cakes from the recent competition have sent acknowlegments. All of them express much pleasure and make it known, if in different words, that they are ready to face anything for us, and that the feeling that they are in the home people’s thoughts gives them much greater heart.

Messrs McDougall, Ltd, London, also write thanking all tradesmen and others who helped to make their competition successful. The helpers and receivers also wish to add thanks.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, who is now at the front in France, has been appointed surgeon to the 24th London Regiment (The Queen’s).

Mr B Whitbread, only son of Mr Charles Whitbread, and Mr Eddy Wilson, youngest son of Mrs E Wilson, have been gazetted to commissions in the 12th Reserve R.W.R.

Two more members of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Association, Mr J Holmes, Advertiser Office, and Mr C Wharton, of Mr Bird’s printing works, enlisted in the R.A.M.C this week.

Sergt D Hamilton, 1st K.0.S.B, who was billeted with Mr and Mrs Haggar, 7 Sycamore Grove, has been recommended for the D.C.M for organising a sniping party which effectively kept back the Turks near Krithia while the British line was being consolidated. He is a native of Clyde Bank, and has been in the Army six years.

The Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee have received the handsome donation of 18gns, the result of a sale of surplus furniture held recently at Te Hira.

Mr Gilbert (Bert) Howkins, son of Mr G F Howkins, of Crick, has obtained a commission in the Royal Engineers. Previous to joining the Army he was in the Government Valuation Department. All three of Mr Howkins’ sons are now serving with H.M Forces, the others being in the Honourable Artillery Company and the Northamptonshire Yeomanry respectively.

Rifleman A Sansom, of 180 Oxford street, Rugby, has been slightly wounded and gassed. He was formerly a bricklayer, and joined the King’s Royal Rifles Corps. He has been in active service nine months.

Victor Cowley, son of Mr W Cowley, 12 Worcester Street, Rugby, an old St Matthew’s boy, employed by the B.T.H Co, Ltd, in the winding department, joined the 7th Battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry early in September, 1914. He went to the front “ somewhere in France ” at the end of last month. While sheltering in a dug-out he was wounded by shrapnel in the face by a German aerial torpedo, which came through the roof and exploded, fatally injuring some. All the platoon were more or less wounded. He is now in hospital at Leeds, and going on satisfactorily.

A KILSBY ATHLETE KILLED.

Although official intimation has not yet been received, from the War Office, Mrs Green, of The Laurels, has been notified by Capt E R Mobbs that her husband, Pte Bert Green, was killed in action some three weeks ago—at the time of the British advance. No letter had been received from him for nearly a month, and, Mrs Green being anxious, communicated with the above-named officer, and received the sad news on Wednesday morning. The sympathy of the village is with his wife and three little daughters. At the beginning of the war he was anxious to enlist, and in January last, unable to resist the call longer, he refused the chance of a commission and joined the 7th Northants Regiment. He was attached to the company of footballers and athletes captained by the famous Rugby inter-national footballer, Capt E R Mobbs. This company is known in the Northampton district ” Mobbs’s lot.” Mr Green was looked upon as a good-natured and genial fellow, both in the village and by his business companions. He was an all-round athlete. Several years ago he used to go on a cricket tour annually with the Yorkshire Gentlemen, and has played for first-class teams. He played for both Kilsby cricket and football teams, at one time captaining the former. He also played for Watford and other village clubs, and was a good asset. For the last two or three years he was a member of the British Thomson-Houston C.C. He made some excellent scores for this club, and for two years headed the batting averages. — Sympathetic reference was made to Pte Green’s death by Mr R Dumas at the meeting of the B.T.H Athletic Club on Thursday evening.

HILLMORTON MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Official news has been received that Pte C Kirby, of the 2nd Worcesters, only son of Mr H Kirby, of School Street, Hillmorton, and nephew of Mrs. F Paxton, 73 Murray Road, Rugby, was killed in action on September 26th in the great advance, at the early age of 22 years. The deceased joined the Army in December, 1911, and went to France in August, 1914. He was wounded in the left forearm on the 3rd of November, 1914, and went into hospital. He was back in the firing line on the 30th January, 1915, and has seen much fighting since that time.—The Vicar (the Rev R Lever) alluded to his death in his sermon on Sunday evening last, he having been a boy in the church Sunday School.

SECOND-LIEUT H D MARRIOTT KILLED IN ACTION.

Second-Lieut Hugh Digby Marriott, of the 8th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade, who, as reported last week, was killed in action in Flanders on October 9th, was a younger son, of Mr and Mrs Marriott, of Cotesbach, Lutterworth, Leicestershire. He was born on August 5th, 1895, and was educated at Temple Grove and at Bradfield College. He was entered at Brasenose College, Oxford, and was about to take up his residence there in October, 1914. Instead of this, however, he obtained a commission in the Rifle Brigade, and after the severe fighting at Hooge on July 30th-in which his brother Frederick was killed—he went out with other officers, and was appointed to the 8th Battalion.

COMMENDED FOR DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT.

Some months ago we recorded an incident in which Pte George Eaton (93 South Street) and other Rugby Territorials were attacked at a listening post by about three times their number of Germans. They defended the position bravely, and succeeded in driving off the enemy. Pte Eaton was referred to by the Corporal as being specially heroic. “ Although wounded, he kept on firing. He was a brick, and stuck to it like a man,” was the comment made upon his action at the time. His friends in Rugby will be glad to learn that for the part he took in this midnight episode he has been commended by the commanding officer “ for distinguished conduct in the field.”

ANOTHER ST MATTHEW’S “OLD BOY” WOUNDED.

Co-Sergt-Major C Favell, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, an old St Matthew’s School athletic championship holder, and well known later as a long-distance runner, has been reported wounded and in hospital.

BILTON SOLDIERS WOUNDED.

SAVED BY A PACK.

Rifleman Tom Reeve, who at the time of enlistment resided with his parents at Bilton, and is now in hospital at Guildford, has written to a friend describing how he received his wound and narrowly escaped being killed outright. He says:—

“ It was a nasty, smack right in the middle of the back—shrapnel wound. There isn’t much chance of dodging them, as they burst overhead for a radius of 200 yards ; but I am pleased to say I have no bones broken. The thing that saved my life was my pack. It went clean through that, and made a big hole in my jacket. I had got about 500 yards from the top of our parapet when I received my share. It knocked me down, but I did not feel it much for a few minutes. I got off my equipment the best way I could, and managed to get back somehow—but only God knows how. One of my pals came to bandage me up, and just as he got to me he was shot clean dead. I was then bandaged up by our doctor and put in a dug-out to await stretcher bearers. The Germans were shelling our trenches, and I thought every minute they would drop one on our dug-out—in fact, one dropped five yards from us and killed several. . . . I am glad to say I am making a wonderful recovery.”

In a subsequent letter he describes the wound as being 7ins long and 4ins wide right across the back, so it will take some time to get healed up.

The parents of Rifleman Reeve (who now live at Holbrook Farm, Little Lawford), have received a letter from E B Kerr, one of his comrades, who says that it happened soon after they started on the big charge. They were sorry to lose him, as he was always a great help. The writer was afraid that several of the Platoon who came from Rugby had suffered.

Mr and Mrs J Stibberd, of Bilton, have received information that their son, Bugler G Stibberd, of the 11th Royal Rifles, has been wounded by a shell while in billets, and is now in hospital at Boulogne. It is not a serious wound, and he is going on favourably. He enlisted in September, 1914, and went out in July.

Pte Alf Day, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital at Sheffield wounded. His parents now live at Bishops Itchington, but at the time of enlistment he had resided with them at Bilton for some time, and worked as a blacksmith at Church Lawford.

BILTON.

MRS CROFTS, of this village has received a letter from her youngest son, John (who is with the 6th Batt Royal Field Artillery), dated from a hospital and stating that he has been in that institution over six weeks suffering from a cracked shin-bone. It seems he was helping to take the horses to water when the horse in front of him suddenly kicked out and caught him. Later reports state that he is progressing as well as can be expected. The unfortunate young fellow had been promoted to sergeant only a few days before his accident. Mrs Crofts’ three sons have all entered the army. Charles came over with the Canadian contingent and is at the front, a letter recently to hand stating that he had been in the trenches about a week at the time of writing. Her eldest son, William, it will be remembered, lost his life while bathing off Sheerness, about three years ago.

WOLSTON.

MR ERNEST CHAMBERS KILLED.—Mr and Mrs Ernest Chambers have been notified from the War Office that their eldest son has died from wounds. He was badly hit in the abdomen. He joined the Royal Field Artillery soon after the war broke out, and was then residing with his parents at Sidon Hill, Brandon. The place of death is not mentioned, but he was fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula. Much sympathy is felt in the district for his relatives.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Mr and Mrs Charles Elliott, of Brook Street, whose son was reported killed in a former issue of our paper, have now received the bad news that two of their nephews have been wounded. One—Fredk Goodwin, of the 2nd Hants Regiment—has four ribs injured, left leg broken, and an injury to his waist, and now lies in a Reading hospital ; while another nephew—Fredk Woolcott—is badly wounded in the arm. Both were fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting at the Drill Hall has been rather better this week, and 21 men have been attested as follows :—D Lilley, C C Wharton, J H Holmes, A Morris, and E G Cloonan, R.A.M.C ; J R Holland, L C Major, and J Stevens, R.F.A ; W Bench, J A Speor, T A Rogers, R J Jackson, A B Webb, E Wood, and J W Wood, A.O.C ; W Richardson, Royal Berks ; W H Gulever and B E Iliffe, R.W.R ; D J Hall R.H.A ; W Southall and D Barnwell, drivers, R.E.

All the units are now open, and men are urgently required for the infantry battalions.

Local arrangements for carrying out Lord Derby’s recruiting scheme are well in hand, and it is hoped that the appeal which is about to be made to the manhood of the town will meet with a ready response. In many towns already the number of recruits had been greatly accelerated, and Rugby, which has so far done exceedingly well, should not now lag behind, as it is clearly understood that any failure in this effort will result in compulsory service. The local Parliamentary Committee is representative of the three great schools of political thought and is composed of the following :- Messrs M E T Wratislaw (chairman), J J McKinnell, H Tarbox, J H Walker W Barnett, L Aviss, C J Newman, G H Rolerts, and Col F F Johnstone, with Mr A Bell and Mr F M Burton joint hon Secretaries.

TOEING THE MARK—A PERSISTENT RECRUIT.

The persistent and patriotic endeavours made by Pte A Seaton, of Old Bilton, to enter the Army should put to shame those who advance all manner of excuses to avoid service. Although barely of enlistment age and having an impediment in his speech, Pte Seaton offered himself at the recruiting office but was rejected on account of deformed toes, one on each foot.

He enquired whether he would be accepted if he had the toes amputated, and on learning that he would be taken if the operation was successful, he entered the Rugby Hospital and has both his toes removed.

He is now serving in the 7th Royal Warwicks.

1/7TH WARWICKS UNDER SHRAPNEL FIRE.

Pte W Rainbow, of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, writing to his parents, says :—“ We had a terrible ten minutes the other night in the village, as the Germans started sending shrapnel over, and about a dozen of us were out on ration party at the time. The shells were bursting over our heads, and some of the chaps were running all over the place instead of taking cover. . . . I believe that all the chaps on that party sent up a short prayer that night, as none of us ever thought of coming out of it safe. . . . God must have seen fit to bring us out safe, for many of Kitchener’s got hit the same night. We have had a worse casualty list this few days than any time before in so short a time. You ought to hear the chaps carrying on over people at home wanting to know if we have been in the firing line yet, with chaps getting killed and wounded every day.”

 

9th Oct 1915. Munitions Tribunal – Local Cases

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.

LOCAL CASES AT COVENTRY AND LONDON.

Two local cases were heard at the Munitions Tribunals, at Coventry, and two at Caxton Hall, Westminster, on Friday. At Coventry, Mr F Tillyard, Birmingham, presided, Mr A H Niblett representing the employers, and Mr H R Farren, the workmen ; the Clerk (Mr Phillip E Wilks), and the Assistant Clerk (Mr D G Bolland) were also present.

A WORKER’S COMPLAINT.

William Clifton, of 35 Graham Road, Rugby, complained that his employers, Messrs Willans & Robinson, Ltd, Rugby, were unreasonably withholding certificate of leave. In his written statement, Clifton complained that there was insufficient work to keep him fully employed, and that his services would be more useful to firms requiring skilled mechanics, as he was doing work which could be done by boys.

A statement by the employers read by the Chairman, stated that Clifton was paid 42s for 51 hours. His average earnings over a period of 21 weeks was £3 5s 10d, average overtime being 17 1/2 hours. He was engaged on important aeroplane work.

The certificate was refused, and Clifton was advised by the Chairman to do his best.

BREACH OF RULES.

E W Crisp and V Green, foundry labourers, were charged by Willans & Robinson, Ltd., with breach of works’ rules, leaving their work without permission and loitering outside the shop during working hours, general indifference to orders and remonstrances of their foreman, and delaying urgent Government work.—Both of these men pleaded guilty to the charges, and admitted the evidence against them. Green was fined 20s and Crisp 15s, the Tribunal ordering these fines were to he stopped out of their wages at the rate of 5s per week, each commencing 8th October. The Chairmen cautioned both as to their future behaviour.

At CAXTON HALL, WESTMINSTER.

Jean Puraye (Belgian), milling machine operator, claimed that a certificate of release had been unreasonably withheld by Willans & Robinson. The evidence showed that during the eleven weeks in which this man had been in the employ of Willans & Robinson, Ltd, he had absented himself on a number of occasions without permission, and without giving a satisfactory reason. Also that urgent Government work being done in his department was already handicapped by shortage of labour.

Previously, on September 10th, Puraye was summoned by Willans & Robinson before the Coventry Tribunal, for absenting himself from work without permission. Puraye then stated that he wished to leave to join his wife in Ireland, but the Court decided that he had not sufficient grounds on which to claim his discharge certificate.

At the hearing at Caxton Hall, on the 1st inst, he gave as his reason for wishing to leave that he had an offer of employment from the Austin Motor Co, of Birmingham, and showed a letter to that effect.

The Court decided that Willans and Robinson were fully justified in withholding his certificate, and advised Puraye to return to his work.

Michel Bury (Belgian), brass fettler, claimed that a certificate of release had been unreasonably withheld by Willans & Robinson. After hearing evidence on both sides, the Court decided that the employers were fully justified in withholding the discharge certificates, commenting upon the high aggregate wages this man and three other members of his family had been receiving as unskilled workers, also, that they had been accommodated in a furnished hutment dwelling by their employers at a very low rental.

The Chairman said that Bury’s employers had treated him exceptionally well, and advised him to return to his work at Rugby.

A SOLDIER’S PREDICAMENT.

Pte Wm Button, Rifle Brigade, stationed at Winchester, was charged with being a deserter on Oct. 4th.—Supt Clarke said he received instructions to arrest defendant, whose home is at Newbold, and an escort would be sent to fetch him.—Defendant said he was not a deserter. He had been awaiting orders.

The Rev J B Hewitt, vicar of Newbold, said the man came home wounded in June, and received a postcard telling him to remain at an address given until he had further orders. The man had lived in the village since and had written three or four postcards to Winchester for instructions, but had received no reply. He had not concealed himself in any way and had never been out of uniform. At the man’s request, he (Mr Hewitt) wrote to Winchester about ten days ago, and had received no reply to his letter.

The Chairman said there was the greatest difficulty about these men. Unless they were actually at a military hospital the men were looked upon as deserters. Some of them did not require hospital treatment, except as outpatients, and they were very hardly dealt with.

The Clerk (Mr Seabroke) said the only way to deal with the case would be to reply that the man was awaiting orders.

Mr Hewitt said the man received a certain amount of money in June, but had received none since. He had been waiting there and living on the kindness of his friends.

Captain Coventry, R.W.R, stated that the defendant came to his office at the Drill Hall and asked him for a warrant to Winchester. In reply to a question, defendant, stated that he had been ill since May and had not reported himself. He wrote to Winchester and received in reply a report to the effect that defendant was a deserter, and asking him to communicate with the police. This happened about a fortnight or three weeks ago.

The Chairman said the Magistrates would dismiss the case, and thought the word “ deserter ” was not an appellation to be used in defendants case. There was no evidence that he was a deserter.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

MONDAY.—Before A E Donkin and J E Cox, Esqrs.

AN INTOXICATED BELGIAN.—Gustave Nicaise, a Belgian labourer, of 14 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, pleaded guilty to being drunk and disorderly in Chapel Street on Sunday night.—P.C Lester said he saw defendant ejected from the Black Swan Inn at 8.55 p.m. Finding that defendant was drunk, the officer tried to persuade him to go home, but he refused, and witness took him into custody. On the way to the Police Station, he was shouting and making use of bad language.—Fined 4s 6d, the sum being paid out of money found on defendant when arrested.

WEDNESDAY.—Before T Hunter, Esq.

FRENCH-CANADIAN’S RAILWAY TRESPASS.

Homer Adolphe Parent, a French-Canadian, with long black hair and wearing a short jacket and knickerbockers, was charged under the Defence of the Realms Act with trespassing on the L & N-W Railway at Rugby on the previous day a—Prisoner admitted being found on the line. He said he had come from Liverpool, having walked to Lichfield, where he took a ticket to Rugby. He got on to the line to find ” the King’s way ” in order to walk on to London, because he had no money.

Pte S White, of the 2/6 Royal Warwicks, deposed that he was on sentry duty near the Great Central Railway Bridge, about a quarter of a mile from the L & N-W Station, at Rugby, on Tuesday, when he saw prisoner at about 10.20 a.m, walking by the side of the goods line. He crossed under a goods train standing there, and came towards witness, who called on him to halt. As he did not do so, witness loaded his rifle, and again shouted to him to stop, which he then did.-In reply to questions, prisoner said he was a French-Canadian, and showed witness a paper with the Canadian Government stamp on it. Witness blew his whistle, and on the arrival of the sergeant prisoner was taken into custody.

Asked if he wished to say anything to the Magistrate, prisoner said he did not think he was doing wrong. On getting out of the train at Rugby he saw no way to go, and tried to find the telegraph posts in order to follow them, as he did when walking along the railway track in Canada.

In reply to a question as to why he left Liverpool, prisoner said he wanted to get to London, principal thing being a matter of religion. He had been living in Canada among Roman Catholics, but “ he belonged to the Church of England, and wanted to get to London,” because, he supposed, the Church of England was there, and he wanted to have the thing settled.”

Detective-Inspector Goode said he thought prisoner had got on to the line quite innocently.

Pte White said prisoner asked him how far it was to London, and he replied : “ It is too far for you to walk, and, as far as I am concerned, you are as close to London as you will get.”

The Magistrate examined prisoner’s papers, which showed that he was a British subject.

In acquitting prisoner, Mr Hunter told him it was a very foolish thing to walk on the railway in this country. There was always a proper way out of a railway station, and he must go by that way. They would let him go now, but he must be very careful in the future not to walk along the railway, and if he did he would he arrested again. Prisoner said he would not repeat the offence.

Green, John Henry. Died 26 Apr 1915

John Henry Green was baptised on 24 October 1880 at Newbold on Avon, the son of Thomas Green and Rhoda (nee Matthews). On their marriage in the same church in 1876, Thomas’ occupation was labourer and they both resided in Long Lawford.

In 1881 Thomas, an agricultural labourer, and Rhoda were living in Newton. Neither John nor his elder brother Thomas were listed with them on the census. By 1891 Thomas was an engine driver and the family were living in Catthorpe. John was aged 10 and there were three more children: George (9) and Sarah Ann (7). The family was still in Catthorpe in 1901, when John was a 20 year old labourer/carman.

The following year John Henry Green married Elizabeth Annie P S Wheeler and by the 1911 census the couple were living in Catthorpe with their four children. John was a farm labourer.

It is not known when he joined the 7th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment (regimental no. 16825), but he served for less than six months. We have been unable to find him on the medal rolls, so perhaps he never went abroad. He died in Tidworth Military Hospital on 26th April 1915 after an operation and was buried in Catthorpe Churchyard.

“There were many beautiful floral tributes, and in addition to those sent by the relatives, from the following friends:- “A” Company 7th Leicesters; N.C.O.’s and men of 7th Leicesters; A Friend; Alice and Bernard Robinson; His Village Friends; Mr & Mrs Nash and his Fellow Workmen on the Catthorpe Estate; Miss Emily Lloyd Spier.
Mrs Green, the widow, desires to thank all the parishioners and friends outside for their sympathy and kindness in her time of sorrow.”
(Rugby Advertiser 1 May 1915)

CWGC grave of John Henry Green in Catthorpe Churchyard

CWGC grave of John Henry Green in Catthorpe Churchyard

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM