22nd Jun 1918. Memorial Tablets in Churches.

MEMORIAL TABLETS IN CHURCHES.—The Bishop of Worcester, in this month’s Worcester Diocesan Magazine, writes :—“ I wish again to call the clergy’s attention to the growing number of large tablets which are being proposed in our churches. We have really no right to occupy the church wall space in this way. The best way to commemorate those who have died in the War is the brotherly way of one memorial for the whole parish, on which the name of comrades can be inserted. For rich persons to occupy the wall space with memorials which cannot be afforded by poorer parishioners is as objectionable as occupying the floor space by large private pews. I appeal to the church feeling of my diocese to consider this.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

CORRECTION.—In our last issue it was inadvertently stated that Lieut H N Salter, who had been awarded the Military Cross, was the son of Mr A G Salter. It should have been Mr H S Salter, of 3 Elborow Street, Rugby.

Mrs. F. Kirby, 15 Sun Street, Rugby, has been informed that her son, Pte A Kirby, R.W.F, had been wounded for the third time and brought to Southampton War Hospital. She has another son in France, and her husband is also serving in Palestine.

The following Rugby men have appeared in the casualty lists issued this week :—Killed, Rfn W Griffin, Rifle Brigade ; missing, Pte G W Wale, Border Regt, Pte J Harris (Royal Scots), and Pte B Lawley (R.W.R).

Mr and Mrs Bland have received news from the War Office that their son, Pte R G Bland, of the Lancashire Fusiliers, was killed in action on June 4th. Also a letter from the Chaplain to say he had buried him in one of the Military Cemeteries, and the Battalion had erected a cross to his memory. He was 18 years of age, and was an Elborow old boy.

Mr and Mrs Pulham, of Barby, have received a letter from their son, Rfn H W Pulham, who has been missing since April 15th, 1918, saying he is a prisoner in Philippapalis, Bulgaria. He joined the colours at the outbreak of the war, and served 12 months in France, where he was wounded on July 1st, 1916. He was transferred to Salonica in November, 1916, where he served till reported missing. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. Machine Assembly Department.

Mr Doyle, of 71 Victoria Street, New Bilton, received news this week that his brother, Pte Thomas Doyle, had been killed in action in Palestine. This makes the third brother he has lost, Frank and Joseph Wilfred Doyle having been killed in France. They were the sons of the late Mr Joseph Doyle, and of Mrs Doyle, of Frankton.

Pte W H Fallon, Wiltshire Regt, son of Mr and Mrs Fallon, 7 Adam Street, New Bilton, who was previously reported missing, is a prisoner of war at Munster, and Pte A Backle, R.W.R., whose wife lives at 27 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, is a prisoner at Hamburg.

AWARDS FOR MERITORIOUS SERVICE.

The meritorious Service Medal in recognition of valuable service rendered in France has been awarded to :—
Sergt H E Gregory. A.S.C., Rugby.
L-Corpl S G Hall. R.W.R., Rugby.
Reg.Q.M.S. E L Hewitt, R.W.R., Rugby.
L-CorpI J W Hooper, R.W.R., Newbold-on-Avon.
Sapper A W Rathbone, R.E., Rugby.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.
ALL SOLDIERS TO BE BURIED FREE.

The Cemetery Committee reported that they had considered the question of the free interment of members of His Majesty’s Forces dying in Rugby and the neighbourhood, and recommended that in future the same facilities be granted as to Rugby men, and in case of any difficulty arising the matter should be referred to the discretion of the Chairman of the Council, Mr Stevenson, and the Clerk.—They had instructed the Clerk to allow the erection of a headstone or curbing over graves of men dying in His Majesty’s Forces and interred in the Cemetery, free of charge, where necessary.

The Public Health Committee reported that four cases of infectious disease had been noticed, of which two had been removed to the Hospital at Harborough Magna.

BRANDON.
HUNS BEHAVE DECENTLY TO SOME PRISONERS.—Mr and Mm L Ward have received a card from their son, Lance-Corpl J Ward, who is now a prisoner at Langensalza, in Germany. He informs them that his right arm was fractured just below the right shoulder. The wound is healing up finely and he can to use his fingers a little. He further states : “ We are being treated well, under the circumstances, and we have nothing to grumble about, so cheer up and do not worry.”

BRETFORD.
PTE JAMES CASTLE.—Pte James Castle, who was an Army Reserve man when the war commenced, has just received his discharge certificate. He joined the Leicester Regt in 1903, and was mobilised when war started. He went to France on the 20th of September, 1914, and was in the thick of the fighting until the 20th of January, 1915, when he was badly injured in the knee through a trench being blown in upon him. He was then sent to an English hospital. Although his knee never got thoroughly well he did a lot of useful work in assisting in the drilling of recruits and afterwards as a Military Policeman. The certificate, which speaks highly of him, says he was honourably discharged. Being the first received at Bretford during the war it is an object of interest to the inhabitants.

NAPTON.
P.C and Mrs Bradbury, of Napton, have recently received the news from their third son in France, Regt-Sergt-Major A H Bradbury, 2/6 R.W.R, that he has won the Military Cross. His Colonel, when wounded, handed over the command of the Regiment to him, although Bradbury himself was slightly wounded. Before joining the army Sergt-Major Bradbury was a member of the Warwickshire Constabulary, stationed at Warwick. Mr and Mrs Bradbury have three other sons in France—Corpl H Bradbury, of the Royal Engineers ; Corpl L Bradbury, of the: Army Service Corps ; and Pte M Bradbury, of the Suffolk Regiment. Mr Bradbury has served eight years in the Royal Rifle Corps, seven of which he was serving in India. He has been in the Police Force over 27 years.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

SIDNEY LANE HOME.—L-Corpl Sidney Lane (K.R.R), second son of Sergt and Mrs Frank Lane, has now been invalided home. He was severely wounded in France last November, and his left leg has been amputated above the knee.

WOUNDED.—Miss Ada Allen has received a notification that her brother, Pte Walter Allen (Cheshire Regt), was wounded by a bullet through his right arm during the advance on the 30th ult He joined up in September, 1914, and though he has been through some trying experiences since then, this is the first time he has been wounded.

DILUTION OF BREAD AND HEALTH.

We are asked to remind the public that bread should be kept in a cool place during warm weather. At temperatures above 60 degrees Fahrenheit bread made from the flour at present in use is apt to become “ ropey ”, and unsuitable for food, but at lower temperatures its keeping qualities are good. Complaints continue to be heard from time to time against the so-called war bread made from standard wheaten floor, with an admixture of flour obtained from other cereals. We are informed that the policy of raising the percentage of flour extracted from wheat and adding flour from other cereals was only adopted after the fullest scientific investigation both as to the digestibility and the nourishing qualities of the resulting product.

The present position of the cereal supplies completely vindicates the policy of dilution as applied to bread. It is authoritatively stated that no evidence whatever has been adduced that the health of the nation has generally suffered from the lowering of the quality of bread, and at the present time the stocks in the country are enough to enable the Royal Commission on Wheat Supplies to make the definite statement that the bread supply of the country is assured until the next harvest is gathered. The total saving effected up to the present is estimated as the equivalent of the cargoes of more than 400 steamers of average size, or nearly one-third of an average annual importation. It is held that such a saving could not have been effected by rationing without disastrous effects on the general national health. The outlook at the moment is distinctly promising.

SUGAR FOR JAM.

UNFAIR CRITICISM RESENTED BY RUGBY COMMITTEE.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday last week the Chairman (Mr T A Wise) referred to the dissatisfaction which has been caused by the refusal of permits to purchase sugar to people who had neglected to enclose a stamped addressed envelope with their application forma. Many people he said, thought that the committee of their own malicious stupidity made this regulation, but it was not so; it was a Government instruction, and the local officials did all they could by drawing the attention of the applicants to the regulation by placing a mark at each side of the paragraph relating to it. Any remarks about red tape had nothing to do with the Committee ; they should be addressed to the Government. Before any agitation arose over the matter he discussed the question with the Executive Officer, and they wrote to London to see if they could get some redress. They had no desire to be harsh or unfair, but when a regulation was printed on a form it saw not too much to expect that the people concerned would read it, particularly when their attention was especially attracted to it ; and the remarks which had been made concerning the committee and the officials were grossly unfair. He thought people should appreciate the difficulties under which the staff had worked.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) said with regard to the suggestion that letters should be sent to all persons who had received permits, asking them to return them for re-consideration if their fruit crop had not come up to expectation, this would have required 5,000 envelopes ; and, after consulting the Chairman and Vice-Chairman, he had placed an advertisement in the local Press, and had had some window bills printed to this effect.—This action was endorsed.

The Executive Officer read a letter from the Ministry on the subject, asking for particulars as to the number of late applications, and stating that if the number was not a large one permits could be issued. If this involved a large indent of sugar details should be sent to the Ministry before issuing the permits. As there were 685 applicants affected he had sent the details.—The Chairman said he hoped they would now get something from the London authorities.

Mr Griffin mentioned the case of a man who could not get his form when he applied for it, but left a penny for the stamp.—The Chairman : That was risky (laughter). I do not mean that as a reflection on the staff ; but if there were a number like that they could not possibly recollect all who left money.—The Executive Officer said they had quite a pile of money handed in, and every penny was used in stamps.

At a later stage of the meeting the Executive Officer stated that if people retained sugar, and had not sufficient fruit to utilise it, they would be liable to be prosecuted.—Mr Humphrey pointed out, however, that many people whose ordinary fruit crop had failed would grow marrows, and it would be impossible for them to say how many of these would be available for jam.—Mr Mellor enquired the position of a man who applied for 20lbs of sugar, and was allowed 10lbs if he had only sufficient fruit to use the 10lbs.—The Chairman : He would be perfectly right in keeping it.—Mr Appleby enquired whether the members of the committee who signed application forms as references were satisfied that the applicants had the fruit trees they claimed to have.—Mr Tarbox said he was satisfied that all those which he signed were in order ; and although many people had not got stone fruit, the vital point was to see that the sugar released was used for jam making.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
ALIEN’S MISUNDERSTANDING.— Ingrid S Andersson, tailoress, 18 Bath Street, Rugby, an alien, was summoned for failing to furnish the Registration Officer with the particulars required under the Aliens’ Restriction Order.—Charles G Youngmark, tailor, 18 Bath Street, was summoned for having an alien living as a member of his household and failing to furnish the Registration Officer with the particulars required under the Order, or to give notice to the Registration Officer of the presence of an alien.—Mr H W Worthington defended both, and pleaded guilty.—Detective Mighall deposed that on June 7th Miss Andersson visited the Police Station, and said she had read in the papers that all aliens over 18 years of age had to register. She added that she had been in England since 1903. Witness asked if she was aware that she should have registered two years ago and she replied in the negative. He registered her, and on the following day he interviewed Mr Youngmark, who said Miss Andersson was his niece, and had lived with him since 1903 as an adopted daughter. He was not aware that he ought to have notified the police that she was staying with him.—Supt Clarke said after such a registration a copy had to be sent to the Chief Registration Officer at Warwick, who had ordered the proceedings.—Mr Worthington said Mr Youngmark was a Swede, who came to England 41 years ago, and had been naturalised. Miss Andersson, his wife’s niece, was also born in Sweden, and on her mother’s death Mr & Mrs Youngmark brought her to England, where she had lived continuously. Miss Andersson was not aware that friendly aliens had to be registered until she read a paragraph in the newspapers.—Both cases were dismissed without conviction under the Probation of Offenders’ Act.

DEATHS.

DOYLE.—In loving memory of my dearest husband, Pte TOM DOYLE, of Borton, killed in action June 6th, 1916, with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call.
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his sorrowing wife and children, mother, sister, and brothers.

HICKINGBOTHAM.—On the 10th inst., WILLIAM (late Pioneer R.E.), eldest son of Mr. & Mrs Hickingbotham, 33 Cambridge Street, Rugby..—“ Thy will be done.”

LEVETT.—Killed in action, in Palestine, March 30th, 1918, Sergeant C. E. LEVETT, 16th N.Z.Coy., I.C.C., only son of Mr. C. A. J. and the late Mrs. Levett (nee Buchanan), Ratanui, Kiwitea, New Zealand ; and grandson of the late Captain C. R. Levett, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

HUGHES.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl (JACK) HUGHES, who was killed in action in France on June 18th, 1915.
“ A loved one gone, but not forgotten,
And as dawns another year,
In our lonely hours of thinking,
Thoughts of him are always dear.”
—Never forgotten by his father, mother, brothers, sister Edie, Kitty and Dick.

MULCASTER.—In proud and loving memory of Coy.-Sergt.-Major J. MULCASTER, who died from disease contracted while serving with his Majesty’s Forces on June 13, 1917.—Fondly remembered by his Wife and Children.

SANDS.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, Pte H. SANDS (HARRY), who died on June 17th, 1917, at El-Arish, Egypt.
“ One year has passed since that sad day,
When our dear one was called away ;
Bravely he went to duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.”
—From his loving wife and children.

Advertisements

14th Apr 1917. Baptist Local Preacher Killed

BAPTIST LOCAL PREACHER KILLED.

News has been received this week of the death in action of Sergt Albert Leeson, of the Bedford Regiment. Sergt Albert Leeson, who was 22 years of age, was before the war employed as a printer by Mr G E Over. His parents reside at Leicester, but he had lived with his grand-parents at Newbold practically all his life. It appears from a letter which has been received, that he was killed by a shell while his unit was following up the German retreat. His death has caused widespread sorrow in local Baptist circles, where he was greatly beloved as a local preacher, and as late secretary to the Christian Endeavour Society. He was a very earnest worker, and, starting to preach at the early age of fifteen, he was a great favourite in the village churches. A young man of considerable intellectual power, he contributed letters and poems to “ The Pioneer,” the Baptist Magazine.

A SON OF MR C J PACKWOOD RECEIVES A COMMISSION.

W H Packwood, fourth son of Mr C J Packwood, of St Matthew’s Street, Rugby, has been granted a month’s leave. Since September he had been out in France with a trench mortar battery of the H.A.C, and has had varied experiences. On the recommendation of his Captain-although still under twenty years of age-he has been offered a Commission, and after his furlough will go into training for his new duties as an officer.

SECOND-LIEUT VICTOR RALLISON KILLED.

General regret will be felt at the news, which was received early this week, that Second-Lieut Victor Rallison, of Manchester Regiment, was killed in action on Saturday. Second-Lieut Rallison, who was 30 years of age, was called to the colours on August 4, 1914, as a reservist, and was granted a commission on October 23rd last. Prior to the War he was for 2 ½ years a member of the Rugby Police Force, and by his unfailing courtesy and tact he made himself very popular not only with his colleagues but with the public generally. He had been married about six months, and his wife resides at her home at Churchover.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte W F W Satchell (Royal Warwicks), son of Mr W Satchell, 94 Park Road, Rugby, has again been wounded, this time by shrapnel, in the right knee.

Major Leonard Parker, cousin of the Earl of Macclesfield, and nephew of the Hon A E Parker (late master of the North Warwickshire Hounds),has been killed in an air duel at the front.

The parents of Trooper P W Labraham, Warwickshire Yeomanry, 23 Little Pennington Street, have received intimation that he was wounded on March 27th in Egypt.

The death took place from measles, in a military hospital on April 8th, of 3rd Air Mechanic M Bruce Andrews, who joined the Royal Flying Corps about three weeks ago. Prior to joining the army A.M Andrews was employed in the Cashiers Dept at the B.T.H.

Mr and Mrs Kirby of Birmingham, late of Winfield Street, Rugby, have received this week official news of the death of their eldest son, W Kirby. He was reported missing from July 1, 1916. He belonged to the Territorial Battalion R.W.R some time before the war broke out, and was drafted to France soon afterwards. Pte Kirby was 19 years of age, and when living in Rugby was employed at the B.T.H.

MARRIAGES.

BRASSINGTON.-Chown.-On April 10th, at the Parish Church, Daventry, by the Rev. A.S. Lindsay (Rector), ALEXANDER FRANK (Fitter, R.F.A.), son of Mr. and Mrs. John Brassington, Murray Road, Rugby, to DORA AUGUSTA, eldest daughter of C.S.M. H. Chown (Northants. Regt.) and Mrs. Chown, “Express” Office, Sheaf Street, Daventry.

DEATHS.

ANDREWS.-On Easter Sunday, at Aldershot Isolation Hospital, of bronchial pneumonia, following measles, 3rd A.M. MELVIN BRUCE ANDREWS, Royal Flying Corps, dearly beloved son of S. M. Andrews and the late Thomas Andrews ; aged 22 years.

KIRBY.-On July 1st, 1916, W. J. KIRBY (BILLY), eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Kirby, late of Winfield Street, Rugby, now of Witton, Birmingham, aged 19 years. Killed in action in France.

MANSFIELD.-In loving memory of 2nd Lieutenant H. E. MANSFIELD, of the 1st Cheshire Regiment, late of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, who died in France, April 12th, 1916.-Gone, but not forgotten.-M. G. W.

23rd Oct 1915. Local Territorials do Good Work

LOCAL TERRITORIALS DO GOOD WORK.

Lance-Corporal W J Boyes, of “C” Company, 1/7 Royal Warwickshire (Territorials), writes to the editor :-

DEAR SIR,

Just a few lines to your paper to let the people of Rugby know our battalion is still going strong out here. In the recent heavy fighting we were in the first line trenches. We did not know until the last moment that the advance was to take place all along the line. Our artillery was busy, and the Rugby Howitzer Battery was well to the front with some deadly firing. For days the roar of heavy high explosives were heard, and there was hardly a moment’s silence. For the first time since we have been out here our trench mortars have been used with great success, and altogether we helped to secure what we fully believe to be the first fruits of a crushing victory. We experienced some bad luck the other night, as the Germans sent over some aerial torpedoes, which unfortunately caused some casualties, but only one of these was a Rugby man.

We have just seen a squadron of our aeroplanes pass over the German lines. It was a grand sight to witness the bursting of shells from the enemy anti-aircraft guns, hut not one of our aeroplanes was hit, although there must have been at least twenty of them passing over the German lines.

Everyone is cheerful and confident, and I know when we get orders to drive the Germans back the Warwicks will be ready.

The weather is very rough just now, and there is every prospect of a severe winter.

I know the people of Rugby will not be behind-hand in sending out a few comforts, and the boys are grateful for what they have already done for us. Hoping this will be interesting to the readers of your paper.

Lance-Corpl Boyes has two brothers also serving—one in the Berkshires and the other in the Oxford and Bucks.

THANKS FROM COVENTRY TERRITORIALS.

Pte J Gayton, 2495, “C” Co, 1/7th Royal Warwicks, writes on October 16th as follows :—

“ Dear Sir,— Please spare me a small space in your paper to thank the people of Rugby who so kindly sent out a consignment of cakes to ‘C’ Co of the l/7th R.W.R. I am a Coventry youth myself, and there are a lot more from there in the above Company and the Rugby boys who are with us very kindly shared the cakes with us. They were a treat—absolutely a luxury for us—and I can assure you and all the good people concerned that we fellows from Coventry will never forget the great kindness shown by the people and the Rugby boys here who shared with us. The day will come, I hope, when we can fully repay them.

Well, I am pleased to say our Company are all keeping well and as cheerful as can be expected ; and, of course, all are looking forward to the end and victory. When the time comes I am certain our fellows will be there, and they will give a good account of themselves. We are out of the trenches at present, but close up to the firing line in case we are wanted. Again thanking the good people of Rugby for their kindness shown,— I am, yours respectfully, (Pte) J GAYTON.”

CAKES FOR THE SOLDIERS.

A number of the recipients of cakes from the recent competition have sent acknowlegments. All of them express much pleasure and make it known, if in different words, that they are ready to face anything for us, and that the feeling that they are in the home people’s thoughts gives them much greater heart.

Messrs McDougall, Ltd, London, also write thanking all tradesmen and others who helped to make their competition successful. The helpers and receivers also wish to add thanks.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, who is now at the front in France, has been appointed surgeon to the 24th London Regiment (The Queen’s).

Mr B Whitbread, only son of Mr Charles Whitbread, and Mr Eddy Wilson, youngest son of Mrs E Wilson, have been gazetted to commissions in the 12th Reserve R.W.R.

Two more members of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Association, Mr J Holmes, Advertiser Office, and Mr C Wharton, of Mr Bird’s printing works, enlisted in the R.A.M.C this week.

Sergt D Hamilton, 1st K.0.S.B, who was billeted with Mr and Mrs Haggar, 7 Sycamore Grove, has been recommended for the D.C.M for organising a sniping party which effectively kept back the Turks near Krithia while the British line was being consolidated. He is a native of Clyde Bank, and has been in the Army six years.

The Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee have received the handsome donation of 18gns, the result of a sale of surplus furniture held recently at Te Hira.

Mr Gilbert (Bert) Howkins, son of Mr G F Howkins, of Crick, has obtained a commission in the Royal Engineers. Previous to joining the Army he was in the Government Valuation Department. All three of Mr Howkins’ sons are now serving with H.M Forces, the others being in the Honourable Artillery Company and the Northamptonshire Yeomanry respectively.

Rifleman A Sansom, of 180 Oxford street, Rugby, has been slightly wounded and gassed. He was formerly a bricklayer, and joined the King’s Royal Rifles Corps. He has been in active service nine months.

Victor Cowley, son of Mr W Cowley, 12 Worcester Street, Rugby, an old St Matthew’s boy, employed by the B.T.H Co, Ltd, in the winding department, joined the 7th Battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry early in September, 1914. He went to the front “ somewhere in France ” at the end of last month. While sheltering in a dug-out he was wounded by shrapnel in the face by a German aerial torpedo, which came through the roof and exploded, fatally injuring some. All the platoon were more or less wounded. He is now in hospital at Leeds, and going on satisfactorily.

A KILSBY ATHLETE KILLED.

Although official intimation has not yet been received, from the War Office, Mrs Green, of The Laurels, has been notified by Capt E R Mobbs that her husband, Pte Bert Green, was killed in action some three weeks ago—at the time of the British advance. No letter had been received from him for nearly a month, and, Mrs Green being anxious, communicated with the above-named officer, and received the sad news on Wednesday morning. The sympathy of the village is with his wife and three little daughters. At the beginning of the war he was anxious to enlist, and in January last, unable to resist the call longer, he refused the chance of a commission and joined the 7th Northants Regiment. He was attached to the company of footballers and athletes captained by the famous Rugby inter-national footballer, Capt E R Mobbs. This company is known in the Northampton district ” Mobbs’s lot.” Mr Green was looked upon as a good-natured and genial fellow, both in the village and by his business companions. He was an all-round athlete. Several years ago he used to go on a cricket tour annually with the Yorkshire Gentlemen, and has played for first-class teams. He played for both Kilsby cricket and football teams, at one time captaining the former. He also played for Watford and other village clubs, and was a good asset. For the last two or three years he was a member of the British Thomson-Houston C.C. He made some excellent scores for this club, and for two years headed the batting averages. — Sympathetic reference was made to Pte Green’s death by Mr R Dumas at the meeting of the B.T.H Athletic Club on Thursday evening.

HILLMORTON MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Official news has been received that Pte C Kirby, of the 2nd Worcesters, only son of Mr H Kirby, of School Street, Hillmorton, and nephew of Mrs. F Paxton, 73 Murray Road, Rugby, was killed in action on September 26th in the great advance, at the early age of 22 years. The deceased joined the Army in December, 1911, and went to France in August, 1914. He was wounded in the left forearm on the 3rd of November, 1914, and went into hospital. He was back in the firing line on the 30th January, 1915, and has seen much fighting since that time.—The Vicar (the Rev R Lever) alluded to his death in his sermon on Sunday evening last, he having been a boy in the church Sunday School.

SECOND-LIEUT H D MARRIOTT KILLED IN ACTION.

Second-Lieut Hugh Digby Marriott, of the 8th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade, who, as reported last week, was killed in action in Flanders on October 9th, was a younger son, of Mr and Mrs Marriott, of Cotesbach, Lutterworth, Leicestershire. He was born on August 5th, 1895, and was educated at Temple Grove and at Bradfield College. He was entered at Brasenose College, Oxford, and was about to take up his residence there in October, 1914. Instead of this, however, he obtained a commission in the Rifle Brigade, and after the severe fighting at Hooge on July 30th-in which his brother Frederick was killed—he went out with other officers, and was appointed to the 8th Battalion.

COMMENDED FOR DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT.

Some months ago we recorded an incident in which Pte George Eaton (93 South Street) and other Rugby Territorials were attacked at a listening post by about three times their number of Germans. They defended the position bravely, and succeeded in driving off the enemy. Pte Eaton was referred to by the Corporal as being specially heroic. “ Although wounded, he kept on firing. He was a brick, and stuck to it like a man,” was the comment made upon his action at the time. His friends in Rugby will be glad to learn that for the part he took in this midnight episode he has been commended by the commanding officer “ for distinguished conduct in the field.”

ANOTHER ST MATTHEW’S “OLD BOY” WOUNDED.

Co-Sergt-Major C Favell, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, an old St Matthew’s School athletic championship holder, and well known later as a long-distance runner, has been reported wounded and in hospital.

BILTON SOLDIERS WOUNDED.

SAVED BY A PACK.

Rifleman Tom Reeve, who at the time of enlistment resided with his parents at Bilton, and is now in hospital at Guildford, has written to a friend describing how he received his wound and narrowly escaped being killed outright. He says:—

“ It was a nasty, smack right in the middle of the back—shrapnel wound. There isn’t much chance of dodging them, as they burst overhead for a radius of 200 yards ; but I am pleased to say I have no bones broken. The thing that saved my life was my pack. It went clean through that, and made a big hole in my jacket. I had got about 500 yards from the top of our parapet when I received my share. It knocked me down, but I did not feel it much for a few minutes. I got off my equipment the best way I could, and managed to get back somehow—but only God knows how. One of my pals came to bandage me up, and just as he got to me he was shot clean dead. I was then bandaged up by our doctor and put in a dug-out to await stretcher bearers. The Germans were shelling our trenches, and I thought every minute they would drop one on our dug-out—in fact, one dropped five yards from us and killed several. . . . I am glad to say I am making a wonderful recovery.”

In a subsequent letter he describes the wound as being 7ins long and 4ins wide right across the back, so it will take some time to get healed up.

The parents of Rifleman Reeve (who now live at Holbrook Farm, Little Lawford), have received a letter from E B Kerr, one of his comrades, who says that it happened soon after they started on the big charge. They were sorry to lose him, as he was always a great help. The writer was afraid that several of the Platoon who came from Rugby had suffered.

Mr and Mrs J Stibberd, of Bilton, have received information that their son, Bugler G Stibberd, of the 11th Royal Rifles, has been wounded by a shell while in billets, and is now in hospital at Boulogne. It is not a serious wound, and he is going on favourably. He enlisted in September, 1914, and went out in July.

Pte Alf Day, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital at Sheffield wounded. His parents now live at Bishops Itchington, but at the time of enlistment he had resided with them at Bilton for some time, and worked as a blacksmith at Church Lawford.

BILTON.

MRS CROFTS, of this village has received a letter from her youngest son, John (who is with the 6th Batt Royal Field Artillery), dated from a hospital and stating that he has been in that institution over six weeks suffering from a cracked shin-bone. It seems he was helping to take the horses to water when the horse in front of him suddenly kicked out and caught him. Later reports state that he is progressing as well as can be expected. The unfortunate young fellow had been promoted to sergeant only a few days before his accident. Mrs Crofts’ three sons have all entered the army. Charles came over with the Canadian contingent and is at the front, a letter recently to hand stating that he had been in the trenches about a week at the time of writing. Her eldest son, William, it will be remembered, lost his life while bathing off Sheerness, about three years ago.

WOLSTON.

MR ERNEST CHAMBERS KILLED.—Mr and Mrs Ernest Chambers have been notified from the War Office that their eldest son has died from wounds. He was badly hit in the abdomen. He joined the Royal Field Artillery soon after the war broke out, and was then residing with his parents at Sidon Hill, Brandon. The place of death is not mentioned, but he was fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula. Much sympathy is felt in the district for his relatives.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Mr and Mrs Charles Elliott, of Brook Street, whose son was reported killed in a former issue of our paper, have now received the bad news that two of their nephews have been wounded. One—Fredk Goodwin, of the 2nd Hants Regiment—has four ribs injured, left leg broken, and an injury to his waist, and now lies in a Reading hospital ; while another nephew—Fredk Woolcott—is badly wounded in the arm. Both were fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting at the Drill Hall has been rather better this week, and 21 men have been attested as follows :—D Lilley, C C Wharton, J H Holmes, A Morris, and E G Cloonan, R.A.M.C ; J R Holland, L C Major, and J Stevens, R.F.A ; W Bench, J A Speor, T A Rogers, R J Jackson, A B Webb, E Wood, and J W Wood, A.O.C ; W Richardson, Royal Berks ; W H Gulever and B E Iliffe, R.W.R ; D J Hall R.H.A ; W Southall and D Barnwell, drivers, R.E.

All the units are now open, and men are urgently required for the infantry battalions.

Local arrangements for carrying out Lord Derby’s recruiting scheme are well in hand, and it is hoped that the appeal which is about to be made to the manhood of the town will meet with a ready response. In many towns already the number of recruits had been greatly accelerated, and Rugby, which has so far done exceedingly well, should not now lag behind, as it is clearly understood that any failure in this effort will result in compulsory service. The local Parliamentary Committee is representative of the three great schools of political thought and is composed of the following :- Messrs M E T Wratislaw (chairman), J J McKinnell, H Tarbox, J H Walker W Barnett, L Aviss, C J Newman, G H Rolerts, and Col F F Johnstone, with Mr A Bell and Mr F M Burton joint hon Secretaries.

TOEING THE MARK—A PERSISTENT RECRUIT.

The persistent and patriotic endeavours made by Pte A Seaton, of Old Bilton, to enter the Army should put to shame those who advance all manner of excuses to avoid service. Although barely of enlistment age and having an impediment in his speech, Pte Seaton offered himself at the recruiting office but was rejected on account of deformed toes, one on each foot.

He enquired whether he would be accepted if he had the toes amputated, and on learning that he would be taken if the operation was successful, he entered the Rugby Hospital and has both his toes removed.

He is now serving in the 7th Royal Warwicks.

1/7TH WARWICKS UNDER SHRAPNEL FIRE.

Pte W Rainbow, of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, writing to his parents, says :—“ We had a terrible ten minutes the other night in the village, as the Germans started sending shrapnel over, and about a dozen of us were out on ration party at the time. The shells were bursting over our heads, and some of the chaps were running all over the place instead of taking cover. . . . I believe that all the chaps on that party sent up a short prayer that night, as none of us ever thought of coming out of it safe. . . . God must have seen fit to bring us out safe, for many of Kitchener’s got hit the same night. We have had a worse casualty list this few days than any time before in so short a time. You ought to hear the chaps carrying on over people at home wanting to know if we have been in the firing line yet, with chaps getting killed and wounded every day.”