8th Jun 1918. More Prisoners of War

MORE PRISONERS OF WAR.

The list of local war prisoners is still increasing, and the number has now grown to 110, so that increased subscriptions are needed to ensure that they are supplied with food parcels. It will be seen by an appeal from the committee in another column that the sum of £330 is required every month.

Mr J R Barker, the hon organising secretary, has received the badge of the British Red Cross Society and Order of St. John for his work in connection with the relief for local prisoners of war.

The following Rugby men have been reported prisoners of war :—Pte T W Florendine, Hants Regiment, son of Mr James Florendine, 19 Bridget Street (Limburg) ; Rifleman Arthur Lee, K.R.R, son of Mrs E Lee, 34 Sandown Road (Limburg) ; Pte Percy Prior, R.W.R, 20 Wood Street, Rugby, employed at the B.T.H as millwright (Soltau), and Pte W Edwards, Wilts Regt, son of Mr T Edwards, 99 Railway Terrace (Limburg).

£330 EVERY MONTH it now required to Feed the 110 Local War Prisoners.

Proofs are abundant in the assurances of exchanged prisoners that the parcels stood between them and starvation, and they speak not only for themselves but for their comrades who are still in captivity.

READ THESE EXTRACTS FROM SOME OF THEIR LETTERS :—

L.-Crpl. HARWOOD HANCOX (New Bilton), transferred to Switzerland, says : “ If it had not been for the help in food and clothing there would not be many of us alive to-day.”

Pte. A. KING (Napton), repatriated, says he “owes his life to the food you sent.”

Pte. P. G. DAVIS (Dunchurch) transferred to Switzerland, says : “ I do not know how I should have got on without your parcels ; I certainly should not have been in Switzerland now.”

Pte. P. MACE (Hillmorton), transferred to Switzerland, says “ I suppose you know that all we had to live on was the food that you sent us from England.”

FUNDS ARE URGENTLY NEEDED

Will you arrange a Flower and Vegetable Show, Fete, or other effort to raise funds this summer ?

Will you organise Weekly Collections at your place of Employment or amongst your friends ?

DONATIONS or promises of regular weekly or monthly subscriptions, which will be gladly acknowledged, should be sent to Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, Hon. Organising Secretary,

RUGBY PRIS0NERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE,
9 REGENT STREET, RUGBY (Registered under the War Charities Act, 1916)

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut F G Greenhill has been promoted Captain.

Driver F Calloway, 3rd Battery, 45th Brigade, an Old Murrayian, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallantry and devotion to duty on April 30th last.

Pte J Donovan, of the Gloucester Regiment, who, prior to joining the Army was employed in the carpenters’ shop at the B.T.H, was killed in action on April 26th.

Rifleman H Corbett, 1st Rifle Brigade, who was recently officially reported as having been killed in action on March 26th, is now reported as wounded and missing. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H.

Mr John Jones, of Cosford, has received news that his youngest son, Pte W R Jones, Machine Gun Corps, has been gassed in France—whether seriously or not has not transpired at present. Only recently Mr Jones lost his second son, Lieut E H Jones, who was killed in action.

Capt E G Passmore, son of Mr Passmore, of Ashby St Ledgers, has been awarded the Military Cross. Capt Passmore is Adjutant in the 7th Northants. He was wounded in June, 1916, and again in April, 1917. He was slightly gassed recently, and was granted leave on account of health. He returned to France the week.

Pte Will Clarke, of the Royal Mariners, who took part in the first raid on Zeebrugge, has written a cheery letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles-Hodges, in which he states that although the injury to his spine is making slow progress, he hopes in time to regain the use of his legs and back.

Lieut A J Harris, R.E. now with the Mesopotamian force, has been recently promoted Captain. He is the third son of Mr A Harris, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby. When at Rugby School he gained a place (half-back) in the Football XV ; and in a regimental football competition, which took place last month, his side won the cup.

THE LATE LIEUT G W BARNWELL.

The widow of Second-Lieut G W Barnwell, formerly of Grosvenor Road, who was reported killed a few weeks ago, has received letters from officer friends in reference to the sad event. In one of them Lieut-Col Frurn, K.O.Y,L.I., who conveys the very deep sympathy of every officer and man in the Battalion, adds : “ He died leading his men, who love the ground he trod on.”—A fellow-officer writes :— “ Although I was not with the Battalion at the time of your husband’s death, I can give you certain details which I heard from those who were there. On the 13th of April the enemy attacked our Battalion, which was in the front line near Neuve Eglise, not far from Ypres. Your husband showed a magnificent example of coolness and courage to his men, repeatedly cheering and encouraging them during a short withdrawal. He exposed himself in throwing a field dressing to a wounded man. and received a machine-gun bullet wound in the chest, which proved almost instantly fatal. His body was subsequently carried down to Battalion Headquarters, and was almost certainly accorded there a proper burial. During the whole time I have known your husband, which is ever since he joined the Battalion, he has been a friend whom I respected most highly, and in whom I had the greatest confidence. His perpetual cheerfulness at all times, and his disregard of danger, won the respect of everyone, and he was most sincerely loved by both the officers and men of the whole Battalion. I can assure you that all of us share your loss with feelings of deep personal sorrow. His magnificent example in the field would undoubtedly have won him a decoration had he lived. Only a few days before he died, when some troops of another Battalion during an enemy attack were becoming disorganised, and beginning to retire, he rushed up and rallied them at a critical moment. We are proud of the memory of such a one. . . I am proud to have been considered his friend ; may we profit by the example he showed to us in his life, and in his death alike. We mourn a gallant comrade, and myself personally a close and trusted friend.”

BRAUNSTON.
PRISONERS OF WAR.—Gunner W H Noble, R.H.A, who was officially reported killed about two months ago, has written to say he was wounded in the right shoulder by shrapnel, and is a prisoner of War at Guben, and asks for parcels to be sent. The Rugby Prisoners of War Committee has made arrangements for a parcel to be sent at once.—Pte R G Green, Cheshire Regiment who was reported as missing last week, is now reported as a prisoner of war, sound, and at present at Limberg.

WEST HADDON.
SAILOR’S FUNERAL.—The funeral took place on Thursday last week of Painter Tom Osborne, H.M.S Fisgard, eldest son of Mr & Mrs George Osborne, West Haddon. The fatal illness was due to a long exposure in the water when torpedoed in the Atlantic. Osborne had volunteered in the special service to combat U boats. He was a brave lad, and had performed many gallant deeds. For five days he and several others were at the mercy of the waves on a raft they made out of odds and ends. They encountered some terrible weather, and were without food five days. He died in Haslar Naval Hospital. The body was brought by rail to Long Buckby Station. Twelve sailors, in charge of the Chief Painter, Mr W H Shergold. H.MS Fisgard, came at their own expense to attend the funeral and to carry deceased to his last resting place. The coffin, borne on the shoulders of six of his mates, was covered with the Union Jack. Deceased had just passed his test for P.O, and had been recommended for award for bravery and devotion to duty.

STOCKTON.
SERGT WILLS is home on leave. He has been offered a commission, and will go shortly into training. The honour conferred on the sergeant is greatly appreciated by his many friends in Stockton. A most interesting letter has been received from George Wilks, who is serving on a motor launch in the Mediterranean. He has had the opportunity of visiting Tunis and other spots in North Africa—an enjoyable experience of strange places and people.—Albert Redgrave, who is an R.A.M.C orderly in the hospital at Etaples, had an unpleasant Whit-Sunday, when the hospital was bombed by the enemy. He fortunately escaped injury himself, but one of his chums was killed.—Cyril Sheasby was posted as missing on March 21st, since which date nothing has been heard of him. This is the third man from the village of whom no news has been received, the other two being L Wincott and Lewis Wall.— Bob Bates has been home on leave this week.
THE CHURCH.—So many flowers and wreaths being placed by the war shrine that their disposal has become a difficulty, Mr Knight generously offered to place a shelf in front of the shrine, on which the flowers could be well arranged. The work has been carried out, and is not only a great convenience, but also improves the appearance of the memorial considerably. Owing to the fact that the Rector is taking charge of the parish of Shuckburgh during Mr MacLaren’s absence as Army chaplain, the services at the Parish Church are fewer in number, and the hours have undergone some modification.

EASENHALL.
Mr and Mrs F Varney of Easenhall have received news that their second son, Pte Frank Varney, Coldstream Guards, who was officially reported as missing on April 13, is now wounded and a prisoner in Germany. This is the second time he has been wounded. They have another son, Sergt C Varney, who also belongs to the Coldstream Guards, and has been wounded three times. He is now Instructor of Musketry at the Guards headquarters in France. It may be added that he was in the retreat from Mons, and has seen much active service.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE BURIAL OF SOLDIERS AT RUGBY.
DEAR SIR,—It may be that there are rules and regulations, but the need for some arrangement for the burial of men dying here in the service of their country was pointed out in these columns long ago, and the wish expressed—and it is the wish of the townspeople—that a free burying plot should be provided for those who are giving their lives for this country. I can assure you Rugby residents are feeling very sore about the way these are being treated.

There are at the present time scattered, unkept (because nameless) graves of men about our cemetery. Were they in France they would be well-kept, with at least a wooden cross inscribed with their name.

The “opening ” fee here again debars us from doing this small service. These minor details are of far more consequence to the bereaved away than some monuments erected afterwards.—Yours truly,
May 27th.
A CITIZEN.

MAGISTERIAL.—At Rugby Police Court on Friday in last week—before Mr A E Donkin—Pte Arthur Williams, Royal Defence Corps, Rugby, and Lance-Corpl John Craig, Scottish Rifles, Invergordon, Scotland, pleaded guilty to drunkenness.—P C Holl deposed that both men were very drunk, and Williams was trying to take care of Craig.—Williams, who was given a bad character by his officer, was fined 3s, and Craig 1s 6d. —For a similar offence William Jennings, 4 West Leyes, Rugby, was fined 1s 6d.

ABSENTEE.—At Rugby Police Court on Wednesday—before Mr A E Donkin—Samuel Winfield, no fixed abode, was charged with being an absentee from the Army—P.S Hawkes deposed that the previous afternoon he saw defendant enter a common lodging house. He followed him, and enquired whether he had any Army discharge papers or other documents. To this defendant replied, “ No ; I have not been in the Army yet. I have dodged it, and I intend to.”—Defendant informed the magistrate that he had neither been registered or medically examined, and he was remanded for the Recruiting Authorities to be communicated with.

STRUCK BY DESCENDING AEROPLANE.

While working on his garden plot at Lilbourne on Friday evening last week, John Garner, labourer, of Yelvertoft, was struck by a descending aeroplane. He was badly bruised on the left shoulder and arm, and was taken to the Hospital of St Cross at Rugby, where he is making good progress.

THE NEW RATION BOOKS.

On the first of next month the present ration cards will be superseded by ration books, the application forms for which have already been sent to many householders in the district, and the remainder will be delivered by the end of the week. These forms are returnable to the Ration Officer by June 15th, but already a number—many of which have been incorrectly filled in—have been returned to the Food Office.

Anyone experiencing difficulty in filling in the forms should attend at any of the Elementary schools in Rugby or New Bilton on Monday or Tuesday afternoon next, where the teachers will be in attendance to give advice and assistance.

At a meeting of the Food Control Committee on Thursday Mr H Tarbox drew attention to the paragraph at the back of the application forms with reference to the term “Self-suppliers.” He said a large number of persons were concerned as to whether they ought to describe themselves as self-suppliers, inasmuch as in many cases a householder would kill a pig and cure his own bacon. This, however, in many cases did not last the whole year. Could such a man describe himself as a self-supplier? This, of course, applied not only to bacon, but to people who kept their own poultry.

The Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) said he could not answer this, because he had not received any instructions on the point.—The Chairman said he thought the only thing to be done was for everyone to use his own discretion, and if they were prosecuted to trust to the magistrates dealing leniently with them.—Mr Tarbox said he could understand the position with regard to a case where a man had a country establishment and a town house, and where supplies were sent regularly from the country place in the town residence.—Mrs Dewar asked if they could get a ruling from the Commissioner?

The Executive Officer said his opinion was that a farmer who made his own butter, or who killed a lot of rabbits on his farm, should describe himself as a self-suppler.—Mrs Dewar enquired as to the position of a person who kept sufficient rabbits to kill one per month.—The Executive Officer replied that such a man would not be considered as a self-supplier.

It was decided that an inquiry should be addressed to the Commissioner on the subject.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

THROUGH the efforts of the Food Economy Committee a second instalment of vegetables has been despatched to the Warwickshire Collecting Society, and this week there is a considerable increase in the supply from the villagers—64 eggs, as well as a quantity of cabbages, onions, mint, and rhubarb, being among the contributions.

IN MEMORIAM.

EVANS.—In affectionate remembrance of WILLIAM, the beloved son of W. E, & A. M. Evans (late of Crick), who was killed in action on June 10, 1917. He will never be forgotten by Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.
“ Who through the fiery gates,
Enter thy rest.
Greet them as conquerors,
Bravest and best.
Every white soul of them,
Ransomed and blest.”

GREEN.—In loving memory of Sergt CHARLES GREEN, the dearly beloved son of James and Flora May Green, of Calcutt Farm, Stockton, who was killed in action in France on June 9, 1917.
“ His sufferings here are ended,
His work on earth is done ;
He fought the fight with patience,
And now the victory’s won.
We loved him— ah ! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him too, and thought it best
To take him home with Him to rest.”

HIPWELL.—In loving memory of Gunner EDWARD WALLACE HIPWELL, second son of George Hipwell, Clifton-on-Dunsmore, who died of wounds in France. Buried at Merville, June 7, 1917.
“ Behind the guns our brave lads stand
To answer for the Motherland.”
—From his loving Father and Mother, Arthur, Fred and Reg.

TERRY.—In loving memory of our dear son, AMBROSE JOSEPH TERRY, R.W.R., who died of wounds on June 7, 1917.
“ In a hero’s grave our loved one sleeps ;
Never will we forge t our noble dead.
—From Mother and Father.

26th Jan 1918. Airman falls from an Aeroplane

AIRMAN FALLS FROM AN AEROPLANE.

On Tuesday morning a shocking aeroplane accident, as the result of which Second-Lieut Harold Griffith Nelson (25), a Canadian officer, lost his life, occurred near Rugby. He had been flying for nearly an hour, and when at an altitude of about 2,000ft. he was seen to fall from his machine. His body was terribly mangled, and death must have been instantaneous. The aeroplane continued its flight, and came to earth about three-quarters of a mile away. The cause of the accident has not been ascertained, and it is not known whether Lieut Nelson had strapped himself in in accordance with the rules of the Service.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Sergt J R Sacree, 10th Rifle Brigade, late assistant to Mr C T Tew, who has been missing since November 30th, is now reported a prisoner of war in Germany. This is the fourth time he has been wounded. He has won the Military Medal, and was again recommended in September last.

The younger son of Mr T Pearman, of Ryton-on-Dunsmore, has recently been promoted to the rank of Captain. He is now with his regiment in Italy.

Major T E Manning, Yeomanry, who previously captained the Northamptonshire Cricket Club, has left his regiment to take on duty as an Assistant Provost Marshal with the British troops in Italy. Major Manning was mobilised with his regiment at the outbreak of war.

Capt J H Lee, 2/1 London Regiment, who was awarded the Military Cross at last summer, has been wounded in eight places, but is making good progress. He was employed in the B.T.H Test at the time he was granted a commission in May, 1915 he was also a member of the Albert Street Congregational Church Choir.

Lieut H A Holder, of the B.T.H Drawing Office, has been promoted Captain (R.G.A). He was wounded in June last, and has now returned to the B.EF. During his stay in England Captain Holder married Miss Nancy Sleath, of Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The following in an extract from a letter from the North Staffordshire Regiment Prisoners of War Association to Hon Secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee :—

“ The work your committee is doing is wonderful, for we know that it not an easy matter to support local men of different regiments.”

Four additional local prisoners of war have been added this week, bringing the number up to 83. The cost to provide for these men—men from our own district—is now £230 6s 6d every four weeks.

BRAVE HILLMORTON SOLDIER DECORATED.

A pleasing ceremony was performed at the usual parade of the Rugby V.T.C on Sunday afternoon, when Lt-Col F F Johnstone, as Commanding Officer of the 2nd Batt. Warwickshire Volunteer Regt, presented Driver F Davies, R.F.A, of Hillmorton, with the Military Medal, which had been awarded him for distinguished conduct in the field under shell fire. The ceremony took place at the Howitzer Battery Drill Hall, in the presence of a fairly large company. Driver Davies was accompanied by his mother, sisters and friends, and there were also present Lieut C J Newman, Mr H Yates and Mr T Ringrose (members of the Rugby Urban District Council).

Before making the presentation Lieut-Col F F Johnstone addressed the company, and said wherever such a presentation could be made it was customary to make it before a parade of soldiers, so that the example set by one brave man could be followed by others when the opportunity arose ; and he had, therefore, taken the occasion of that parade to present Driver Davies with the medal. He then read the official description of the deed for which the medal had been awarded, from which it appeared that on April 9, 1917, a shell fell on the ammunition wagon in front of the wagon Driver Davies was driving, and a comrade, Driver Hook, was pinned under his horse. Driver Davies’s horse was also wounded, and fell on Hook. Davies was pitched into the road, but he got up and went to the assistance of his friend, and got him into a place of safety. Col Johnstone then pinned the medal on the breast of the brave young fellow, and having shaken hands with him, continued: “ The attributes of a good soldier are five, and all commence with the letter c, viz, courage, commonsense, cheerfulness, cleanliness, and cunning. He thought they might congratulate Driver Davies on possessing most of these and upon having done his duty as a right down good, brave young man and soldier, a credit to his battery and also to the town from which he came. He was again leaving for the front on Tuesday night, and they all wished him all good luck and a safe was return.”

Hearty cheers having been given for Driver Davies, his mother was presented to Col Johnstone, who shook her warmly by the hand, saying: “ It is the women like you, the women with sons like this, who are winning this War for us.”

Before joining the Army Driver Davies was employed in the tinsmiths’ shop the B.T.H.

NAPTON.

MUCH sympathy is extended Mr & Mrs Frederick Sheasby, sen, of Napton, in the death of their youngest son, Horace, at the age of 19 years. He was wounded in France on December 30th and taken to hospital, but never regained consciousness. He lived with Mr Mushing, of Lower Farm, Napton, for four years, and was a most trustworthy servant and cheerful with everyone.

RUGBY NOT A MUNITION AREA.

At a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Monday evening Mr Geo Cooke, a representative of the Rugby Trades and Labour Council, stated that the Ministry of Munitions had refused to create Rugby a munition area, which would have had the effect of preventing the eviction under any circumstances of men engaged on munition work.

THE FOOD SHORTAGE.

During the week-end the meat and margarine queues were again in evidence. The supply of margarine was smaller than usual, and many bitter complaints were made of the inadequacy of the purchases, which were only secured in many instances after dreary waits in the cold and slush. On Friday morning an angry crowd besieged one grocer’s shop under the mistaken belief that a quantity of margarine was in stock. The Executive Officer, Mr F M Burton, was summoned to the scene, and he explained the situation to the people. In order to minimise the disappointment of the crowd as far as possible, the proprietor decided dispose of his stock of jam, and for about an hour Mr Burton was busily engaged handing out the pots to the people, who subsequently dispersed in “ sweeter ” humour.

The butchers’ shops were the centres of interest on Saturday, and the shop-keepers and their assistants spent a very anxious time. Several of the traders worked till late Friday night cutting up their meat into the very smallest quantities, and even those who were lucky enough to be supplied only received infinitesimal amounts. One large establishment, containing 70 persons, was allowed 17lbs ; while many other large establishments had to be content with even less than this, in one case the supply working out at 1½ozs per person, including bone. The situation was rendered more serious by the total disappearance of rabbits, which, it was noted, coincided with the fixing of the maximum price, and all the shops were cleared out at a very early hour. The meat shortage caused a run on the fishmongers’ establishments, and small herrings, kippers, and bloaters were eagerly snapped up at 6d each, other fish fetching proportionately high prices.

NO SUGAR FOR JAM MAKING.—The Chairman of the Royal Commission on the Sugar Supply (Sir Charles Bathurst, M.P) desires to make it known that, as it will probably be impossible during the present year to make special issues of sugar to private fruit growers for the making of jam for their own home consumption, the latter would well advised to begin saving as much sugar as possible out of their own domestic rations for the above purpose. Such saving will not constitute hoarding.

POTATO BREAD.—A general notice on the use of potatoes in the manufacture of bread removes any limit to the percentage of potatoes that may be used in the manufacture of bread. As it is essential that such a general use is secured in order to conserve cereal supplies, it is the intention of the Ministry to issue at an early date an Order making the use of a certain percentage of potatoes compulsory, and as such an Order would apply to bakers and domestic bread makers alike, all makers of bread are advised at once make such arrangements as will enable them to comply with the requirements of the Order when issued.

DR DAVID’S THREAT TO CLOSE RUGBY SCHOOL.

The meat question was discussed fully at a meeting of the Local Food Control Committee, presided over by Mr T A Wise on Monday evening, when it was intimated that unless more meat could be provided, Dr David had threatened to close Rugby School.

Mr Burton (the Executive Officer) reported that there was a very serious shortage of meat in the town last week and the inspectors of three of the foreign meat shops in the town called upon him, and stated that if they were granted permits they could send more than their 50 per cent. of meat to their shops. He accordingly granted the permits.—This action was approved.—Mr Burton also reported that that afternoon he had received an application for a similar permit from one of firms, and he had promised to bring the matter before the committee. The position locally that day was that the Rugby urban and rural butchers were 17 beasts short of their 50 per cent., and the town butchers alone only got 51 sheep out of the 108 required. It was, therefore, much worse than last week.—It was decided to grant the permit, and to give the Executive Officer discretionary powers to grant others which he might deem necessary.—Mr Reeve asked how the English butchers stood if they could get extra supplies ? He could have sold more sheep last week, and he thought if the foreign butchers were allowed this privilege the English vouchers should be treated similarly provided they could get the sheep. He had eight sheep which he was willing to kill if he could do so.—The executive officer said he failed to see how the English butchers could do this, because they were limited as to their supplies, which have to be purchased through the auctioneers.—Mr Reeve said he bought these sheep several weeks ago ; but the Executive Officer reiterated his opinion that the sheep would have to be sold through the auctioneers.—Mr Reeve said he should not send them, because if he did, and he bought them, he would have to pay 3s 6d on each of them, he would also have to pay an additional 1s 6d because he was the vendor.—Mr Stevenson suggested that they write to Lord Rhondda to have the matter cleared up.—Mr Reeve also expressed the opinion that the Rugby butchers should be allowed to have their 50 per cent before other butchers received anything. In the past the big towns had largely relied on foreign meat, and now they were trying to get some of the supplies which should belong to other towns.—Mr Gay enquired whether live stock was being killed in Rugby and the carcasses sent out of the town ?—Mr Reeve replied that he had been in the habit of killing a number of beasts and sheep each week, and sending the carcasses away ; but he could not do this last week because of the shortage of meat.—Mr Burton : Then that is to the benefit of Rugby.—Mr Reeve differed from that view, and pointed out that when he sent meat away he retained all the offal, which people were very pleased to purchase.—Mr Gay thought it unfair that the town should be limited as to its supplies and for a portion of these to be sent away.—The Chairman, however, pointed out that it was Mr Reeves’ duty to continue to send meat away if he could get it. The government’s idea was that all customers should receive 50 per cent. of the supplies they were getting in October.—Mr Burton said, strictly speaking, a butcher who had been selling wholesale could not refuse to sell, otherwise the aggrieved firm would have a claim upon him. He pointed out that the foreign meat companies were in a different position to the English butchers because they received their meat frozen, and did not have to go into the open market to buy it.—Mr Cooke enquired if the additional supply could be distributed amongst the English Butchers ; but Mr Burton replied in the negative. He added that he had impressed upon the managers the necessity of cutting down their customers to 50 per cent., and not to serve them with the full 100 per cent.

THE B.T.H CANTEEN.

It was reported that, as a result of several consultations with the auctioneer vice-chairman (Mr W Howkins), the manager of the B.T.H canteen, and two other butchers, the permit of a butcher had been increased by 500lbs per week, so that he could supply meat to the B.T.H Canteen. This allowed 2ozs (uncooked) for each meal. The Executive Officer, however, understood that the butcher in question was unable to obtain this amount.—The Chairman stated that the manager of the canteen was very dissatisfied with the supplies, and complained that he could not serve all the dinners required. He (the Chairman) fully explained the situation, and pointed out that with the present shortage of meat they could not expect to get their full supply. He asked if it was expected that the B.T.H was to receive all the meat in Rugby, and other people were to go without.—Mr Mellor pointed out that in the staff restaurant they were having two meatless days per week, and there was a feeling that all the meat was being sent to the canteen in the works.

The caterer to Messrs Willans & Robinson’s also wrote complaining of the inadequate supplies of meat ; and in view of the increasing number of people dining at the works, asking that a local butcher be given a permit to supply them with 300lbs daily.—The butcher in question informed the committee that he had not accepted the offer to supply them, because he did not wish to take the trade from a colleague.—The whole question was referred to the Food Controller.

With reference to the Chester Street communal kitchen, the Divisional Commissioner wrote stating that such institutions deserve every encouragement, and authorising the committee to use their discretion as to the amount of meat to be apportioned for their use.—Miss A V Fenwick wrote stating that their requirements were 50lbs of meat daily, 10s worth of bones for soup, and 6lbs of lard or fat per week.—It was decided to give a permit for this amount.

RUGBY SCHOOL MEAT SUPPLY.

The Auctioneer-Chairman for the District wrote that he had received a complaint from Mr David, stating that the ration of meat proposed to be allowed to Rugby School was not nearly enough, and threatening, if he could not get a bigger supply, to close the School. He had wired to the Food Controller on the matter, and the only satisfaction he could get was a wire as follows :—“ Refer Headmaster of Rugby School to Food Control Committee.” It seemed to him a serious matter, and he thought the school should not be closed. He asked the committee to see what could be done, and suggested that they should see the Headmaster and ascertain what his minimum requirements were.—In a letter Dr David said he had not complained that the ration of meat supplied to the School was not nearly enough. If as he was told the ration was 2lbs, it was, in his opinion, sufficient, and even if it was not so it was not for them to complain. His complaint was that the four School butchers were not allowed to buy sufficient meat to supply anything like this ration. He therefore asked that their purchasing permits should be altered so as to allow them to send the requisite amount within that scale. With this they were perfectly prepared to be content. He could not say the minimum amount that was required.—The Chairman stated that they had sent round to all the schools and boarding-houses to ascertain what meat they received in October, so that by that means they could have the basis of their normal supplies. Returns had been received from 18 schools concerning 1,086 persons, and the meat consumption was 2,948½lbs. Some, however, had included pork pies, sausages, brawn, rabbits, game, &c, while others had not. This worked out at an average of about 2¾lbs per head per week, and he took it that the butchers could not now supply anything like that quantity.—Mr Reeve : It is impossible at the present time.—Mr Stevenson : That is more than the majority of people get in the town.—The Chairman : Under the rationing scheme boys are entitled to 3lbs of meat per week. As a munition and educational centre, he thought they should be entitled to more meat, and it was unanimously decided to support Dr David in his efforts to obtain more for the town.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS.
FAIRNESS TO ALL.—Too late for insertion this week, but you will see by reports of Food Control Committee meeting in this issue that a rationing scheme is to put in force in Rugby.

DEATHS.

FEVERS.—In loving memory of WILLIAM, the eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Fevers, of Woolscott, near Rugby, who was killed in action on April 11, 1917. Aged 24.
“ Oh ! how sadly we shall miss him,
There will be a vacant place.
We shall never forget his footsteps,
Or his dear familiar face.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Sister & Brother.

IN MEMORIAM.

CHATER.—In loving memory of my dear son, Pte. W. T. CHATER, who was killed at Mesopotamia on January 23, 1917.—From Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

COLLIER.—In loving memory of AMY ELIZABETH, wife of Samuel Collier, who passed away on January 20, 1914 “ At rest.”—Also of WILLIAM CHARLES COLLIER, eldest son of above, who was killed in action in France on October 9, 1917 ; aged 39 years.

McDOWELL.—In ever-loving memory of WILLIAM McDOWELL, 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in action on January 27, 1917.
“ There is a link death cannot sever ;
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—Sadly missed by his Wife.

9th Jan 1915. Local War Notes and Christmas at the Front

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

At the Rugby Cattle Market, on Monday next, Mr W Wiggins will sell by auction a sheep, which has been presented for the purpose, the proceeds of which will be given to the Belgian Relief Fund.

Mr R G S Anderson, of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, who was wounded, has now re-joined his regiment.

Mr P A Morson, son of Mr Arthur Morson, of Rugby, has joined the Foreign Service Battalion of the Honourable Artillery Company.

Sergt-Instructor Bird, of the Stores Department of the B.T.H Company, has been appointed to a commission in the Northants Regiment in connection with Lord Kitchener’s Army.

Mr C G Richards, late of Rugby, is now with Royal Army Medical Corps at Diss, in Norfolk, and he expects to sail for Egypt with a detachment of the Corps in a few weeks’ time.

H Welsby, T Lee, T Batchelor, and H Webber (Rugby), and C Batchelor (Hunningham) hare joined the reserve battalion of the 7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The battalion has now more than 1,000 men.

Mr C F E Dean, partner of Mr W G B Pulman, solicitor, Rugby and Lutterworth, has enrolled in the Public Schools Battalion attached to the Royal Fusiliers, and left to take up duty in London on Saturday.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting still continues fairly satisfactory at Rugby. During the past week 36 men enlisted, the best day being Monday, when 15 came [?]d. So far the total for Rugby is 2,102.

AMUSING RECRUITING INCIDENT.

The recruiting officer in charge at the Drill Hall had an amusing experience on Wednesday morning. Two little boys from Pinder’s Lane-one aged 6 years 10 months and the other aged 7 years-presented themselves, and stated quite seriously that they wished to enlist as buglers, The sergeant, instead of informing the youngsters that this was impossible, entered into the spirit of the joke, got out the papers, and began to fill in the particulars. The would-be recruits expressed their willingness to join any corps to which they could be sent, and subsequently left the hall fully satisfied that they might at any be called to serve.

A SOLDIER’S THANKS.

Pte J T Meadows, of the 1st Northants Regiment, writes from the London General Hospital : ” Will you allow me space to convey my many thanks to the people of Rugby, who have so generously thought of me this Christmas and New Year, and who have made it so happy for me in my sufferings from terrible wounds received in action. The names of engagements I am unable to state, only the one where I was put out of action (Ypres). I regret to say my recovery is very slow. Through it all I remain quite happy.”

RUGBY SHUNTER’S NARROW ESCAPE.

S S Alfred Wood, of the 1st Artillery Division, who previous to being called up for active service was employed at Rugby L & N-W Railway Station as a shunter, in a letter to a friend says :-

“Things have been a bit rough at the front, but are a little better now. He was having a fortnight’s rest from the firing line, and it seemed quite a change to be away from the ‘ coal boxes.’ He was hit once, but it did not do any damage, the bullet going through his jacket and just grazing his back. One of his mates from Rugby got killed, and another had his eye taken out with a piece of shell at Ypres. In one passage he says: ‘ When we got back from the battle of Ypres they had completely blown the town to atoms. We were in a wood one day, and the

Germans started to shell us just us we were going to have a bit of breakfast—such as it was. One of our sergeants was having a wash, when over came a German shell and shot him dead. Five more were killed and wounded, and also about a dozen horses. So you see we have been through a bit. At the battle of the Aisne we had a rough time, losing nine guns out of eighteen in the Brigade and a lot of men. We lost two guns and about 40 men one day ; the Germans captured them and took them prisoners.”

KITCHENER’S RECRUIT AT THE FRONT.

Driver Jack Jones, son of Mr Rowland Jones, brewery agent, Claremont Road, who joined the new heavy battery, Garrison Artillery, in connection with Lord Kitchener’s Army, in August, was selected for the front early in November, and must have been among the first in Kitchener’s Army to go. He has written several letters home, in each of which he states that he is quite well. In one letter he says : “ Our guns have gone very well up to now, without a casualty, so I think we have been very lucky. I think we have to put all that down to the officers, because they are all very clever men. They know how to find the enemy, but the enemy has not found us yet, and I hope they won’t.” In another letter he says : “ Things out here are a bit quiet. We have been in action now about one month.”

HOW THE WARWICKSHIRE YEOMANRY SPENT CHRISTMAS.

At the time of the German raid on Scarborough the Warwickshire Yeomanry were stationed on the coast not a hundred miles from the scene of hostilities. General regret was expressed that their bit of the coast had not been selected for the attack instead of the Yorkshire coast.

A week before Christmas the regiment was moved from the coast to a few miles inland. The change was not appreciated, for the men are now quartered in a Little village of about 300 inhabitants, and five miles from any town. The last place they were at was about the size of Warwick, which, besides the ever-present attraction of the sea and shipping, boasted a couple of picture shows, and a hall where writing, &c, could be done. Also the men were billeted on private people, and consequently lived very well and had real beds to sleep in, which, after sleeping on bags of straw for the last few months, was Paradise. Army rations went down very badly after billeting for a month, after Christmas fare was a welcome break in the monotony of bread and meat and bread and jam. Most of the men are now billeted in empty houses, a troop to a house. Six or seven men occupy a room, and with the coming of Christmas hampers many enjoyable, if informal, dinners and teas were held. A whip round is made periodically for coal, and the same method was adopted to buy a couple of kettles. Some queer meals have been eaten lately ; pineapple chunks, pork pie, and cake and tea have provided many a meal, some of which have been breakfasts, others dinners or teas. Each room usually has its own store of small groceries, and every man ought soon to be a complete housekeeper. If one room is short of tea, it can often be obtained from the next by swapping a piece of coal for it. In the same way a couple of mince pies area equal to half a candle. The latter are indispensable articles of the men’s housekeeping, as there is no other means of lighting the houses, and friends sending parcels might with advantage slip a few in. A very pleasant Christmas was spent, each squadron having a real Christmas dinner, followed by a concert in the evening. Everyone enjoyed the Christmas spread, which was done in real style, turkeys, geese, roast beef, plum puddings, with fruit, nuts, and drinks ad lib. After living more or less on bully beef, this was a welcome change, and everyone enjoyed it to the full. The concert also was a great success, and was kept up till 10.30 p.m, a very late hour for soldiers, who on ordinary occasions must be in their billets by 9.30 p.m.

The regiment has been engaged in very interesting work and schemes lately, much of which has involved a good deal of cross-country riding.

A CHRISTMAS DAY TRUCE.

In a further letter home, Pte Sheasby says that on Christmas Eve they were ordered to some new trenches. We hadn’t been there many minutes before we started shouting the compliments of the season to the Germans, who were entrenched about 250 to 300 yards in fronts of us, and to our surprise they shouted back : “ Hello ! you English, if you won’t fire we won’t over Christmas ” ; so, of course, we shouted : “ All right; we won’t fire till you do.” Of course, the sentries were at their posts just the same ; but we felt more free, and hadn’t to keep bobbing down to miss stopping a bit of lead. At the same time we hardly expected them to keep to their word ; but there was not a shot fired that night by us or by the Germans opposite, although there was firing going on on our right and left. The next morning as soon as it got light and we had had breakfast, we took a walk through our barbed wire entanglements, and met them halfway between the two trenches. After hand-shakes and “ A Merry Christmas ” we exchanged cigars and cigarettes, and all had a chat and smoke together. I took a drop of whiskey, and we had a drink. They were very eager after the whiskey, you bet ; and they also seemed very eager after food too. . . Our officer came out and took our photograph, about 20 of us, Germans and British mixed together, and he has promised me one if he can get them away to be done. . . We fixed things up that neither side would fire on the other unless we were ordered to, and then we were to fire in the air until after Boxing Day ; but one of the Germans came over and volunteered the news that he had seen their orders, and that they were to make an attack on us that (Boxing night) at 12.15 p.m. Of course, we got prepared, and all stood to arms at about 11.30 with fixed bayonets, all at our posts, anxiously waiting for them. And then our big guns started to let them have it for a few minutes after that, and shelled their trenches for about three-quarters of an hour, dropping shells right into them. I think that must have put them off it and made them think that we were about to make another attack. Anyway, we stood to our posts till 2.30, and nothing happened.”