14th Oct 1916. Horses for the Army

HORSES FOR THE ARMY.

COL. MULLINER’S SCHEME.

The two last issues of “ The Field ” contain articles by Col Mulliner, of Clifton Court, in which, he discusses the supply and maintenance of horses for the army after the war. It will be remembered that Col Mulliner was responsible for raising the Howitzer Brigade which was formed at Rugby and Coventry, and he was at once met with the difficulty of supplying it with horses. He, found that hiring, whether for their camps or for the local weekly or bi-weekly trainings, was not merely a waste of money, but that the number of horses which could be hired for Saturday afternoons and certain evenings of the summer months was ridiculously small. The absence of proper stabling was also a serious draw-back. To meet the difficulty, Col Mulliner, after investigating various continental systems, finally instituted the boarding-out system, which is now known as the “ Mulliner Scheme.” The success that attended this scheme in promoting the efficiency of units by which it was adopted, combined with greater economy and convenience, is Col Mulliner’s justification for putting forward a vaster and more comprehensive scheme to deal with all, or nearly all, the army horses of the kingdom.

Col Mulliner points out that it is abundantly proved that the horse still remains an absolute necessity in modern warfare, and he takes it for granted National Service in some form will be continued. He calculates that for permanent use, and for periodical training, manoeuvres, etc, something like 300,000 horses is the fewest number which must always be immediately available for monthly trainings in peace, and for mounting the army in time of war.

As to where this number of horses is to be obtained, Col Mulliner reminds us that at the conclusion of hostilities the Government will be in possession of a large number still serviceable, and instead of selling these off at once, or even gradually, most likely at ridiculous prices, he suggests that they should be retained to inaugurate his scheme, and sent to the “ homes ” which will, if the scheme is adopted, have bean arranged for them.

Probably doubts may be raised as to the ability to provide homes for so large a number of horses, but judging from the great success of the scheme in Warwickshire, and if the whole country and towns are properly worked, it may be found that users of horses willing to receive them and board them will be found in fair numbers.

What we have to consider is that whereas the stock of horses actually possessed by the Army at the outbreak of war was something under 25,000, when the war is at an end probably ten times that number will be required to keep the standing army in a state of efficiency. How is this to be done ? Either the State must maintain some 300,000, more or less, or the sane number (less those required at permanent establishments) should be kept and used by individuals while remaining the property of the State. Col Mulliner urges that if the scheme is adopted, the necessary organisation should be taken in hand at once, and not left till the end of the war.

THE “ EDITH CAVELL ” ENGINE AT RUGBY ERECTING SHOP.

After running on the L & N-W Railway for nearly a year, the passenger engine of the “ Prince of Wales ” type, named in honour of the late Nurse Cavell, was recently brought to Rugby Erecting Shop for repairs. These were completed yesterday (Friday), and before the locomotive left Rugby the idea occurred to Mr J Shaw, the shop foreman, to have it decorated in honour of the brave British lady after whom it was named. The men willingly fell in with the idea, and there was no lack of autumn flowers to adorn the engine. Prominence was given on the side to the motto, “ Lest we forget,” and also to a special wreath subscribed for by those employed in the Erecting Shop. Other wreaths, and also small Union Jacks, were included in the general scheme of decoration, which was carried out in an effective and pleasing manner, the work when finished being greatly admired.

RUGBY NURSE HONOURED.—At the recent investiture held at Buckingham Palace on October 7th, His Majesty the King presented Miss Mabel Allibone, of Charles Street, Rugby, with the Royal Red Cross for valuable services rendered during the war. Miss Allibone, who is a native of Rugby, was called up for nursing services on the outbreak of the war.

LIGHTING RESTRICTIONS & AIR RAIDS.

When notification is received of probable Zeppelin raids police officers and the special constables for Rugby are called out, and it is part of their duty to patrol the streets and roads, and where lights are showing to request people to extinguish them.

It does not seem to be generally understood that in such circumstances all lights are to be extinguished at the request of the responsible Military or Police Authorities., and neglect or refusal may involve the offender in serious penalties.

It is not in such a case a question of whether only a “ dull subdued light ” is being shown ; but, however weak or small the illumination, a request to extinguish it from the Military Police or Special Constables must be instantly complied with.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

R ATHEY, an Old Laurentian, formerly pupil and teacher at the Murray School, who has seen service in the ranks in France, has been gazetted to a second lieutenancy in the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders.

The weekly parcels sent to the 64 local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained tea, tin of milk, large tin of corned beef, large tin of tomatoes, tin of sauce, tablet of soap, ½-lb of margarine, 2lbs of biscuits, and a thick, warm woollen vest.

“ The Rennbahn Church Times ” it the title of a little magazine issued by the British prisoners in the internment camp at Rennbahn. A copy for September has been sent to Mr J R Barker by Pte F A Ward, of the 2nd Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, a Ryton-on-Dunsmore man, who is interned there. It consists of eight small pages, the first of which contains an illustrated line drawing of the interior of the church. The price is 10 pfennigs, about 1d, or 5s for the home country. The September issue is the first anniversary number, but the editor docs not wish to stay there longer than he can help, so he will not express the hope that the journal will have a long run.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mrs T Howard, 26 Clifton Road, has received a letter from her son, Pte Samuel L Howard, of the R.A.M.C, dated September 16th, saying he has been wounded by a piece of shrapnel through the right knee. He has been operated upon three times, and is now in Hospital at Rouen.—Pte S L Howard joined the R.A.M.C in September, 1915, and was sent to France in April, 1916.

Gunner Joseph Fenton, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, son of Mr T Fenton, 9 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has been rather seriously wounded in the back and shoulder by a tear shell, while asleep behind the lines, and is at present in the Hospital at Ashton-under-Lyne. Gunner Fenton was before the war a ringer at the Parish Church.—Driver H Hughes, another member of the Battery, living at Paradise Street, Rugby, has also been wounded, and is in a hospital in England.

ANOTHER B.T.H MAN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl L Davies, R.E, has been killed in action. Previous to enlistment Corpl Davies, who is a Welshman, was employed in the Chemical Laboratory at the B.T.H. He was about 26 years of age.

ST MATTHEWS OLD BOYS CASUALTIES.

The casualty list of St Matthew’s School continues to now at a rapid rate. During the last three weeks the following have been notified :— Lieut W D Wroe, Lincolnshire Regiment, a former member of the teaching staff, killed in action ; old boys—Rifleman F J Green, King’s Royal Rifles, died from wounds ; Rifleman G Norman, King’s Royal Rifles, killed in action ; Pte H Hopkins, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, missing ; Rifleman R Coles, London Regiment ; Rifleman W Harris, King’s Royal Rifles ; Lance-Corpl H Thompson, Oxford and Bucks LI ; Pte G Baker, Royal Warwickshire Regiment ; and Pte J W West, Australian I.E.F, wounded.

DUNCHURCH.

The Inhabitants are pleased to hear that Gunner G Redmanyne of the Rugby Howitzer Battery has gained the Military Medal for bravery.

Corpl Walter Ryland, of this village, at present serving with the B.E.F. in the Railway and Canal Troops, has been offered a commission in the Motor Machine Gun Corps, but owing to medical unfitness was unable to accept it.

BILTON.

MEMORIAL SERVICE TO THE LATE LIEUT.-COL. F C B WEST.

A service in memory of the late Lieut-Col F C B West, R.F.A, of “ Bawnmore,” Bilton, who was killed in action on September 29th, was held in St Mark’s Church, Bilton, on Friday afternoon, when despite the inclement weather, the church was filled with friends and neighbours anxious to show their respect for the gallant colonel. The members of the family present were : Mrs F C B West (widow), Mrs Bowen Coulthurst (sister), Mrs West (stepmother), Miss West (half-sister), Mr and Mrs Dewar, Capt Michael Dewar, Miss Dewar, Dr and Mrs Sadler, Mrs Bartholomew, and Miss Bartholomew, of Towcester. Amongst others who attended were Col H H Mulliner, of the Howitzer Brigade, Major Hardisty, representing the Warwickshire County Association, Major Mortimore. D.S.O, once adjutant of the brigade, Major Claude Seabroke, Capt Thomas, Rev G M Hardwich, Mrs C G Steel, Mr H P Burdekin, Mr J J McKinnell, Mr and Mrs W Brooke, Mrs Nickalls, Mr H V Wait, Mr A Adnitt, Mr F E Hands, Mrs Assheton, Mr and Mrs S Robbins, Mr A J Ashew, Mr G Whiteman, Mr F Betts, Mr F Fellows, Miss Scott, etc, and also members of the New Bilton Cheerup Club, of which Mrs West is a prominent supporter. The service, which was of a brief, simple, but impressive character, was conducted by the Rector, Rev W Assheton, R.D. At the commencement the organist, Mr J E Boynton, played “ O rest in the Lord.” Psalm cxxi was chanted, and the special lesson was taken from the third chapter of Solomon. The hymns used were “ The saints of earth and those above,” and “ For all the saints who from their labours rest.” At the conclusion of the service the organist played Beethoven’s “ Marche Funebre.”

POSITION OF FARM WORKERS.

Arising out of the first case on the list—that of Bertram Henry Waring, 13 Earl Street, Rugby, shepherd and stud-groom in the employ of Mr Chas Wilson, Three Horse Shoes Hotel—discussion took place with reference to the letter circulated by the Army Council to recruiting officers that, subject to certain considerations, no more men from among those now employed in agriculture will be called to the colours till January 1st next.—The Tribunal granted a temporary exemption till December 6th, and Mr Channing asked what about what about the new ruling, the man being engaged in agriculture ?— Mr Wale : He must be fully engaged in agriculture.

Mr Eaden said one of his clients had received notice not to attend that day, as he was not to be called up.—The Chairman said the Tribunal had received no instructions whatever about the new Army Order.—The Clerk (Mr Nelson) understood the Military proposed to adjourn the case referred to, which would not affect the decision.—The Chairman understood the position was that although the Tribunal might decide that a man engaged in agriculture should go, the Military would not call him up till January, but that had nothing to do with the Tribunal.—This appellant would be given to December 6th, and it was very doubtful if they would extend that, as they thought it was a case where the man might be replaced.

RUGBY FIRM COMMENDED.

Mr W H Linnell appeared in support of a claim for the exemption of Horace Walter Gilbert (23, single), electrician and wireman, 56 New Street, New Bilton.—He pointed out that the man had only been passed for “ Labour at home.” Before the war they employed about 85 men, and now there were only about 20. This was the only man left in the electrical department, which would have to be closed down if he went.—The Military had appealed against the temporary exemption granted to Mr Linnell, jun, and the Tribunal was informed that he was going into the Army in the following week.—The Chairman : I take it you agree to the Military appeal being upheld ?—Mr Linnell : That it so.—The Chairman : We will give this man to January 1st, as the other has gone. They have done very well, I think.

BIRDINGBURY FARMER’S APPEAL.

Absolute exemption was asked for by Mr Cockerill, of Birdingbury (through Mr Harold Eaden), in respect of his cowman, Wm Bethuel Ingram (30, married).—Given till January 1st.

AN ADDITIONAL REASON.

In appealing on behalf of Capt Henry Boughton-Leigh, R.F.A, Brownsover Hall, for Walter Congreve, estate carpenter, Churchover, Mr Worthington mentioned an additional reason for his exemption. Capt Boughton-Leigh had been requested by the War Office to fell about 50 trees on his Northamptonshire estate, and this work would fall upon Congreve, who was now the only man left, with the exception of an aged gardener.—The Chairman said he thought the army could provide its own tree fellers. The man having been passed for general service, there would be no total exemption in this case.—Given till December 6th, and the Chairman said it was extremely improbable that the time would be extended.

GETTING READY TO JOIN.

“ Please decide my case in my absence, as I am very busy getting ready to join the army,” wrote Frederick Ernest Wm Lowe, grocer, sub-postmaster, etc, 112 Lawford Road, New Bilton. He added : “ As I have rather a large business which I shall have to close down, I cannot waste my time by coming to Coventry.”—The Clerk said appellant only asked for a short time.—The Chairman : Where a man meets as like this, we ought to help him.—Given 21 days.

A NATURALISED HAIRDRESSER.

Temporary exemption to December 1st had been granted by the Local Tribunal to Richard Bruno Meerholz, hairdresser, of 23 High Street, Rugby, who had been passed for labour B, but the Military appealed, Mr Wratislaw stating that there were other hairdressers in Rugby whose businesses had been closed, and who were natural born British subjects, whereas this man was naturalised. In reply to the Chairman, appellant said he had been naturalised eight years.—Given to November 30th, with the intimation that it would not be much use making a further application.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

THURSDAY.—Before T Hunter, Esq.

FAILING TO REPORT HIMSELF.—Percy Douglas Elliott, 80 Bridget Street, Rugby, pleaded not guilty to a charge of being an absentee under the Military Service Act since August 17th.—He called A Corbett, Elliott held a War Service Badge Certificate.—It transpired that defendant left the B.T.H Works on July 26th, and was now employed at the Standard Motor Works, Coventry, but was not yet badged.—The Military representative said defendant offered no explanation why he should not join the Army, and the Magistrate said his proper procedure was to have appealed to the Tribunal. He could only fine him £1, to be deducted from his pay, and hand him over to the Military Authorities.

IN MEMORIAM.

BUSSON.-In loving memory of our dear son, WILLIAM ALFRED BUSSON, who was killed in France on September 26th, 1914 ; aged 31.
“ He gave his life for his country.”

BUSSON.-In loving memory of our dear son, ERNEST CHARLES BUSSON, who was killed in action in France on October 17, 1915 ; aged 23 years.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
—From FATHER, MOTHER, and SISTER.

HAWKINS.—In loving memory of Pte. ALFRED HAWKINS, of Harborough Magna, previously reported wounded and missing, May 10, 1915 ; now reported dead. R.I.P.—“ To live in the hearts of those we leave behind is not to die.”

LANCASTER.-Previously reported to be wounded and missing between May 8 and 11, 1915, now officially presumed to have been killed, Major J. C. LANCASTER, ROYAL Warwickshire Regt., elder son of the late Robert Lancaster, of Allesley, Warwickshire, and of Mrs. R. Lancaster, of The Grange, South Nutfield, Surrey, and grandson of the late John Lancaster, M.P., Bilton Grange, near Rugby.

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7th Oct 1916. Lieut-Colonel West Killed in Action

LIEUT-COLONEL WEST KILLED IN ACTION.

The news, which came to hand on Friday last week that Lieut.-Colonel F C B West, R.F.A, of Bawnmore, Bilton, had been killed in action was received with the deepest regret in Rugby and neighbourhood. The unfortunate event happened on September 29th. While riding, as he had often done before, down a section of road which was much subjected to the enemy’s artillery fire, a shell burst close to him, killing him instantly, and wounding his orderly, Driver Barlow, who had been with him since before Christmas, 1914. Both their horses were killed. Col West was buried in the cemetery in which the remains of Lieut Wyley, Major Brown, and Major Stone, who had been killed only a few days previously, were laid to rest.

When at Baddow, before going out to France, and also for some time afterwards, Col West, Capt Kidd—subsequently promoted Major—and Lieut Wyley were working together on the Head-Quarter Staff. Then they were separated, and it is a sad coincidence that all three of them were killed within a period of ten days in different parts of the line.

Lieut.-Colonel West was the only surviving son of the late Rev C F C West, Fellow of St John’s College, Oxford, and Vicar of Charlbury. He was educated at Cheltenham College & St John’s College, Oxford, where he rowed for his college in 1904 and 1905, both in Torpids and Eights. He took his degree in 1905, and was called to the Bar in 1907, but never practised. On the formation of the Territorial Force he received a commission in the R.F.A, and went to the front with his brigade as commanding officer in March, 1915. He married, in June, 1909. Agatha Mary, elder daughter of William Dewar, of Rugby. He leaves a widow and four daughters, to whom the deepest sympathy is extended.

Lieut-Col West took a very great interest in the Territorial movement, and always preferred to be regarded as a “ Territorial.” He did his utmost to prove that the term was synonomous with proficiency, and, being keen himself on gunnery, he spared no pains to ensure the effectiveness of the officers and men in his command and to explain technical details to them.

He was the first Captain of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, when it was formed some years ago through the instrumentality of Col Mulliner, and was afterwards promoted to Major and transferred to the Coventry Battery. In August, 1914, as Lieut-Colonel, he succeeded Col Mallock to the command of the Brigade.

Polo and hunting were his favourite sports and for a season he acted as master of a pack of hounds in the South of Ireland.

Col West was a member of the Lawrence Sherriff Lodge of Freemasons, and for a time served on the House and Finance Committee of the Hospital of St Cross. He took the greatest interest in the Working Men’s Club at Bilton (of which he was a vice-president), and generously assisted in the provision of the new Club premises a few years ago.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson (Gordon Highlanders), of Rokeby House, Rugby, who was killed in France on July 20th, has left estate of the value of £8,929, the whole of which he gave to his mother, Mrs. Anne Rose Anderson.

SECOND-LIEUT HORACE NEEVES PROMOTED.

Second-Lieut Horace Neeves, of the Northumberland Fusiliers (the Old Fighting 5th), son of Mr and Mrs S Neeves, of Murray Road, Rugby, has been promoted to the rank of captain. The gallant young officer was formerly in the Warwickshire Yeomanry, and took part in the landing at Suvla Bay. On returning home he received a commission with the Northumberland Fusiliers, has been at the front since June, and has seen a lot of fighting.
The second son of Mr and Mrs Neeves is serving with the Australian Light Horse.

INTERNATIONAL O.R KILLED BY A BURSTING SHELL.

The Rev R E Inglis (Rugby and Oxford), whose death occurred, at the age of 53, from shell-burst while tending wounded, was an old English Rugby International. After getting his XI and XV colours at Rugby, he played against Cambridge in 1883 and 1884. He played for England in all three matches of 1886. His club football was identified with that of Blackheath. Mr Inglis was the youngest son of the defender of Lucknow, Major-General Sir John Inglis, and we believe we are correct in stating that his son was the googlie bowler of this year’s Rugby XI. Mr Inglis volunteered to join the Forces as a chaplain, and went to the front in July, 1915. During the time he was at Rugby School as a Town boy, his mother, Lady Inglis, lived at The Lawn, Newbold Road.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

Mr T Reynolds, builder, Dunchurch Road, Rugby, received official intimation on Thursday that another of his soldier sons, Corpl J Reynolds, of the Grenadier Guards, had been seriously wounded and was in Chichester Hospital. Prior to joining the army Corpl Reynolds was in the Metropolitan Police Force, and was expecting early promotion. Mr Reynolds had four sons in the army. Two have been killed and two wounded.

PTE J R BRADLEY.

Pte J R Bradley, of the Northumberland, Fusiliers, who was killed in action on September 1st, was prior to the War employed by the B.T.H Company on the outside construction staff.

PTE H LEE KILLED.

Mrs Lee, of 34 Sandown Road, Rugby, received a letter from Sergt Burton, of Hillmorton, this week, informing her that her son, Pte H Lee, of the R.W.R, was killed in action on September 3rd. The writer said he was in command of the platoon, and saw him struck by a piece of shell in the head, and he died in a very short time. He was a brave and noble soldier, and highly respected by all N.C.O’s and men of his Company, for he always did his duty well, “ and feared nothing.” Deceased was 25 years of age, and before, the war was employed as a labourer in the Test Department. He was in the reserve, and was mobilised at the commencement of the war. He had already been wounded. Mrs Lee has four other sons at the front, two of whom have been wounded, and a son-in-law was killed 12 months ago.

HILLMORTON.

MEMORIAL SERVICE.—On Sunday evening a memorial Service was held in the Parish Church for Reginald Bartlett and Joseph Barnett, who have fallen in France. The Vicar preached an impressive and comforting sermon from St John xiv 27.

Mr J W Barnett, 264 Western Road, Leicester, has received official information that her husband, Pte J W Barnett, Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment, was killed in action on September 11th. Deceased was the second son of Mr and Mrs J Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox. He was 27 years of age, was called up in February, and sent to France early in July. Prior to his enlistment he was employed by the Leicester Tramway Company.

CHURCHOVER.

KILLED IN ACTION.—Quite a gloom was cast over this village on Friday when it was known that Pte Frank Sutton, of the Grenadier Guards was killed in action on September 15th. Frank was liked and respected by all who knew him. He was working in Coton House gardens when he answered his country’s call. Mrs Sutton’s three sons have all joined the colours, and the deepest sympathy of the parish is extended to her in the great loss that she has sustained. A memorial service was held in the church an Saturday by. the Rev L J Berrington. All the parish was represented. The xe Psalm and Hymns 536 and 537 were sung, and the service was very impressive.

DUNCHURCH.

On Sunday, Sept 10, the collections at both Dunchurch and Thurlaston Churches were devoted to the Lord Kitchener National Memorial Fund. The satisfactory sum of £32 7s 6d was sent up to headquarters.

Sergt W J Constable, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mrs John Constable, late of Dunchurch, has gained the Military Medal for bravery.—Private Fissard, of the R.E, who has been home on sick leave, has gone to Bletchley to a rest camp for three months.

The Dunchurch Girls’ and Infants’ School have sent £2 to St Dunstan’s Hostel for Blind Soldiers, £2 to the Jack Cornwell Ward in the Star and Garter Home, £1 to Bilton Red Cross Hospital, and 11s to Mrs Neilsen for egg fund. The money was the proceeds of the entertainment held in the spring, and also includes contributions by the children for the Jack Cornwell Memorial Fund during the month.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

News has been received by Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, that their youngest son, Percy, was wounded in action at the Battle of Thievpal. He received shrapnel wounds in both arms and hands. He is going on well in hospital in Cambridge. This is the second son wounded in action.

WEARING NAVAL UNIFORM WITHOUT AUTHORITY.

Claude Henry Hammond, aged 21, formerly of New Bilton, and of Rugby, charged at Lancaster with giving false information to Morecambe boarding-house keepers and wearing a naval uniform at Morecambe without authority, was committed for six months. Accused stayed at three places in Morecambe, and registered in false names. He described himself as a graduate of Pembroke College, Cambridge, and gave the name of a relative at Nottingham. All the statements were false. He was a deserter, and was wanted at Sheffield and Blackpool for false pretences.

DEATHS.

BARNETT.—Killed in action, September 11th, 1916, Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399, Queen’s London Regiment, second son of Mr. & Mrs. J. Barnett, Rossmount, Hillmorton Paddox.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again ;
Here life to us without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could we have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard
For us who loved you well.”
—From his sorrowing WIFE, FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

GREEN.—On September 7th, RFN. FREDERICK JOHN GREEN, King’s Royal Rifles, died of wounds in France, the dear son of Frederick and the late Louisa Greenfield Green, of 4 Gladstone Street, New Bilton, aged 25.—Sadly mourned by his Father, Brothers, Sisters, and Minnie.

WARD.—On September 3rd, Rifleman C. WARD, 10th Rifle Brigade, second son of Thomas and Mary Ward, of Brandon. Killed in action in France.
“ We often sit and think of him,
And tenderly breathe his name ;
Nothing left for us to look at
But his photo in the frame.
Some day our eyes shall see
That dear face still kept in memory.”

IN MEMORIAM.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of Pte. Frederick Frankton, Grenadier Guards, of Lawford Road, Rugby, killed on 27th September, 1915, at Loos.
“ Could we have raised his dying head,
Or heard his last farewell ;
The grief would not have been so hard,
For us who loved him well.
A light is from the household gone,
The voice we loved is still’d.
A vacant place is in our home,
Which never can be filled.”
—From his loving Wife, Children, and Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds.

RUSSELL.—In loving memory of Gunner PERCY EDGAR RUSSELL, R.F.A., who was killed in action, October 3, 1915.—“ He gave his life that others may live.”— Never forgotten by FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

5th Aug 1916. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps, Swearing-in Ceremony

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

SWEARING-IN CEREMONY.

An interesting ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, chairman of the Urban District Council, at the Benn Buildings, on Saturday afternoon, when eighty-seven members of the Rugby Company of the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment were sworn in as soldiers under the new regulations. The proceedings took place in the Assembly Room, and the Chairman was supported on the platform by Lieut-Col Johnstone, Major Glover, Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, S B Robbins, R W Barnsdale, T M Wratislaw, H N Sporborg, T Hunter, and F M Davenport. The company, under the command of Mr C H Fuller (Commandant) and Mr L G Haigh, fell in at the Drill Hall, Park Road, and marched to the Benn Buildings.

The Chairman said, in the first place, he wanted on behalf of the Council and of the town, to give them a very hearty welcome. He thought they would all agree that it was most appropriate that that most important ceremony, which was the administering of the oath to a civic force, should take place in the building which was the centre of the management of the town. He had received apologies for absence from Lieut-Col Hood, Col Lewis, Hon E Parker, Brigadier-General Little, Mr A James, and Mr W L Larke. He would now ask them a short question, to which he wished them to answer “ Yes.” It was : “ Do you fully understand all the questions put to you on the official form of enrolment ? ” The men answered “ Yes ” ; whereupon Mr McKinnell requested them to take their hats off and to answer a longer question, which was in effect the declaration : “ Do you solemnly declare that the answers made by you to the questions set out on page 1 of the form of enrolment are true, and that you are willing, to be enrolled as members of the Volunteer Force of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment under the conditions laid down by the Army Council under the regulations for the Volunteer Force framed by them in accordance with the Statute Law relating to that Force ?” An affirmative answer was made, whereupon the Chairman administered the oath as under :-

“ I (–—) do sincerely promise and swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his Majesty King George V, and that I will faithfully serve his Majesty in Great Britain for the defence of the same against all his enemies and opposers whatsoever, according to the conditions of my service.”

This ceremony over, the Chairman said they were now soldiers, and he was proud to be the first one to congratulate them on behalf of their fellow-citizens. They had joined a very gallant and very noble army. The Volunteers had been unrecognised for months and months past, and at last the Government had thought well to take some notice of them, and to allow that, after all, they might possibly be of some use. Personally, he thought that a great mistake was made right at the very beginning in the nervousness and apprehensiveness of the War Office, who feared that if this Force was made too much of recruiting would suffer. He believed that the contrary would have been the effect. They honoured the Volunteers for plugging away (applause). Despite a great deal of very cheap wit on the subject of their age, despite the Government lukewarmness, and despite thousand and one more hindrances, they had gone steadily on making themselves efficient. He had heard what they had been doing, and he believed they put in a great deal of hard work, and he was sure there was not one among them who was not very glad he had done that hard work.

This question of the Volunteer movement was a very deep and vital one, because the men could, when they were fairly well trained, if the need arose, as it might possibly now arise, take the places of members of the Regular Forces, who would then be able to go and fight in France, Flanders, and elsewhere. In all probability things would get very critical before they had won the War. They were going to win, but it might be a bit of a squeeze, and heaven knew what was going to happen to anyone of them during the next twelve months.

Addressing those who had been ordered by the Tribunal, as a condition of exemption, to join that body, the Chairman said they must not think they were different from any other member of that Force. They were honoured just as much as the others. Those on the Tribunal knew, but others did not, all the reasons which stopped them from joining in the past ; and therefore, he did want to impress upon them that there was no distinction between them and other members of the Force (applause). This Force could do a most extraordinary good work in training those men who might have to be sent for soldiers, and who would then be three-parts trained when they went up. The oath they had taken only bound them to fight the enemy in the case of invasion of this country ; and this recognition by the Government ought to put a new life into their ranks. That swearing-in ceremony ought to be the starting point of fresh vigour both in men and efficiency. There ought to be a lot more men in their ranks, not only men of over military age, but the young men of 17 and 18 years who were employed in the town, and he earnestly hoped they would have a large influx of recruits in the near future.

Now they were enrolled as soldiers they must have some sort of uniform, arms, and equipment, and he understood they had certain sums in hand. However he would appeal to the public to support their funds with rather more liberality than they had done in the past. He was told they wanted £600. He hoped they would get it ; he thought they would, because they certainly ought to. They were extremely lucky to have such extraordinarily zealous and efficient officers, who worked very hard and also knew their job, and there was no man whom he would rather see as Commandant than Mr C H Fuller.

Major Glover said he hoped the enthusiasm that had been shown that day would not be allowed to evaporate ; but that they would induce others to follow their example. He thought that in a town of the size of Rugby there should be a large number of eligible men who could come forward. He was now Acting Commandant and Regimental and Battalion Adjutant ; and with regard to the first position, he was acting as a warming-pan for Col Johnstone, who, he knew, had received an invitation from the proper authorities to accept that post. He hoped Col Johnstone would accept that post, and then he (the speaker) would step back into the position that he could fill with greater credit to himself-that of Adjutant to the Battalion. In conclusion, he urged them to form a detachment of 250 in the town, so that they could have a company of their own. Hitherto they had been connected with Southam and Harbury, but it was now proposed to get these detachments affiliated to another corps.

Mr C H Fuller, on behalf of the Company, expressed thanks to the Chairman for the part he had played in that day’s ceremony, and to the other gentlemen who had attended. Their requirements could be expressed in two words, “ men ” and “ money.” He understood that men disqualified from service in the Army, who had to remain at home, had great difficulties to contend with, but they must have a certain amount of spare time, and he felt that in the crisis they were now in it was their duty to spend part of that spare time by joining their Corps. They must remember the men at the Front-that vast number that had given up money and everything. They must remember, also, that vast number who would never return, and that probably those present would live to see the final victory and to enjoy the triumphal peace. They had been given clearly to understand that they must not look upon the question of invasion as impossible even now ; and, therefore, it seemed to him that it behoved every man to do what he could to prepare himself for that event. It would very much strengthen their position ; and he hoped it could come about, if they could form a company of their own. He would ask each of them within the next fortnight to get one man who for some reason was unable to join the Regular Forces to join their Corps. There object would then be attained as regarded numbers ; and with regard to funds, he thought they could rely on the public to assist them if they showed they were willing to assist themselves, but could not do so to the full extent required. Eighty-seven men had taken the oath that day, and forms had been completed for 155 men to enrol who for various reasons were unable to be present. There had been a lamentable amount of apathy in that neighbourhood with regard to the Corps, more than in other places. Those eligible people who said the Force was not wanted were seeking an excuse for not joining, and he begged of everyone who was able to do his bit in this position-and it was a serious position they found themselves in—to do his best and join them and prepare to be ready. If they did that no man who was disqualified for active service would have anything to regret at the end of the War. To those who were preparing themselves he would commend as a motto the well-known lines :—

“ He also serves who only stands and waits.

Lieut-Col Johnstone then addressed the detachment, and said it was a great regret to him that, shortly after raising the second Battalion, he had to give up the command because of the other duties which were placed upon him. He had now been asked to take over the command of it again. After considering the matter, he really found that his duties were so heavy at the present time that, although he took the greatest interest in them, he felt he could not do justice to them. But he was going to his best. He accepted it (applause), and he would be glad to be with them again. all he asked was that they would put their backs into it, because if he found any slackers he would not want them. He wanted men who were going to try to do their work and to become soldiers in earnest. They did not know when they would be required. They might be required at any moment, and they must fit themselves for that moment. He thanked them for the kind manner in which they had received his return to the Company (loud applause).

The Chairman : Col Johnstone must be gratified by the way his return has been received.

Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut B B Salmon, Manchester Regiment, killed, was in the football XV at Rugby School.

The numerous friends of Pte W T Satchell (Kilsby) of the Royal Warwicks, will be sorry to hear that he is lying seriously ill in the Canadian Hospital, near Maidenhead. There are every prospects of a final recovery, but it will be a long time before he regains health and strength completely.

SECOND-LIEUT F HUNTER HAS NARROW ESCAPES.

The name of Second-Lieut F Hunter, of the Gordon Highlanders, son of Mr T Hunter, J.P, Elmhurst, Hillmorton Road, appeared in the list of officers suffering from shell shock. The losses of the Battalion were heavy, and Second-Lieut Hunter had a remarkably narrow escape. A shell dropped at his feet and burst outwards, killing the men on either side of him and blowing him for some yards, but happily he was not touched by any of the fragments. He lost the use of his legs through shell shock, and was brought to London, and afterwards sent home to Rugby. Two days before this Second-Lieut Hunter had another narrow escape. He was standing talking to another officer, when they were espied by a German sniper, who shot the officer dead. Mr Hunter stooped to pick his friend up, and a bullet, evidently intended for him, passed through his pack, smashing his hair brush, &c.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following young mm connected with the Rugby Baptist Church have been wounded in the great offensive : Will Spaggett (Manchester), Frank Burberry (Netley), Percy Harris (Rawtenstall), Bob Mayes (Leeds), and Corpl Horly (Birmingham).

Pte George Clarke, E Co, R.W.R, has written to his parents, who live at 98 Avenue Road, New Bilton, informing them that he is now in hospital suffering from a bullet wound in the left thigh. He adds that the bullet has not yet been extracted, but that he is going on well.

Mrs Rixom, 108 Claremont Road, has received intimation in letters from the War Office and Major C P Nickalls that her son. Bombardier F W Rixom, Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded at the back of the head, with shrapnel on July 29th. He is now in St George’s Hospital, Stockport, and is progressing favourably. This is the second time Bombardier Rixom has been wounded.

Rifleman H G King, of 16 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was wounded by shrapnel in the foot on June 26th, as reported in this paper three weeks ago, and was in hospital in France, has had his leg amputated below the knee, the bones being smashed and also poisoned. He is now in hospital at Liverpool, where he has been visited by his friends, who found him going on very well indeed.

TWO B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News was received at the B.T.H this week that Pte Arthur Hipwell, Leicestershire Regiment, son of Mr Arthur Hipwell, of Catthorpe, and Corpl Richards, of the R.W.R, have been killed during the recent fighting. Before the War Pte Hipwell was employed in the Turbine Department, and Corpl Richards was a draughtsman in the Drawing Office for several years.

CAPT C E ANDERSON.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson, the Gordon Highlanders, who was killed in action on July 21st, was the second son of the late William Henry Anderson and Mrs Anderson, of Rokeby House, rugby. He was born in December, 1890, and entered the Gordon Highlanders from Sandhurst in October, 1910, getting his first step in promotion in June, 1912, and his captaincy in April, 1915. He was wounded at the first battle of Ypres in October, 1914, and again slightly on July 14th last, but remained on duty, and was killed by a shell on the early morning of July 21st. Captain Anderson was a keen follower to hounds, and when on leave hunted with the Atherstone and North Warwickshire Hounds.
[Captain Anderson is listed on the Rugby Memorial Gates. His biography will be published at a later date]

SERGT J GILBERT, of BILTON.

Another respected member of the Warwickshire Territorials, Sergt John Gilbert, eldest son of Mr T Gilbert, of Bilton, died from wounds in a Brighton hospital on Tuesday. Sergt Gilbert, who was 32 years of age, was wounded while engaged with a Trench mortar battery on or about July 20th ; and in order, probably, to avoid causing alarm to his wife, who only a fortnight ago gave birth to a child, he wrote home minimising his injuries. On July 26th he was brought to England, and sent to a hospital at Brighton. Unfortunately blood poisoning set in, and developed so rapidly that Sergt Gilbert died before his relatives, who had been summoned by telegraph, could reach the hospital. Before the War he was employed by Messrs Hands, china dealers, Sheep Street. He was a member of the Bilton Working Men’s Club and the Bilton Brass Band. He leaves a wife and four children, to whom, and also his parents, much sympathy is extended in their sad loss.

The interment took place at the Parish Church, Bilton, on Thursday afternoon, the remains having been brought from Brighton on the preceding day. A large number of parishioners assembled at the church to show respect to the deceased and his family ; and although it was not possible to arrange for a military funeral, the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital supplied, as far as they could, the honours due to a departed comrade. A detachment of about 35 preceded the cortege from deceased’s former home at Bilton Hill. They lined the path to the church, and additional pathos was imparted to the scene when each one saluted, as well as wounds would permit, the coffin, covered with a Union Jack and the cap, tunic, and belt of the deceased, as it passed by. The Burial Service was read by the Rector, the Rev W O Assheton, R.D. Among those who assembled in the church and at the grave-side were : Mr T A Wise, J.P, Mrs West (Bawnmore, Mrs W Barnett, Mrs Assheton, Mrs F E Hands and Mr J Lee (Rugby), Miss Wilson (Bournemouth), Messrs G Wilson and W Wilson, Mr and Mrs F Betts and Mrs Elsom, Mrs Yates, Mr and Mrs H Freeman. Mrs E Smith, Mr and Mrs Manning, Messrs H J Hughes (representing the Working Men’s Club), G Evans, J Cripps, sen, G Birch, J Burton, and others. A number of beautiful floral tributes were sent by relatives and friends, including the members of the Working Men’s Club ; Mr Bedford’ ; Brass Band, of which deceased was formerly a member ; the Bilton Brass Band ; and the wounded soldiers who had collected flowers and made up a handsome cross, upon which they placed the inscription, “ From Wounded Comrades at Bilton Hall.”

DEATH.

HAYES.—On July 19th (killed in action). Signaller Frank Hinde Hayes, aged 19 years, youngest son of Mrs. Hayes, 86 York Street, Rugby.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried.
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”

BOUCHER.—On the 25th July, in hospital, of wounds received in action on 14th July, Captain Alan Estaeurt Boacher, Leicestershire Regiment, dearly loved younger surviving son of the Rev. Canon and Mrs. Boucher, of Frolesworth Rectory, Lutterworth, aged 21.

DICKEN.—July 20th, died of wounds in France, Lance-Corporal Signaller Sidney Harold Dicken, youngest dearly loved son of St. and Mrs. W. Dicken, Claremont Road, Rugby. Aged 22 years. Deeply mourned.

GILBERT.—Died from wounds received in France, Sergt. John T. Gilbert, the beloved Husband of Edie Gilbert, and eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Gilbert, Bilton. Aged 32 years.

HIPWELL.—On July 23, 1916, Pte. John Henry Hipwell, No. 10,816, 6th Leicester Regt. (died of wounds), eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hipwell, of Lilbourne, aged 23 years.
“ He gravely answered duty’s call,
His-life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his loving father, mother, sister, & brother.

SMITH.—Killed in action on July 22nd, 1916, Eric-Arthur Rae Smith, Second Lieutenant, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged twenty-seven years. Youngest son of Arthur E. Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, Middlesex, and late of Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

WHITE.—On the 19th or 20th July, killed in action, Sergt. W. H. White, 2nd 7th Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged 19. Dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. George White, of Dunchurch.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France, July 3, 1916, William Samuel, second son of Thomas and Many Sophie White, of 46 Manor Road, Rugby and grandson of the late Thomas Clarke, of Glencoonera, Irviaestown, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland, who was for 31 years, a well-known member of the Royal Irish Constabulary.
“ No useless coffin endowed his breast,
Nor in sheet nor in shroud they wound him ;
But he lies like a warrior taking his rest,
With no martial cloak around him.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ARIS.—In loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl Mark Aris, killed in action August 6, 1915.
“ Some day we hope to meet him ;
We know not when.
We shall clasp his hands in the Betterland,
Never to part again.”
—Ever in thoughts of his loving SISTERS & BROTHERS, (SID in France).

HOLLIS(Frankton).—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother “ Bert,” who was killed in action at the Battle of Chunuk Bair, August 10, 1915—Sadly missed.
“ For still for him high service waits,
Tho’ earth’s last fight is fought;
God did not give that martial soul
To end at last in nought
That stedfast soldier-heart was not
For this brief life alone;
‘Tis as a soldier he will stand
Before the Great White Throne.”

WOODWARD.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. A. Woodward, 7th S. Stafford Regiment, killed in action at Chocolate Hill, Gallipoli, August 7th, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all,
But the unknown grave it the bitterest blow ;
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving wife ; also father and mother.

15th Jul 1916. New Red Cross Hospital at Bilton Hall

NEW RED CROSS HOSPITAL AT BILTON HALL.

Bilton Hall, which has been fully prepared and equipped by Mrs E D Miller, Vice-President of the Rugby District Division, was opened as a Red Cross Hospital on Friday in last Week. Mr Walter Barnett has very kindly lent the house, and the British Red Cross Society have laid on gas and water, and have provided the fittings and equipment necessary for the proper uses of a hospital from subscriptions collected by Mrs F D Miller in the Rugby District Division.

There are eight wards, and fifty patients can be accommodated at one time. The hospital differs from the majority of V.A.D Hospitals in one important respect, and that is that a modem and extremely well-equipped operating theatre has been provided.

Mrs G K Ansell has been appointed Commandant of this hospital, and Dunchurch V.A.D. (Warwick 64) and Hillmorton V.A.D. (Warwick 62) are the detachments on duty. Owing to the Quartermaster of Dunchurch (Warwick 64) being unable to undertake her duties, Mrs Barnett has been appointed Quartermaster of the building. The medical officers are : Dr B Relton and Dr H E Powell. Mrs Bannister has been appointed Sister-in-charge by the British Red Cross Society, and the night sister is Mrs Maghoney.

It is interesting to note that the patients at the Hospital come directly from France, and are not convalescents. On Friday 27 men, who had taken part in the great battle, arrived, and on Saturday this number was increased to 48.

Gifts of eggs, fruit, butter, vegetables, groceries, magazines, and newspapers will be gratefully received at the Hospital.

We are informed by Mrs E D Miller that the other two hospitals in her district—Newnham Paddox and Pailton House—are full, and that the former now has 43 patients.

Forty of the soldiers at Bilton Hall have been invited to the Garden Fete at Stretton-on-Dunsmore, advertised in another column, on Tuesday next.

The Rugby Town V.A.D. Hospital, “ Te Hira.”—

Our thanks are due to the following kind friends for gifts and donations during the past two weeks :—Mrs David, the Swinford Congregational Church, Bourton Parish, Mrs Liddington, Mr Bayes, Mrs Livingston, Mrs Hall, Miss Walton, Mrs Chandler, the children of Cambridge Street School, Church Lawford and Kings Newnham, Miss Holiday, Mrs Hopps, Mrs Richards, St Peter’s Working Party, Mrs Hensman, Mr Fisher, Mrs Burdekin, Miss Manley. Mrs Goodacre, Miss Smart, Mrs Bluemel, Mrs Barnwell, and Mrs James.

The following laundresses have offered their services free of charge, and we take this opportunity of thanking them :—Mrs Tite, Mrs Lambourne, Mrs Wilson, Mrs Cleaver, Mrs Thanlin, and Mrs Stibbard.

We are most grateful to Mr van den Arend, Mrs Thompson, Miss Campbell, and Mr Simmonds for the instant loan of their cars, and to the members of St John’s Ambulance Brigade and the Boy Scouts for their usual kind assistance in many ways.

(Signed) DOROTHEA WHARTON (Quartermaster).

BANK HOLIDAY POSTPONED.

The Government has decided that it is essential in the national interest that there shall not be any holiday, either general or local, until such subsequent date as may be announced.

There most be no slackening of output (munitions) even for a moment.

July 16 to 22.

This is War Savings Week.

How will you help ?

THE object of the National War Savings Week is to fix the attention of all classes on the supreme needs of the Nation in the present crisis of the War, and on the fact that these needs can be met only through the most rigid self-denial on the part of all.

In view of the great sacrifices that are being made by our Sailor and Soldiers, every patriotic person should do something definite in the way of saving labour or money to help to win the War.

How to save labour.

In particular, wherever possible, every man and woman should; for the duration of the War, limit their consumption of goods and their use of labour to bare necessities. When you save you help our Sailors and Soldiers to win the War. When you spend on things you do not need you help the Germans, because when you spend you make other people work for you, and the work of everyone is wanted now to help our fighting men, or to produce necessaries or to make goods for export.

Everybody can help.

For instance—

(1) Cut down your meat bills.
(2) Reduce the amount of coal, electric light and gas you use.
(3) Do not ask the shopkeeper to deliver small parcels—carry them home yourself.
(4) Give a regular order for your newspapers instead of buying them haphazard, and thus save waste of paper and labour.
(5) Do not buy any article unless you absolutely need it.

Every little helps, and if everyone will economise wherever and whenever possible much will be done.

Save money also.

During this week also every man, woman or child in the country should start to do something definite in the way of lending their money to their country.

By Saturday everyone should be able to show some definite proof of what he or she has lent to help to win the War.

What will you have to show ?

How to form a War Savings Association.

During this week it is hoped that every church, office, shop, factory, school, village, ward of a town, and club will start a War Savings Association. Even ten or twelve men and women are not too few. These Associations are for the purpose of enabling the members to save small weekly sums for the purchase of £1 for 15/6 War Savings Certificates.

Certificates bought at the Post Office by individuals earn interest at the rate of £5/4/7 per cent. Certificates bought through Associations may earn as much as £6 per cent.

Members of an Association are given special facilities of various kinds, and the National War Savings Committee or the Committee in your district will supply free of cost the rules for such societies, deposit books for members, all forms and account books needed for working the scheme, and a supply of leaflets, etc., for securing members.

Everyone who is willing to back up the fighting men by starting an Association should send this form at once.

POST THIS FORM TO-DAY.

—————————————-

To the Secretary, National War Savings Committee,
18, Abingdon Street, London, S.W.

Please send me free of charge full details of how to form a War Savings Association.

Name

(Send this form or a postcard mentioning this paper.)

Occupation……….

Address………….

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

An officer was admitted to the Hospital of St Cross on Thursday evening with serious injuries sustained in an aeroplane accident.

We understand that the Rugby Howitzer Battery has been busily engaged of late, but that the men are in good health and spirits. Several have, however, been wounded.

Capt R Hopewell, of the 2/7th Worcesters, has been wounded in the shoulder and legs. Capt Hopewell (whose only brother was seriously wounded in Gallipoli) is the elder son of Mr E W Hopewell, formerly of Rugby and for many years headmaster of Hartlebury Grammar School. He was a schoolmaster up till the outbreak of the War, when he obtained a commission in the Worcesters.

Mrs W H Manning, of 1 Newland Street, New Bilton, has received news that her husband, a private in the R.A.M.C, was wounded by shrapnel on July 1st. Pte Manning was carrying in wounded at the time, and was the first member of his detachment to be hit. He is wounded in both legs above the knees, in the right arm and hand, and in the right eye. He has been at the front twelve months, and has had many narrow escapes. At present he is in a hospital in England. Pte Manning is an old member of E Company, and his parents live at 2 Dale Street, Rugby.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

Captain Arnold L Thackhall Browett, Warwickshire Regiment, who has been killed in action, was the only surviving child of Mr and Mrs Thackhall Browett, of Corley, near Coventry. He was an officer in the old[?] 7th Battalion Warwicks, and re-joined in December, 1914. While in England he did good work in training young troops, and left for the front a few months ago. Captain Browett was a solicitor, a member of the firm of Messrs Browetts, Coventry. He was educated at Rugby, and married a daughter of the late Mr C [?] Barton, of Coventry. He leaves two children.

Mr J Watson, Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has received official intimation that his son, Pte Jim Watson, 1/7th Warwick Regiment, had been killed in action on July 2nd. Before the war he was employed at the Rugby Gas Works.

News was received at the B.T.H this week that Second-Lieut G H Foss, of the Border Regiment, has been killed in the recent heavy fighting. Lieut Foss, whose home is at Leamington, enlisted as a private in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry at the commencement of the War, and was subsequently granted a commission and posted to the Border Regiment. He was at the outbreak of war a special apprentice in the Millwrights’ Department at the B.T.H, and was very popular with his colleagues.

News was received on Thursday that Douglas Gould (Worcester Regiment), formerly employed at the Cambridge Street Stores of the Rugby Co-operative Society, has died of wounds received in the advance on July 3rd. His home is at Lutterworth.

BILTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Another Bilton soldier, Lance-Corpl F Facer, who joined the K.R.R in the first month of the War, has been killed. He had been wounded, and was in England some months till convalescent, when he returned to France, and was almost at once sent up to the firing line. His wife has received a letter from the Platoon Sergeant, stating that Lance-Corpl Facer was killed instantly by a bomb on Sunday, July 2nd, while bravely doing his duty, much to the regret of his comrades, by whom he was much liked. He was buried in a British cemetery behind the lines. He was one of the most popular young men in Bilton, especially among members of the Football Club, of which he was captain, and was the best left half they ever had. He was light-hearted, generous, and forgiving, and his loss is regretted by many outside family circle.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

Sapper E W Paget & Sergt T Cox have been home on leave for a few days. Mrs Tarr has received news that her husband, Pte C Tarr, has been wounded.

On Tuesday Mrs Seeney received the sad news that her son, Signaller William Seeney, had been killed in France. He was a bright, promising young soldier, and had been at the front since last summer. Mrs Seeney has received comforting letters from his officers and friends, who all speak very highly of him both as regards his work and his friendship to his comrades. Much sympathy is felt for Mrs Seeney and family.

THURLASTON.

The news came to Thurlaston on Wednesday morning to say that Pte W Sweeney, of the R.W.R, was killed. He was the youngest soldier belonging to Thurlaston, and was much liked in the place.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

ROWLAND EVETTS KILLED.—On Friday morning, 7th inst, news was received from the War Office of the death of Rowland Evetts, Royal Warwicks, aged 20, the first of our Derby recruits. He enlisted early in the New Year, and left the village on January 20th. He returned every inch a soldier early in May for a short furlough, and sailed for France on May 12th. His death took place on June 26th. As previously reported, his father Lance-Corpl A T Evetts, was killed while serving with the Indian Expeditionary Force on April 5th last. Great sympathy is expressed with Mrs Evetts and family in their terrible double bereavement.

STOCKTON.

This week Mr and Mrs J Carter have received official notification from the War Office that their eldest son, Harold, was killed in action on the 1st inst, being shot through the head. The Lieutenant, in a letter to the parents, spoke very highly of the bravery of Harold Carter, who was his orderly. Harry Warner, eldest son of Mr and Mrs C Warner, was wounded and is now lying in hospital at Pendleton.

ABSENTEES

LIST OF ABSENTEES FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE FIRST MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1916.

The following are their last-known addresses :—

  1. PICKLES, Railway Hotel, Rugby, age 28.
  2. SMITH, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 29.
  3. HEWITT, “ Zotha House,” Park Road, Rugby, age 30.
  4. W. WALKER, 37 Wood Street, Rugby, age 30.
  5. OWEN, 6 Drury Lane, Rugby, age 36.
  6. ROSS, Spring Hill, Rugby, age 18.
  7. JACKSON, White Lion, Warwick Street, Rugby, age 38.
  8. FRANCIS [or HEENEY], 186 Murray Road Rugby, age 39.
  9. W. ELLERTON, Bridget Street, New Bilton, age 24.
  10. E. CAPEWELL, Wharf Farm, Hillmorton, age 34.
  11. COOPER, Radford, age 39.
  12. FIELD, Mount Pleasant, Stockton, age 27.
  13. OLIVER, Radford Semele, age 31.

LIST OF ABSENTEES FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM.

The following are their last-known addresses :—

H. E. TREECE, 17 Boughton Road, Brownsover age 26, married.

It must be clearly understood that Lists of Absentees are compiled after every endeavour has been made to trace the missing men, both by the Military Authorities and the Police who furnish a written report on each individual case.

Under these circumstances any mistakes made are owing to the default either of the employers or men concerned or their relatives, who have failed to notify the change of address as required by the National Registration Act.

The Public are invited to give all the assistance in their power to the Military Authorities by giving any INFORMATION in their possession which they consider would assist in the tracing of these absentees.

The Information should be given or sent to the,

RECRUITING OFFICER, DRILL HALL, RUGBY.

The names of all giving information will be regarded as strictly confidential.
F. F. JOHNSTONE, LIEUT.-COLONEL,
Recruiting Officer.
June 22nd, 1916.

AN ABSENTEE.—Pte Alfred Smith, of Princethorpe, pleaded guilty to being an absentee from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, before A E Donkin, Esq, at Rugby Police Court, on Thursday, and was remanded to await an escort.

THE INTERNMENT OF GERMAN SYMPATHISERS. THE OPINION OF THE RUGBY ADVISORY COMMITTEE.

The following resolution, passed by the Rugby Military Advisory Committee, has been forwarded to the Prime Minister :—

“ That the Rugby Military Advisory Committee considers the time has now arrived when the Government should take immediate steps to intern all naturalised and un-naturalised German sympathisers, especially now that the tradesmen of the town are having to close down their businesses, and so leave these people to capture their trades.

DEATHS.

FACER.—Killed in action, Lance-Corpl. F. Facer, K.R.R., Old Bilton (in France), July 2, 1916, aged 23.
“ We loved him—oh ! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well;
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldier’s grave.”
— Deeply mourned by his loving WIFE and BABY, FATHER, MOTHER, SISTERS, BROTHERS.

SAPTE.—Killed in action, on the 2nd July, Captain Anthony Sapte, Middlesex Regiment, beloved elder son of Fitzroy and Edith Sapte, of 21 Crediton Hill, N.W., and grandson of the late Captain William Sapte, of Rugby, aged 19 years.

WATSON.—In loving remembrance of Arthur James Watson (Jim), killed in action at France, July 2, 1916 ; age 19.
“ He sleeps not in his native land ;
But under foreign skies ;
Far from those that loved him best,
But in a hero’s grave he lies.”
—FROM FATHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

IN MEMORIAM..

BARNWELL.—In loving memory of our dearly beloved son and brother, Lance-Corpl. George T. Barnwell, died of wounds in France, July 15, 1915.
“ Dearly loved in life, deeply mourned in death.”
—From his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

BARNWELL.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. George T. Barnwell, who died in France, July 15,1915.
“ No lips need speak where the heart mourns sincerely.”

RUGBY SCHOOL FARMING SQUADS.

These have to be discontinued after to-day July 15, as the School will be busy with military training and summer examinations.

23rd Oct 1915. Local Territorials do Good Work

LOCAL TERRITORIALS DO GOOD WORK.

Lance-Corporal W J Boyes, of “C” Company, 1/7 Royal Warwickshire (Territorials), writes to the editor :-

DEAR SIR,

Just a few lines to your paper to let the people of Rugby know our battalion is still going strong out here. In the recent heavy fighting we were in the first line trenches. We did not know until the last moment that the advance was to take place all along the line. Our artillery was busy, and the Rugby Howitzer Battery was well to the front with some deadly firing. For days the roar of heavy high explosives were heard, and there was hardly a moment’s silence. For the first time since we have been out here our trench mortars have been used with great success, and altogether we helped to secure what we fully believe to be the first fruits of a crushing victory. We experienced some bad luck the other night, as the Germans sent over some aerial torpedoes, which unfortunately caused some casualties, but only one of these was a Rugby man.

We have just seen a squadron of our aeroplanes pass over the German lines. It was a grand sight to witness the bursting of shells from the enemy anti-aircraft guns, hut not one of our aeroplanes was hit, although there must have been at least twenty of them passing over the German lines.

Everyone is cheerful and confident, and I know when we get orders to drive the Germans back the Warwicks will be ready.

The weather is very rough just now, and there is every prospect of a severe winter.

I know the people of Rugby will not be behind-hand in sending out a few comforts, and the boys are grateful for what they have already done for us. Hoping this will be interesting to the readers of your paper.

Lance-Corpl Boyes has two brothers also serving—one in the Berkshires and the other in the Oxford and Bucks.

THANKS FROM COVENTRY TERRITORIALS.

Pte J Gayton, 2495, “C” Co, 1/7th Royal Warwicks, writes on October 16th as follows :—

“ Dear Sir,— Please spare me a small space in your paper to thank the people of Rugby who so kindly sent out a consignment of cakes to ‘C’ Co of the l/7th R.W.R. I am a Coventry youth myself, and there are a lot more from there in the above Company and the Rugby boys who are with us very kindly shared the cakes with us. They were a treat—absolutely a luxury for us—and I can assure you and all the good people concerned that we fellows from Coventry will never forget the great kindness shown by the people and the Rugby boys here who shared with us. The day will come, I hope, when we can fully repay them.

Well, I am pleased to say our Company are all keeping well and as cheerful as can be expected ; and, of course, all are looking forward to the end and victory. When the time comes I am certain our fellows will be there, and they will give a good account of themselves. We are out of the trenches at present, but close up to the firing line in case we are wanted. Again thanking the good people of Rugby for their kindness shown,— I am, yours respectfully, (Pte) J GAYTON.”

CAKES FOR THE SOLDIERS.

A number of the recipients of cakes from the recent competition have sent acknowlegments. All of them express much pleasure and make it known, if in different words, that they are ready to face anything for us, and that the feeling that they are in the home people’s thoughts gives them much greater heart.

Messrs McDougall, Ltd, London, also write thanking all tradesmen and others who helped to make their competition successful. The helpers and receivers also wish to add thanks.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, who is now at the front in France, has been appointed surgeon to the 24th London Regiment (The Queen’s).

Mr B Whitbread, only son of Mr Charles Whitbread, and Mr Eddy Wilson, youngest son of Mrs E Wilson, have been gazetted to commissions in the 12th Reserve R.W.R.

Two more members of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Association, Mr J Holmes, Advertiser Office, and Mr C Wharton, of Mr Bird’s printing works, enlisted in the R.A.M.C this week.

Sergt D Hamilton, 1st K.0.S.B, who was billeted with Mr and Mrs Haggar, 7 Sycamore Grove, has been recommended for the D.C.M for organising a sniping party which effectively kept back the Turks near Krithia while the British line was being consolidated. He is a native of Clyde Bank, and has been in the Army six years.

The Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee have received the handsome donation of 18gns, the result of a sale of surplus furniture held recently at Te Hira.

Mr Gilbert (Bert) Howkins, son of Mr G F Howkins, of Crick, has obtained a commission in the Royal Engineers. Previous to joining the Army he was in the Government Valuation Department. All three of Mr Howkins’ sons are now serving with H.M Forces, the others being in the Honourable Artillery Company and the Northamptonshire Yeomanry respectively.

Rifleman A Sansom, of 180 Oxford street, Rugby, has been slightly wounded and gassed. He was formerly a bricklayer, and joined the King’s Royal Rifles Corps. He has been in active service nine months.

Victor Cowley, son of Mr W Cowley, 12 Worcester Street, Rugby, an old St Matthew’s boy, employed by the B.T.H Co, Ltd, in the winding department, joined the 7th Battalion of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry early in September, 1914. He went to the front “ somewhere in France ” at the end of last month. While sheltering in a dug-out he was wounded by shrapnel in the face by a German aerial torpedo, which came through the roof and exploded, fatally injuring some. All the platoon were more or less wounded. He is now in hospital at Leeds, and going on satisfactorily.

A KILSBY ATHLETE KILLED.

Although official intimation has not yet been received, from the War Office, Mrs Green, of The Laurels, has been notified by Capt E R Mobbs that her husband, Pte Bert Green, was killed in action some three weeks ago—at the time of the British advance. No letter had been received from him for nearly a month, and, Mrs Green being anxious, communicated with the above-named officer, and received the sad news on Wednesday morning. The sympathy of the village is with his wife and three little daughters. At the beginning of the war he was anxious to enlist, and in January last, unable to resist the call longer, he refused the chance of a commission and joined the 7th Northants Regiment. He was attached to the company of footballers and athletes captained by the famous Rugby inter-national footballer, Capt E R Mobbs. This company is known in the Northampton district ” Mobbs’s lot.” Mr Green was looked upon as a good-natured and genial fellow, both in the village and by his business companions. He was an all-round athlete. Several years ago he used to go on a cricket tour annually with the Yorkshire Gentlemen, and has played for first-class teams. He played for both Kilsby cricket and football teams, at one time captaining the former. He also played for Watford and other village clubs, and was a good asset. For the last two or three years he was a member of the British Thomson-Houston C.C. He made some excellent scores for this club, and for two years headed the batting averages. — Sympathetic reference was made to Pte Green’s death by Mr R Dumas at the meeting of the B.T.H Athletic Club on Thursday evening.

HILLMORTON MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Official news has been received that Pte C Kirby, of the 2nd Worcesters, only son of Mr H Kirby, of School Street, Hillmorton, and nephew of Mrs. F Paxton, 73 Murray Road, Rugby, was killed in action on September 26th in the great advance, at the early age of 22 years. The deceased joined the Army in December, 1911, and went to France in August, 1914. He was wounded in the left forearm on the 3rd of November, 1914, and went into hospital. He was back in the firing line on the 30th January, 1915, and has seen much fighting since that time.—The Vicar (the Rev R Lever) alluded to his death in his sermon on Sunday evening last, he having been a boy in the church Sunday School.

SECOND-LIEUT H D MARRIOTT KILLED IN ACTION.

Second-Lieut Hugh Digby Marriott, of the 8th Battalion of the Rifle Brigade, who, as reported last week, was killed in action in Flanders on October 9th, was a younger son, of Mr and Mrs Marriott, of Cotesbach, Lutterworth, Leicestershire. He was born on August 5th, 1895, and was educated at Temple Grove and at Bradfield College. He was entered at Brasenose College, Oxford, and was about to take up his residence there in October, 1914. Instead of this, however, he obtained a commission in the Rifle Brigade, and after the severe fighting at Hooge on July 30th-in which his brother Frederick was killed—he went out with other officers, and was appointed to the 8th Battalion.

COMMENDED FOR DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT.

Some months ago we recorded an incident in which Pte George Eaton (93 South Street) and other Rugby Territorials were attacked at a listening post by about three times their number of Germans. They defended the position bravely, and succeeded in driving off the enemy. Pte Eaton was referred to by the Corporal as being specially heroic. “ Although wounded, he kept on firing. He was a brick, and stuck to it like a man,” was the comment made upon his action at the time. His friends in Rugby will be glad to learn that for the part he took in this midnight episode he has been commended by the commanding officer “ for distinguished conduct in the field.”

ANOTHER ST MATTHEW’S “OLD BOY” WOUNDED.

Co-Sergt-Major C Favell, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, an old St Matthew’s School athletic championship holder, and well known later as a long-distance runner, has been reported wounded and in hospital.

BILTON SOLDIERS WOUNDED.

SAVED BY A PACK.

Rifleman Tom Reeve, who at the time of enlistment resided with his parents at Bilton, and is now in hospital at Guildford, has written to a friend describing how he received his wound and narrowly escaped being killed outright. He says:—

“ It was a nasty, smack right in the middle of the back—shrapnel wound. There isn’t much chance of dodging them, as they burst overhead for a radius of 200 yards ; but I am pleased to say I have no bones broken. The thing that saved my life was my pack. It went clean through that, and made a big hole in my jacket. I had got about 500 yards from the top of our parapet when I received my share. It knocked me down, but I did not feel it much for a few minutes. I got off my equipment the best way I could, and managed to get back somehow—but only God knows how. One of my pals came to bandage me up, and just as he got to me he was shot clean dead. I was then bandaged up by our doctor and put in a dug-out to await stretcher bearers. The Germans were shelling our trenches, and I thought every minute they would drop one on our dug-out—in fact, one dropped five yards from us and killed several. . . . I am glad to say I am making a wonderful recovery.”

In a subsequent letter he describes the wound as being 7ins long and 4ins wide right across the back, so it will take some time to get healed up.

The parents of Rifleman Reeve (who now live at Holbrook Farm, Little Lawford), have received a letter from E B Kerr, one of his comrades, who says that it happened soon after they started on the big charge. They were sorry to lose him, as he was always a great help. The writer was afraid that several of the Platoon who came from Rugby had suffered.

Mr and Mrs J Stibberd, of Bilton, have received information that their son, Bugler G Stibberd, of the 11th Royal Rifles, has been wounded by a shell while in billets, and is now in hospital at Boulogne. It is not a serious wound, and he is going on favourably. He enlisted in September, 1914, and went out in July.

Pte Alf Day, of the Royal Warwicks, is in hospital at Sheffield wounded. His parents now live at Bishops Itchington, but at the time of enlistment he had resided with them at Bilton for some time, and worked as a blacksmith at Church Lawford.

BILTON.

MRS CROFTS, of this village has received a letter from her youngest son, John (who is with the 6th Batt Royal Field Artillery), dated from a hospital and stating that he has been in that institution over six weeks suffering from a cracked shin-bone. It seems he was helping to take the horses to water when the horse in front of him suddenly kicked out and caught him. Later reports state that he is progressing as well as can be expected. The unfortunate young fellow had been promoted to sergeant only a few days before his accident. Mrs Crofts’ three sons have all entered the army. Charles came over with the Canadian contingent and is at the front, a letter recently to hand stating that he had been in the trenches about a week at the time of writing. Her eldest son, William, it will be remembered, lost his life while bathing off Sheerness, about three years ago.

WOLSTON.

MR ERNEST CHAMBERS KILLED.—Mr and Mrs Ernest Chambers have been notified from the War Office that their eldest son has died from wounds. He was badly hit in the abdomen. He joined the Royal Field Artillery soon after the war broke out, and was then residing with his parents at Sidon Hill, Brandon. The place of death is not mentioned, but he was fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula. Much sympathy is felt in the district for his relatives.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Mr and Mrs Charles Elliott, of Brook Street, whose son was reported killed in a former issue of our paper, have now received the bad news that two of their nephews have been wounded. One—Fredk Goodwin, of the 2nd Hants Regiment—has four ribs injured, left leg broken, and an injury to his waist, and now lies in a Reading hospital ; while another nephew—Fredk Woolcott—is badly wounded in the arm. Both were fighting in the Gallipoli Peninsula.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting at the Drill Hall has been rather better this week, and 21 men have been attested as follows :—D Lilley, C C Wharton, J H Holmes, A Morris, and E G Cloonan, R.A.M.C ; J R Holland, L C Major, and J Stevens, R.F.A ; W Bench, J A Speor, T A Rogers, R J Jackson, A B Webb, E Wood, and J W Wood, A.O.C ; W Richardson, Royal Berks ; W H Gulever and B E Iliffe, R.W.R ; D J Hall R.H.A ; W Southall and D Barnwell, drivers, R.E.

All the units are now open, and men are urgently required for the infantry battalions.

Local arrangements for carrying out Lord Derby’s recruiting scheme are well in hand, and it is hoped that the appeal which is about to be made to the manhood of the town will meet with a ready response. In many towns already the number of recruits had been greatly accelerated, and Rugby, which has so far done exceedingly well, should not now lag behind, as it is clearly understood that any failure in this effort will result in compulsory service. The local Parliamentary Committee is representative of the three great schools of political thought and is composed of the following :- Messrs M E T Wratislaw (chairman), J J McKinnell, H Tarbox, J H Walker W Barnett, L Aviss, C J Newman, G H Rolerts, and Col F F Johnstone, with Mr A Bell and Mr F M Burton joint hon Secretaries.

TOEING THE MARK—A PERSISTENT RECRUIT.

The persistent and patriotic endeavours made by Pte A Seaton, of Old Bilton, to enter the Army should put to shame those who advance all manner of excuses to avoid service. Although barely of enlistment age and having an impediment in his speech, Pte Seaton offered himself at the recruiting office but was rejected on account of deformed toes, one on each foot.

He enquired whether he would be accepted if he had the toes amputated, and on learning that he would be taken if the operation was successful, he entered the Rugby Hospital and has both his toes removed.

He is now serving in the 7th Royal Warwicks.

1/7TH WARWICKS UNDER SHRAPNEL FIRE.

Pte W Rainbow, of the 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, writing to his parents, says :—“ We had a terrible ten minutes the other night in the village, as the Germans started sending shrapnel over, and about a dozen of us were out on ration party at the time. The shells were bursting over our heads, and some of the chaps were running all over the place instead of taking cover. . . . I believe that all the chaps on that party sent up a short prayer that night, as none of us ever thought of coming out of it safe. . . . God must have seen fit to bring us out safe, for many of Kitchener’s got hit the same night. We have had a worse casualty list this few days than any time before in so short a time. You ought to hear the chaps carrying on over people at home wanting to know if we have been in the firing line yet, with chaps getting killed and wounded every day.”

 

7th Aug 1915. Rugby Prisoners of War Fund

RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR RELIEF FUND.

WHAT TO SEND AND HOW TO PACK IT.

A meeting of the committee recently appointed to take over this fund was held at the Benn Buildings, on Thursday evening, the Chairman, Mr W Flint, C.C, presiding. It may be mentioned that the fund, which has hitherto been collected and administered by Mrs Blagden, will now be managed by this committee, which is quite a representative one.

It was decided to call the fund “ The Prisoners of War Help Committee (Rugby Branch).”

Mrs J H Lees (wife of the Rev J H Lees, Baptist Church) and Mr F R Davenport (General Manager of Messrs Willans & Robinson, Ltd) were co-opted on the committee.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that he had been able to obtain considerable information as to articles required by our soldiers who were prisoners of war in Germany, and also special directions for packing and despatching the same, which he explained to the meeting.

Mr Barker said a new order had just been issued to the effect that tin boxes containing food or cigarettes, tin covers of boxes, or tin in any form whatever, is not allowed to be sent to prisoners of war. Any parcels containing tin will in future be refused and the parcel confiscated. Fresh fruit and meat cannot be sent.

On no account must letters or newspapers be enclosed in parcels.

Parcels under 11lbs in weight must be sent by post, and there would be no charge for postage.

Arrangements had been made with the American Express Co, Haymarket, S.W, for the transportation of packages exceeding 11 lbs and up to 112 lbs in weight. There would be no charge for transport, provided special labels were used, and the parcels would be received at any railway parcels office, and forwarded to London and then to Germany free of charge. A receipt will be sent from London for all parcels despatched.

In the present circumstances no guarantee can be given of the delivery of any parcel to the person to whom it is addressed, but it is believed that the arrangements made are the most secure that are possible and there is every confidence that, saving accidents, parcels will be properly delivered, provided they are packed and despatched in accordant with the rules laid down.

The time taken for transmission of a parcel varies according to the situation of the camp in which the addressee is interned, and may be estimated at from 15 to 18 days. As it takes about three weeks for letters to arrive here from Germany, it will be seen that the receipt of a parcel cannot be acknowledged under five or six weeks at the earliest.

SUGGESTED LIST OF ARTICLES TO BE SENT.

Bread is much asked for and needed by British prisoners in Germany, but some of the bread sent even before it leaves England is in bad condition, and delays on the journey make it uneatable before it reaches the prisoners. Bread for sending to prisoners must be extra well-baked, not too light, and must be quite cold before being packed. It should not be packed in tins which exclude all air, but each loaf should be carefully wrapped in paper, grease-proof if possible, then placed in corrugated cardboard or a stout cardboard box. At present parcels (under 11 lbs) sent by parcel post in most cases reach their destination in a shorter time than parcels sent by other agencies, which is an advantage to be considered in sending bread.

Other articles of food which will be most acceptable are :- Tea, biscuits, cocoa, cheese (small whole cheeses are best), sugar, chocolate, cake, milk tablets, chocolate, cocoa milk and sugar (in cubes), crushed oats, dried peas, lentils, soup packets, dried vegetables, dried fruits (apples, French plums, raisins, etc), meat paste and essences.

Miscellaneous articles such as : Tobacco, plug twist and cigarettes, packs of cards and games, ordinary washing soap, papier mache plates and cups, tooth brushes, carbolic soap, shaving brushes.

Articles for personal use : Hair brushes and combs, handkerchiefs, pencils, outer clothing (for civilians only), needles and thread, buttons, underclothing.

Books (in separate parcels). Books must not have any reference to the war or political subjects, or any matter offensive to Germany.

The committee will be grateful for gifts of any of the articles of food mentioned in the schedule. Gifts in kind may be left at the Rectory at any time, and any article mentioned in the Hon Secretary’s report will be welcomed. Subscriptions should be sent to either of the Hon Treasurers—Mrs Blagden, The Rectory, or Mr C J Newman, Henry Street—and will be duly acknowledged.

The committee earnestly hope that any person knowing of any prisoner of war whose relations cannot afford to send comforts, will let the Hon Secretary, Mr J R Barker, 9 Regent Street, have full details of his address.

CAMP REGULATIONS.

New regulations have been issued from German headquarters which order that all prison camps in Germany shall conform to uniform rules.

The camp is to be in a healthy locality, special care is to be taken in regard to questions of sanitation and hygiene, and adequate washing and bathing facilities are to be provided.

Officers buy their food and clothing and it is to be provided in proper variety and at reasonable prices. N.C.O’s and men have three meals a day, consisting of : Morning, coffee, tea, or soup ; noon, plentiful fare of meat and vegetables ; night, substantial plain meal.

The meals must be sufficient for proper nourishment, and Commandants are authorised to increase the amount of meat or vegetables if required. The same amount of bread is to be provided as for German soldiers.

In canteens at each camp food and underclothing can be purchased at fixed low prices.

Parcels from home containing food and tobacco are allowed.

Clothing will be provided if and when needed.

Prisoners are allowed to write one letter a fortnight and one postcard a week. Officers limited to letters of six pages and men to four pages. In special urgent circumstances of business or family affairs exceptions may be allowed.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

THANKS FROM PRISONERS OF WAR.

DEAR SIR,—Many thanks for inserting my letter in your paper, for I have this week received a parcel of food from some very kind friends of Rugby, who request that my communication to them should be made through the same periodical, so I should be very thankful if you would again insert the following :—Dear Rugby friends, we, Pte Grant and Pte Payne, wish to thank you for your kindness in sending so promptly to our help, parcels which we accept with the sincerest gratitude, and we are very glad to know that we still have someone who thinks of us a little, and should the time come when we can return this kindness, we shall think it a grateful occupation.-We remain, Your sincere friends,

T GRANT AND G F PAYNE.
No 1417 Pte T Grant,
2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment.
Gefangenlager, Altdamm, Germany.

A CLUB-FOOTED RECRUIT.

Charles Henry Maynard, of 8 Victoria Street, New Bilton, a machine-minder at Messrs Frost & Sons’ Printing Works, has for some time felt that he would like to “ do his bit ” for his country, but he regarded himself as physically unfit by reason of a congenital club-foot. However, he recently wrote a personal letter to Lord Kitchener at the War Office expressing his earnest wishes, and pointing out that, although club-footed, he could box, swim, run, walk, cycle, etc. He made out as good a case for himself as possible, which was only natural, he being very anxious to get into the army, and a few days later—as the result of the communication to headquarters-a recruiting sergeant called upon him and, acting on his advice, Maynard enlisted in the R.A.M.C. He left his home for Salisbury Plain to commence training on Tuesday morning. The enterprising recruit had, of course, to satisfy a doctor that was physically sound, save for the foot, and his ambition for a military life was doubtless influenced by the fact that he has two brothers in the service—one being in the navy and the other in the army, the latter being a lance-sergeant with the Territorial force in India. Mr Maynard came to Rugby from Croydon six years ago. He has a wife and three children. He is ambitious to merit promotion and his future career will be watched with interest by those who know him, all of whom will wish him well.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has been somewhat slacker at Rugby during the past week. The following have been accepted :—H H F Cleaver, 213th Fortress Company, R.E ; C H Maynard, R.A.M.C ; P Cleaver, C E Jenkins, and H L Benjamin, R.W.R ; E Hackleton and D T Cousins, Oxon and Bucks L.I.

VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS AT WARWICK PARK.

During the past week the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Regiment of the V.T.C have been encamped in Warwick Park, under the command of Lieut-Colonel Johnstone. The camp commenced on Saturday, when about 250 men went under canvas, each man being responsible for his own expenses. A detachment attended from Rugby, under the command of Mr C H Fuller, commandant ; and a number of these made the journey by train, under Sergt Yates, and the remainder marched, under Mr Robinson. The latter party arrived at Leamington in time to accompany the Leamington members to the Park, via the Old Road. Very useful work has been accomplished by the members, who paraded three times daily for about two hours, the reveille sounding at 5 a.m. Company and Battalion drills, each ending with an attack, have been held, and the members have also been practised in trench and field work, and mounting guard. On Bank Holiday sports were arranged, but owing to the heavy downpour in the morning and the storms of the afternoon the attendance fell considerably below expectations. There were, however, a fair number of visitors to the camp. The Rugby members were well represented among the prize-winners. Messrs W T Sidwell and Bell won their respective heats in the 100 yards race, and in the final Mr Sidwell finished second, and Mr Bell, who lost considerable ground through slipping at the start, third. There were a good number of entries for the N.C.O’s race, in which Mr W H Cluett finished second. Messrs Sidwell and Whitworth finished first in the three-legged race. Rugby did fairly well in the tug-of-war, registering a surprising win over Leamington 4, after two good pulls, in the first round. Owing to lack of weight, however, they were defeated in the second round by Knowle. A great feature was the officers’ race, which ended in a popular victory for the Colonel.—The weather during the week-end was not at all what could have been desired, but, on the whole, a very pleasant and instructive time was spent. The majority of the Rugby members left on Tuesday, but several remained for the whole week. The other local officers present were: Messrs Gough, Robinson, and Alderson.

BILTON.

THE FRIENDS of Sergt Martin, of the 7th K.R.R, who, as recorded in a recent issue of Advertiser, died from wounds sustained in action on July 1st, have received official intimation from the Army Council, and also a letter through Lord Kitchener, expressing the true sympathy of the King and Queen for them in their sorrow. Lieut-Col Rennie, the C.O of the Regiment, also writes :-” I am extremely sorry to have to tell you that your son, Sergt Martin, died of wounds the day after he was hit by a shell in the head. I can only offer you my deepest sympathy for a loss that cannot be replaced. He died a noble soldier’s death in action. He is a great loss to the battalion, and had been doing very well indeed.”

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

LANCE-CORPORAL STENT.

5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who, as we reported in our last issue, has been awarded the D.C.M for gallantry in action, is an Old Murrayian. He formerly belonged to the Rugby “ E ” Co, R.W.R, and was one of the famous machine-gun section known as “ The Mad Eight.”

 

 

17th Jul 1915. More Reports from the Front

INTERESTING LETTER FROM A RUGBY TERRITORIAL.

Mr W F Wood, Market Place, last week received a very interesting letter from Pte W H Evans, “C” Company (formerly “E” Company), 1/7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment (son of Mr W Evans, tailor), from which we make the following extracts :—

I must write in sympathy with you in the loss of your stepson. But it must be a consolation to you knowing that he died doing his duty, the death of a true Englishman. He has set an example for all Rugby fellows to follow, more so the fellows out here who belonged to the Brigade and knew him so well. . . . We are now out of the trenches and have marched for four nights, so, of course, are a good way back from the firing line, and it is a real treat to be out of the sound of gun and rifle fire. We are now billeted in a village where the Germans have not been ; so everything is standing and the natives are living their simple life. So you see we are faring well. I often think of the times I had while in your Brigade, and one thing often comes across my mind. That is, while at Conway one year we had to sleep eight in a tent, and we grumbled. You had us in front of you, and talked to us, and said that perhaps some day we should be glad to sleep twelve in a tent. Your words have come true, for we have slept in some “rum places” since we have been out here—cow sheds where the cows have been a few hours before, loft with rats for company, and lots of funny places, but we must not grumble, for it has got to be done, and the sooner this lot is over the better.-The writer then refers in sympathetic terms to the death of Corpl Johnson, which we recorded at the time, and says that he often used to talk with him at the front of the old days with the Brigade. He adds : “ It was a blow to me, for he was my best chum.”—In conclusion, he expresses the hope that the Brigade is up to strength, and wishes it the best of success.

Both Pte Evans and Corpl Johnson were old members together of the Boys’ Brigade, the former being the bass drummer and the latter a side drummer. They both won the Recruits’ Cup for shooting the first year they were in the Territorials.

AN “OPEN LETTER” TO THE CITIZENS OF RUGBY.

FROM MEMBERS OF THE 1ST BORDER REGIMENT.

SIR,-We have read with interest the “ open letter ” published in the Advertiser of last month, and we are sure that the feelings expressed therein are reciprocated by the whole of the 87th Brigade, especially the Border Regiment. It will interest the good people of Rugby to know that those of their late guests who remain of the 87th Brigade are faring pretty well, under the circumstances, thanks to the rotten marksmanship of the Turkish artillery, the shells of which the boys have christened “ Wandering Willies ” and “ Algys.” With regards to the “ Wandering Willies,” they got their name on account of the wandering habits of the gun they are fired from, which after every shot wanders across the peninsula to another position. As regards the “ Algys,” their christening is due to the fact that they are too gentle to hurt. We are of opinion that the gun which fires the “ Algys” is manned by a blind gun crew !

The boys would like to know if there are any vacancies in the B.T.H harriers, as we can recommend the Turks as very good runners—when they see us fixing our bayonets.

The majority of our Brigade have been wounded, but have left the various hospitals and gone back to the peninsula. You will have learnt that our list of killed is rather heavy, but we have the consolation of knowing that the Turkish list is far heavier than ours.

Wishing every prosperity to the citizens of the town that so hospitably entertained us, we conclude with best wishes to all our late landladies from the boys of the 1st Border Regiment.—Sir, believe us to be, Yours, etc,

9973 Pte William E Groom,
8213 Pte W A Little.
9794 Pte S George.
8387 Pte G Weller.
5701 Pte T Grunder.

“DEAR OLD RUGBY.”

APPRECIATION FROM SERGT MILLS, OF INNISKILLING FUSILIERS.

Sergt E A Mills, 1st Batt Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, writing from Graylingwell War Hospital, Chichester, Sussex, states :—“ After the delightful time we spent in dear old Rugby, we have undergone some trying experiences, which you have read about in Sir Ian Hamilton’s dispatch, and I am sure the people of Rugby feel proud to know of the splendid exploits of the soldiers of the 87th Brigade, who formed a part of the renowned 29th Division. During all those trying experiences all you could hear was ” Roll on, Rugby,” but alas ! many of those splendid fellows will never see that picturesque town again, but those of us who are left will have the consolation of knowing that the people of Rugby will always have our fallen comrades in their minds. I consider myself very fortunate in arriving back in dear old England again, although a Turkish sniper only missed my “Cupid’s dartboard” by half-an-inch, and I am hoping to pay a visit to your town before I go out again to do a little more for King and country and the world’s peace. I must take this opportunity of thanking those ladies who inserted that splendid letter to the soldiers, which I happened to read in your paper, which I receive from my respected friends in Oxford Street. I must conclude now, by wishing every success to all the residents of “Dear old Rugby.”—I remain, respectfully yours, SERGT. MILLS, of the “ Skins.”

 

HILLMORTON SOLDIER’S NARROW ESCAPE.

VALISE BLOWN AWAY.

Machine-Gunner R S Bartlett, of the 5th Battalion Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mrs T Smith, of School Street, Hillmorton, has sent home a souvenir of the war, his valise, or what remains of it, for whilst entering the trenches, it was blown off his back by the explosion of a shell, which killed four comrades and wounded two others badly. Gunner Bartlett must have had a very narrow escape, judging by the torn and threadbare appearance of the remnants of the “ rucksack,” as he calls it, which we have had an opportunity of inspecting. It seems almost incredible, from the appearance of the valise, that the wearer should have escaped, yet in letter to his mother, he is able to record that he got off “ without a scratch.” It is not surprising that he adds, “It gave me a ‘oncer’ at the time, and I thought my back had gone.” Home cured ham was in the valise, “ but better that than me,” observes the soldier, “ and I am still in the pink.”

In a letter to a brother, Pte Bartlett gives additional particulars. He says:-“ When we were coming to the trenches on Saturday night they sent a tidy lot of ‘souvenirs,’ I can tell you, and blew my large coat, canteen of sugar and tea, some home-cured ham, cake, and all the sweets ; two bars of carbolic soap and writing-case, water-proof sheet and two sandbags, also a loaf ; and it left just the back of the rucksack on. I went to look for some of it after, but all I could find was an envelope on the parapet. I wondered what hit me for a minute, and I thought my back had gone. Toby Bates got his rucksack cut a bit in front of me. I asked him how he was and he said “ all right.” We started to laugh till we turned to look at the back of us and that did it. We had to pull Ayres out. . . . Billy Chamberlain got wounded coming up, and he was reported missing. . . . It’s the worse “ do ” we have had, but most of us are none the worse for it, and the other poor chaps have done their duty.”

LOCAL CASUALTIES OF THE WAR.

WELL-KNOWN RUGBY ATHLETE KILLED.

Members of the Rugby Hockey and Cricket Clubs in particular, and the residents of the town in general, will hear with regret that Second Lieut H G Rogers, of the 9th Somerset Light Infantry, has been killed at the Dardanelles. Second-Lieut Rogers, who received his commission in September last, had resided at Rugby for four or five years before the outbreak of the war, and was formerly employed on the staff of the B.T.H and latterly with Mr Ivan B Hart-Davies. He was a fine all-round athlete and especially excelled in hockey. He was a prominent member of the Rugby Club, and had also played for Warwickshire and the Midland Counties, and narrowly missed securing his inter-national cap. Second-Lieut Rogers was also an excellent cricketer, and did useful service for the premier local eleven. Of a most genial disposition, he was very popular with all with whom he came in contact, and his early death will be mourned by a large circle of friends. He was about 24 years of age.

Writing to a friend in Rugby from the Dardanelles, under date of June 21st, the late Second-Lieut Rogers said :—“ I landed a month ago and was attached to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers—a topping crowd, who did awfully well in the landing. Well, from the first we have not been out of shell-fire ; even landing they shell the beach, and it is perfectly beastly. Leman von Sanders must be told to stop it. Three other Somerset men came out with me, and, thank God, we are all here still, although we have lost since we landed about eight officers and 300 men—quite enough ! Still things are very merry and bright. We have only had two real scraps—one on the 4th, when we had to attack up a nullah, which was not pleasant, and then on top a couple of days in some perfectly rotten trenches, which held all right. Then lately we had five days in the trenches. I had a perfectly lovely bit, jetting out at right angles to our main line and with the Turks only about forty yards away on two flanks. The trench had only just been taken from the Turks, and was in an awful state, dead all along the bottom less than an inch down, and built into the sides all over the place. Well, we had a beastly time for three days and nights. I averaged three hours’ sleep per 24 hours, and then not consecutive hour’s all five days. Then, on the night of the third day, at 8.30 p.m, they attacked us in force on both sides, throwing any number of hand-bombs (awful things), and eventually, about 5.30 a.m, they got half the sap, but we drove them out again by 6.30, and still hold the trench. A wounded man, who gave himself up, said that 500 men had come up specially for the attack, and only three got back. I was ‘severely’ wounded. I was sitting on the parapet firing my revolver at the brutes ten yards away, when one of their bullets just took the skin off my first finger. I tell you I did not stay sitting there long ; it was lucky. We are just at the end of our rest and expect to go up to-night, so will have an exciting time again.”

SERGT. MARTIN, OF BILTON, REPORTED KILLED.

Sad news has been received by Mr and Mrs Martin, of 4 Addison Terrace, Bilton, concerning their son, Sergt D C Martin, of the 7th King’s Royal Rifles. The official communication is to the effect that he has been wounded in action, but the officers’ letters carry the tidings beyond this, and there seems no doubt from what is learnt from this and other sources, that the unfortunate soldier has been killed. Sergt Martin joined the forces on the outbreak of the war, and received quick promotion. At the time he enlisted he was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and previously he worked for a number of years at the Rugby engine-sheds; first as a cleaner and subsequently as a fireman. He was popular and much liked amongst his associates, and being fond of football he assisted both the Village Club and the Elborow Old Boys. Amongst the latter he had several intimate friends, and joined the army with them. For a number of years Sergt Martin belonged to the Rugby Infantry Co, so he was not unfamiliar with military matters when he enlisted in the King’s Royal Rifles.

Major Geoffrey St Aubyn, in a letter to the parents, says: “I regret to inform you that Sergt Martin was killed in action on 1st of July, 1915. Please accept my sincerest sympathy in your great loss. Your son promised to be a really good soldier. He had been in my Company since he joined the army, and his promotion was very quick because I thought so well of him. Please allow me to convey to you the sympathy of his comrades in the Company, both officers and men.”

Another letter which was much appreciated by the parents, has been received from Lieut G H Gibson. It is dated July 10th, and it as follows : “ Dear Mr Martin,—Just a line to tell you as best I can, how sad and sorry I am to lose your son. He died a soldier’s death, and I should like you to know how highly we all thought of him. I knew him very well, and I feel a sense of great personal loss. You have my very deep sympathy. May God give you strength to help you through. We have one consolation, that he died doing his duty. Would that he could have been spared, but God willed otherwise.—With my sincere sympathy, Believe me, Yours sincerely, G H Gibson, Lieut.”

BILTON MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Mr and Mrs Maddocks, of Bilton, have received news that their son, Pte Cyrus Underwood (aged 22), who enlisted in the 1st Royal Warwicks on December 4th, was killed in action on July 9th.

In a letter conveying the sad news to Mrs Maddocks, a chum of the late Pte Underwood says:—“ I can assure you he died without any pain, as he was shot through the forehead by a sniper. He lived about half-an-hour after, but never regained consciousness. You have my deepest sympathy. I have already missed him very much, not only me but a good many more in our company, as I don’t think he was disliked by anyone. He was killed in the early hours of Friday morning, July 9th, I was with him in a dug-out all day on Thursday, and we had some fun together. I can hardly realize his old cheery face has left us for ever.”

Lce-Corpl J Dark confirms the regrettable news, and says deceased was a bomb thrower, and it was while throwing bombs at the Germans that he was killed. He adds: “ Your son was respected by all his comrades and we deeply mourn the loss of him.”

For several years Pte Underwood was employed at Bilton Grange as a footman.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

J H Watts and Arthur Massey, both of Long Lawford, and Bertie Howard, of Dunsmore Stud Farm, have enlisted in the 3/7th Batt Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which is in training at Wedgnock, near Warwick.

F C E Rendall, B.A. has been appointed to a second-lieutenant in the 13th Service Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He has been selected to attend a class of instruction at Fort Purbrook, Portsmouth, and Saturday, July 17th.

Leslie K Phillips, second son of Mr J Phillips, of St Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, Rugby, has received a commission as second-lieutenant in the Royal Marine Light Infantry (Portsmouth Division), stationed at Gosport. He was a pupil at “Oakfield” School, and is also an Old Rugbian. His elder brother, Eric S Phillips, is a second-lieutenant in the 8th Battalion of the Border Regiment.

Second-Lieutenant A K Bennett, son of Mr A Bennett, of Elmdon House, Rugby, who some months ago was detailed from the 9th Battalion Warwicks to the Divisional Cyclists Corps, sailed with his Division a fortnight ago to join the Mediterranean Force. In his letters home he refers to the splendid accommodation on the troopship, and the excellent health and spirits of all on board, notwithstanding the great heat they were experiencing during the voyage.

RUGBY SOLDIERS WOUNDED.

News has been received by Mrs C Batchelor, of 16 Pinder’s Lane, that her son, Pte A J Batchelor, who enlisted in the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry at the commencement of the war, was wounded in the hand on June 24th, and is now in the Cumberland Hospital at Carlisle, where he is doing well.

News has been received by Mrs W Sansome, of 5 Gas Street, that her son, Lance-Corpl Samuel George Barnett, of the 5th Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, was wounded in the back in France on June 16th. He has now been discharged from hospital and admitted to a convalescent home.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been accepted at the Rugby Drill Hall during the past week :—E Hartopp and F Coleman, Leicester Regiment ; A W Ades and J Harvey, Royal Sussex Regiment ; G Holloway and F S C Pickering, R.W.R ; F Rogers, Army Service Corps ; F Bull, Worcester Regiment ; E F Mack, East Kents.

It has been decided to accept for enlistment in the Infantry not only men who are fit for service in the Field, but also those who are fit for garrison service abroad, or for home service only.

In future no man will be rejected provided he is free from organic disease and is fit for duty in garrisons at home or abroad.

Men enlisted “ Fit for home service only,” although enlisted for general service, who are at the moment only fit for garrison service, will not be taken for service in the Field unless they become fit.

In future men will be enlisted as follows :-

(a) Service in the Field at home or abroad.

(b) Garrison service at home or abroad.

(c) Home service only.

F F JOHNSTONE, Lieut-Col,

July 14, 1915.             Recruiting Officer.