Newman, William Henry. Died 28th Sep 1918

‘A H Newman’ appears on the Rugby Memorial Gates, however, there does not appear to be any relevant casualty with Rugby connections with that surname and initials.

Two possible ‘H’ Newmans were mentioned in September 1914: an ‘H H Newman’ was in a list of men from the Locomotive Department of the L & N-W Railway at Rugby;[1] and an ‘H Newman’ joined up from the Cambridge Street Wesleyan Bible Class.[2]   The death of the wife of a 2nd Lt C J Newman of Henley Street, was reported in July 1918.[3]  There was a ‘J E Newman, 220th Fortress Co, R.E.’ who joined up in 1916,[4] also, a Drummer W Newman, of the ‘Rugby Infantry Co, younger son of Mr C Newman, of Benn Street, Rugby,’ and who was also mentioned in the ‘7th Battery Royal Warwickshire Regiment, brother to Mr C J Newman, architect, of Rugby’ or in the ‘‘C’ Company, 1st/7th Warwicks’ and who appeared in several press reports – albeit the regiment and relationships may have been confused – indeed was it he reported as ‘R.W.R, … and C E Newman’?  It seems that a ‘C J Newman’ may himself have served later.  George William Newman, of 7 Houston Road, Brownsover, Rugby, who was also born about 1895, served as a Driver No. 840763 in the Royal Field Artillery, was discharged unfit with a head wound in November 1917.  However, there is no evidence that any of these died in the war.

The most likely candidate would seem to be a ‘W H Newman’ for whom a casualty report appeared in 1918.
… and Private W. H. Newman, Royal Berks Regt, has died of wounds.[5]

The CWGC site names him as the ‘Son of Mr. and Mrs. Newman, of 37, Campbell St., New Bilton, Rugby.’

William Henry NEWMAN was probably born in early 1895 in Long Ditton, Surrey, as he was baptised there on 14 July 1895 at St Mary’s church.  He was the eldest son of William Henry Spencer Newman, who was born in about 1866 in East Coker, Somerset, and Emily Ann, née Spooner, Newman, who was born in Surbiton Hill, Surrey in about 1867.  When Ernest was baptised, his father was working as a ‘labourer’.  His parents had been married on 26 December 1891 at St. Mary’s church, Long Ditton, Surrey

Soon after his birth, sometime between 1896 and 1899, the family moved from Long Ditton to Rugby, and in 1901, when William H junior was five years old, the family were living at 7 Windsor Street, Rugby.  His father was a ‘labourer in foundry’.

In 1911, William junior’s parents had been married for 19 years and had had five children, all of whom were still living.  They lived in a six room house at 29 Campbell Street, New Bilton, Rugby.  With his father working as an ‘iron moulder’, 15 year old William junior, was an ‘Iron Moulders Apprentice’, probably working with his father.  A later report[6] noted that he was formerly employed at Willans & Robinson’s.

Unfortunately no Service Record has survived for William, but he joined up, and served, at least latterly, as a Private, No: 43077, in the 5th Battalion, Princess Charlotte of Wales’s (Royal Berkshire) Regiment, more usually known as the Royal Berkshire Regiment.

The 5th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Berkshire Regiment was formed as part of the First New Army (K1) in Reading on 25 August 1914 and joined the 35th Brigade of the 12th Division and then moved to Shorncliffe.  In January 1915 the Battalion moved to Folkestone and then, on 1 March 1915, to Malplaquet Barracks at Aldershot.  On 31 May 1915 they mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and then engaged in various actions on the Western Front including:

1915: the Battle of Loos.
1916: the Battle of Albert; the Battle of Pozieres; and the Battle of Le Transloy.
1917: the First Battle of the Scarpe; the Battle of Arleux; the Third Battle of the Scarpe; and the Cambrai operations.
1918: on 6 February 1918, they transferred to the 36th Brigade,[7] but were still in the 12th Division and continued to fight on the Western Front in the Battle of Bapaume; the First Battle of Arras; the Battle of Amiens; the Battle of Albert; the Battle of Epehy; and then took part in the Final Advance in Artois.

There is no date when William went to France, but it would probably have been some time after he joined up as he would have had to be trained.  However, he would have been old enough to serve overseas from the start of the war and he probably could have gone to France with his Battalion.  However, he was not awarded the 1914-1915 Star, and this suggests he did not go to France until after 1915.

Whilst he may have been involved in some of the actions outlined above, it is only the actions in 1918 and around the time of his death that are detailed here.

Whilst it was fairly quiet at the start of 1918, William would have continued to be involved in the routine of trench warfare, and the front was comparatively quiet prior to 21 March.

However, an attack by the Germans had been anticipated, and on 21 March 1918 they launched a major offensive, Operation Michael;[8] against the British Fifth Army and the right wing of the British Third Army.  The German artillery targeted command and communications; then, the destruction of artillery; and then the front-line infantry.  The artillery bombardment began at 4.40am on 21 March 1918, and hit targets over an area of 150 square miles, the biggest barrage of the entire war.  Over 1,100,000 shells were fired in five hours.

The Battalion War Diary until January 1918 is filed under the 35th Brigade,[9] and then from February onwards it is filed under 36th Brigade.[10]   In late December 1917 the Battalion was training in the Merville area, and on 21 January 1918 relieved the 7th Bn. Royal Sussex Regiment and then on 29 January they were relieved by the 7th Norfolks, and soon after transferred to the 36th Brigade.

Their activities in the period March to June 1918 were described in Rugby Remembers under the biography of Ernest COLSTON who was also in the 5th Battalion and killed on 20 June 1918.

A summary of the Battalion’s movements and actions during William’s last few months, based on the 5th Battalion War Diary, is given below.

From 1 September the Battalion had been ‘resting and refitting after CARNOY operations, in valley, W. of MARICOURT.’  Over the next two days they moved to trenches around ST-PIERRE VAST WOOD.  On 5 September, they moved on through a gas shelled area to MUNASTIR, ready ‘… to attack village of NURLU at 8-0am … orders miscarried and rations lost the Battalion …’.  On 5 September at 4-0am ‘Battalion moved over Canal at MOISLAINS … and attacked village at 8-0am under cover of Creeping Barrage.  The next day they held the line and the following morning were ‘… withdrawn to NURLU … Cookers were waiting as arranged, with breakfasts’.

From 7 to 17 September they were training and refitting for future operations.  The rest of the month is reported in detail in a three page typed report.  A major attack on EPEHY took place on 18 September with follow up action the next day.  After a day’s relief, they formed up for a midnight attack on 21 September – ‘ … by 2-0am all Objectives were captured.  One officer and 18 Other Ranks and about 30 M.G’s captured.’  They were relieved on 23 September and dispersed in reserve.  An enemy attack and entry to DADOS LANE and LOOP the next day led to unsuccessful attempts to repulse them over the next four days.

27 September   – ‘Battalion held line on Left of Brigade Sector.’

28 September   – ‘5.20am – 6th Queens attacked DADOS LOOP and LANE without success.            

                          – ‘10.0pm – 6th Queens withdrawn and Battalion took over line …’.

After further fighting on 29 September, attacking ‘… across the Tunnel of the Canal …’, on 30 September, ‘It was found that enemy had withdrawn from area W of canal … Brigade pushed on.’

The casualties sustained during these operations from 18 to 30 September 1918 totalled, one Officer killed and five wounded, and 250 Other Ranks, Killed, Wounded & Missing.

W H Newman’s death is recorded by the CWGC on 28 September 1918, and he would have been one of those 250 men killed or wounded in the operations near Epehy between 18 and 30 September 1918.  He was 23.  Whilst the Battalion was in action near Epehy, several members of the 5th Battalion were buried in the nearby Epehy Wood Farm Cemetery.  William was buried some five miles behind the lines to the south-west, which suggested (this was later confirmed in the Rugby Advertiser) that he was wounded and was evacuated to one of the Casualty Clearing Stations that had been established that month at Doingt, and died, or was registered dead, there.

He was buried in the nearby Doingt Communal Cemetery Extension, in grave reference: I. E. 42.  Later when a permanent gravestone replaced the temporary cross, probably in the 1920s, it included his family’s message, ‘Gone but not Forgotten by his Loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters’.

Doingt is a small village on the eastern outskirts of Peronne.  Doingt was captured by the 5th Australian Division on 5 September 1918, and the village was completely destroyed in the fighting.  In the same month, the 20th, 41st and 55th Casualty Clearing Stations arrived, remaining until October, when the cemetery was closed.  It was made in three plots; Plot I contained only Commonwealth graves, Plot II only American, and Plot III the graves of both armies.  The American graves were later removed by the American Graves Registration Services.  Doingt Communal Cemetery Extension contains 417 Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

In mid-October, the Rugby Advertiser announced,
The death from wounds is announced of Pte W H Newman (23), son of Mr & Mrs Newman, 37 Campell Street, New Bilton.  Pte Newman was formerly employed at Willans & Robinson’s.[11]

The same edition had the family’s notice in the Deaths section.
DEATHS.    NEWMAN. – In loving memory of Pte. W. H. NEWMAN, who died of wounds in France on September 28, 1918; eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Newman, 37 Campbell Street, New Bilton, Rugby.
“A loving son, a faithful brother,
One of the best towards his mother.
He bravely answered his country’s call;
He gave his life for one and all.
We pictured his safe returning,
We longed to clasp his hand;
But God has postponed our meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.”
From his loving Mother, Father, Brothers and Sisters, and his Young Lady.

William’s Medal Card showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.  He is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gate.

William’s parents were later registered by the CWGC as living at 37, Campbell Street, New Bilton, Rugby, having either moved or been re-numbered.  William’s mother, Emily Ann, died in Rugby, aged 63 in 1928; his father, William H Newman senior, died there, aged 86 in late 1951.

 

 

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on ‘A. H.’, or more likely, William Henry NEWMAN was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, June  2018.

 

[1]      Rugby Advertiser, 5 September 1914, also, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2014/09/05/5th-sep-1914-rugbys-magnificent-response/.

[2]      Rugby Advertiser, 19 September 1914, also, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2014/09/19/19th-sep-1914-more-recruits/.

[3]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 20 July 1918.

[4]      Rugby Advertiser, 25 September 1915, also https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2015/09/26/25th-sep-1915-local-war-notes/.

[5]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 9 November 1918.

[6]      Rugby Advertiser, 19 October 1918.

[7]      This does mean the Battalion War Diary has to be found in two separate files under the two Brigades.

[8]      See: https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2018/03/20/the-1918-spring-offensive-operation-michael/.

[9]      UK, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, Various Infantry Brigades, 12th Division, TNA ref: Piece 1850: 35 Infantry Brigade (1915 – 1919).

[10]     UK, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, Various Infantry Brigades, 12th Division, TNA ref: Piece 1856: 36 Infantry Brigade (1915 – 1919).

[11]     Rugby Advertiser, 19 October 1918.

19th Feb 1916. Should Motor Buses be Encouraged in War Time?

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

SHOULD MOTOR BUSES BE ENCOURAGED IN WAR TIME ?

THE MOTOR BUSES.

Mr EVERS, in moving that the paragraph in the report dealing with motor buses be referred back to the Committee, said he would like to raise the whole question of these buses plying in Rugby. He did not consider that they should encourage them, either by allowing them to stand in the town or by allowing them to open up fresh routes, for this reason : That although they were a convenience to many people, at the same time they were not a necessity. At such times as this they ought not to encourage fresh enterprises of this sort, which were not a necessity, partly on account of the damage to the roads, but, more than that, because they ought to economise, and to encourage everybody else to economise, in the consumption of petrol, one of the commodities which had to be imported, and which they had to pay for. They could not do this by their exports, and so they had to do it either by sending gold abroad or selling their securities. He was sorry that the Highways Committee had given them permission to open up fresh enterprises to and from the station.

The CHAIRMAN : They have only given them permission subject to confirmation by the Council.

Mr WISE seconded, and said his views were the same as those of Mr Evers.

Mr RINGROSE opposed this motion, on the grounds that the new enterprise would benefit the town in a great many ways. If any member of that Council had duties to perform in the country instead of walking a few yards to work, he would take a different view of the matter.

Mr EVERS : That is rather a rude thing to say. I must ask you to withdraw it.

The CHAIRMAN asked Mr Ringrose not to be personal.

Mr RINGROSE added that he had to go out into the country, and he found the buses very handy. He hoped they would continue to run, not only for himself, but for the benefit of the people living in the villages around who had to come to work at Rugby in all weathers. It was better for the workmen to be able to come in a nice comfortable bus.

Mr WISE : We are talking of the new route.

The Clerk : The mover raised the general question, and the Chairman and Mr Walker agreed.

Mr RINGROSE said he was in favour of giving every facility for the omnibuses to run. The Company would have to pay for petrol, and if, eventually, it was found necessary to put a road tax on, they would have to pay it the same as anyone else did. He considered that to try to stop these things running in the town was very shortsighted.

Mr NEWMAN said the Highway Committee had carefully considered the question, and he thought the general opinion was that they could stop them.-The Clerk said he would like the matter referred back so that he could consider this question more deeply. At the present time he thought they had no power whatever. If the Company liked to apply for a license, the Council had to grant it.

Mr NEWMAN said he would rather have seen a local company plying for hire instead of an outside one. As regarded petrol, it was a serious point to get over, but he thought there were a number of steam motors about.

Mr EVERS : These aren’t steam ones.

Mr NEWMAN said at the Committee meeting he tried to get a stipulation passed that the Company should give something towards the roads, but it was ruled out.

Mr YATES supported the reference back, mainly on the grounds enunciated by Mr Evers, that buses might be desirable in normal times, but not to-day. He would like to meet the convenience of people going to and from work, but he would go further than Mr Evers, and ask the Highway Committee to see if they had not got power to prohibit private motor cars using the roads to take people out for pleasure. This would save a good deal of petrol. Then, too, if they had power to prevent motor-cars dashing along at high speed at nights it would be a good thing. It would save petrol, too, if they were kept in the garage all the time. Although they might not have power to prevent the buses running, they had the power to prevent them having all the privileges they might have, were they a desirable thing.

Mt WALKER said he saw all the buses going along, and he had come to the conclusion that they were a great service to the working-class population. He would not give his vote against anything to hinder them.

Mr BARNSDALE also spoke in favour of the buses, and said they brought people into the town who otherwise would not come.

Mr ROBBINS, while disagreeing with Mr Evers on some things, agreed with him with regard to the consumption of petrol, and said it was an astonishing thing to him how any such firm could start nowadays. It must cost them double money to do it. He pointed out, however, that the chief people who used the bus were those who could not afford motor-cars, or could not get about very well. He thought the buses would be a great boon to the men working at Coventry. He had been approached by working men, who told him that there were 40 and sometimes 100 men going to Coventry every day ; these men had to get up at 3.30 to catch a train just after 4 o’clock, but now, by starting at 5 o’clock, they could get to work by 6 o’clock. He would therefore support the granting of facilities to the Company.

Mr LINNELL said the Committee., would be very pleased to reconsider the matter, especially as he would then be able to look the law up. He pointed out that the Committee looked upon the request as a reasonable one, and accordingly they granted it. The request complied: with the regulations. By simply taking out a license, the buses could run in the town as mush as they liked, and they could not stop them. In his opinion, if they took out a license, they were privileged to stand at any of the registered stands, the same as anyone else.

Mr STEVENSON said he was in favour of referring the matter back.

After complaining of these heavy motor vehicles, and similar ones belonging to the Government, using the roads without paying any compensation, Mr LOVEROCK expressed the hope that after the war there would be a tax put upon them…..

MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1916.

THE following is an extract from a Minute of the London Yearly Meeting of the Society of Friends held specially from Jan. 28 to 30 last:—

“ We feel that Friends will have a duty in watching the action of the Tribunals, in assisting young men with regard to the statement of their conscientious objections before these Tribunals, including if necessary the Appeal Tribunals, and in giving what support and advice may be needed. We decide also to make known our readiness to assist conscientious objectors other than Friends so far as is in our power.”

Any interested are invited to enter into communication with HERBERT W. EDMUNDSON, “ Oakbank,” Bilton, near Rugby.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

H L Satchell, son of Mr J G Satchell, Dunchurch Road, who was promoted to lieutenant last October, has been Brigade Physical Training and Bayonet Fighting Officer of the 8th Reserve (Infantry Brigade for the last four months.

H J A Parkinson, youngest son of Sir and Mrs Parkinson, of Clifton Road, Rugby, who joined the 10th Leicester Regiment in June last, has been granted a commission as Second-Lieutenant in the 3/4th Leicesters. He holds a first-class certificate as a hand-grenade specialist, and he is now with his regiment in England. The elder son is now in the Motor Red Cross Ambulance in France.

The funeral of Pte Frederick Baxter, 10th R.W.R, of New Street, New Bilton, whose death from wounds received in action we recorded last week, took place at Rugby Cemetery on Friday afternoon last. A contingent from the Super-numerary Company, R.W.R, acted as bearers, and the wreaths included one from Old Comrades in the 10th Warwicks, and another from Friends in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

The whole of the sons of Mr James Martin, Liberal agent for East Wolverhampton, and for some years Liberal agent at Rugby, are either serving with the colours or have attested. Three of them are in infantry regiments, one is a mechanic in the Royal Flying Corps, the fifth is in training, and the other two are under Lord Derby’s scheme.

HOME FROM THE TRENCHES.

Drummer W Newman, of the Rugby Infantry Co, younger son of Mr C Newman, of Benn Street, Rugby, has been home on leave this week, after spending eleven months at the front. Until he reached Rugby he had not slept in a bed for seven months, but he is wonderfully well and in high spirits. His visit to Rugby comes to an end to-day (Saturday), when, as he puts it, he is going back “ to see it out.”

ALL UNEXEMPTED SINGLE MEN TO BE CALLED UP.

All single men of military age who have not been granted exemption from service are almost immediately to be called to the colours. The date upon which the first of the men to be affected by the order will be asked to present themselves is March 18.

The men concerned are those between the ages of 31 and 40 who have attested and are in Groups 14 to 23, and those of the same ago who under the Military Service Act will on March 5 be deemed to have enlisted.

There have been rumours that the War Office intended to place all the unmarried men under training as speedily as possible, but the decision to call up 10 groups and classes under one Proclamation was not generally anticipated, as up to the present the groups have been summoned four at a time.

INCONSIDERATE TELEPHONE SUBSCRIBERS.

On the occasion of the recent air raid the transmission of official telephonic messages of urgent importance was seriously interfered with at several, places by what the Postmaster-General calls the inconsiderate and unnecessary use of the telephone by private subscribers to call up the police and other public officials. The Postmaster-General earnestly appeals to the public to use the telephone as little as possible on such occasions, and on no account to call up the police or other public officials on unimportant or merely personal matters. If this warning is not regarded it may become necessary to curtail the facilities afforded to private persons on occasions of public emergency.

12th Jun 1915. A Fierce Struggle

A FIERCE STRUGGLE.

Pte A Goode, attached to the machine gun section of the 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, “ somewhere in France,” in a letter his father, 173 Cambridge Street, Rugby, says :-

“ I suppose by this time you will have read about the great fight we had on May 9th. I shall never forget it. We have named it “ The bloody Sunday.” We went into the trenches at ten o’clock on the Saturday night, and lay there during a bitterly cold night. At five o’clock on Sunday morning the big guns commenced their music, which was terrible, and it lasted an hour. Then came the order to advance to do or die. We had to go over five lines of breastworks, 200 yards of open ground between each. All the time the enemy were raining upon us shrapnel shells, “ coal-boxes,” and lead from machine guns ; but we never faltered, and as chum after chum went down we set our teeth and gripped out guns tighter. When we had passed the last breastwork we took a breather for two minutes ; then for the German trenches 350 yards in front—is was hell itself, I can tell you. We charged them with the bayonet, but it was beyond the power of man to get through their barbed wire fences. Blood, however, flowed like water ! But our time will come when we will avenge our brave chums who gave their lives on that field for home and country. The fight lasted through 24 hours, until the Monday. It was a terrible sights after we had finished to see dead and wounded. Never mind ; we are all ready and willing again when wanted ; but we are getting less in numbers—I mean we who came here first. Will the young men of England pluck up and come out and give us a hand ? It is about time some of them threw away the tennis bats and golf clubs and learn to use a rifle, and come out and help us. We have a very stubborn enemy, and he will take some shifting ; but by the help of men, guns, and ammunition, we shall do it—for we are still British and have the hearts of men. Pluck up, slackers, and give us a hand.”

IMPUDENT GERMAN SNIPERS.

Drummer W Newman, of the 7th Battery Royal Warwickshire Regiment, brother to Mr C J Newman, architect, of Rugby, in a letter from the front says:—“ The weather out here is grand, but it is enough to roast us as we do our sentry duty, which is nothing but standing and watching through a periscope at the enemy’s lines. They have been rather cheeky this time. For instance, during Saturday night one of their patrols must have been very near to ours, for in the morning, when we looked over the parapet, we saw fastened on a willow tree, about 200 yards away, a board with the words painted on it: ‘Przemysl Zunicherobert.’ The last word we take to mean ‘re-taken.’ However, if they come out doing those tricks too many times they will find a ‘pleasant surprise’ waiting for them in the way of a bomb or a shot from one of our patrols.”

CASUALTIES IN THE SEVENTH WARWICKSHIRE BATTALION.

The following casualties in the Warwickshire Territorial Battalion are reported under dates May 19th and 22nd :-

KILLED.—Brooks, 1168, Sergt E.

WOUNDED.—Evans, 2785, Pte R O ; Hobbs, 2632, Pte W R ; Shearsby, 2741, Pte A ; Tuggey, 2578, Pte W ; Ball, 1621, Pte R ; Blundell, 2452, Pte R ; Coltman, 1814, Lce-Corpl W C ; Cook, 2269, Pte J ; Dolman, 2649, Pte ; Dunn, 2511, Pte W ; Fowler, 2064, Pte W H ; Hughes, 1755, Pte J ; Mence, 1802, Pte F ; Ramsden, 2377, Pte J A ; Sadler, 1287, Lce-Corpl J ; Sale, 1674, Pte J ; Savage, 909, Pte W ; South, 1986, Sergt G ; Taylor, 1071, Corpl H A ; Ward, 2762, Pte E ; Wormell, 2536, Pte J

 

LOCAL CASUALTIES OF THE WAR.

“ E ” COMPANY’S CASUALTIES.

A member of “ E ” Company (now merged with “ C ” Company of the 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion), writing under date June 6th, says :-

“ The weather here is glorious ; we are all brown as berries and in the very best of health. On Tuesday last I paid the Company a visit. They were off to the trenches that night ; but, to judge by the interest displayed in an inter-company cricket match, you would never believe that within an hour or two they would be doing their whack in the trenches. The news, I’m sorry to say, is by far the worst since our arrival in France, and concerns members of the old ‘E’ Company. On Thursday, May 27th, Lance-Corpl R Clowes and H Rogers were wounded. The former, I regret to say, died on June 2nd. On Friday night, May 28th, there was a most exciting episode, in which the Rugby lads came through with flying colours, but with further loss. The following are, as far as I could gather, the details :—A party, including Corpl W Bromwich, Ptes L Hill, L Eaton, and P Hall, were out on the listening post, when a party of Germans came out and tried to surprise them. The enemy opened fire, killing L (Bleb) Hill, a Newbold lad, and wounding L Eaton. The latter stuck to his post, and continued firing until help arrived, consisting of a party under Sergt G Ward. I expect the enemy gave it up for a bad job, and upon examination by our chaps we found they had left one dead. Our men brought him in, and he proved to be an iron cross man. His rifle has been despatched to England, and will some day repose in the Rugby Drill Hall as a war trophy. The Company has been congratulated by the Colonel, as undoubtedly by their watchfulness and presence of mind they saved an awkward situation. Corpl Bromwich has since been promoted lance-sergeant. Some of this news may be stale by now, yet I think the Rugby people should learn what their lads are doing. At the request of several I have been asked to point out that what they consider to be an insult to them is the booming of the troops who were billeted in Rugby as “ The Rugby Soldiers, &c.” The sentiments expressed to me are that only the Battery and ‘E’ Company, &c, really come under that nomenclature. We appear to be off the picture. We were the original ‘ Rugby soldiers ’ long before this war broke out, and still claim that honour ; and, what’s more, refuse to allow any other troops—no matter what splendid work they have done, sacrifices they have made, and losses suffered—to step into our rightful position in the hearts and sympathies of the people of Rugby. The Rev B McNulty conducted a service a week last Wednesday. He was quite pleased to drop across Rugby men.”

LOCAL WAR CASUALTIES

CAPT RENNIE WATERHOUSE KILLED.

Capt Rennie Waterhouse, of the 7th Lancashire Fusiliers, who is reported as having been killed in the Dardanelles on May 10th, was formerly a member of the B.T.H Company’s staff as an engineer in the contract and turbine sales department. He was the third son of Mrs T C Waterhouse, of Lomberdale Hall, Bakewell, and of Thorncliffe, Kersal Edge, Manchester, and all his brothers are serving with H.M Forces. Capt Waterhouse, who during his residence in Rugby lived at Epworth, Clifton Road, owned a textile mill at Rheims, which has been destroyed by the Germans.

BILTON.

MUCH regret has been caused in this village by the death of Gnr. Harold Freeman, of the Royal Field Artillery, son of Mr H Freeman ; and the greatest sympathy is felt for the bereaved relatives. Harold, a strong, well-built young fellow, was a painter and plumber by trade, and his unassuming manner and genial disposition made him a general favourite in the place. He was a member of the Cricket and Football Clubs, and also of the Working Men’s Club, for which he did a great deal of useful work when it became necessary to renovate the club premises last summer. He also belonged to the Foresters’ Court, and in all respects his conduct was exemplary. When the war broke out he at once realised that it was his duty to obey the call to arms, and enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery. He quickly made himself an expert artilleryman, and was several times offered promotion, but preferred to remain a private. His Battery was daily expecting orders to go to the front; everything was in readiness, and he was looking forward to the opportunity of seeing active service, when some time last week he was taken ill with pneumonia, complications developed, and he passed away on Monday at the age of 26. The body was brought to Bilton on Wednesday night and placed in the Memorial Chapel, near his home at The Magnet, to await burial yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

THE DEATH OF PTE. HILL.

Mr and Mrs Hill, parents of Pte Hill, of the Rugby Territorial Company, who, as reported last week, was killed in action, have received a letter from Sergt Ward, who says :—

“ I wish to express my deepest sympathy with you all in the loss of such an excellent soldier as your son, who was killed whilst doing his duty on Friday, May 28th, at about 1 a.m. We are all sorry at the loss of his services, for he was one of our best men. Whenever he was called upon to perform any duty, no matter what it was, he did it with a cheerful spirit. This time he was out on the listening post, which is in front of our lines between 50 and 60 yards, when a party of Germans attacked them. Every man performed his duty splendidly. His comrade by his side was also wounded, but kept on firing until a party reinforced them, and made it possible for us to get his body and retire to the trenches. His death was avenged by a German’s death, whose body was fetched in. There is not a man in the Company that will not miss him, for a good many times when on the march he has made the march go easy by singing a song. He was in my section, and there is no one out hero who will miss him more than I shall. I must express to you the deepest sympathy on behalf of the section to which he belonged, also the whole platoon. Louis was buried by the side of our other unfortunate comrades. He suffered no pain or agony, for death was instantaneous.”

To the letter is appended the following note by Capt Mason :—

“ Unfortunately no time to write a letter, but the above expresses the opinion of officers as well as men. On behalf of the officers I most deeply sympathise with you in your bereavement.”

Q.M.S A C Tomlinson also writes:-

“ It is with deepest regret and sincere sympathy that we have to tell you of the death of your son, Pte L Hill. He met his death gallantly, fighting in defence of the post entrusted to him. His memory is proudly established in the hearts of all his comrades. He was always cheery, always happy, and every man in the Company was his friend, and we all miss his bright presence. It may be a comfort for you to know that his death was instantaneous and without pain. He died fighting for his King, his country and his home, and no man can wish for a prouder death.”

Mr and MRS J HIPWELL received a notification from the War Office on Sunday last that Corpl William Hence, C Company, 2nd Border Regiment, was killed in action on May 16th. He was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and joined the regiment soon after the war commenced. He was 25 years of age, and has made his home with Mr and Mrs J Hipwell (Newbold) from a boy. He had been previously wounded, and was away in hospital for seven weeks, but returned to the firing-line again a short time ago.

WOLSTON.

MR AND MRS A OWEN, of Wolsten, have now heard definitely that their son is amongst the missing and they have received official intimation that he has been missing since an action near Ypres on the 25th of April last. Since that date no information has come to hand as to his whereabouts.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt G T Seabroke, of the East Lancashire Regiment, son of Col Seabroke, Rugby, has been gazetted major.

Mr P G Chamberlain, M.A, of No. 3 Market Place, Rugby, has joined the H.A.C (Infantry Battalion).

The French Military Authorities have requested Dr Frances Ivens (formerly of Harborough Parva) to start a Field Hospital between the firing line and Royaumont. With the approbation of the Scottish Committee, Dr Ivens agreed to do so and to have it ready at 48 hours’ notice.

Brev-Col R A Richardson, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, whose gallant conduct on the occasion of the torpedo attack on the Wayfarer was referred to in an Army Order, published last week, is a brother of Mrs Mulliner, of Clifton Court.

Mrs H R Lee, of 78 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received official intimation that her husband, Pte Lee, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, a former employee of the B.T.H, is in a hospital at Rouen suffering from a slight scalp wound.

It is gratifying to learn that the complaints which have been made in certain quarters of slackness among workmen employed in the manufacture of munitions do not apply to Rugby, and that the local representatives of the allied engineering trades are rendering every assistance. In accordance with Press regulations we abstain from giving further details.

TWO RUGBY CLERICS JOIN THE FORCES.

We understand that the Rev S M Morgan, curate-in-charge of the Church House, and the Rev R W Dugdale, curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church, have been appointed by the Chaplain-General as chaplains to H.M. Forces in the 63rd and 64th Brigades, now stationed at Tring, and that they will be leaving Rugby shortly. We are sure that they will carry with them the hearty good wishes of all Rugbeians.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Eighteen recruits have been accepted at Rugby Drill Hall during the past week, as follows :- S W Wareing, J E Burnham, and T Batchelor, R.W.R ; T Jennings, 13th Gloucesters : G B Cox, Leicesters ; F Southam, Rifle Brigade ; F Gardner, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; H Bishop, A.S.C (H.T) ; W R Seaton, Welsh Guards ; J Clarke and W H Moseley, Army Vet. Corps ; H Bate, F C Woodhouse, S C Hobbs, W R Davis, E W Ellson, and S H Oswell, Rugby Fortress Company. R.E ; F Morrey, Household Cavalry.

HAIRDRESSERS’ CHARGES.

A meeting was held on Monday last by the Rugby hairdressers to discuss the advisability of increasing their saloon charges. It will be remembered that about twelve months ago the Rugby Hairdressers’ Association fixed a minimum price of 1½d for shaving and 3d for haircutting, which abolished 1d shaving in Rugby. The better-appointed shops have decided that, owing to the rapid increase of expenses—both business and domestic—and the flourishing state of the labour market they will increase their charges to the following prices:—Shaving, 2d; hair-cutting, 4d; ditto (boys under 14), 3d; singeing, 4d; shampooing, 4d. The new prices are to come in force on Thursday, June 10th.

It was mentioned that a great number of their customers had joined his Majesty’s Forces, and were now in training or at the front, and those who were serving his Majesty in the local works were working so many hours that they are unable to attend the saloon, and therefore cause a considerable fall in the saloon takings. It was decided by those who have adopted the new prices to attend the Warwickshire Reservists at the old prices, and the same privilege will be extended to those customers who have donned the khaki when they come home on furlough.

NOTICE TO WARWICKSHIRE LICENSED VICTUALLERS.

The Chief Constable of Warwickshire (Captain J T Brinkley) has issued the following notice to licensed victuallers under the Intoxicating Liquor Laws :- “Complaints being received from Red Cross Hospitals in the county that wounded soldiers are being supplied with drink in the public-houses, and, in some instances, return in an intoxicated condition, license holders are requested not to serve them with intoxicants. The Brigadier-General commanding this district informs me that unless this request is observed as far as it is possible to do so, it will be necessary to put the premises complained of out of bounds for all troops, with the further liability of being closed altogether under the Defence of the Realm regulations if further complaints are received.