25th May 1918. The Recent Flying Accident Near Rugby

THE RECENT FLYING ACCIDENT NEAR RUGBY.
URBAN COUNCIL RESENT CORONER’S STRICTURES.

At a meeting of the Rugby Urban Council, acting as a Burial Board, on Tuesday evening, Mr. Stevenson referred to the criticisms which had been levelled against the Council in connection with the charge of £11 for the ground for the burial of a Royal Air Force officer who was killed in a recent flying accident. He said he was sorry to see the remarks which appeared in one of the local papers condemning the Council for its unpatriotic action. In view of the town’s record all through the war he did not think such remarks were called for, and he was also very sorry indeed to see such an educated man as the Coroner using strong remarks, particularly as he had not made himself fully conversant with the whole facts. He also deprecated the Coroner’s action in asking the Press to take up the cudgels and to start a propaganda to slander the Council. No mention had been made of the fact that on a previous occasion a flying corps officer had been interned in the cemetery free of charge, and no request had been made by soldiers or their relatives which had not been granted. Had the gentleman who had impugned Rugby’s patriotism or any of his officers, communicated with the Clerk to the Council on the matter he had no doubt that the Council would have done its duty as it always did.

The Clerk said he regretted that such a thing had ever occurred. The Council would remember that some months ago they decided that a free site should be granted to any Rugby soldier who lost his life whilst serving with His Majesty’s forces, if it was the wish of his friends. This had been carried out, and had been much appreciated by the relatives of the men. Then, about a couple of months ago, a young officer of the R F.C. met with an accident and died in Rugby, and in his discretion he (the Clerk) decided that this case came under the purview of the Council’s resolution and a free internment was granted. It seemed strange that the Military, in their statement concerning the present case, entirely omitted to mention the fact. In the present case the undertaker informed Mr. Foxon, who consulted him (the Clerk) on the matter, that it was desired to bury the young man at Rugby. He ascertained that the death did not take place in the town. He explained the circumstances very fully to the undertaker, who quite understood the position, and telephoned the facts to the Commanding Officer. From that moment until after the inquest he (the Clerk) never heard any more about the matter ; the military never approached him, and so far as he knew the funeral was to be at Rugby, and the day before the funeral they borrowed the Council’s Union Jack. Although at the inquest the Coroner was asked to communicate with him (the Clerk) he had heard nothing from him. He did not wish to say anything which would cause a continuation of any controversy, but he did think if the Military felt so very strongly on the matter they might have put themselves in touch with him, and had they done so he would have used every effort to have met the request for any soldier who had given his life for his country to be buried in their cemetery, even to the extent of providing the fees had it been necessary.

Mr. Linnell said it had always been usual to charge double fees for strangers, but he thought that, to stop the chance of similar occurrences, they should allow any soldier dying in the neighbourhood to be buried at Rugby if his friends wished it. He hoped there would be so few that it would make little or no difference to the number of interments.

Mr. Stevenson suggested that this should be referred back to the Cemetery Committee.—Mr. Robbins supported.

Mr. Yates thought it very regrettable that such a controversy had arisen. They had acted entirely within the regulations, but this was one of the unexpected emergencies arising for which there was no provision made. He supported the suggestion to refer the matter to the Cemetery Committee to see if they could frame a rule or amend the regulations to cover contingencies such as this. They wanted to scrap as much red tape as possible, and if they had officials and there were regulations they could only expect them to carry them out. They could pass no strictures on Mr. Morson although they might blame themselves for not making their regulations elastic enough to cope with such cases.

Mr. Barnsdale agreed that all soldiers whose friends desired it should be allowed a free burial in the Cemetery, but he regretted that this question had cropped up. Much had been said about it which should not have been said.

The Chairman (Mr. McKinnell) also thought it was a great pity that the matter had arisen. The gist of the matter seemed to be that while the Military felt very strongly that this young officer should be buried in Rugby Cemetery they did not get into touch with the Clerk to inquire whether the charge could be reduced or waived altogether. Had the Clerk not felt able to take the responsibility upon himself or to find the chairman of the Cemetery Committee he certainly would have authorised him to give permission for the burial, and he felt quite certain that the Council would have been only too glad to have confirmed his action.

Mr. Hands suggested that a copy of the paper containing the discussion should be forwarded to the Coroner.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

DESERTER.—Wallace Harper, no fixed abode, was charged with being a deserter from the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C.—He pleaded guilty.—P.S Hawkes deposed that he met prisoner on Saturday morning in Railway Terrace, and as ha was of military age he asked to see his Army discharge papers or rejection certificate. Prisoner replied that he had neither, and that he had not been registered, examined, or called up. He gave his name as James Davis, no fixed abode ; but while he was taking his description at the Police Station witness noticed that he had been recently vaccinated ; and on being questioned about this, prisoner admitted that his name was Wallace Harper, and that he had been a deserter from Norwich since April 27th.—Remanded to await an escort.

A PATRIOTIC OFFER.—Mr Harold Cole, a retired Metropolitan policeman, was sworn in as a reserve constable, and complimented by the Bench upon his patriotism in coming forward.

DISCHARGED SOLDIERS.—The number of discharged soldiers in the different districts is as follows:—Rugby 443, Alcester 138, Atherstone 287, Brailes 30, Coleshill 85, Coventry 406, Henley 57, Kenilworth 104, Kineton 39, Leamington 429, Solihull 135, Southam 91, Stratford 157, Sutton Coldfield 241, Warwick 236.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

LOW FLYING OVER THE TOWN.
In reply to a letter to the Military Authorities asking that low flying in aeroplanes over the town should be stopped, Capt King, the officer commanding, wrote :— “ It is impossible to eliminate all low flying, as present War conditions make a certain amount of low flying essential. Flying has to be carried out when the clouds are very low, and, consequently, the machines have to fly underneath the clouds. I will, however, try as far as possible to keep the machines from flying low over Rugby.

FIRST LADY DRIVER.
A hackney carriage driver’s license was granted to Miss Ida Cooper, of 83 Winfield Street. This is the first license that has been granted to a lady locally.

THE RECENT EXPLOSION.
In presenting the Electric Committee’s report, Mr H Yates expressed the gratitude of the Committee to the B.T.H. staff & workmen for the very speedy manner in which they effected the repairs after the recent accident at the Power House. When he visited the scene of the accident with Mr Shenton, and saw the extent of the damage done, he was surprised that they should attempt to get the supply renewed for the evening. He thought the achievement reflected great credit on the staff and workmen who worked so hard to get the supply assured by eight o’clock. He therefore moved that a letter of appreciation be sent to the B.T.H.

Mr T A Wise seconded, and said the speed of the repairs was really wonderful. He did not see the damage, but those who had seen it told him that they never believed it possible that the work could be done so quickly. Praise was due also for the extraordinary presence of mind of two workmen—Messrs Smart and Newitt—who took steps immediately the accident occurred to eliminate all chance of a further explosion. Had it not been for them, he understood much more serious damage would have been done.—This was carried.

ROLL OF HONOUR.
In reply to a question, the Clerk said he had received a long list of names of Rugby men who had fallen in the War, but they were not nearly complete yet, and he hoped that friends and relatives of fallen men would communicate with him at once.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The following Rugby soldiers, all belonging to the Oxford and Bucks LI., have been reported missing:—Ptes W Chamberlain, F Lenton, H Slatcher, and Corpl W F C White. Rifleman Pitham, 10 Earl Street ; Pte W H Mitchell, Worcester Regt, son of Mr and Mrs David Mitchell, Lodge Road, and Pte H Facet, Leicester Regt, have also been reported as missing.

Pte A G Shilbock, Gloucester Regt, 41 Abbey Street, Rugby, who has been reported as missing, is believed to have fallen into the hands of the Germans as he was last seen in a small group which was cut off by the enemy on March 24th. He was a fine swimmer and won three certificates at the Rugby Baths. He had been in France 12 months.

Mr. and Mrs. Bland have received news from the War Office that their eldest son, Private W Bland, of the Somerset Light Infantry, has been missing since March 21. This is their second son who has been reported missing. A third son is now in France.

Mrs. Freeman, Bennett Cottage, Bennett St., has received news from her husband. Sergt. J. Freeman, R.W.R, an old member of E Company that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He was officially posted as missing on March 22nd.

D.C.M. FOR RUGBY SOLDIER.
Sergt J Webb, 1st Warwicks, Dunchurch Rd, Rugby, who, as we announced last week, was congratulated on his fine behaviour by the General commanding the 4th Division, has been awarded the D.C.M. for gallantry in the field.

RUGBY PRISONER OF WAR’S STORY.
Transferred to Holland after more than three years in Germany as a prisoner of war, Sergeant H Collins, of New Bilton, Rugby, writes: “ I must tell you about my last three days in Germany, just to give you an idea of the starvation out here. Three days before leaving Germany for Holland we were sent to an exchange station on the German frontier, a town called Aaken. When we arrived at the station there and marched through the streets, hundreds of children followed us begging us to give them bread and among them also were many women. Of course we had food with us from our parcels, and at our billets we threw the empty meat and jam tins away. My God, it was painful to see crowds of these women and children dash for the empty tins.

DESERTER.—On Monday, before Mr. A. E. Donkin, Driver William Henry Jones, 24 Kimberley Road, pleaded guilty to being a deserter from the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C., since April 7.—P.S. Hawkes deposed that prisoner was in plain clothes when he arrested him at his residence. He was unable to produce any Army discharge papers, and he admitted that he was a deserter.—Remanded to await an escort.

DUNCHURCH.
DR POWELL has heard that his son, who was reported missing, is wounded and a prisoner in Germany.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
LATEST NEWS OF OUR SOLDIER BOYS.—News is now to hand that Pte Sidney Linnett, Army Cyclist Corps, previously reported missing, is a prisoner of war at Limberg. He was captured on April 9th last.—Pte Frank Lane, Grenadiers, is now reported missing. He is son of Mr & Mrs Joseph Lane, and his brother Arthur, also of the Grenadiers, was killed on March 29, 1916.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
RIFLEMAN W BUTTON, 7th Batt. Rifle Brigade, has sent word to Mrs Day, of Newbold-on-Avon, that he was taken prisoner about two months ago, and is now at Langensalza, Germany. Rifleman Button resided in the village for several years, and before joining the Army in September, 1914, was employed at the Cement Works.

SILVER COINAGE MUST NOT BE HOARDED.

The prohibition of the hoarding of silver coinage and the sale or purchase at more than its face value, in Ireland, announced on Tuesday morning, is now extended to the whole of the United Kingdom. The Regulation provides that after next Monday “ no person shall retain current silver coins of a value exceeding that of the amount of silver coinage reasonably required by him at that time for the purposes of the personal expenditure of himself and his family and of his trade or business (if any).” Contravention of the Regulation constitutes an offence against the Regulations, and the burden of showing what amount of silver it is “ reasonable ” for a person to have it placed on the person charged. The Regulation also provides that any person who sells or purchases, or offers to sell or purchase, any current coin for an amount exceeding the face value of the coin, or accepts or offers to accept any such coin in payment of a debt or otherwise for an amount exceeding its face value, shall be guilty of an offence.

FARMERS WANT PROTECTION AGAINST POLITICIANS.

At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the National Farmers’ Union on Tuesday, in London, progress was reported in respect of the proposed Council of Agriculture, which is to represent owners, occupiers, and labourers to watch the interests of agriculture generally against urban interests, which one member said cared only for votes and how to get the cheapest food. It was hoped the Council would protect farmers against politicians, who set party against party, and class against class. It was agreed to send a resolution to Mr Prothero and Lord Rhondda, asking for a revision of food prices, in view of the greatly increased cost of production.

“ It is curious one can buy a live rabbit without a coupon, but not a dead one. You ought to have bought a live one and wrung its neck,” said Mr. H. Jackson, the clerk at West Ham Police Court.

WHITSUNTIDE BOOKINGS.—Although the number of persons travelling during the holidays was not so large as in pre-war days, the bookings at the G.C.R. Station on Saturday showed an advance on last year’s figures. On Whit-Monday, too, the numbers were high, but in most cases tickets were taken to Willoughby or stations within easy reach of the town. On the L & N.W. Rly. the traffic was quite normal, and although no extra trains were run passengers were not unduly crowded except in a few cases. The countryside was looking at its best last week-end and presented great attraction to those who could by any means of locomotion get out a few miles to enjoy the vernal surroundings. Most of them adopted the wise precaution of taking their lunch and tea rations with them.

SCHOOLBOY LABOUR ON THE LAND.
APPEAL TO PARENTS, HEADMASTERS & BOYS.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—The military situation has necessitated calling-up of a large number of agricultural labourers, which will seriously deplete the available labour during the coming hay, corn, and potato harvests. It is of vital importance that the harvest of these crops should be successfully secured this year. This success will depend largely upon boys at public and secondary schools who have reached an age that will enable them to do useful work on the land.

The extent to which farmers are counting on their help is shown by the fact that demands for over 17,000 boys have already been received at the Ministry ; and there is no doubt that these numbers will be largely increased when the full effect of the calling-up for military service has been appreciated by the farmers. Of these numbers not less than 3,000 will be required during June and July, and a further 3,500 are needed for October for potato lifting if suitable accommodation can be arranged.

In view of the above facts, I am reluctantly compelled to appeal to schools to release during term-time such groups of boys as may be necessary for getting in the harvest. This is a time of national crisis, and the ordinary considerations of education have not the same force as in normal times. As I have pointed out, it is necessary to provide men for the Army, and it is necessary to provide labour to take their places on the farms and I must urgently appeal to parents, headmasters and boys to give all the help they can.

In view of my representations as to the urgency of the national need, the President of the Board of Education concurs in this appeal, and is issuing a circular on the subject to secondary schools in England and Wales.

All offers of service must be made through the headmasters of the schools. Headmaster who have not already received the regulations, and who can offer boys of 16 and over, should communicate with this Ministry.—I am. your, faithfully.

(Signed) A C GEDDES.
Ministry of National Service, Westminster, S.W.1.

DEATHS

DODSON.—In loving memory of Trooper GEOFFREY H. DODSON, 10th Australian Light Horse, son of Armourer-Staff-Sergt & Mrs. Dodson, 4 St. Matthew’s Street, who was killed in action in Palestine on May 2nd, 1918 ; aged 25.

IN MEMORIAM.

HUDSON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, HENRY JOHN HUDSON, who died at Chatham Naval Hospital, May 20, 1917.
With patience he suffered, his troubles were sore.
But now it is ended, he suffers no more ;
He sleeps, we will leave him in silence to rest,
The parting was painful, but God knoweth best.
—Sadly missed by his loving Wife and Children.

4th May 1918. Local Heroes in the Zeebrugge Raid

LOCAL HEROES IN THE ZEEBRUGGE RAID.

Chief Motor Mechanic W Gilbert, who as stated in our last issue, was one of those who volunteered and took part in the naval raid on Zeebrugge, is the son of Mr T Gilbert, who resides at the picturesque old cottages near Bilton Church. He was one of the first Bilton lads to volunteer for Kitchener’s Army, but when in training he unfortunately received injuries while trench digging, in consequence of which he was, much to his disappointment, eventually discharges. He came home, and worked at Messrs Robbins’ Motor Garage, Warwick Street, as motor mechanic, and was one of the first to drive the Southam mail van when the motor was adopted by the Postal Authorities in lieu of the old horse-driven vehicle. But his desire to get back into active service was keen, and his skill as a mechanic and driver enabled him to find his way into the Navy. After passing his examination at Southampton promotion soon followed, and ultimately, he was appointed chief motor mechanic on one of the motor launches engaged in the important work of patrolling the Channel off Dover. He had taken part in several hazardous runs, and when the Zeebrugge business came along it afforded him an opportunity he could not resist. On a postcard to his parents afterwards he briefly wrote :—“ I have been and come back again O.K. Zeebrugge is a hot place. We had a shell through the deck, but no one was hit. We were more lucky than some. It was hell. Got back at 12 o’clock—just 24 hours’ run.” In a subsequent letter he says :—“ I am pleased I was there on Monday night. It was worth seeing. We ‘smoked’ for the Vindictive, so you can guess how far we were in. I think it is the finest bit of work that has been done in this War ;” and he winds up humorously : “ Talk about ——’s birthday and the fireworks—that’s washed out now.”

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of the Murray School, has received a cheery postcard from Pte Will Clark, R.M.L.I, now an inmate of a military hospital at Dover, who took part in the Zeebrugge Raid. He writes :—“ As you see by my address, I am ‘ in dock’ again once more, and, by the way, having a grand time. The last time I told you I told you I should have another go before long. Well, I volunteered to be one of the landing party at Zeebrugge, and we visited the Huns on Monday last (midnight). We had rather a warm time while it lasted, but they did not like the look of when we got on the Mole. Do you think it was my face that frightened them? My sister said it was. Anyhow, I know what it was—so many of us had had a good schooling like you always gave us. We had several Rugger players of note aboard us, including Lieut-Commander Harrison and Lieut Walker. I am pleased to say I have played against both. Really, sir, I am a very lucky man, as my wounds are quite light—a few small pieces in the head, slight concussion, and sprained back. I am looking forward to seeing you and the school again very soon.”

Pte Clerk is a grandson of the late Mr E Allen, for many years stationmaster at Rugby.

Pte Clerk, who is a son of Mr H Clark, 8 Winfield Street, Rugby, and an Old Murrayian, joined the R.M.L.I eight years ago. In a letter his sister, who has visited him at the hospital, says :—“ He has got shrapnel wounds about the head and face, and has hurt his back ; a shell exploded and blew him off a scaling ladder. There were 40 killed round him, but he was lucky. Unfortunately he any on the deck all night soaked in blood and rain, as they were all mixed up anyhow—dead, dying and wounded. . . . They had a dreadful time, but did what they set out to do.”

FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.

While flying near Rugby on Thursday evening last week Second-Lieut David Percival McIntyre (19), of the Royal Air Force, whose home is at Broughton Ferry, Scotland, collided with some telegraph wires, and received injuries from which he died shortly afterwards in the Brookfield Nursing Home.

At the inquest, which was held on Monday by Mr E F Hadow, Second-Lieut Norman Maximilian Smith said his attention was attracted to the deceased officer by the fact that he was flying very low down and diving over hedges and trees. He then turned towards the sun, and came down lower, apparently trying to fly under the telegraph wires which were set back a considerable distance from the road. He crashed into the wires and the machine toppled over.

The Coroner : Have you ever seen this done before ?—Answer : No. but I have heard some wild stories about it, and I have heard of pilots who have flown under the wires and have lived to tell the tale. He added that there should have been 2ft of space under the wheels and 2ft between the top of the plane and the wires had deceased been flying straight.—The Coroner : That is cutting things very fine.—Witness expressed the  opinion that deceased made a mistake in judgment. He was not flying right in the face of the sun at the time of the accident.

Major Leslie Frederick Forbes deposed that the deceased officer had graduated as a pilot and was very competent.

The Coroner enquired whether trick flying low down was necessary.—Witness said not altogether, but overseas a pilot is supposed to do a certain amount of low flying. He added that when a pilot was competent he was allowed to fly rather low. After the accident he visited the spot and concluded that deceased had fallen from a height of 20 to 30 feet, while travelling at 100 miles an hour. He must have been going very fast because some parts of the machine were found some distance away. The top part of the plane struck the under part of the wires and deceased was evidently trying to fly underneath them. This was often done by pilots, but in this case he was not sufficiently competent. Deceased was flying against the sun and might not have seen the wires.

The Coroner enquired whether there were any restrictions on young officers playing such tricks.—A : We have restrictions for officers who have not completed their time, but others have rather more latitude, and are sent up to do as they like. It is strictly against the regulations to fly at low altitudes over towns.

Air Mechanics Coles and Muir deposed that the engine and rigging were in good condition before the ascent.—Surgeon Major Cester Collins deposed that deceased was found 20 yards away from the machine. He had a fracture at the base of the skull, partial dislocation of the vertebrae of the neck, fracture of the left leg, and rupture of the internal organs. His machine must have struck the wires with a tremendous impact.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Gunner W E Wellens, R.F.A, who removed from an ambulance train in a dying condition, died at the Hospital of Cross on Wednesday.

Pte Alfred Charles Williams, R.W.R, son of Mr A Williams, 29 William Street, has written home stating that he was taken prisoner by the Germans during the heavy fighting of March 22nd.

Pte C W Oakley, R.W.R, only son of Mr & Mrs Oakley, 21 Sandown Road, Rugby, has been wounded in three places. Before joining up in 1917 he worked at Rainsbrook.

Pte T H Bosworth, Lancashire Fusiliers, youngest son of Mr Samuel Bosworth, Lutterworth, of whom nothing had been heard since March 17th, has now written to say that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He has served in Egypt and France for three years.

Mr A D Stocks, formerly of Misterton, Lutterworth, and later with Messrs Seabroke & Son, solicitors, of Rugby, has for some time been in training at Bushey in the Officers’ Cadet Battalion in preparation for joining the Coldstream Guards.

Mrs J Lee, Regent Street, Lutterworth, received news last Saturday that her brother, Pte H W Lee, Royal Berkshire Regiment, has been missing since March 21st. He is 19 years of age, and had only been in France five weeks. Any news of him will be gratefully received by his brother and sister at the above address.

Second-Lieut C Pridmore Dunn, son of Mr F Dunn, at one time on the staff of the National Provincial Bank, Rugby, and later with the Cement Company, is reported missing. In a letter to his parents the Colonel says that he had fought well, and that he had recommended him for his gallantry.

Mr & Mrs Cowley, of 17 James Street, Rugby, have received a postcard from their only son, Pte W F Cowley, of the Wiltshire Regiment, saying that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and is slightly wounded by a bullet in the stomach. He is 19 years of age, and was before joining up employed at Messrs Badham’s, High Street.

News been received by Mrs Joseph E Walker, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, that her husband, a lance corporal in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed action on March 30th. Lance-Corpl Walker, who was 29 years of age and joined the Army in January, 1916, formerly carried on business as a greengrocer in Bridget Street.

Pte T Eaton-Shore, son of the late Mr J Eaton-Shore, formerly works manager for Messrs Willans & Robinson, who been out in France for two years and seven months with the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has recently been offered a commission. He is now in training with the 18th Officers’ Cadet Battalion at Bath. Before the War he was well-known in Rugby, especially in cricket and hockey circles.

In their report to the Warwickshire County on Wednesday the General Purposes Committee reported :—“ We regret to learn that Lieut J Greenwood, formerly assistant master at Rugby Eastlands Boys’ School, has been invalided out of the Army, and that he will never able to resume work as a teacher. We regret to find that the Local Government (Emergency Provisions) Act, 1916, makes no provision for the Council to pay any allowance in such a case. We understand that Mr Greenwood will receive a pension.”

Miss E G M Bryant, daughter of Mr William Bryant, of Rugby, who was appointed matron of the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital, Mont Boron, Nice, A.M. In 1908, has been decorated with the French Medaille d’Argent des Epidemics, the hospital having during the War been taken over by the French Government for military purposes. Last year, when dressing wounds, Miss Bryant contracted blood poisoning in the right hand, and in consequence had to have the little finger amputated and thumb shortened. It is now hoped that she will ultimately regain the use the remaining portion, which at one time it was feared she would lose altogether.

SERGT J. FREEMAN.

Sergt John Freemen, R.W.R, Bennett Cottage, Bennett Street, a son of Mrs Freeman, Lancaster Road, has been reported missing since March 22nd. He had been a member of “ E ” Company for 12 years when war broke out, and held several shooting cups which he had won. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. as a carpenter. He had been in France a little over twelve months.

B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Rifleman H Corbett, Rifle Brigade, late of the Works Stores, was killed in action on March 28th, and that Pte J E Garner, Leicestershire Regiment, formerly employed in the Pattern Shop, died from wounds on April 24th.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS H EDMONDS, The Heath, Dunchurch, who received official news on April 18th that her husband had been wounded, has since received a card from him saying he is a prisoner of war in Badam, Germany, with bullet wounds in shoulder and face. He writes very cheerfully, and says he is going on all right, and being treated well. Pte H Edmonds has served 18 months in France, and has been through some hard fighting on the Western front. He was in the Cambrai attack in November, 1917. Before joining up he was employed at Messrs Alcock & Sons, tailors, Dunchurch.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.
SIGNALLER A L IRESON WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs E W Ireson have received news that their son, Signaller A L Ireson, of the R.F.A, has received a shrapnel wound in the head. Before volunteering, at the age of 17¼ years, he was a draughtsman at the Drawing Office of Coventry Ordnance Works. He had been in France for nearly two years, where he had seen much fighting. His elder brother, who was similarly wounded, has now got his discharge and returned to Canada, from whence he came to fight  for the Old Country.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
On Sunday, which happened to be Hospital Sunday in the parish, a Memorial Service was held at the Parish Church in the afternoon for Gunner Henry Howkins, of the Royal Garrison Artillery, the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Chas Howkins, who was officially reported as having died in hospital in France on March 30th. The family being members of the Primitive Methodist body, the memorial was really a joint service of the two congregations, and the Rev W Vaughan, of the Primitive Methodist Church, Rugby, attended it and took part by reading the Lesson, the Service used being the one authorised in the Diocese, and the Vicar giving an address. A very large congregation assembled to show their sympathy with and respect for the family, including a numerous deputation from the Village Benefit Club. A substantial addition to the Hospital Fund was collected, in view of its work amongst wounded soldiers.

GRANDBOROUGH.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs W Coling have received official notice that their eldest son, Sergt P Coling, has died from wounds received on April 10th. He joined the Army on the outbreak of war, and had participated in much of the fighting, and had had some very narrow escapes. This is the second son Mr & Mrs Coling have lost in the War, and much sympathy is felt for them locally.

REMARKABLE REDUCTION OF VAGRANTS IN WARWICKSHIRE.

At the annual meeting of the Warwickshire County Vagrancy Committee it was reported that during the quarter ended March 31st the number of casual poor relieved in the county was 2,581 men, 604 women, and 6 children, making a total 3,191, as compared with a total of 7,086 for the corresponding quarter of last year. The total number of food tickets issued by the unions during the quarter was 2,256, of which 1,938 were produced to tradesmen.—The Chairman moved the approval of the statistics, saying that they revealed a healthy reduction in the number of admissions.—The annual report, which was approved, recorded a pronounced reduction in vagrancy in the county.

DEATHS.

BENFIELD.—Died at 39 Stationary Hospital, Aire, France, from wounds received in action on April 16th, 1918, Pte. BERTRAM GEORGE BENFIELD, of the D.C.L.I., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Benfield, Northend.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—Deeply mourned by his Father (in France), Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

CHANT.—In loving memory of my dear husband, who fell in action on March 22, 1918 ; aged 37 years.
“ There is a link death cannot sever ;
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—From his loving Wife and Baby.

COLING.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. P. Coling, who died of wounds received in action on April 10th ; aged 24 years. Deeply lamented.

HALL.—In ever-loving memory of SYDNEY GEORGE, only dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. G. Hall, 31 Alexandra Road, Rugby, who killed in action on April 12th ; aged 21 years.

JONES.—E. H. JONES, Second-Lieut., R.F.A., 87th Brigade, killed in action on April 25th ; son of Mr. John Jones, Cosford.

PACKWOOD.—In loving remembrance of WILLIE, the very dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Packwood, St. Matthew’s Street, who was killed in action on April 12, 1918.

TABOR.—In loving memory of ALICK JOHN TABOR, aged 19, of the Durham Light Infantry, killed in action on March 25, 1918 ; youngest son of Mr. G. Tabor, of Woolscott.—Deeply mourned by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

DEMPSEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. P. DEMPSEY, K.O.S.B., who died of wounds in France on April 30th, 1916.

HOPCRAFT.— In loving memory of JOHN ANDREW HOPCRAFT, who was accidentally killed whilst on duty on May 3, 1915.
“ We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.
Some may think that we forget him
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which is hid behind that smile.”
—From his devoted Wife and Children.

STEBBING—In loving memory of Gunner SYDNEY REGINALD STEBBING, Motor Machine Gun Section, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action at Zonnebeke on May 4, 1915.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.—R.I.P.

1st Jul 1916. Charge Against an “Enemy Alien” Dismissed

CHARGE AGAINST AN “ ENEMY ALIEN ” DISMISSED.— Arthur E A Bierderman, canvasser, was charged with that he, being an alien enemy, did furnish false particulars for the purposes of registration in contravention of the Aliens’ Restriction (Consolidation) Order, 1916, at Rugby, on June 23rd.—Mr Eaden appeared, for the defendant, and pleaded not guilty.—P.S Ghent stated that on June 22nd defendant registered himself at the Police Station as a German, and signed the register produced, and gave an address in Bath Street. He returned later, and said he was staying at 138 Bath Street. On June 24th he called again, and was granted a travelling permit. Subsequently witness received from Mrs Smith, 138 Bath Street, the registration form produced. On that form defendant had written “ Australia,” and there was no mention of the fact that he was a German. Defendant was subsequently arrested at Banbury. He was charged with giving false information; and, in reply, he said, “ I feel relieved that that is all.”—By Mr Baden : In his identity book defendant had entered his nationality as “ Australia ” ; but someone had crossed that out, and substituted the word “ German.”—Mr Eaden asked what the nationality was of a man born in a British colony of a German parent naturalised in that colony ?—Witness said he thought he would be British, but defendant had to prove this.—Mr Wise pointed out that defendant’s father was naturalised after defendant was born.—P.S Ghent said the man was a “ German under protest,” and he did not like being called one. He added that when he asked defendant what has nationality was he said, the police said he was a German, but he believed he was an Australian. The man said unfortunately he had nothing to prove that he was born in Australia.—Supt Clarke said the man always travelled as a German, and he called at the Police Station and informed them that he was a German. He afterwards deceived his landlady by saying that he was an Australian.—Mr Baden pointed out that the defendant’s father and mother were unquestionably German, and had lived there. Defendant’s elder brother was born while they lived in Germany, and after this they went to Australia, where defendant was born. He was brought up at an English school, and was afterwards employed by a Mining Company in Australia. He lived in Australia 36 years, and during that time his father became naturalised, and his mother also became English automatically. Defendant and his brother, subsequently came to England, and as there was no question that the latter was a German, he became naturalised. There was no necessity for this in defendant’s case, because, as he was born in a British colony, he had the opportunity of adopting which country he would become a citizen of when he came of age, and he then chose to become an Australian. He had lost his birth certificate, and when he was before the Wandsworth police they insisted upon registering him as a German. He had never been to Germany, nor had he any German connections. He submitted that the man had only committed a technical offence, and if the Bench wished to adjourn the case defendant’s brother, who was the secretary of a large Insurance Company in London, could attend and give evidence to the effect that he was born in Australia.—The Chairman said defendant had committed a technical offence. He was in his present unfortunate position because he had lost his birth certificate, but they believed that he was an Australian, and they would dismiss the case. They thought the police did quite right in bringing the case forward.

PROGRESS OF THE WAR.

A message from the British Headquarters, sent on Thursday night, states that activity continues to increase along the whole of the British front.

The Russians have had another victory in the south. On a front of about 25 miles, east of Kolomea, they have defeated the Austrians, taking prisoners 221 officers and 10,285 men.

Sir Roger Casement was found guilty of high treason on Thursday, and the Lord Chief Justice pronounced upon him sentence of death by hanging.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Official intimation has been received by Mr and Mrs D Conopo, of Kilsby, that their son, Stoker Conopo, went down with H.M.S Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland on May 31st. Stoker Conopo, who was 26 years of age, joined the Navy four years ago, and visited his parents on leave in March last.

Gunner F Bosworth, D Battery, 241st (S.M Brigade) R.F.A, an Old Murrayian, was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s last despatch. In a letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, he says :— “ I am a telephonist in our Battery, and in this work we have many opportunities of taking part in some of the exciting incidents of this War, and it is in these little stunts that they have evidently thought me worth mentioning.”

Miss F E Knight, who was trained at the Hospital of St Cross, Rugby, was mentioned in the list of the King’s Birthday Honours, and has been awarded the decoration of the Royal Red Cross. Miss Knight joined the Territorial Nursing Force in 1914, and is at present working in Brighton.

Lance-Corpl J Jordan, R.F.A, son of Mr H J Jordan, railway inspector, of 84 Abbey Street, who has been missing for some time, is now reported to have been taken prisoner at Kut. He was an old 1st Rugby Co Boys’ Brigade member.

Mr W Seaton, of 134 Grosvenor Road, has received news that his son, Gunner Harry Seaton, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been severely wounded in the head. Gunner Seaton is the secretary of the Old Murrayians’ F.C, and is well known in local football circles.

RUGBY FOOTBALLER WOUNDED.

The list of casualties published on Wednesday includes the following men from this district who have been wounded :—Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry : Lance-Sergt F.G Judge and Sergt E Watts, Rugby. F G Judge played for Rugby F.C. He was a very useful forward, and showed great promise. Formerly he was vice-captain of the Junior XV. His home is at the Old Station.

Other local casualties reported in recent lists are :—

Wounded: Lance-Corpl J Faichnie, Oxon and Bucks L.I (B.T.H Foundry) ; Rifleman B Banbrook, Rifle Brigade ; Trooper R Goodfellow, Hussars. Taken prisoner at Kut : Corpl F C Jordan, R.F.A.

ANOTHER PRISONER OF WAR.

Mr W C Hitchcox, of 96 Abbey Street, has received a postcard from his son, Sergt Bernard Geo Hitchcox, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. The postcard is dated June 10th, and as a field card was received from him dated June 6th, he must have fallen into the hands of the enemy between those dates. Sergt Hitchcox belongs to the 2nd Canadian Contingent. A younger brother (Pte Clifford Hitchcox, of the same contingent) was killed in action in August last. Both were Old Murrayians.

OLD MURRAYIAN AWARDED THE D.C.M.

Rugbeians in general, and Old Murrayians in particular, will be interested to hear that Bomb W K Freeman, 73rd Battery, 5th Brigade R.F.A, son of Mrs Freeman, 6 Lancaster Road, has been awarded the D.C.M for “ Conspicuous gallantry. When some men were wounded in the town by the enemy’s fire, he took the medical haversack, although telegraphist, and rendered every assistance under heavy fire. Later, when himself wounded, he went to two dressing stations to get stretchers. He had previously displayed great bravery.” Bomb Freeman has also been awarded a French Military decoration.

THE LATE MR. JIM HOWKINS.

At Monday’s meeting of the Rugby Board of Guardians touching reference was made to the loss sustained by Mr G F Howkins, of Crick (a member of the Board), in the sad death of one of his soldier sons, reported in the Advertiser last week.

At Rugby Cattle Market (where Mr Jim Howkins for several years sold the sheep for Messrs Howkins & Sons) the buyers, after hearing of the sad news, proceeded to bid for the next few lots with their hats off to his memory. They also sent Mr and Mrs Howkins a letter of sympathy, which about 40 or more signed.

A memorial service was conducted by the Rev W C Roberts at Crick Parish Church on Sunday afternoon. A good number of Lance-Corpl Howkins’s friends from Rugby, Long Buckby, Murcott, West Haddon, and Crick attended. Suitable hymns were used, and the service was of a solemn and impressive character.

ANOTHER BARBY MAN GIVES HIS LIFE FOR HIS COUNTRY.

William Elkington, a driver in the R.H.A, was killed in action on June 17th. Mr Elkington received the following letter :-

“ I regret to say-your son Will has passed away to-day. We have had a terrible day to-day ; we have got four or five wounded. Poor little Will was one of the unlucky ones, and got a fatal hit with a bursting shell. He was riding his horse at the time ; his horse was killed outright. We (his comrades) had the care of burying him, and I can assure you he was buried in the very best way. He is lying in a soldier’s grave behind the firing lines. We shall all miss him very much ; he was such a jolly fellow. He died doing his duty for his King and country; he was a thorough soldier all through.”

On Sunday a memorial service was held in St Mary’s Church, Barby. There was, of course, a large congregation, including eight soldiers, who came over from the Daventry Hospital. Special hymns and psalms were sung, and the lesson from the Burial Service was read. The Rector (Rev R S Mitchison) preached from Rev iv 1, “ Behold a door was open in heaven.” He said they must look on all the pain, sorrow, and anxiety which came to us through this terrible War as warnings from God to make us think less of this world and more of the Heavenly Father. Another of our brave man had gone. Before he left,.after his last leave, he attended many of the services in the church ; he returned thanks to God for his life. He attended the Intercession service ; he partook of the Holy Communion ; he received the Church’s Blessing before he went in the little service all take part in before they go to the Front. Now they would see him no more on this earth, but he left behind him a good example.

WOMEN FARM WORKERS.

In many parts of the country there appears to exist a suspicion that, if women register their names for farm work, they may be subjected to some form of compulsory service.

The War Office and the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries desire to assure all women who are engaged in work on the land, or who may be willing to undertake such work, that the registration of their names for that purpose will in no way be used to compel them to undertake either agricultural or any other form of work. Such work is entirely voluntary. In no case will they be asked or expected to work on farms outside their own neighbourhood unless they are willing to do so. But it is necessary, in order that the most efficient use may be made of their services, to have a list of the names and addresses of women who are prepared in the emergency to undertake work in the place of the men who are fighting in the trenches. As there is a great need for the services of patriotic women who are willing to assist in the home production of food, it is hoped that all women who can see their way to offer their services, either whole or part time, will at once have their names registered at the local Labour Exchange or by the village Registrar.

RUGBY CASES AT COVENTRY MUNITIONS COURT.

The following cases were dealt with on Friday last week by Coventry Munitions Tribunal

Annie and Mary Sleath, Clifton, v Rugby Lamp Co, Ltd.—This was a complaint in each case of withholding certificate.—Certificates were refused.

W W Wilson. 94 Holyhead Road, v Willans & Robinson, Ltd.—Similar complaint.-The case was struck out.

The cases heard at Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Tuesday included the following :—

Joseph Thomas Lindsell, Rugby, v Willans & Robinson, Rugby.—This was a complaint of withholding certificate. He said he wished to go back to his home at Stoke, where his mother lived, she being a widow and he being an only child. He said he was told there was plenty of work in the Stoke district.—The Chairman suggested that a man at Stoke who wanted to come to Rugby might be exchanged for Lindsell. The case was adjourned for four weeks to see if an exchange could be effected.

James Henry Ball, Rugby, v B.T.H, Rugby.—This was a complaint of withholding certificate. He said he was doing the work of a millwright, though engaged as an assistant millwright, but was refused the district rate. The firm said he was a skilled labourer. It was stated that the man had been offered a fully qualified situation, and that the A.S.E was supporting him. The certificate was granted. It was intimated that an appeal might be lodged.

B.T.H Co, Rugby, v F Dexter, Rugby.—This was a complaint of time losing. He said he was ill, but did not inform the firm.—He was fined 40s.

B.T.H Co v W J Price, Rugby.—Complaint of being absent without leave. He pleaded illness.—Fined 25s.

B.T.H Co v D Conopo, Kilsby.—Similar complaint. He said he walked six miles to his work every morning, and sometimes walked back to his home. It transpired that the man lost his son, who was on the Queen Mary, and the firm said they did not know that, and would not press the case under the circumstances.—The case was withdrawn.

Two other employees of the same firm, J A Grimes, 18 Hunter Street, Rugby, and Alfred Day, 3 Bridge Street, Rugby, were also before the Court for breach of rules.—Day was fined 10s, and the case against Grimes dismissed with a caution.

ABSENTEES.—At- Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before T A Wise, Esq, two young Hillmorton soldiers, Alfred Giddings (3rd Royal Berks) and John Saddler (Durham Light Infantry), pleaded guilty to being absentees from their units, and were remanded to await an escort.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. Herbert Wm. Astill, 10744, Oxon and Bucks L.I., stretcher bearer, who died of wounds, June 29, 1915.—Deeply mourned by his widowed MOTHER.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. Arthur Coombes, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last.
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son Arthur, who died February 26,1915.
—From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

LEESON.—Previously reported missing, now killed in action on the 25th of September, 1915, Sergt Fred Leeson (Bob), Oxford and Bucks L.I., dearly loved second son of Mr. and Mrs. Leeson, 70 Hartington Road, Leicester (late of Hunter Street, Rugby), aged 23 years.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a voice that is still.”

 

20th May 1916. Clocks to be put forward.

THE DAYLIGHT SAVING BILL.

CLOCKS TO BE PUT FORWARDS.

The Summer Time Bill, 1916—the object of which is to reduce the number of hours during which artificial lighting is used, and so save a very large quantity of coal required for war purposes at the present time—received the Royal Assent on Wednesday, and comes into force at 2 a.m on Sunday morning.

At that hour the time at all railway stations will be advanced one hour (that is, the clocks when at 2 o’clock’ will be altered to indicate 3 o’clock instead); the change will also be made in Post Office and other Government clocks, and arrangements are being made for the alteration of public clocks generally, either at that hour or some convenient time on Saturday evening.

The altered time, which will be generally called “summer time,” will remain in force up to and including September 30 next.

During this period “summer time” will be the time for all purposes, except astronomical, meteorological, and navigation. For instance, all trains will run according to “ summer time ”—that is, a train which, according to the time-table is timed to leave, say, at 6 a.m, will leave at 6 a.m summer time, as indicated by the clock. All establishments whose hours are regulated by law will be required to observe the altered time—e.g., factories, shops, public-houses, etc. Thus, factories which work from 6 a.m to 6 p.m will commence and finish at 6 a.m and 6 p.m summer time ; and a shop, if required to close at 8 p.m will close at 8 o’clock summer time. It is suggested that employers should warn their employees before they leave work on Saturday, and advise them to put their clocks and watches forward on Saturday evening.

The public generally are requested by the Government to alter their own clocks and watches in the same way, by putting them forward one hour, during the course of Saturday evening or early on Sunday morning.

It should be noted that the Act does not affect lighting and other Orders which fix a time by reference to sunrise or sunset. In giving effect to these orders, it will be necessary to take the alteration of the clock into consideration. For instance, the sun will set on Sunday, May 21st at 7.51, Greenwich time. Vehicles must light up half an hour afterwards—i.e, 8.21 Greenwich time, which will be represented on your clock or watch (if correctly altered) by 9.21. Similarly, the reduction of lights in houses, etc, will take place an hour and a half after sunset, Greenwich. This will be indicated by the altered clock as 10.21.

LIGHTING OFFENCES.—George G Stott, manager of a clothing establishment, Hillmorton Paddox; Walter Watts, Club steward, Market Street, Rugby; Alice Readman, lady’s help, 42 Clifton Road; were summoned for not shading windows so that no more than a dull subdued light was visible outside their premises.—Stott admitted the offence, and P.C Lester said he saw a brilliant naked electric light coming from the Grand Clothing Hall, illuminating the church and churchyard. Defendant was sent for and on his arrival he extinguished the lights.—Defendant explained that at 7.15 that evening he sent the boy upstairs to a back room for a pail. It was then quite light, and there was no necessity for him the switch the light on. He had evidently did so on this occasion, and then shut the door.-This was the only light burning in the shop.-Fined £1.—Watts pleaded guilty.—P.S Percival said the light, which was situated it the back of the Rokeby Club, was not shaded. He could see the light shining through the top of the blind. There was also an ordinary street lamp in the yard, which was shaded half-way down with brown paper.—Supt Clarke said this was a very bad light. It was like a great star, and he sent the officer round to it.—Defendant said he had done the best he could.—The Chairman : Not quite; you will be fined £2.—Miss Readman said it was quite an oversight, and the light was turned half down, there being a very subdued light.—P.C Elkington said when in the Lower Hillmorton Road he saw a very bright light from the rear of No 42 Clifton Roan. On going to the house he saw a bright, incandescent gas light in the kitchen, there being no blind drawn.-Defendant admitted her responsibility, and told witness she was very sorry ; she went to bed and forgot to turn out the light.-Margaret Fullorton, called by defendant, said she was mistress of the house. The light in question which she saw after the policeman had been, was half turned down, as it had been during the evening. She had been at considerable trouble and expense to darken all the windows, but on the night in question, being overtired, defendant forgot to turn out the light.—Fined 10s 6d.

NO LIGHT.—Geo Kenney, 30 New Street, New Bilton, was summoned for riding a bicycle without a light at New Bilton on the 4th inst.—Defendant pleaded guilty, and said he did not know what lighting-up time was.—P.C Ruane proved the case, and said it was getting dusk at the time.—Fined 6s.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Thirty-four former scholars of the Baptist Sunday School have joined the Army, and five have been granted commissions. Three of these, 2nd-Lieut J Forbes, Lance-Corpl Geo Barnwell, and Stanley Stebbing, have been killed in action.

Lieut L G Neville, a son of the late Mr J T Neville, Dunchurch, and of Mrs Neville, of 1 Bilton Road, Rugby, who went through the Boer War, the Zulu Campaign, and the German West African Campaign, left England last week for the Mediterranean Force with a Territorial Regiment.

Second-Lieut C.T Morris Davies, of Rugby, the well-known Welsh international hockey player, is now on a short leave from the front, where he has been for fourteen months. Lieutenant P E Banting, of lawn tennis and hockey fame, is also home for a few days.

Lieut C H Ivens, of the 9th Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr J H Ivens, of Hillmorton Road, Rugby, who was wounded in one of the battles in Mesopotamia, has been granted six months’ leave. The wound sustained was from a bullet which, after being deviated in its course by a rupee in his pocket, pierced the left thigh. After having been in hospital at Bombay for a time, he was on his way home, when a relapse necessitated his being landed at Alexandria, from whence he made another start a few days since.

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY WOUNDED.

The parents of Pte W J Payne, R.A.M.C, whose home is at 55 Stephen Street, have just received an intimation that Pte Payne is wounded and suffering from shock, and has been removed from the front to a hospital in England. Pte Payne is an old boy of St Matthew’s School.

MEDAL FOR AN OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY

As announced in a previous issue of the Advertise, Police Constable Herbert Archer, a Rugby man, has been awarded the bronze medal and certificate of the Royal Humane Society for conspicuous bravery in rescuing a young lad from drowning at Rosyth Naval Dockyard. The presentation was formally made to P.C Archer at Rosyth on Wednesday last week by Commodore Harvey Bruce, M.V.O, R.N, in the presence of the Dockyard officials and a contingent of the Metropolitan Police. P.C Archer is an old boy of St Matthew’s School, Rugby, and, like Sergt W Bale, who was recently decorated with the D.C.M, was in 1904-5 a member of the St Matthew’s XV which won the Rugby and District Schools’ Football Union Shield in the first competition.

ANOTHER OF MESSRS FROST’S EMPLOYEE KILLED.

Messrs A Frost & Son have received intimation that another of their employees has been killed in action. Lance-Corpl Henry Hayes, of the 6th City of London Regt was fatally shot through the chest on April 30th. He had been employed by Messrs Frost for several years as a bookbinder, and he enlisted on September 2, 1914. He went to France in March, 1915, and has been through a good deal of fighting, including the battle of Loos. A few months ago he came home on leave to get married. It is interesting to note that prior to the war Lance-Corpl Hayes lodged with Riflemen Negus and Newton, two other employees of Messrs Frost, both of whom have been killed. Thirty-four of Messrs Frost’s employes are serving with the colours, and Lance-Corpl Hayes is the seventh to be killed ; several others have been wounded.

OLD MURRAYIAN AWARDED THE MILITARY CROSS.

The many friends of Bomb W K Freeman, R.F.A, son of Mrs Freeman, of 6 Lancaster Road, Rugby, will be pleased to hear that he has been awarded the Military Cross, and has been recommended for the D.C.M. Bomb Freeman is a signaller, and he gained his award by sticking to his post at the telephone under heavy fire. He was wounded in the arm and leg, and is now in the St John’s Brigade Hospital recovering from his injuries. He joined the army at Christmas, 1914, and went to the front in June, 1915. Prior to enlistment he was employed by the L & N.-W Railway in the Goods Manager’s office, Nuneaton. He is an old Murrayian and Laurentian, and brother of Sergt Jack Freeman, of “ E ” Company, 7th R.W.R.

BAND CONCERT.—On Sunday evening the B.T.H Military Band, under the conductorship of Mr H Saxon, gave a concert in the Caldecott Park. There was a large attendance.

ABOUT £10 was realised by the Rugby Branch of the National Union Railwaymen’s effort on behalf of the dependents of members killed at the front, held at Rugby recently.

THE Government have decided to instruct Local Tribunals to grant exemption in cases where, if a man with wife and family dependent were called up, his business would probably close down.

CONSCIENTIOUS OBJECTOR SENTENCED.—P G Davies, a conscientious objector, lately employed in a Rugby ironmonger’s establishment, and associated with the Congregational Church, has been sentenced by Court Martial at Gosport to two years’ hard labour for refusing to obey military orders. News to this effect has been received by his father, who lives at Stratford-on-Avon.

CONSCRIPTS CHARGED.—George James Costello, dealer, 2 Gas Street, Rugby, was charged on remand with being an absentee under the Military Service Act, 1916, at Rugby on the 10th inst. George E Hart, labourer, 164 Lawford Road, New Bilton, was charged with a like offence.—Costello pleaded guilty, and Det Mighall said when he saw defendant the man admitted that he had received his papers, and that he should have gone up for service in March last. The reason he did not go up was that he was ruptured, and had a weak heart.—Prisoner was asked why he had not been up for medical examination, and he replied that he went to the Drill Hall, but they refused to give him a pass to Warwick because he was a conscript. He then offered to pay his own fare, but was told that this would be no good because he would not be examined.—The Chairman : Why did you not go at the proper time ?—Defendant: Because I thought that I was not eligible.—The Chairman : That is not for you to think. That is for the authorities.—He was fined £2 and remanded to await an escort.

Hart pleaded guilty.— P.S. Brown, who arrested prisoner, said Hart informed him he had received the notice, but he did not trouble any more about it.—The Chairman asked him why he did not go up, and he said he knew nothing about it.—Fined £2, and reminded to await an escort.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

Mr and Mrs Grant, Newbold, have received official intimation from the War Office that their son, Rifleman Harry Grant, of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, was killed in action May, 1915. Rifleman Grant was 24 years of age, and was employed at the time of his enlistment at the B.T.H. He enrolled in Kitchener’s Army in September, 1914, and has been mining since May 9th, 1915. Much sympathy is expressed with his parents. Another son of Mr and Mrs Grant has been sent home disabled, and a third son is at the present time at the front.

VOLUNTEERS’ NEED OF SHOT GUNS.

An appeal is being made by Lord Leigh, in the absence of the Lord-Lieutenant of Warwickshire, for the loan of shot guns for the Volunteer Training Corps. In Warwickshire, he states, many important munition works are guarded by the County Volunteer Regiment. Companies are organised to co-operate with the police in case of air raids, and they are of service in other ways. Only a proportion of the regiment is armed. Now a call has been made for the regiment to undertake, in case of imminent invasion, duties which will entail the employment of a number of Volunteers who are unarmed. The Field-Marshal Commanding-in-Chief the Home Defences has given instructions that in such cases men of the V.T.C who are unarmed should be provided with shot guns.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVIS.—In Memory of 2nd-Lieut. D. C. G. Davis, R.G.A., who died of wounds, May 15, 1915.
“ We never shall our memories forget,
The friend we found so cordial-hearted.”
-From his old friends of the Electrical Laboratory B.T.H. Co.).

ELLIOTT.—In affectionate remembrance of Gunner S J. Elliott, who was killed in action at Gallipoli, May 17, 1915.
“ There is a link Death cannot sever:
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
-Doll.

 

12th Jun 1915. A Fierce Struggle

A FIERCE STRUGGLE.

Pte A Goode, attached to the machine gun section of the 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, “ somewhere in France,” in a letter his father, 173 Cambridge Street, Rugby, says :-

“ I suppose by this time you will have read about the great fight we had on May 9th. I shall never forget it. We have named it “ The bloody Sunday.” We went into the trenches at ten o’clock on the Saturday night, and lay there during a bitterly cold night. At five o’clock on Sunday morning the big guns commenced their music, which was terrible, and it lasted an hour. Then came the order to advance to do or die. We had to go over five lines of breastworks, 200 yards of open ground between each. All the time the enemy were raining upon us shrapnel shells, “ coal-boxes,” and lead from machine guns ; but we never faltered, and as chum after chum went down we set our teeth and gripped out guns tighter. When we had passed the last breastwork we took a breather for two minutes ; then for the German trenches 350 yards in front—is was hell itself, I can tell you. We charged them with the bayonet, but it was beyond the power of man to get through their barbed wire fences. Blood, however, flowed like water ! But our time will come when we will avenge our brave chums who gave their lives on that field for home and country. The fight lasted through 24 hours, until the Monday. It was a terrible sights after we had finished to see dead and wounded. Never mind ; we are all ready and willing again when wanted ; but we are getting less in numbers—I mean we who came here first. Will the young men of England pluck up and come out and give us a hand ? It is about time some of them threw away the tennis bats and golf clubs and learn to use a rifle, and come out and help us. We have a very stubborn enemy, and he will take some shifting ; but by the help of men, guns, and ammunition, we shall do it—for we are still British and have the hearts of men. Pluck up, slackers, and give us a hand.”

IMPUDENT GERMAN SNIPERS.

Drummer W Newman, of the 7th Battery Royal Warwickshire Regiment, brother to Mr C J Newman, architect, of Rugby, in a letter from the front says:—“ The weather out here is grand, but it is enough to roast us as we do our sentry duty, which is nothing but standing and watching through a periscope at the enemy’s lines. They have been rather cheeky this time. For instance, during Saturday night one of their patrols must have been very near to ours, for in the morning, when we looked over the parapet, we saw fastened on a willow tree, about 200 yards away, a board with the words painted on it: ‘Przemysl Zunicherobert.’ The last word we take to mean ‘re-taken.’ However, if they come out doing those tricks too many times they will find a ‘pleasant surprise’ waiting for them in the way of a bomb or a shot from one of our patrols.”

CASUALTIES IN THE SEVENTH WARWICKSHIRE BATTALION.

The following casualties in the Warwickshire Territorial Battalion are reported under dates May 19th and 22nd :-

KILLED.—Brooks, 1168, Sergt E.

WOUNDED.—Evans, 2785, Pte R O ; Hobbs, 2632, Pte W R ; Shearsby, 2741, Pte A ; Tuggey, 2578, Pte W ; Ball, 1621, Pte R ; Blundell, 2452, Pte R ; Coltman, 1814, Lce-Corpl W C ; Cook, 2269, Pte J ; Dolman, 2649, Pte ; Dunn, 2511, Pte W ; Fowler, 2064, Pte W H ; Hughes, 1755, Pte J ; Mence, 1802, Pte F ; Ramsden, 2377, Pte J A ; Sadler, 1287, Lce-Corpl J ; Sale, 1674, Pte J ; Savage, 909, Pte W ; South, 1986, Sergt G ; Taylor, 1071, Corpl H A ; Ward, 2762, Pte E ; Wormell, 2536, Pte J

 

LOCAL CASUALTIES OF THE WAR.

“ E ” COMPANY’S CASUALTIES.

A member of “ E ” Company (now merged with “ C ” Company of the 7th Warwickshire Territorial Battalion), writing under date June 6th, says :-

“ The weather here is glorious ; we are all brown as berries and in the very best of health. On Tuesday last I paid the Company a visit. They were off to the trenches that night ; but, to judge by the interest displayed in an inter-company cricket match, you would never believe that within an hour or two they would be doing their whack in the trenches. The news, I’m sorry to say, is by far the worst since our arrival in France, and concerns members of the old ‘E’ Company. On Thursday, May 27th, Lance-Corpl R Clowes and H Rogers were wounded. The former, I regret to say, died on June 2nd. On Friday night, May 28th, there was a most exciting episode, in which the Rugby lads came through with flying colours, but with further loss. The following are, as far as I could gather, the details :—A party, including Corpl W Bromwich, Ptes L Hill, L Eaton, and P Hall, were out on the listening post, when a party of Germans came out and tried to surprise them. The enemy opened fire, killing L (Bleb) Hill, a Newbold lad, and wounding L Eaton. The latter stuck to his post, and continued firing until help arrived, consisting of a party under Sergt G Ward. I expect the enemy gave it up for a bad job, and upon examination by our chaps we found they had left one dead. Our men brought him in, and he proved to be an iron cross man. His rifle has been despatched to England, and will some day repose in the Rugby Drill Hall as a war trophy. The Company has been congratulated by the Colonel, as undoubtedly by their watchfulness and presence of mind they saved an awkward situation. Corpl Bromwich has since been promoted lance-sergeant. Some of this news may be stale by now, yet I think the Rugby people should learn what their lads are doing. At the request of several I have been asked to point out that what they consider to be an insult to them is the booming of the troops who were billeted in Rugby as “ The Rugby Soldiers, &c.” The sentiments expressed to me are that only the Battery and ‘E’ Company, &c, really come under that nomenclature. We appear to be off the picture. We were the original ‘ Rugby soldiers ’ long before this war broke out, and still claim that honour ; and, what’s more, refuse to allow any other troops—no matter what splendid work they have done, sacrifices they have made, and losses suffered—to step into our rightful position in the hearts and sympathies of the people of Rugby. The Rev B McNulty conducted a service a week last Wednesday. He was quite pleased to drop across Rugby men.”

LOCAL WAR CASUALTIES

CAPT RENNIE WATERHOUSE KILLED.

Capt Rennie Waterhouse, of the 7th Lancashire Fusiliers, who is reported as having been killed in the Dardanelles on May 10th, was formerly a member of the B.T.H Company’s staff as an engineer in the contract and turbine sales department. He was the third son of Mrs T C Waterhouse, of Lomberdale Hall, Bakewell, and of Thorncliffe, Kersal Edge, Manchester, and all his brothers are serving with H.M Forces. Capt Waterhouse, who during his residence in Rugby lived at Epworth, Clifton Road, owned a textile mill at Rheims, which has been destroyed by the Germans.

BILTON.

MUCH regret has been caused in this village by the death of Gnr. Harold Freeman, of the Royal Field Artillery, son of Mr H Freeman ; and the greatest sympathy is felt for the bereaved relatives. Harold, a strong, well-built young fellow, was a painter and plumber by trade, and his unassuming manner and genial disposition made him a general favourite in the place. He was a member of the Cricket and Football Clubs, and also of the Working Men’s Club, for which he did a great deal of useful work when it became necessary to renovate the club premises last summer. He also belonged to the Foresters’ Court, and in all respects his conduct was exemplary. When the war broke out he at once realised that it was his duty to obey the call to arms, and enlisted in the Royal Field Artillery. He quickly made himself an expert artilleryman, and was several times offered promotion, but preferred to remain a private. His Battery was daily expecting orders to go to the front; everything was in readiness, and he was looking forward to the opportunity of seeing active service, when some time last week he was taken ill with pneumonia, complications developed, and he passed away on Monday at the age of 26. The body was brought to Bilton on Wednesday night and placed in the Memorial Chapel, near his home at The Magnet, to await burial yesterday (Friday) afternoon.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

THE DEATH OF PTE. HILL.

Mr and Mrs Hill, parents of Pte Hill, of the Rugby Territorial Company, who, as reported last week, was killed in action, have received a letter from Sergt Ward, who says :—

“ I wish to express my deepest sympathy with you all in the loss of such an excellent soldier as your son, who was killed whilst doing his duty on Friday, May 28th, at about 1 a.m. We are all sorry at the loss of his services, for he was one of our best men. Whenever he was called upon to perform any duty, no matter what it was, he did it with a cheerful spirit. This time he was out on the listening post, which is in front of our lines between 50 and 60 yards, when a party of Germans attacked them. Every man performed his duty splendidly. His comrade by his side was also wounded, but kept on firing until a party reinforced them, and made it possible for us to get his body and retire to the trenches. His death was avenged by a German’s death, whose body was fetched in. There is not a man in the Company that will not miss him, for a good many times when on the march he has made the march go easy by singing a song. He was in my section, and there is no one out hero who will miss him more than I shall. I must express to you the deepest sympathy on behalf of the section to which he belonged, also the whole platoon. Louis was buried by the side of our other unfortunate comrades. He suffered no pain or agony, for death was instantaneous.”

To the letter is appended the following note by Capt Mason :—

“ Unfortunately no time to write a letter, but the above expresses the opinion of officers as well as men. On behalf of the officers I most deeply sympathise with you in your bereavement.”

Q.M.S A C Tomlinson also writes:-

“ It is with deepest regret and sincere sympathy that we have to tell you of the death of your son, Pte L Hill. He met his death gallantly, fighting in defence of the post entrusted to him. His memory is proudly established in the hearts of all his comrades. He was always cheery, always happy, and every man in the Company was his friend, and we all miss his bright presence. It may be a comfort for you to know that his death was instantaneous and without pain. He died fighting for his King, his country and his home, and no man can wish for a prouder death.”

Mr and MRS J HIPWELL received a notification from the War Office on Sunday last that Corpl William Hence, C Company, 2nd Border Regiment, was killed in action on May 16th. He was employed at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s, and joined the regiment soon after the war commenced. He was 25 years of age, and has made his home with Mr and Mrs J Hipwell (Newbold) from a boy. He had been previously wounded, and was away in hospital for seven weeks, but returned to the firing-line again a short time ago.

WOLSTON.

MR AND MRS A OWEN, of Wolsten, have now heard definitely that their son is amongst the missing and they have received official intimation that he has been missing since an action near Ypres on the 25th of April last. Since that date no information has come to hand as to his whereabouts.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt G T Seabroke, of the East Lancashire Regiment, son of Col Seabroke, Rugby, has been gazetted major.

Mr P G Chamberlain, M.A, of No. 3 Market Place, Rugby, has joined the H.A.C (Infantry Battalion).

The French Military Authorities have requested Dr Frances Ivens (formerly of Harborough Parva) to start a Field Hospital between the firing line and Royaumont. With the approbation of the Scottish Committee, Dr Ivens agreed to do so and to have it ready at 48 hours’ notice.

Brev-Col R A Richardson, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, whose gallant conduct on the occasion of the torpedo attack on the Wayfarer was referred to in an Army Order, published last week, is a brother of Mrs Mulliner, of Clifton Court.

Mrs H R Lee, of 78 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received official intimation that her husband, Pte Lee, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, a former employee of the B.T.H, is in a hospital at Rouen suffering from a slight scalp wound.

It is gratifying to learn that the complaints which have been made in certain quarters of slackness among workmen employed in the manufacture of munitions do not apply to Rugby, and that the local representatives of the allied engineering trades are rendering every assistance. In accordance with Press regulations we abstain from giving further details.

TWO RUGBY CLERICS JOIN THE FORCES.

We understand that the Rev S M Morgan, curate-in-charge of the Church House, and the Rev R W Dugdale, curate-in-charge of Holy Trinity Church, have been appointed by the Chaplain-General as chaplains to H.M. Forces in the 63rd and 64th Brigades, now stationed at Tring, and that they will be leaving Rugby shortly. We are sure that they will carry with them the hearty good wishes of all Rugbeians.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Eighteen recruits have been accepted at Rugby Drill Hall during the past week, as follows :- S W Wareing, J E Burnham, and T Batchelor, R.W.R ; T Jennings, 13th Gloucesters : G B Cox, Leicesters ; F Southam, Rifle Brigade ; F Gardner, Oxon and Bucks L.I ; H Bishop, A.S.C (H.T) ; W R Seaton, Welsh Guards ; J Clarke and W H Moseley, Army Vet. Corps ; H Bate, F C Woodhouse, S C Hobbs, W R Davis, E W Ellson, and S H Oswell, Rugby Fortress Company. R.E ; F Morrey, Household Cavalry.

HAIRDRESSERS’ CHARGES.

A meeting was held on Monday last by the Rugby hairdressers to discuss the advisability of increasing their saloon charges. It will be remembered that about twelve months ago the Rugby Hairdressers’ Association fixed a minimum price of 1½d for shaving and 3d for haircutting, which abolished 1d shaving in Rugby. The better-appointed shops have decided that, owing to the rapid increase of expenses—both business and domestic—and the flourishing state of the labour market they will increase their charges to the following prices:—Shaving, 2d; hair-cutting, 4d; ditto (boys under 14), 3d; singeing, 4d; shampooing, 4d. The new prices are to come in force on Thursday, June 10th.

It was mentioned that a great number of their customers had joined his Majesty’s Forces, and were now in training or at the front, and those who were serving his Majesty in the local works were working so many hours that they are unable to attend the saloon, and therefore cause a considerable fall in the saloon takings. It was decided by those who have adopted the new prices to attend the Warwickshire Reservists at the old prices, and the same privilege will be extended to those customers who have donned the khaki when they come home on furlough.

NOTICE TO WARWICKSHIRE LICENSED VICTUALLERS.

The Chief Constable of Warwickshire (Captain J T Brinkley) has issued the following notice to licensed victuallers under the Intoxicating Liquor Laws :- “Complaints being received from Red Cross Hospitals in the county that wounded soldiers are being supplied with drink in the public-houses, and, in some instances, return in an intoxicated condition, license holders are requested not to serve them with intoxicants. The Brigadier-General commanding this district informs me that unless this request is observed as far as it is possible to do so, it will be necessary to put the premises complained of out of bounds for all troops, with the further liability of being closed altogether under the Defence of the Realm regulations if further complaints are received.