6th Jun 1919. School’s Gift to the Hospital

SCHOOL’S GIFT TO THE HOSPITAL.—The principals of Arnold High School have decided that the school war memorial shall take the form of a gift of a massage couch to the Hospital of St. Cross, which will cost about £20, and last week a concert was given by the children of the Lower School and Kindergarten Department on the lawn at “ Eastfield,” Church Walk, in aid of this object. A good number of friends attended, and an excellent programme of character songs, dances, recitations, physical drill. and instrumental items was given. The children had been trained by Misses Pratt, Taylor, Darby, and Shepherd.

CAPT. A. J. HARRIS, R.E., son of Mr. A. Harris. Dunchurch Road, Rugby, has been awarded the O.B.E. (Military Division) for work done during the final operations on the Tigris with the 17th Division, ending at the battle of Shergat, south of Mosul.

SERGEANT GILBERT’S D.C.M.

SIR,—The following appeared in your last week’s issue :—The Distinguished Conduct Medal has been awarded to Sergt. E. R. Gilbert. R.E., attached to the 18th Div. Sig. Co., of Rugby. The official report says:—“ On October 28, 1918, near Sherqat, Mesopotamia, during an attack when the enemy’s fire was greatly impeding our advance, he was sent up the side of a spur to locate hostile machine guns. On reaching the top he found one gun, which he immediately charged, killing or capturing the entire team. His prompt and daring action materially relieved the situation.”

With reference to the foregoing it would appear that someone at the War Office has blundered.

My D.C.M. was awarded to me, according to the official account issued in November, 1918, For “ carrying despatches under heavy fire and maintaining continued communication with an isolated Brigade.”

Curiously enough, the place, Sherqat, and the date, October 28th, 1918, are quite correct. I should be very glad if you would correct this in your next issue.—Yours, etc.,

ERNEST R. GILBERT.
14 Willow Bridge Road, Canonbury, London, N.

DUNCHURCH AVENUE.
THE APPEAL FOR £5,000.
PROGRESS OF THE FUND.

To-day we give a list of local subscriptions to the fund for the re-planting of Dunchurch Avenue, the scheme for which was fully described in last Friday’s Rugby Advertiser.

As then stated, the proposal not only aims at the restoration of a famous beauty spot of leafy Warwickshire, but it is further meant to be a memorial to the gallant 29th Division who were billeted in the county before their departure for the heroic fighting in Gallipoli, and were inspected by the King in Dunchurch Avenue on May 12, 1915. To carry out the re-planting scheme the sum of £5,000 is required, and it is proposed to allocate the money as follows :— Monument to the 29th Division, £500 ; alterations to road, £500, re-planting trees, £2,500 ; maintenance, £1,500.

The treasurer of the fund is Mr. Edward Field, of Leamington, and the Rugby Advertiser will be pleased to acknowledge all subscriptions from its readers and to forward the same to him. Two new members of the committee are Lord Algernon Percy and Mr. C. E. Blyth, of Cawston, Rugby. . . . .

AN OPPORTUNITY FOR GENEROUS CYCLISTS.
Writing in the “ Midland Daily Telegraph,” “ Rover ” says:—Many cyclists have imagined that the glorious avenue of trees that once led from the top of Knightlow Hill practically into Dunchurch village on the London Road were cut down either by a Government that wanted timber or landlord that wanted money. This was not the case. The trees were mostly elms, and the gales of 1915 denuded the avenue of no less than seventy-four of these trees, the roots of which do not take so firm a hold of mother earth as the British oak. The lord of the manor, the Duke of Buccleuch, who owned the grazing rights at the roadside as well as the land on which the trees stood, took expert advice, and was recommended to remove what might have been a source of danger to the travelling public. The result is that one of the pleasantest rides in the neighbourhood has become one of the least interesting. The felled timber lies all along the road, and gives a semblance of a continuous timber yard. As my readers have learned from “ The Midland Daily Telegraph,” a committee of the Warwickshire County Council met the Duke to discuss the question of renovation, and he has offered as a nucleus of the replanting fund to hand over half the net proceeds of the sale of the felled timber, and to renounce his rights over the unenclosed land on which grew the trees. This column is written by a cyclist for cyclists, and I feel sure that I shall not appeal in vain when I ask those who have enjoyed the shade of the Dunchurch Avenue on a hot day to subscribe to this fund. It Should be borne in mind that the avenue when replanted is to be a perpetual memorial to the gallant 29th Division who died in Gallipoli to save the honour and lives of Britons. These brave soldiers were, previous to that unfortunate expedition, reviewed by the King on the Dunchurch Avenue, and were also billeted in Warwickshire. Is it not fitting that a lasting memorial should be erected to their memory, and what is more suitable than the poplars, chestnuts, oaks, beeches, and pines which it is suggested should be planted to fill up the odd five miles of denuded avenue ?

It is also proposed, as you know, to erect a monument to the officers and men of this division, and to enable this to be done, as well as to maintain the tress, the sum of £5,000 is required. I know that the demands on one’s pocket are constant, but whatever we disburse will compensate for the loss of the gallant lives, and the least we can do is to subscribe willingly and generously in accordance with our finances. I always think that a subscription to a memorial should appeal much more strongly to the mind than any other form of appeal. It is a last tribute to the gallant dead, and I hope cyclists will respond heartily. All donations will be acknowledged in the columns of this paper, and the sums received handed to the Treasurer, Mr. E. Field, of Leamington. The proprietors of “ The Midland Daily Telegraph ” (Messrs. Iliffe and Sons, Ltd.) have subscribed £25 to the fund, and the writer appeals with confidence to the generosity of cyclists to see that this section of the community who use the roads assist to attain the required amount as soon as possible. I try to practice what I preach, therefore “ Rover ” has handed to the Editor his smite.

NOVEL SERVICE AT RUGBY.
V.A.D. FLAGS PRESENTED TO ST. PETER’S CHURCH.

On Sunday the flags used at the Infirmary V.A.D. Red Cross Hospital were deposited in St. Peter’s Church as an act of thanksgiving by the V.A.D.’s and the workers at the hospital. Special prayers of thanksgiving were offered at the celebrating of Holy Communion, and at the evening service, after the anthem “ Praise the Lord,” Mrs. Burdekin (commandant), accompanied by two V.A.D. Nurses, Miss Townsend and Miss Thompson, presented the colours at the alter rails to the priest in charge, the Rev. T. H. Perry. The Te Deum was sung after the Blessing.
It is proposed to hang the colours in the church.

DUNCHURCH.
The Dunchurch and Thurlaston District Nursing Association gratefully acknowledge a gift of dressings, linen, and other nursing requisites from Newnham Paddox Red Cross Hospital.

FINDING A JOB.
APPEAL TO EMPLOYERS.

SIR,—In view of the appeal made to employers by the Prime Minister, will you kindly allow us, through the medium of your valued columns, to make a special appeal to local employers of all classes of labour on behalf of our members ?

These are at present a large number of discharged sailors, soldiers and airmen out of employment in Rugby. These men are most anxious to obtain work, but are unable to do so. Many are men who, through wounds, are unable to go to their old trades, but are fully fitted for work where less physical strength is required. It must be admitted by all that this unemployment is bad for the men and worse for the nation.

Is it necessary that all employers should ask for men who have done their particular class of work before ? May we not submit that a little time should be given to teaching men who risked everything for those who are now asked to help them in return ?

There are men willing to work who are suffering in every way from this enforced idleness. The national bill for unemployment pay is mounting up. Under these circumstances we appeal to employers to make their wants known and give the men who have won the great victory and the Peace we are all discussing the first chance, in recognition thereof.

(Signed) J. CAIN, Chairman Rugby & District Discharged Sailors, Soldiers, etc., Association.
A. FARNDON, Chairman Employment Committee.
CHARLES E. JOYNES, Sec. Employment Committee.
40 Railway Terrace, Rugby.

IN MEMORIAM.

BENNETT.—Died March 22, 1918, or since, Rifleman FRED BENNETT, 17th K.R.R., late A.S.C., aged 22, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. F. Bennett, Marton.

DOYLE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. TOM DOYLE, of Bourton, killed in action, June 6th, 1918, with the Egyptian Expeditionary Force.
“ No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can know
Who have lost their loved and dearest
Without saying good-bye.”
“ I miss dim and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memories of days that have been.”
—Sadly missed by his loving wife & Children.

DOYLE.—In loving memory of my dear Sons and our dear Brothers, Pte. TOM DOYLE, killed in action June 6, 1918 ; Corpl. FRANK DOYLE, killed in action July 13, 1916 ; Pte. WILFRED DOYLE (BILL), killed in action November 11, 1917, the dearly beloved Sons of Betsy and the late Joseph Doyle, of Frankton.
—Sadly missed by their loving Mother, Sisters, and Brothers.

HANCOX.—In ever loving memory of my dear husband, FRANK, who died of wounds in France, June 5, 1918.—Inserted by his loving wife, Una, Daventry Street, Southam.
Out of the shadows of war into the light of Eternal Peace.

HANCOX.—In ever loving memory of our dear son and brother, who died of wounds in France, June 5th, 1918.—Sadly missed by all.
No morning dawns or evening shadows flee without we think of thee.

LEE.—In loving memory of Pte. W. LEE, 1st R.W.R., who died at Birmingham, June 5th, 1918, from wounds received in action on April 15th, 1918. After much suffering, sweet rest.
—Lovingly remembered by his sisters, Polly, Em, and Alice.

TERRY.—In loving remembrance of our dear son, AMBROSE JOSEPH TERRY, R.W.R., who died of wounds on June 7th, 1917.
“ They miss him most who loved him best.”
—From Mother and Father.

30th May 1919. The Chronicles of 55 Squadron

THE CHRONICLES OF 55 SQUADRON
AN ECHO OF WAR TIME AT LILBOURNE AERODROME.

Captain L. Miller, of the R.A.F., now stationed at Cologne, has written a book under the above title—a book which should appeal very closely to members and ex-members of the Squadron. The profits will be handed to a R.A.F. charity, viz., “ The Flying Services Fund,” which is for the benefit of officers, N.C.O.’s and men of the R.A.F. who are incapacitated while on duty and for the widows and dependants of those who were killed or contracted injuries while on duty.

The matter is of interest to Rugby and district, as it will be recalled that 55 Squadron was stationed at Lilbourne during the winter of 1916 and early months of 1917. The Squadron left for France early in March, and during its service on the Western Front took part from the air in the Battle of Arras and Third Battle of Ypres, doing important bombing raids and reconnaissances. Subsequently in October, 1917, it moved down nearer the Vosges sector as the first Daylight Bombing Squadron, of what was afterwards known as “ The Independent Force,” and during its service there was responsible for raids such as those on Mannheim, Cologne, Frankfort-On-Main, Bonn, and in any others, most of which were mentioned in the Press at the time they took place, but of course the identity of the Squadron was not given.

THE DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL has been awarded to Sergt. E. R. Gilbert, R.E., attached to the 18th Div. Sig. Co., of Rugby. The official report says :—“ On October 28, 1918, near Sherqat, Mesopotamia, during an attack when the enemy’s fire was greatly impeding our advance, he was sent up the side of a spur to locate hostile machine guns. On reaching the top he found one gun, which he immediately charged, killing or capturing the entire team. His prompt and daring action materially relieved the situation.”

DEATH OF AN OLD VOLUNTEER.—The death took place on Wednesday in last week at his residence, 8 Earl Street, of Mr. Harry Barnett, aged 49. He was for many years a member of the Old Rugby Volunteer Company, and soon after the commencement of the war he enlisted in the Bridge Guarding Companies. He was subsequently sent to Egypt and India, where his health broke down, and he arrived home on May 1st a physical wreck, only to die three weeks afterwards. The funeral was conducted by the Rev. T. H. Perry (St. Peter’s) in the Cemetery on Saturday afternoon in the presence of a large number of friends and sympathisers. The coffin was covered with a Union Jack, and a firing party was provided by Rugby Volunteers, under the command of Sergt.-Major W. H. Cluett. A number of wreaths were sent by relatives and friends.

WAR MONUMENT AT NEWBOLD.
DESIGN AND SITE ADOPTED.
COMPLAINTS OF APATHY AT PARISH MEETING.

On Friday last a parish meeting was held in Newbold Council School. The object was to receive the report of the War Memorial Committee. The meeting was most disappointing, as excepting the ten members of the committee, only about six villagers were present.

Mr. Martin said if this was representative of the interest taken by the parishioners, it seemed to be a foreboding that the whole thing would be a failure.

In the absence of Mr. C. E. Boughton-Leigh, the chair was taken by the Rev. J. B. Hewitt, who said the design for the monument had been decided upon and a site for it chosen. It was between the church and the road.

Mr J. P. Cox proposed, Mr. Harvey seconded, and it was unanimously agreed that the design placed before the meeting be provisionally accepted.

Alter discussion it was decided, on the proposition of the Rev. J. B. Hewitt, seconded by Mr. E. Dodson, that the meeting be adjourned until some future date, when it is hoped a more representative gathering will be present.

[drawing] Our illustration shows the design prepared for the memorial. The site chosen is in the churchyard, opposite the north porch. The idea upon which the design is founded is that the names of the fallen should be recorded on bronze tablets framed in stonework designed in the Gothic style in keeping with the architecture of the Church, and that the whole should be surmounted by a cross. The base of the structure is octagonal in shape, being divided into four wide and four narrow panels. The latter will be left blank, but the four wider panels will contain the bronze tablets. On three of these tablets will be recorded the names of the fallen, and on the fourth will be an inscription and particulars as to when and by whom the memorial was erected. It is also intended that a text should be incised in the stonework on the band running round near the base. The material proposed is a reddish-brown freestone similar in colour to that of which the church is built. The height of the monument will be about 15 feet. The total estimated cost is between £275 and £300.

The design is the work of Mr. S. J. Oldham, M.S.A., of Rugby.

THE PASSING OF DUNCHURCH AVENUE
EFFORT TO RESTORE A BEAUTY SPOT.
THE SCHEME FOR RE-PLANTING.
MEMORIAL TO THE GALLANT 29th DIVISION.

The question of the reinstatement of the famous Dunchurch Avenue is again cropping up. It was in 1917 that the lord of the manor, the Duke of Buccleuch, found it necessary to take action with a view to safeguarding the traffic along the famous road. The elm trees, many of them planted so long ago as 1740, were becoming increasingly dangerous, and finally, after a negotiation of several months’ duration with the Warwickshire County Council, the menace was removed by the felling of the trees, and the beautiful old avenue reduced to the naked unwonted appearance it now bears.

We have called attention to the matter in the Rugby Advertiser several times, and suggested that, seeing that the King on March 12, 1915, reviewed the immortal 29th Division on the London Road, in the parish of Stretton-on-Dunsmore, shortly before they went to become heroes at Gallipoli, there was an opportunity of erecting a lasting monument to the brave fellows who fell.

Since then the project has developed, and a committee has been appointed, consisting of the Chairman of the Warwickshire County Council, Lord Algernon Percy, Capt. Oliver-Bellasis (chairman of the County Roads and Bridges Committee) ; the Mayors of Coventry, Leamington, Nuneaton, Stratford, and Warwick ; County Aldermen the Hon. H. Arden Adderley and Mr. T. Hunter ; Capt. Wratislaw ; Messrs. Harry Smith, J. J. McKinnell, C.C., James Johnson, C.C., and F. R. Davenport, C.C. The Mayor of Warwick (Mr. Austin Edwards) is acting as treasurer and hon. secretary to the fund.

This body has been actively engaged in considering re-planting proposals, which are as follow :—
Commencing at the Coventry end of the Avenue, to plant the trees on the unusually wide margins of the road in the following order :—
Canadian poplars, 29.
Red chestnuts, 53.
Montana elms, 143.
Scarlet oaks, 149.
Beeches, 82.
Scotch pines, 90.
The trees will be planted about 50ft. apart except that the last 40 or 50 (Scotch pines) will be arranged in clumps.

The full length to be planted is 8,753 yards, and the total number of trees 546, with 78 extra as a reserve against failures.

£5,000 REQUIRED.
For this important work, together with the provision of a monolith as a memorial to the men of the 29th Division, the sum of £5,000 is required. That sum will be spent thus :—
Monument……………………… £500
Alterations to road……………. £500
Re-planting trees……………… £2,500
Maintenance…………………… £1,500

APPEAL TO THE RUGBY PUBLIC.
When the matter of a permanent memorial and organised action was first mooted Mr. A. E Donkin appealed to the people of Rugby on behalf of the scheme, and himself got up a concert in the Temple Speech Room in aid of the fund. As a result he was able to forward £35, but there was such apathy in the matter among the public generally that the town has done nothing more. The opportunity now recurs, for our contemporary —the “ Midland Daily Telegraph ”—has opened a subscription list, and has given a donation of £25. The Rugby Advertiser is sending five guineas to the fund.

If any of our readers would like to be associated with this public-spirited movement, and would care to send donations to the Editor of the Rugby Advertiser, he will see that they are forwarded to the proper quarter and duly acknowledged.

In helping forward this project for re-planting, the public will be aiding a worthy cause in a two-fold way. They will ensure by reason of the restoration of the Avenue that coming generations will enjoy a similarly delightful scene ; they will also be taking part in the provision of a memorial to the heroes of the gallant 29th Division.

A calculation over a considerable portion of the distance, and counting both sides of the road, shows that 20 trees to every 100 yards have been felled. At this rate some 1,000 trees have taken from the famous Avenue, but the figure can only be very roughly estimated.

LEAMINGTON RAISES £589.
At a meeting at Leamington, re the Dunchurch Avenue Fund, for the purpose of supplying a suitable memorial to the 29th Division, Mr. S. C. Smith, the hon. secretary, reported that there was a balance in hand of £589 19s. 5d.

Application has been made to War Office for two German guns captured by the 29th Division, which would form part of the Memorial. Delays have occurred in preparing the site for the memorial owing to the shortage of labour. Mr. Bridgman, of Lichfield, the architect appointed, attended, and the question of adding some wide stone steps to the memorial was discussed. It way decided that Mr. Bridgman should submit models of the memorial, with and without the steps, and then a discussion could take place as to which form the memorial should take.

MONEY IN WASTE PAPER.
HOW RUGBY BOYS HELPED TO WIN THE WAR.
41 TONS COLLECTED.

The final meeting of the Rugby Waste Paper Committee was held on Monday, Mr. J. J. McKinnell, J.P., presiding.

The Hon. Secretary (Mr. J. Reginald Barker) outlined the work accomplished during the 18 months’ activities of the committee. Over 41 tons of waste paper have been collected, the greater part being through the efforts of the boys of Murray and Elborow Schools. Messrs. Willans & Robinson, Ltd., had disposed of their office waste to the committee, devoting the proceeds to local charities ; and the boys of St. Oswald’s School, New Bilton, under the direction of Mr. W. A. Sheppard, and Bilton C.E. School had also assisted in the collection. A number of private purchases had also been made from persons who had given the money to charity. From time to time the committee had met and voted grants, including the following :— Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, £44 4s ; Hospital of St. Cross, £10 ; District Nursing Association, £10 ; St. John’s Ambulance, £10 ; Hamilton Home, £10 ; Rugby Town Red Cross Society, £10 ; and Willans & Robinson, Ltd., £10. They had had to purchase three trucks, but had sold one. There remained a disposable balance of £28 and two trucks, both having been recently repaired, painted, and put into quite new condition. Mr. Barker proposed that, in recognition of the services of the boys of Murray and Elborow Schools, the committee give these trucks to the schools, and upon being carried, Mr. W. T. Simmonds and Mr. Coles Hodges expressed their thanks, remarking that they would be extremely useful to the boys in many ways.

A discussion arose as to the best means of disposing of the balance in hand ; and the Hon. Secretary having stated that the Bilton collections had been made with a view of helping their local war memorials, the committee unanimously decided to give £10 to New Bilton per Mr. Sheppard, and £3 to Bilton per Mr. J. W. Higgie for that purpose. Other grants made were : £5 to Rugby Nursing Association, £5 to Hamilton Home, and £5 to Messrs. Willans & Robinson for any charity they cared to name.

The Chairman expressed his thanks to all who had helped in making the collections financially successful, not only to the advantage of the local institutions, but the nation also during the serious paper famine. He specially referred to the work of the boys of the schools under the supervision of Mr. Simmonds & Mr. Coles Hodges, and asked these gentlemen to convey to their boys the great appreciation of the committee for all they had done.

Mr. Coles Hodges said it had been very hard work for the boys, and he doubted if anyone other than those actually concerned in the collection realised what a vast amount 40 tons of loose waste paper represented and the work entailed in handling same.

On the proposition of Mr. Simmonds, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded to the Chairman.

IN MEMORIAM.

CONOPO.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, WILLIAM CONOPO, who lost his life on H.M.S. Queen Mary, in the Battle of Jutland, May 31st, 1916.
“ Three years have passed since that sad day,
When one we loved was called away.”
Gone from our home, but never from our hearts.
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

GRANT.—In proud and ever-loving memory of our two sons, HARRY GRANT, Rifleman, 4th Batt. Rifle Brigade, “ missing ” during the night of the 8th-9th May, 1915, whilst out on advance post duty near Ypres, since presumed to have been killed in action on that date, and now in absence of any further news, confirmed, third son of George and Elizabeth Grant, of Newbold-on-Avon, aged 22. Also, on the 12th August, 1916, ERNEST GRANT, Acting Corporal, 3rd Batt. Rifle Brigade, previously wounded, killed by a sniper whilst out at night digging advanced trench with his section at Guillenmont, near Cobbles, second son of George and Elizabeth Grant, aged 26.
“ So they passed on, out of the warfare of the world into the peace of God.”
“ Their lives were perfect in loving unity,
And in their death they were not divided.”
E’en as they trod that day to God, so walked they from their birth,
In simpleness and gentleness, in honour and clean mirth.”

HALE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, PTE. A. G. HALE, killed in action May 28th, 1918. Gone, but not forgotten by his loving wife.

INGRAM.—In ever loving memory of my youngest and dearest son, PTE. LEONARD INGRAM, who died from wounds in France, May 29th, 1918. Never forgotten by his broken-hearted Mother and Brothers Joe, Arthur, and Val.
“ Forget him, No ! we never will ;
We loved him here and we love him still ;
Nor love him less because he’s gone
From here to his eternal home.”
“ God in His tender care His loved one keepeth,
And softly whispers to our hearts, ‘ He is not dead, but sleepeth.’”

SHARMAN.—In ever loving memory of PERCY J. SHARMAN, son of S. and F. Sharman, Queen Street, Rugby, reported missing 21st March—1st April, 1918, now presumed to have died on or about that time. He paid the big sacrifice and left his friends mourning.

 

14th Dec 1918. Rugby’s War Trophy

RUGBY’S WAR TROPHY.
ARRIVAL OF THE CAPTURED GERMAN GUN.

We announced last week that in consideration of the excellent war record of Rugby a German field gun, captured by the Royal Warwicks, had been allocated to the Town; and this interesting relic of a shattered military system duly arrived on Wednesday afternoon. The weather was anything but suitable for an outdoor ceremony. A drizzling rain fell most of the morning, but the weather improved early in the afternoon and a large number of people then turned out to witness the arrival of the gun. It was originally arranged that the Chairman of the Rugby Urban District Council, Mr J J McKinnell, J.P. C.C, should formally receive the gun on behalf of the Town at the urban boundary on the Bilton Road. Unfortunately, however, a break-down occurred at Bilton, and a messenger had to be despatched to Warwick for a spare part, and this necessitated an alteration in the arrangements.

The Rugby School O.T.C, under Capt C P Evers, turned out for the occasion, and, headed by the Corps Band, marched to Bilton, where Mr McKinnell, who was accompanied by Messrs W H Linnell, F E Hands, R S Hudson, T Ringrose, A Morson (Clerk), J H Sharp (Surveyor), T S Shenton (Manager of the Electric Light Dept.) received the gun (a 4.5 field cannon) which has evidently seen much service.

The procession restarted from Bilton shortly after three o’clock and when the gun crossed the parish boundary it was received with enthusiastic cheers and a frantic waving of miniature flags by the schoolchildren who had taken up positions on each side of the road.

The gun will be mounted on the grass plot fronting the Public Baths in Regent Street and to celebrate the auspicious occasion streamers of bunting had been hung round the three sides of this plot. On arriving at the Baths the Chairman standing near the gun said “ Ladies and gentlemen, this gun was captured by the gallant boys of the Royal Warwick Regiment, and all I want to do is to ask you to give three ringing cheers for the R.W.R.”

These having been given, an interesting and unique ceremony came to an end.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Dr Paramore, Bilton Road, Rugby, has been released from the Army and has resumed his practice.

The following B.T.H employes have been reported killed :—Lieut C A Field ; Sergt H M Bradford, R.W.R (Controller factor) ; Pte F J Swingler, Notts and Derby Regt (Collections and Credits Dept) recently died in France from influenza.

Captain R Snewing, eldest son of Mr and Mrs R Snewing, of Bath Street, Rugby, has been awarded the Military Cross. He was educated at the Lower School, and later entered the office of the B.T.H, and it still attached to the staff. He joined the Westminster Dragoons in 1916 as a trooper, and by his smartness and efficiency soon gained promotion and secured his commission, quickly following this up this his Captaincy. He was later attached to the Tank Corps, and gained the honour at La Cateau on October 23rd.

Sergt Ernest Gilbert, son of the late Mr Henry Gilbert, of St Andrew’s Street, Rugby, has been awarded the D.C.M. The Sergeant joined up with the Surrey Yeomanry, and, after serving in India, took part with the Royal Engineers in the operations in Mesopotamia, where he is still on active service.

Pte Gordon Stretton, sen of Mr & Mrs A Stretton, Stanford Road, Swinford, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany, arrived home on Monday night. Thanks to the food parcels that he has received, he has not fared so badly as some, but is thankful to be in England once more.

Bombardier J Jeffery, R.F.A, son of Mr W Jeffery, 33 Rokeby Street, has been awarded the Military Medal for bravery on the field. When his battery was held up by barbed wire he went forward with a sergeant, and under heavy shell fire cleared a path, thereby enabling his battery to come into action.

RUGBY OFFICER’S RETURN.
EXPERIENCES AS A PRISONER.

Captain Gabriel Gray (Lancashire Fusiliers), who was wounded and taken prisoner on March 26th, returned to Rugby on Tuesday evening, having been interned at Pforyheim Camp, Baden, with 180 other officers. Capt Gray has returned home in the best of health and spirits. After a month in hospital at Bielefeld, he proceeded to Karlsruhe, a distributing centre for officers. From there he went to Pforyheim. The food supply, which up to this time had been of a very meagre description, was augmented in June by the arrival of Red Cross parcels, and from that time there was no more talk of starving by inches. The prisoners at Pforyheim entrained on December 3rd, and proceeded to Basle, where they had a very hearty reception from the inhabitants, and again at Pontalier, on crossing the frontier, they were received with enthusiasm. By easy stages they reached Boulogne on the 9th, and crossed to Dover on the 10th.

DUNCHURCH.

PTE HARRY EVANS, whose funeral took place recently at Dunchurch, was at the time of his death (from pneumonia) in the A.S.C. and was formerly a corporal in the 7th Battalion, K.R.R. He joined the regiment on September 2, 1914, and served through the battles of Ypres and the Somme. He was wounded in the last-named battle, and being unfit for further active service was transferred to the A.S.C. Owing to the prevalence of influenza at the depot, it was impossible to arrange for a military funeral, but a bugler was sent over to sound the “ Last Post.”

In a letter to his mother, the C.O states that Pte Evans was one of the best and most reliable men in Transport department and respected by everyone in the Company. His loss was especially felt by members of the football team, of which he was one of the best and sturdiest players. The respect in which he was held was shown by six beautiful wreaths sent by his officers and comrades. His elder brother, Pte W Evans, was killed in June, 1917, and the remaining son, Driver A Evans, M.G.C, is now recovering from an attack of fever.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
On Thursday afternoon last week Pte Bertie Evetts, Gloucester Regiment, arrived home after eight months’ captivity. He has spent his time behind the German lines, and looks very little the worse for his adventures. When he reached home he had to be informed of the recent loss of his mother, who died from influenza on the 8th ult. He enlisted on February 28, 1917, on reaching the prescribed age, and had previously lost his father and elder brother in the War, who both died fighting for their country.

KINETON.
MUCH sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Askew, who were notified this week of the death of their son Horace. This is the third son they have lost in the War.

LILBOURNE.
A CONCERT was given in the schoolroom on Wednesday, December 4th, by the R.A.F Concert Party. A large and appreciative audience greatly enjoyed the varied programme, and called for several encores, to which the performers kindly responded. The proceeds will be sent to the soldiers from this parish, and will take the form of postal orders instead of parcels.

DEMOBILISATION QUESTIONS.
AN OFFER TO OUR READERS.

The question of demobilisation is uppermost in everyone’s thoughts at the moment, and it is beset with endless difficulties and misunderstandings. This being so, we shall be pleased to secure an official reply from the Department of Demobilisation and Resettlement in London to any questions our readers may care to put to us, addressed to the Editor at 2 Albert Street, Rugby.

RUGBY MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.
FRIDAY. Before Mr E M G Carmichael (chairman), Mr J Findlay (assessor for employers), and Mr E G Evans (assessor for the men).
FITTER’S SUCCESSFUL COMPENSATION CLAIM.

Kenneth H Lythgoe, fitter, 4 Kimberley Read, Rugby, claimed £4 15s compensation from the B.T.H. Company, for dismissal without notice.—Lythgoe stated that he entered the firm’s employment in 1916, and on October 26th was informed by the charge hand that there was no more work for him. He then asked for notice, or failing that a week’s wages. He subsequently saw the foreman, who said he was entitled to a week’s wages and referred him to the office, where he was told that if he had any complaint he must apply at the Tribunal.— In reply to Mr London, representing the B.T.H. Company, complainant stated that owing to the shortage of matches a Bunsen gas burner, which was used for heating materials, was kept burning during working hours, although when it was not in use it was turned low. One day the charge hand approached him with a circular from the head office urging the necessity of economy in the use of gas, and he (the chargehand) asked complainant to turn the gas out when it was not required. Complainant replied that he would turn the gas out if the chargehand would supply him with matches.—The chargehand explained that it was not so much what complainant said as the way in which he said it. On the day following this affair complainant stayed away from work, and when he returned on Saturday he was dismissed on the grounds of general insolence and unreliability as a timekeeper.—Complainant urged that he had never held a job up during his connection with the company.—The Chairman said the firm were quite justified in getting rid of such a workman, but they were not entitled to dismiss him instantly and peremptorily as they had done. Complainant would be awarded a week’s wage as compensation.

THE SALVATION ARMY BAND, in connection , with their Christmas playing, are making a special effort to provide more instruments for their comrade bandsmen, who will soon be returning from active service, when a generous response is hoped for.

ABOUT 45 Army horses were sold at last Monday’s market by Messrs Howkins & Sons at prices ranging from 20 to 76 guineas each. Several bunches of store cattle also met a good trade, the prices realised being £30 to £39 per pair.

SCRAP RUBBER WANTED.—The Ministry of National Service, Rubber Salvage Department, are appealing to the public for scrap rubber, which will be sold to the War Office, and the proceeds devoted to the Red Cross. The Hon Secretary of the Rugby Part-Time Committee, Mr A W Sheasby, of 30 Sheep Street, will be pleased to receive motor-cycle, cycle and other old tyres, rubber boots, air cushions, rubber flooring, hose, belting, waterproof clothing, hot water bottles, air beds, water beds, rubber toys, heels, soles of boots, rubber off electric cables and shock absorbers, or, in fact, any form of rubber, and he will forward it to the department.

DEATHS.

BRAIN.—In ever loving memory of GEORGE WILLIAM BRAIN, of Dunchurch, who was killed in action somewhere in France or Belgium on November 1st, 1918, aged 18.
“ We loved him, yes, no tongue can tell,
How much we loved him and how well.
God loved him too, and thought it best
To take him to his Heavenly rest.
Gone from us, but not forgotten.
Never shall thy memory fade ;
Sweetest thoughts shall ever linger
Round the spot where thou art laid.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

INGRAM.—In proud and loving memory of Gunner ERNEST B. INGRAM (BEN), of the R.F.A., killed in action on Dec. 8, 1916. aged 22 years.
“ Somewhere in France in a lonely grave
There sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Loved and sadly missed by his sorrowing Mother, and not forgotten by his sisters and brothers and all who knew him.

MATTHEWS.—In loving memory of HARRY J. MATTHEWS (the dearly beloved and only son of D. and M. A. Matthews), who died in France Dec. 14th, 1917, aged 28 years.—Never forgotten by his Father, Mother, and Sisters.

READ.—In loving memory of CHARLES GEORGE READ, the beloved son of Charles John and Minnie Read, 46 Rokeby Street, Rugby, who was killed in action December 15, 1916, aged 22 years.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried ;
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

4th May 1918. Local Heroes in the Zeebrugge Raid

LOCAL HEROES IN THE ZEEBRUGGE RAID.

Chief Motor Mechanic W Gilbert, who as stated in our last issue, was one of those who volunteered and took part in the naval raid on Zeebrugge, is the son of Mr T Gilbert, who resides at the picturesque old cottages near Bilton Church. He was one of the first Bilton lads to volunteer for Kitchener’s Army, but when in training he unfortunately received injuries while trench digging, in consequence of which he was, much to his disappointment, eventually discharges. He came home, and worked at Messrs Robbins’ Motor Garage, Warwick Street, as motor mechanic, and was one of the first to drive the Southam mail van when the motor was adopted by the Postal Authorities in lieu of the old horse-driven vehicle. But his desire to get back into active service was keen, and his skill as a mechanic and driver enabled him to find his way into the Navy. After passing his examination at Southampton promotion soon followed, and ultimately, he was appointed chief motor mechanic on one of the motor launches engaged in the important work of patrolling the Channel off Dover. He had taken part in several hazardous runs, and when the Zeebrugge business came along it afforded him an opportunity he could not resist. On a postcard to his parents afterwards he briefly wrote :—“ I have been and come back again O.K. Zeebrugge is a hot place. We had a shell through the deck, but no one was hit. We were more lucky than some. It was hell. Got back at 12 o’clock—just 24 hours’ run.” In a subsequent letter he says :—“ I am pleased I was there on Monday night. It was worth seeing. We ‘smoked’ for the Vindictive, so you can guess how far we were in. I think it is the finest bit of work that has been done in this War ;” and he winds up humorously : “ Talk about ——’s birthday and the fireworks—that’s washed out now.”

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of the Murray School, has received a cheery postcard from Pte Will Clark, R.M.L.I, now an inmate of a military hospital at Dover, who took part in the Zeebrugge Raid. He writes :—“ As you see by my address, I am ‘ in dock’ again once more, and, by the way, having a grand time. The last time I told you I told you I should have another go before long. Well, I volunteered to be one of the landing party at Zeebrugge, and we visited the Huns on Monday last (midnight). We had rather a warm time while it lasted, but they did not like the look of when we got on the Mole. Do you think it was my face that frightened them? My sister said it was. Anyhow, I know what it was—so many of us had had a good schooling like you always gave us. We had several Rugger players of note aboard us, including Lieut-Commander Harrison and Lieut Walker. I am pleased to say I have played against both. Really, sir, I am a very lucky man, as my wounds are quite light—a few small pieces in the head, slight concussion, and sprained back. I am looking forward to seeing you and the school again very soon.”

Pte Clerk is a grandson of the late Mr E Allen, for many years stationmaster at Rugby.

Pte Clerk, who is a son of Mr H Clark, 8 Winfield Street, Rugby, and an Old Murrayian, joined the R.M.L.I eight years ago. In a letter his sister, who has visited him at the hospital, says :—“ He has got shrapnel wounds about the head and face, and has hurt his back ; a shell exploded and blew him off a scaling ladder. There were 40 killed round him, but he was lucky. Unfortunately he any on the deck all night soaked in blood and rain, as they were all mixed up anyhow—dead, dying and wounded. . . . They had a dreadful time, but did what they set out to do.”

FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.

While flying near Rugby on Thursday evening last week Second-Lieut David Percival McIntyre (19), of the Royal Air Force, whose home is at Broughton Ferry, Scotland, collided with some telegraph wires, and received injuries from which he died shortly afterwards in the Brookfield Nursing Home.

At the inquest, which was held on Monday by Mr E F Hadow, Second-Lieut Norman Maximilian Smith said his attention was attracted to the deceased officer by the fact that he was flying very low down and diving over hedges and trees. He then turned towards the sun, and came down lower, apparently trying to fly under the telegraph wires which were set back a considerable distance from the road. He crashed into the wires and the machine toppled over.

The Coroner : Have you ever seen this done before ?—Answer : No. but I have heard some wild stories about it, and I have heard of pilots who have flown under the wires and have lived to tell the tale. He added that there should have been 2ft of space under the wheels and 2ft between the top of the plane and the wires had deceased been flying straight.—The Coroner : That is cutting things very fine.—Witness expressed the  opinion that deceased made a mistake in judgment. He was not flying right in the face of the sun at the time of the accident.

Major Leslie Frederick Forbes deposed that the deceased officer had graduated as a pilot and was very competent.

The Coroner enquired whether trick flying low down was necessary.—Witness said not altogether, but overseas a pilot is supposed to do a certain amount of low flying. He added that when a pilot was competent he was allowed to fly rather low. After the accident he visited the spot and concluded that deceased had fallen from a height of 20 to 30 feet, while travelling at 100 miles an hour. He must have been going very fast because some parts of the machine were found some distance away. The top part of the plane struck the under part of the wires and deceased was evidently trying to fly underneath them. This was often done by pilots, but in this case he was not sufficiently competent. Deceased was flying against the sun and might not have seen the wires.

The Coroner enquired whether there were any restrictions on young officers playing such tricks.—A : We have restrictions for officers who have not completed their time, but others have rather more latitude, and are sent up to do as they like. It is strictly against the regulations to fly at low altitudes over towns.

Air Mechanics Coles and Muir deposed that the engine and rigging were in good condition before the ascent.—Surgeon Major Cester Collins deposed that deceased was found 20 yards away from the machine. He had a fracture at the base of the skull, partial dislocation of the vertebrae of the neck, fracture of the left leg, and rupture of the internal organs. His machine must have struck the wires with a tremendous impact.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Gunner W E Wellens, R.F.A, who removed from an ambulance train in a dying condition, died at the Hospital of Cross on Wednesday.

Pte Alfred Charles Williams, R.W.R, son of Mr A Williams, 29 William Street, has written home stating that he was taken prisoner by the Germans during the heavy fighting of March 22nd.

Pte C W Oakley, R.W.R, only son of Mr & Mrs Oakley, 21 Sandown Road, Rugby, has been wounded in three places. Before joining up in 1917 he worked at Rainsbrook.

Pte T H Bosworth, Lancashire Fusiliers, youngest son of Mr Samuel Bosworth, Lutterworth, of whom nothing had been heard since March 17th, has now written to say that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He has served in Egypt and France for three years.

Mr A D Stocks, formerly of Misterton, Lutterworth, and later with Messrs Seabroke & Son, solicitors, of Rugby, has for some time been in training at Bushey in the Officers’ Cadet Battalion in preparation for joining the Coldstream Guards.

Mrs J Lee, Regent Street, Lutterworth, received news last Saturday that her brother, Pte H W Lee, Royal Berkshire Regiment, has been missing since March 21st. He is 19 years of age, and had only been in France five weeks. Any news of him will be gratefully received by his brother and sister at the above address.

Second-Lieut C Pridmore Dunn, son of Mr F Dunn, at one time on the staff of the National Provincial Bank, Rugby, and later with the Cement Company, is reported missing. In a letter to his parents the Colonel says that he had fought well, and that he had recommended him for his gallantry.

Mr & Mrs Cowley, of 17 James Street, Rugby, have received a postcard from their only son, Pte W F Cowley, of the Wiltshire Regiment, saying that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and is slightly wounded by a bullet in the stomach. He is 19 years of age, and was before joining up employed at Messrs Badham’s, High Street.

News been received by Mrs Joseph E Walker, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, that her husband, a lance corporal in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed action on March 30th. Lance-Corpl Walker, who was 29 years of age and joined the Army in January, 1916, formerly carried on business as a greengrocer in Bridget Street.

Pte T Eaton-Shore, son of the late Mr J Eaton-Shore, formerly works manager for Messrs Willans & Robinson, who been out in France for two years and seven months with the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has recently been offered a commission. He is now in training with the 18th Officers’ Cadet Battalion at Bath. Before the War he was well-known in Rugby, especially in cricket and hockey circles.

In their report to the Warwickshire County on Wednesday the General Purposes Committee reported :—“ We regret to learn that Lieut J Greenwood, formerly assistant master at Rugby Eastlands Boys’ School, has been invalided out of the Army, and that he will never able to resume work as a teacher. We regret to find that the Local Government (Emergency Provisions) Act, 1916, makes no provision for the Council to pay any allowance in such a case. We understand that Mr Greenwood will receive a pension.”

Miss E G M Bryant, daughter of Mr William Bryant, of Rugby, who was appointed matron of the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital, Mont Boron, Nice, A.M. In 1908, has been decorated with the French Medaille d’Argent des Epidemics, the hospital having during the War been taken over by the French Government for military purposes. Last year, when dressing wounds, Miss Bryant contracted blood poisoning in the right hand, and in consequence had to have the little finger amputated and thumb shortened. It is now hoped that she will ultimately regain the use the remaining portion, which at one time it was feared she would lose altogether.

SERGT J. FREEMAN.

Sergt John Freemen, R.W.R, Bennett Cottage, Bennett Street, a son of Mrs Freeman, Lancaster Road, has been reported missing since March 22nd. He had been a member of “ E ” Company for 12 years when war broke out, and held several shooting cups which he had won. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. as a carpenter. He had been in France a little over twelve months.

B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Rifleman H Corbett, Rifle Brigade, late of the Works Stores, was killed in action on March 28th, and that Pte J E Garner, Leicestershire Regiment, formerly employed in the Pattern Shop, died from wounds on April 24th.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS H EDMONDS, The Heath, Dunchurch, who received official news on April 18th that her husband had been wounded, has since received a card from him saying he is a prisoner of war in Badam, Germany, with bullet wounds in shoulder and face. He writes very cheerfully, and says he is going on all right, and being treated well. Pte H Edmonds has served 18 months in France, and has been through some hard fighting on the Western front. He was in the Cambrai attack in November, 1917. Before joining up he was employed at Messrs Alcock & Sons, tailors, Dunchurch.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.
SIGNALLER A L IRESON WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs E W Ireson have received news that their son, Signaller A L Ireson, of the R.F.A, has received a shrapnel wound in the head. Before volunteering, at the age of 17¼ years, he was a draughtsman at the Drawing Office of Coventry Ordnance Works. He had been in France for nearly two years, where he had seen much fighting. His elder brother, who was similarly wounded, has now got his discharge and returned to Canada, from whence he came to fight  for the Old Country.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
On Sunday, which happened to be Hospital Sunday in the parish, a Memorial Service was held at the Parish Church in the afternoon for Gunner Henry Howkins, of the Royal Garrison Artillery, the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Chas Howkins, who was officially reported as having died in hospital in France on March 30th. The family being members of the Primitive Methodist body, the memorial was really a joint service of the two congregations, and the Rev W Vaughan, of the Primitive Methodist Church, Rugby, attended it and took part by reading the Lesson, the Service used being the one authorised in the Diocese, and the Vicar giving an address. A very large congregation assembled to show their sympathy with and respect for the family, including a numerous deputation from the Village Benefit Club. A substantial addition to the Hospital Fund was collected, in view of its work amongst wounded soldiers.

GRANDBOROUGH.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs W Coling have received official notice that their eldest son, Sergt P Coling, has died from wounds received on April 10th. He joined the Army on the outbreak of war, and had participated in much of the fighting, and had had some very narrow escapes. This is the second son Mr & Mrs Coling have lost in the War, and much sympathy is felt for them locally.

REMARKABLE REDUCTION OF VAGRANTS IN WARWICKSHIRE.

At the annual meeting of the Warwickshire County Vagrancy Committee it was reported that during the quarter ended March 31st the number of casual poor relieved in the county was 2,581 men, 604 women, and 6 children, making a total 3,191, as compared with a total of 7,086 for the corresponding quarter of last year. The total number of food tickets issued by the unions during the quarter was 2,256, of which 1,938 were produced to tradesmen.—The Chairman moved the approval of the statistics, saying that they revealed a healthy reduction in the number of admissions.—The annual report, which was approved, recorded a pronounced reduction in vagrancy in the county.

DEATHS.

BENFIELD.—Died at 39 Stationary Hospital, Aire, France, from wounds received in action on April 16th, 1918, Pte. BERTRAM GEORGE BENFIELD, of the D.C.L.I., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Benfield, Northend.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—Deeply mourned by his Father (in France), Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

CHANT.—In loving memory of my dear husband, who fell in action on March 22, 1918 ; aged 37 years.
“ There is a link death cannot sever ;
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—From his loving Wife and Baby.

COLING.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. P. Coling, who died of wounds received in action on April 10th ; aged 24 years. Deeply lamented.

HALL.—In ever-loving memory of SYDNEY GEORGE, only dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. G. Hall, 31 Alexandra Road, Rugby, who killed in action on April 12th ; aged 21 years.

JONES.—E. H. JONES, Second-Lieut., R.F.A., 87th Brigade, killed in action on April 25th ; son of Mr. John Jones, Cosford.

PACKWOOD.—In loving remembrance of WILLIE, the very dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Packwood, St. Matthew’s Street, who was killed in action on April 12, 1918.

TABOR.—In loving memory of ALICK JOHN TABOR, aged 19, of the Durham Light Infantry, killed in action on March 25, 1918 ; youngest son of Mr. G. Tabor, of Woolscott.—Deeply mourned by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

DEMPSEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. P. DEMPSEY, K.O.S.B., who died of wounds in France on April 30th, 1916.

HOPCRAFT.— In loving memory of JOHN ANDREW HOPCRAFT, who was accidentally killed whilst on duty on May 3, 1915.
“ We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.
Some may think that we forget him
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which is hid behind that smile.”
—From his devoted Wife and Children.

STEBBING—In loving memory of Gunner SYDNEY REGINALD STEBBING, Motor Machine Gun Section, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action at Zonnebeke on May 4, 1915.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.—R.I.P.

5th Aug 1916. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps, Swearing-in Ceremony

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

SWEARING-IN CEREMONY.

An interesting ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, chairman of the Urban District Council, at the Benn Buildings, on Saturday afternoon, when eighty-seven members of the Rugby Company of the 2nd Battalion Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment were sworn in as soldiers under the new regulations. The proceedings took place in the Assembly Room, and the Chairman was supported on the platform by Lieut-Col Johnstone, Major Glover, Messrs W Flint, T A Wise, S B Robbins, R W Barnsdale, T M Wratislaw, H N Sporborg, T Hunter, and F M Davenport. The company, under the command of Mr C H Fuller (Commandant) and Mr L G Haigh, fell in at the Drill Hall, Park Road, and marched to the Benn Buildings.

The Chairman said, in the first place, he wanted on behalf of the Council and of the town, to give them a very hearty welcome. He thought they would all agree that it was most appropriate that that most important ceremony, which was the administering of the oath to a civic force, should take place in the building which was the centre of the management of the town. He had received apologies for absence from Lieut-Col Hood, Col Lewis, Hon E Parker, Brigadier-General Little, Mr A James, and Mr W L Larke. He would now ask them a short question, to which he wished them to answer “ Yes.” It was : “ Do you fully understand all the questions put to you on the official form of enrolment ? ” The men answered “ Yes ” ; whereupon Mr McKinnell requested them to take their hats off and to answer a longer question, which was in effect the declaration : “ Do you solemnly declare that the answers made by you to the questions set out on page 1 of the form of enrolment are true, and that you are willing, to be enrolled as members of the Volunteer Force of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment under the conditions laid down by the Army Council under the regulations for the Volunteer Force framed by them in accordance with the Statute Law relating to that Force ?” An affirmative answer was made, whereupon the Chairman administered the oath as under :-

“ I (–—) do sincerely promise and swear that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance to his Majesty King George V, and that I will faithfully serve his Majesty in Great Britain for the defence of the same against all his enemies and opposers whatsoever, according to the conditions of my service.”

This ceremony over, the Chairman said they were now soldiers, and he was proud to be the first one to congratulate them on behalf of their fellow-citizens. They had joined a very gallant and very noble army. The Volunteers had been unrecognised for months and months past, and at last the Government had thought well to take some notice of them, and to allow that, after all, they might possibly be of some use. Personally, he thought that a great mistake was made right at the very beginning in the nervousness and apprehensiveness of the War Office, who feared that if this Force was made too much of recruiting would suffer. He believed that the contrary would have been the effect. They honoured the Volunteers for plugging away (applause). Despite a great deal of very cheap wit on the subject of their age, despite the Government lukewarmness, and despite thousand and one more hindrances, they had gone steadily on making themselves efficient. He had heard what they had been doing, and he believed they put in a great deal of hard work, and he was sure there was not one among them who was not very glad he had done that hard work.

This question of the Volunteer movement was a very deep and vital one, because the men could, when they were fairly well trained, if the need arose, as it might possibly now arise, take the places of members of the Regular Forces, who would then be able to go and fight in France, Flanders, and elsewhere. In all probability things would get very critical before they had won the War. They were going to win, but it might be a bit of a squeeze, and heaven knew what was going to happen to anyone of them during the next twelve months.

Addressing those who had been ordered by the Tribunal, as a condition of exemption, to join that body, the Chairman said they must not think they were different from any other member of that Force. They were honoured just as much as the others. Those on the Tribunal knew, but others did not, all the reasons which stopped them from joining in the past ; and therefore, he did want to impress upon them that there was no distinction between them and other members of the Force (applause). This Force could do a most extraordinary good work in training those men who might have to be sent for soldiers, and who would then be three-parts trained when they went up. The oath they had taken only bound them to fight the enemy in the case of invasion of this country ; and this recognition by the Government ought to put a new life into their ranks. That swearing-in ceremony ought to be the starting point of fresh vigour both in men and efficiency. There ought to be a lot more men in their ranks, not only men of over military age, but the young men of 17 and 18 years who were employed in the town, and he earnestly hoped they would have a large influx of recruits in the near future.

Now they were enrolled as soldiers they must have some sort of uniform, arms, and equipment, and he understood they had certain sums in hand. However he would appeal to the public to support their funds with rather more liberality than they had done in the past. He was told they wanted £600. He hoped they would get it ; he thought they would, because they certainly ought to. They were extremely lucky to have such extraordinarily zealous and efficient officers, who worked very hard and also knew their job, and there was no man whom he would rather see as Commandant than Mr C H Fuller.

Major Glover said he hoped the enthusiasm that had been shown that day would not be allowed to evaporate ; but that they would induce others to follow their example. He thought that in a town of the size of Rugby there should be a large number of eligible men who could come forward. He was now Acting Commandant and Regimental and Battalion Adjutant ; and with regard to the first position, he was acting as a warming-pan for Col Johnstone, who, he knew, had received an invitation from the proper authorities to accept that post. He hoped Col Johnstone would accept that post, and then he (the speaker) would step back into the position that he could fill with greater credit to himself-that of Adjutant to the Battalion. In conclusion, he urged them to form a detachment of 250 in the town, so that they could have a company of their own. Hitherto they had been connected with Southam and Harbury, but it was now proposed to get these detachments affiliated to another corps.

Mr C H Fuller, on behalf of the Company, expressed thanks to the Chairman for the part he had played in that day’s ceremony, and to the other gentlemen who had attended. Their requirements could be expressed in two words, “ men ” and “ money.” He understood that men disqualified from service in the Army, who had to remain at home, had great difficulties to contend with, but they must have a certain amount of spare time, and he felt that in the crisis they were now in it was their duty to spend part of that spare time by joining their Corps. They must remember the men at the Front-that vast number that had given up money and everything. They must remember, also, that vast number who would never return, and that probably those present would live to see the final victory and to enjoy the triumphal peace. They had been given clearly to understand that they must not look upon the question of invasion as impossible even now ; and, therefore, it seemed to him that it behoved every man to do what he could to prepare himself for that event. It would very much strengthen their position ; and he hoped it could come about, if they could form a company of their own. He would ask each of them within the next fortnight to get one man who for some reason was unable to join the Regular Forces to join their Corps. There object would then be attained as regarded numbers ; and with regard to funds, he thought they could rely on the public to assist them if they showed they were willing to assist themselves, but could not do so to the full extent required. Eighty-seven men had taken the oath that day, and forms had been completed for 155 men to enrol who for various reasons were unable to be present. There had been a lamentable amount of apathy in that neighbourhood with regard to the Corps, more than in other places. Those eligible people who said the Force was not wanted were seeking an excuse for not joining, and he begged of everyone who was able to do his bit in this position-and it was a serious position they found themselves in—to do his best and join them and prepare to be ready. If they did that no man who was disqualified for active service would have anything to regret at the end of the War. To those who were preparing themselves he would commend as a motto the well-known lines :—

“ He also serves who only stands and waits.

Lieut-Col Johnstone then addressed the detachment, and said it was a great regret to him that, shortly after raising the second Battalion, he had to give up the command because of the other duties which were placed upon him. He had now been asked to take over the command of it again. After considering the matter, he really found that his duties were so heavy at the present time that, although he took the greatest interest in them, he felt he could not do justice to them. But he was going to his best. He accepted it (applause), and he would be glad to be with them again. all he asked was that they would put their backs into it, because if he found any slackers he would not want them. He wanted men who were going to try to do their work and to become soldiers in earnest. They did not know when they would be required. They might be required at any moment, and they must fit themselves for that moment. He thanked them for the kind manner in which they had received his return to the Company (loud applause).

The Chairman : Col Johnstone must be gratified by the way his return has been received.

Cheers for the King concluded the proceedings.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut B B Salmon, Manchester Regiment, killed, was in the football XV at Rugby School.

The numerous friends of Pte W T Satchell (Kilsby) of the Royal Warwicks, will be sorry to hear that he is lying seriously ill in the Canadian Hospital, near Maidenhead. There are every prospects of a final recovery, but it will be a long time before he regains health and strength completely.

SECOND-LIEUT F HUNTER HAS NARROW ESCAPES.

The name of Second-Lieut F Hunter, of the Gordon Highlanders, son of Mr T Hunter, J.P, Elmhurst, Hillmorton Road, appeared in the list of officers suffering from shell shock. The losses of the Battalion were heavy, and Second-Lieut Hunter had a remarkably narrow escape. A shell dropped at his feet and burst outwards, killing the men on either side of him and blowing him for some yards, but happily he was not touched by any of the fragments. He lost the use of his legs through shell shock, and was brought to London, and afterwards sent home to Rugby. Two days before this Second-Lieut Hunter had another narrow escape. He was standing talking to another officer, when they were espied by a German sniper, who shot the officer dead. Mr Hunter stooped to pick his friend up, and a bullet, evidently intended for him, passed through his pack, smashing his hair brush, &c.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following young mm connected with the Rugby Baptist Church have been wounded in the great offensive : Will Spaggett (Manchester), Frank Burberry (Netley), Percy Harris (Rawtenstall), Bob Mayes (Leeds), and Corpl Horly (Birmingham).

Pte George Clarke, E Co, R.W.R, has written to his parents, who live at 98 Avenue Road, New Bilton, informing them that he is now in hospital suffering from a bullet wound in the left thigh. He adds that the bullet has not yet been extracted, but that he is going on well.

Mrs Rixom, 108 Claremont Road, has received intimation in letters from the War Office and Major C P Nickalls that her son. Bombardier F W Rixom, Rugby Howitzer Battery, was wounded at the back of the head, with shrapnel on July 29th. He is now in St George’s Hospital, Stockport, and is progressing favourably. This is the second time Bombardier Rixom has been wounded.

Rifleman H G King, of 16 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, who was wounded by shrapnel in the foot on June 26th, as reported in this paper three weeks ago, and was in hospital in France, has had his leg amputated below the knee, the bones being smashed and also poisoned. He is now in hospital at Liverpool, where he has been visited by his friends, who found him going on very well indeed.

TWO B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News was received at the B.T.H this week that Pte Arthur Hipwell, Leicestershire Regiment, son of Mr Arthur Hipwell, of Catthorpe, and Corpl Richards, of the R.W.R, have been killed during the recent fighting. Before the War Pte Hipwell was employed in the Turbine Department, and Corpl Richards was a draughtsman in the Drawing Office for several years.

CAPT C E ANDERSON.

Captain Charles Edward Anderson, the Gordon Highlanders, who was killed in action on July 21st, was the second son of the late William Henry Anderson and Mrs Anderson, of Rokeby House, rugby. He was born in December, 1890, and entered the Gordon Highlanders from Sandhurst in October, 1910, getting his first step in promotion in June, 1912, and his captaincy in April, 1915. He was wounded at the first battle of Ypres in October, 1914, and again slightly on July 14th last, but remained on duty, and was killed by a shell on the early morning of July 21st. Captain Anderson was a keen follower to hounds, and when on leave hunted with the Atherstone and North Warwickshire Hounds.
[Captain Anderson is listed on the Rugby Memorial Gates. His biography will be published at a later date]

SERGT J GILBERT, of BILTON.

Another respected member of the Warwickshire Territorials, Sergt John Gilbert, eldest son of Mr T Gilbert, of Bilton, died from wounds in a Brighton hospital on Tuesday. Sergt Gilbert, who was 32 years of age, was wounded while engaged with a Trench mortar battery on or about July 20th ; and in order, probably, to avoid causing alarm to his wife, who only a fortnight ago gave birth to a child, he wrote home minimising his injuries. On July 26th he was brought to England, and sent to a hospital at Brighton. Unfortunately blood poisoning set in, and developed so rapidly that Sergt Gilbert died before his relatives, who had been summoned by telegraph, could reach the hospital. Before the War he was employed by Messrs Hands, china dealers, Sheep Street. He was a member of the Bilton Working Men’s Club and the Bilton Brass Band. He leaves a wife and four children, to whom, and also his parents, much sympathy is extended in their sad loss.

The interment took place at the Parish Church, Bilton, on Thursday afternoon, the remains having been brought from Brighton on the preceding day. A large number of parishioners assembled at the church to show respect to the deceased and his family ; and although it was not possible to arrange for a military funeral, the wounded soldiers at Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital supplied, as far as they could, the honours due to a departed comrade. A detachment of about 35 preceded the cortege from deceased’s former home at Bilton Hill. They lined the path to the church, and additional pathos was imparted to the scene when each one saluted, as well as wounds would permit, the coffin, covered with a Union Jack and the cap, tunic, and belt of the deceased, as it passed by. The Burial Service was read by the Rector, the Rev W O Assheton, R.D. Among those who assembled in the church and at the grave-side were : Mr T A Wise, J.P, Mrs West (Bawnmore, Mrs W Barnett, Mrs Assheton, Mrs F E Hands and Mr J Lee (Rugby), Miss Wilson (Bournemouth), Messrs G Wilson and W Wilson, Mr and Mrs F Betts and Mrs Elsom, Mrs Yates, Mr and Mrs H Freeman. Mrs E Smith, Mr and Mrs Manning, Messrs H J Hughes (representing the Working Men’s Club), G Evans, J Cripps, sen, G Birch, J Burton, and others. A number of beautiful floral tributes were sent by relatives and friends, including the members of the Working Men’s Club ; Mr Bedford’ ; Brass Band, of which deceased was formerly a member ; the Bilton Brass Band ; and the wounded soldiers who had collected flowers and made up a handsome cross, upon which they placed the inscription, “ From Wounded Comrades at Bilton Hall.”

DEATH.

HAYES.—On July 19th (killed in action). Signaller Frank Hinde Hayes, aged 19 years, youngest son of Mrs. Hayes, 86 York Street, Rugby.
“ The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away ;
Even so His servants are tried.
Blessed be the Name of the Lord.”

BOUCHER.—On the 25th July, in hospital, of wounds received in action on 14th July, Captain Alan Estaeurt Boacher, Leicestershire Regiment, dearly loved younger surviving son of the Rev. Canon and Mrs. Boucher, of Frolesworth Rectory, Lutterworth, aged 21.

DICKEN.—July 20th, died of wounds in France, Lance-Corporal Signaller Sidney Harold Dicken, youngest dearly loved son of St. and Mrs. W. Dicken, Claremont Road, Rugby. Aged 22 years. Deeply mourned.

GILBERT.—Died from wounds received in France, Sergt. John T. Gilbert, the beloved Husband of Edie Gilbert, and eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Gilbert, Bilton. Aged 32 years.

HIPWELL.—On July 23, 1916, Pte. John Henry Hipwell, No. 10,816, 6th Leicester Regt. (died of wounds), eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hipwell, of Lilbourne, aged 23 years.
“ He gravely answered duty’s call,
His-life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
— From his loving father, mother, sister, & brother.

SMITH.—Killed in action on July 22nd, 1916, Eric-Arthur Rae Smith, Second Lieutenant, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged twenty-seven years. Youngest son of Arthur E. Smith, Pencarrow, Enfield, Middlesex, and late of Clifton-on-Dunsmore.

WHITE.—On the 19th or 20th July, killed in action, Sergt. W. H. White, 2nd 7th Batt. Royal Warwickshire Regiment, aged 19. Dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. George White, of Dunchurch.

WHITE.—Killed in action in France, July 3, 1916, William Samuel, second son of Thomas and Many Sophie White, of 46 Manor Road, Rugby and grandson of the late Thomas Clarke, of Glencoonera, Irviaestown, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland, who was for 31 years, a well-known member of the Royal Irish Constabulary.
“ No useless coffin endowed his breast,
Nor in sheet nor in shroud they wound him ;
But he lies like a warrior taking his rest,
With no martial cloak around him.”

IN MEMORIAM.

ARIS.—In loving remembrance of Lance-Corpl Mark Aris, killed in action August 6, 1915.
“ Some day we hope to meet him ;
We know not when.
We shall clasp his hands in the Betterland,
Never to part again.”
—Ever in thoughts of his loving SISTERS & BROTHERS, (SID in France).

HOLLIS(Frankton).—In loving Memory of our dear son and brother “ Bert,” who was killed in action at the Battle of Chunuk Bair, August 10, 1915—Sadly missed.
“ For still for him high service waits,
Tho’ earth’s last fight is fought;
God did not give that martial soul
To end at last in nought
That stedfast soldier-heart was not
For this brief life alone;
‘Tis as a soldier he will stand
Before the Great White Throne.”

WOODWARD.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. A. Woodward, 7th S. Stafford Regiment, killed in action at Chocolate Hill, Gallipoli, August 7th, 1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all,
But the unknown grave it the bitterest blow ;
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving wife ; also father and mother.