Donald, Charles. Died 31st Dec 1916

Charles Donald was born in Brighton, Sussex, England to Joseph Donald born 1841 and Frances Beeby born 1839. Frances had been married previously to John Whelan.

John and Frances married in India and had 4 children. Joseph was a regular soldier and the family moved around. Charles’ elder brother was born in Lucknow, India in 1876 followed by Bertha in Aldershot in 1879. The family then moved to Brighton, and then on to Wrexham, Wales where in 1881, Joseph was a Serjeant-Major of the Denbighshire Yeomanry. In 1891 the family had moved to Denbigh, Wales and Joseph is now Troop Superintendent. He died in 1892.

By 1901 Charles had moved to Rugby and in the Census taken that year was living as a Boarder at 30, Arnold Street, Rugby with William and Sarah Daynes. William was one of the earliest photographers of Rugby.

Charles married Alice Wilson on the 2nd of November, 1902 at St. Mary, Far Cotton, Northampton. Alice was the youngest child of Edward and Mary Ann Wilson, both born in Brixworth, Northamptonshire. In 1891 they were living at Kingsthorpe, Northampton, Edward was a Labourer.

They went on to have 3 children, all born in Rugby, Alice, born 1904, who sadly died in 1905, she was followed in 1907 by Charles and in 1909, by Frances Ruth.

In the 1911 census Charles and family are living at 16, Wood Street, Rugby. He is a Compositor working for Overs a letterpress printing company, and had worked for the firm started by G E Over for 16 years.

He became a member of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Society. He also joined the Oddfellows and served as Grand Officer of the Loyal Addison Branch in Rugby.

He joined the Army on 1st of August 1916 as Bombardier in the 262nd Siege Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery. Siege Batteries were a relatively new method of land warfare. They were based on the Coastal Batteries and each platoon deployed 4 6” Howitzers, which could each fire a 100lb weight shell over a maximum distance of 6,000 yards.

Each platoon comprised 5 Officers and 177 Other Ranks. The guns were pulled by horses, 6 draught, and 80 heavy draught with 6 riding horses. The guns were set on wagons: 3 off 2-horse and 10 off 4-horse. 3 Platoons formed one Siege Battery.

Headquarters (HQ) was staffed as follows: 7 Officers, 137 Other Ranks 21 Riding Horses 5 Draught and 72 Heavy Draught Horses.

Charles died at Aldershot on the last day of 1916. He is buried at Clifton Road Cemetery, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

30th Dec 1916. Military Cross for Old St Matthew’s Boy

MILITARY CROSS FOR OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOY.

The Military Cross has been awarded to Capt Tom Marriott, son of the late Mr J Marriott, who resided at Stratford-on-Avon for nearly 40 years.

Capt Marriott was in charge of a small post at Malingali, East Africa, and being attacked by superior German forces under General Wahle, put up an unexpected resistance. He held the post for four days, until the arrival of a relief force, which drove General Wahle’s forces back. Capt Marriott was promptly awarded the Military Cross.

Capt Marriott was a scholar at St Matthew’s School, under the late Mr Phillips. He was a Lieutenant in the United States Army at that time of the Spanish-American War, subsequently volunteering in the British army for the Boer War. He was one of the first to ride into Ladysmith at the relief of that town, and rose to the rank of Captain in the South African Light Horse. Since the Boer War he has been engaged in farming in South Africa, and on the outbreak of hostilities in 1914, again volunteered for active service, and was engaged with General Botha in German West Africa. On the subjugation of that colony his regiment was transferred to German East Africa. He was wounded in the arm at Malingali in July, the same place where in December he has gained the distinction of the award of the Military Cross.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr PC Longney, deputy-organist at Catthorpe Parish Church, and a member of the choir of St Andrew’s Church, Rugby, has joined the A.S.C, and is proceeding to France this week.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

HOWITZER BATTERY MAN KILLED.

Mrs Ingram, of 68 Victoria Street, New Bilton, has just received official information from the War Office that her son, Driver E (Ben) Ingram, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, was killed by a shell on December 8th. He was an old New Bilton Council School boy and a former member of the Boys’ Brigade, in which he was a stretcher bearer. He had been a member of the Howitzer Battery for six years, and prior to the outbreak of the war was an assistant in Mr J J McKinnell’s shop. He was 22 years of age, and was held in high esteem by all who knew him. In a letter to his parents, Capt Lister says : “ I can assure you that his death came as a great blow to the Battery. He was a great favourite, and always willing to do any work that was to be done. Personally, I feel the blow very much. He had been my servant ever since the Battery left England, and I know full well what a very good fellow he was.” Mrs Ingram has three other sons serving, or who have served. Corpl B Ingram, Coldstream Guards, who has gone all through the present War, is well known in local football circles ; Corpl T Ingram, R.W.R, has served since the commencement of the War ; and Corpl R Ingram, of the same regiment, has been discharged through injuries received on active service.

VICAR OF ST. MATTHEW’S GOING TO THE FRONT.

Arrangements have been made for the Rev C T Aston, vicar of St Matthew’s, to take charge of a hut in France, under the auspices of the Soldiers’ Christian Association. He expects to leave Rugby in the second or third week of January, and will probably be away for five or six months. The hut to be placed under Mr Aston’s charge is a new one, now approaching completion, and is nearer the trenches than any others provided by this association. Mr Aston will take with him the good wishes of his many friends in Rugby. During his absence the work at St Matthew’s will be under the care of the Rev P E Warrington (curate). The Rev Dr David and some of the masters at Rugby School have promised to help and other clergymen from a distance are giving assistance for week-ends.

THE WEATHER.

The weather during the Christmas season has been of a wintry character, but not exactly the kind that people usually like to see at this time of the years. Following a spell of frosty weather, there was a considerable fall of snow on Friday last week. On Saturday morning rain came down for a time, and this gradually changed to snow, and when this began to accumulate in a partly melted condition, roads and footpaths were before nightfall inches deep in slush, making it most uncomfortable for people to get about to do their shopping. During the night the remaining snow became frozen, and the surface was covered with ice. This state of affairs continued till Thursday, when a thaw set in. Vehicular traffic on the ice-bound roads was carried on with difficulty, and pedestrians found it necessary to walk with the greatest care. The temperature was not particularly low, but the air was at times very raw, and only for a few moments occasionally was a glimpse of the sum obtainable. On Wednesday there was a dense fog.

A FOOD INVENTORY.

The Food Control Department is engaged on an inventory of the national stocks, resources, and expected supplies of each of the principal articles of food. This is a necessary preliminary to the devising of plans for the equitable distribution of food, and when the stock-taking is completed, as it will be shortly, the exact form of these plans in the way of preventing wasteful and extravagant misuse of food will be devised. Meatless days and sugar rationing will be first taken into consideration.

SEED POTATOES.—Arrangements have been made by the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries with the Treasury to finance a scheme for the distribution of seed potatoes. The President has invited the County War Agricultural Committees to request Borough and Urban Councils and Parish Councils to ascertain what quantity of seed potatoes is required in each village ; to collect cash with orders and to distribute seed. It is proposed that arrangements should be made to deliver the potatoes at convenient distributing centres in 1-cwt bags. Not more than 5-cwt may be supplied to each grower and the range of varieties will necessarily be limited

23rd Dec 1916. The New Food Regulations

THE NEW FOOD REGULATIONS.

The regulations limiting the number of courses to be served in hotels and restaurants came into force on Monday. Under the regulations breakfast and luncheon are limited to two courses, and dinner in the evening to three courses. Everywhere caterers and consumers showed themselves ready to make the best of the new system, although in some quarters doubts were expressed as to its value from the point of view of economy. Under the new regulations hors d’oeuvre containing no fish or meat is a half course, but if it contains fish or meat it counts as a whole course, as does also soup containing meat in solid form ; fish, meat, poultry, game, and sweet ; soup without solid meat and dessert are half courses. Plain cheese does not count as a course.

At the Grand Hotel, Rugby, the regulations have made very little difference, because, owing to the threatened shortage of food the dinner menu was reduced from five to three courses several weeks ago, when the entrees and savoury were discontinued. Although only three courses are served, the guests have a varied choice for dinner each evening, and no complaint has been received regarding the reduced menu.

At the Royal George, where a 6 or 7 course dinner was the rule, the management have also welcomed the change, and the bill of fare at all meals is as varied as the permit will allow.

THE CHRISTMAS TRAIN SERVICE.

There are very few alterations in the local train service during the Christmas festival this year, and the ordinary trains will be run on Saturday and Sunday on the L & N-W Railway. On Christmas Day the service will be the same as Sunday, and on Boxing Day the ordinary week-day trains, with the exception of the 7.30 to Coventry. There are several alterations on the Great Central line. On Saturday there will be a relief train for Leicester, Loughborough, Nottingham, Sheffield, and Manchester, leaving Rugby at 1.54. On Christmas Day the usual Sunday trains will be run, except that the 11.16 to the South and the 4.39 to Sheffield will be cancelled. On Boxing Day the following trains will be cancelled :—1.35 a.m and the 11.23 a.m to Bristol. The 1.55 to London and the Great Western will only run as far as Woodford, and there will be no G.W connection there. A train will leave Rugby for Leicester at 11.15. In place of the ordinary train due at Rugby at 7.2, a special train will leave Oxford on Tuesday at 5.55, Banbury at 6.30, and reach Rugby at the usual time.

The new railway rules were announced on Wednesday. On and after January 1 the passenger services are to be restricted. Passenger fares will be increased by 50 per cent, but this will not affect workmen’s fares or season tickets for distances not exceeding 40 miles.

NOTICE !

Tuesday next being Boxing-Day, the Mid-week Edition of the Advertiser will be published on WEDNESDAY Afternoon at the usual time.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The number of Old Rugbeians known to be serving with the forces is now 2,661. The total casualties to December 14th are : 361 killed, 544 wounded, 14 prisoners wounded, 17 prisoners unwounded, and 21 missing, making a total of 957. The honours number 692, including two V.C’s, 48 D.S.O, 120 Military Cross, and 444 mentioned in despatches.

The parcels sent to the local men who are prisoners of war in Germany, on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee, this week contained :— 1 tin marmalade, ½ lb lunch tongue, 1 tin paste, 1 tin baked beans, ¼ lb ham in tin, ¼ lb tea, ½ lb sugar, 3 soup squares, ½ lb biscuits, ½ lb dripping in tin, 50 cigarettes, 1 lb Quaker oats.

Captain Brinkley, Chief Constable of Warwickshire, has issued notices to several men in the county forces, calling them to hold themselves in readiness to go to France for duty in the mounted military police force.

Major and Adjutant L St Cheape, Dragoon Guards, the famous polo player, one of the team who won the International Cup for England in 1914, who was killed in Egypt on April 23rd, left property of the value of £10,608.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.

Another employee of the Rugby Advertiser, Mr F J Jones, who attested on December 10, 1915, has now been called up, and joined the Colours on Thursday. Mr Jones, who is 38 years of age and has a wife and three children, has been a compositor and machineman at the Advertiser Office about 26½ years, and the firm, and also his fellow-workman, naturally regret his departure and hope for his speedy and safe return. This feeling will be shared by his fellow-craftsmen in the town, Mr Jones having been vice-president of the Rugby branch of the Typographical Society for two years. Ninety per cent. of the eligible men at the Advertiser Office have now been called up.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

LANCE-CORPL H MAYES DIES OF WOUNDS.

Lance-Corpl Horace Mayes, elder son of Mr D Mayes, of 28 Abbey Street, died from wounds in a hospital at Bristol on December 6th. The unfortunate young man—he was only 20 years of age—enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks L.I. at the commencement of the War, and was seriously wounded in France on September 15th, and remained in hospital there for two months, when he was brought to England. Before the War, Lance-Corpl Mayes was an apprentice at the B.T.H. The body was brought to Rugby, and the funeral took place at the Cemetery last week. A firing party attended from Warwick, and the coffin was draped with the Union Jack. The Rev T J Simcox conducted the service.

RUGBY MAGISTERIAL.

MONDAY.—Before J E Cox, Esq.

NEATLY CAUGHT BY BILTON CONSTABLE.—Fred Pratt pleaded guilty to a charge of being absent without leave from the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.—P.C Day, stationed at Bilton, said from prisoner’s appearance he suspected him, and asked him to explain how it was he was absent from his regiment. He said he had been temporarily released from the Army to work under the agricultural scheme. Prisoner added that he had been working for a farmer at Knowle. Witness arrested him on suspicion, and on the way to the Police Station he admitted having left his regiment, stationed at Cheltenham, a month ago.—He was remanded in custody to await escort.—The Magistrate said it was an exceptional case. The constable acted very wisely, and he would be rewarded for it.

 

EMPLOYMENT OF GERMAN PRISONERS.—Warwickshire War Agricultural Committee met on Saturday at Warwick, when the question of the employment of German prisoners on the land was under consideration. Captain Fellows explained the Government proposals. One speaker offered the suggestion that threshing machines should be manned by German labour, and a resolution was passed calling upon the Government to provide gangs of German labourers for every threshing machine in the country. A committee was appointed to prepare for the employment of German labour, and it was stated that Messrs Greaves, Bull, and Lakin were prepared to employ about 30 men at their cement works at Harbury.

PAILTON.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS.—A parcel, containing cigarettes, cafe au lait or cocoa, oxo, socks, sweets, stationery, &c, has been sent to the men from Pailton both at the front and at home. Judging by the letters of thanks received, the parcels are much appreciated.

THURLASTON.

A VERY successful sale in aid of funds for the new Recreation Room for the soldiers at Bilton Hall Hospital was held on Friday last week at the Mill House, kindly lent by Mr Stanley. The stalls were laden with provisions, rabbits, poultry, new goods and rummage, and in a short time nearly everything was sold. The sale was organised by Miss Hackforth and Miss Johnson, assisted by Mrs Appleby, Mrs Hopps, Miss Stanley, the Misses Hopps, Miss Roberts, Mrs Pickering, Miss Prestige, Mrs J Shaw, and Miss Burns. The receipts amounted to £27 7s 4d.

WOLSTON.

AWAY BUT NOT FORGOTTEN.—The Directors and employees of Messrs Bluemel Bros, Ltd, have again this year dispatched Christmas presents to the men who have joined the colours from the Wolston Works, numbering about 90. To those in France, Salonica, Egypt, and India useful boxes have been sent ; and those who are at present in this country in hospital or training have received a postal order for 5s. Besides this, a specially designed Christmas greeting card has been sent to each one, at home or abroad. This design was the work of the Works Manager, Mr W R Glare, and was bountifully done. Its jovial side and the good wishes thereon would undoubtedly cheer the recipients. The _____ lied what should be sent, and the committee carried out their wishes admirably.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

ON SATURDAY morning last Mrs S Wells received news that her husband, Pte S Wells, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, had been dangerously wounded in the head, and is now lying in a critical condition in hospital in France. This is the second time he has been wounded, having only recently gone back to the trenches. It is now two years since his brother, Corpl Walter Wells, died from wounds in Ipswich Hospital. Pte S Wells had only recently been transferred to the Royal Warwicks.

NAPTON.

At the Warwickshire Appeal Tribunal on Thursday last week, Mr C Badger, Napton, sought the further exemption of his son, F E Badger (21, single), cowman and wagoner, and said he would be compelled to give up the farm if his son joined the army. Appellant said he was a canal foreman, and therefore could not see to the farm. He had another son, aged 39, who was exempt.—The appeal was dismissed.

CHRISTMAS PARCELS.—Since the War commenced over 100 men have answered their country’s call from the parish of Napton—five of whom have given up their lives, one is a prisoner of war, and one has died. As Christmas approaches the thoughts of those left behind go out to the men who have gone, and the necessary preparations were made for Tommy’s and Jack’s Christmas parcels. The whole parish has subscribed in one way or another generously for this end, and already about 90 parcels have been despatched. The ladies engaged in packing the parcels feel very proud of the parishioners’ gifts. Each parcel cost 6s, and contained a cake, salmon or sardines, tobacco, pipe, cigarettes, oxo, and concentrated tea or coffee. Already several answers have been received from the recipients.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

CHRISTMAS PUDDINGS FOR SOLDIERS.—The members (together with a few friends) of the Heart and Hand Lodge of Oddfellows (M.U) have collected and forwarded through their Secretary, Mr G Leeson, the sum of £1 2s 6d towards a Daily Paper Fund for supplying Christmas plum puddings to the soldiers at the Front.

DEATHS.

EVERTON.—Lance-Corpl. WILLIAM ROBERT EVERTON, who died at Brinklow on November 27, 1916, while home on leave from France ; aged 27 years.—“ Thy will be done.”

LOMAS.—In loving memory of Pte. GEORGE LOMAS, who was killed in action in France on November 22nd, 1916 ; only son of Thomas Lomas, Pailton ; aged 39.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one amid the brave ;
One of the rank and file, he heard the call.
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”

IN MEMORIAM.

BROWN.—PERCY EDWIN BROWN, 11 York Terrace, Dunchurch Road, killed in action on Sept. 25, 1915.

 

16th Dec 1916. Dr Hoskyn Recommended for the Albert Medal

DR. HOSKYN RECOMMENDED FOR THE ALBERT MEDAL.

Capt C R Hoskyn, R.A.M.C, of Rugby, has been recommended for the Albert Medal of the First Class—the highest medal for saving life outside the fighting line. The act for which Dr Hoskyn has been recommended was on the occasion of a serious railway accident at Gezaincourt on the 24th November, 1916, and it is referred to in the general orders issued to the Fifth Army by the General commanding in the following terms :—

Capt C R, Hoskyn, R.A.M.C.—In addition to other plucky acts he crawled under some burning debris at great risk and commenced to amputate the leg of a man who was pinned down. In doing so he loosened the man’s body, and he was got out alive.

The Commanding Officer wishes to express his appreciation of the gallantry and initiative displayed by the officers and N.C.O.’s mentioned in the report.

The Director-General of Medical Services, British Armies in France, also mentions Dr Hoskyn and others in his orders, and adds : “ I wish to express to you the greatest admiration which I feel for your splendid conduct under conditions calculated to try the courage of the bravest. You all showed courage, resource, and coolness, and I consider that your behaviour is an honour to yourselves and a credit to your Corps.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr F Turner, of 6 West Street, has this week received official news that his son, Pte J L Turner, who has been posted as missing since September 25th last year, was killed in action on that date. Before the war Pte Turner was in the Machine Shop at the B.T.H., and was only 19 years of age.

Corpl Harold Orchard, youngest son of the late Councillor Joseph Orchard, formerly of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field. He was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch of April 30, 1916. Corpl Orchard enlisted in the Royal Engineers in December, 1914.

Major J L Baird, M.P, C.M.G, D.S.O, has been appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Air Board in the new Ministry, and Mr Steel Maitland, M.P, a former Unionist candidate for the Rugby Division, is to be Under-Secretary for the Colonies.

The war is now costing the country upwards of 5½ millions per day.

THE parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : 1 tin fruit, 1 tin salmon. ½lb ration biscuits, 1 tin syrup, ½lb tin cafe au lait, 1 tin beef, 3 soup squares, 1 tin prunes, ¼lb chocolate, ½lb figs. ½lb margarine.

STRETTON-UNDER-FOSSE.
DEATH OF A SOLDIER HERO.—Deep sympathy is extended toward the parents of Pte Fergus Benson, of the 7th Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action last week. Pte Benson went out to France with the second draft of the 7th Warwicks, and was very popular with his fellow-soldiers.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.
CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR THE TROOPS.—At a meeting held recently the Whist Committee decided to arrange a house-to-house collection to provide funds for sending a Christmas parcel to each of the thirty-five soldiers from the parish. The following school girls—Lizzie Hickman, Lily Isom, Edith Davenport, Evelyn Thompson, Nancy Lane, Edith Neal, Olive Gamble, Kate Lane, and Maggie Ritch—acted as collectors. The sum collected, with the balance from the last whist drive, amounted to £5 1s 11d, and this was expended on the parcels and postage (£1 4s 3d). The parcels contained oxo cubes, cocoa and milk tablets, chocolate and cigarettes or tobacco, with a note of good wishes from the parishioners.

BRANDON.
PTE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward have received news, that their son, Pte J. Ward 4th Worcesters, has been wounded in the eye and thigh rather severely, and is now in hospital in France. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, as it is only recently that they lost their son, Charles Ward. They also have another son in the Army.

CATTHORPE.
In order to provide parcels for the men who have joined H.M Forces, two whist drives have lately been promoted for that purpose, and have been very successful. The proceeds were further augmented by gifts, and altogether £5 10s was collected for providing the 25 parcels which have been sent off this week.

CHURCHOVER.
A SUCCESSFUL whist drive and dance was held in the School to raise money to provide Christmas parcels for Churchover soldiers. Twenty-four tables were occupied. Mrs Arthur James and Col Forkus came down from Coton House, and took part in the drive. Mr E W Berrington was M.C. The prize-winners were :—Ladies : 1 Miss L Grundy (148), 2 Miss D Davis (145), 3 Miss A Skeet (142). Gentlemen : 1 Mr F Leatherland (144), 2 Mr C Whitehead (143), 3 Mr F Gibbs (143). Messrs Whitehead and Gibbs cut for second prize. Mrs James gave the prizes away, and said that Mr James had asked her to tell them how sorry he was that he could not be with them. He sent £1, and hoped the effort would be a success. About 150 then commenced dancing to the strains of Mr Ash’s band. Mr W W Mathews and Mr W Sutton were the M.C’s. The arrangements were admirably carried out by the following committee :— Mrs B Berrington, Mrs Semple, Mrs Rimmington, Miss M Beesley, Rev L G Berrington, Mr E Berrington (hon secretary and treasurer), Mr W W Mathews, Mr W Sutton, and Mr A Daynes. The sum of £22 12s 6d was cleared, so that each soldier will be able to have a nice parcel.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR BRAVE SOLDIERS.—Pte Arthur Priest, Coldstream Guards, who was wounded on September 8th is now in the King George’s Hospital, Stamford Street, London. His wounds consist of a bad fracture of the right leg and flesh wounds in the left leg, hip and side. His parents, who have visited him, found him in good spirits.—This week-end Pte Tom Hunt has paid a visit home. He and his brother Richard are both in the Rifle Brigade. They are sons of the Kandahar veteran, Mr Richard Hunt.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains 159 names of local soldiers. Of these ten have given their lives for their country, one is missing, one is a prisoner of war, and over thirty have been wounded.

DUNCHURCH.
P.C Cox, who was formerly stationed at this village, and who is now in the Army, paid a visit to Dunchurch, on Tuesday, and was warmly welcomed by the villagers, amongst whom he was always very popular.

GERMAN PRISONERS TO WORK ON THE LAND.—Warwickshire Chamber of Agriculture at Warwick on Saturday passed a resolution approving the employment of prisoners of war in agriculture. A letter from the officer commanding the Southern Command, which was read to the meeting, stated that only selected men of good character would be sent—with an interpreter. The Government would find rations, and charge the farmers the average rate of wages for the prisoners’ services.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

OTHER CASES.

An appeal was made by Mr F Sharpe, of Bath Street, for John George Bennett, carriage builder and wheel[wright] 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton.—Adjourned for the Military representatives to find out whether the Army is in need of wheelwrights.

On behalf of Mr Chas Wilson, Three Horse Shoes Hotel, Mr Eaden appealed for Bertram Henry Waring (36, married), shepherd and stud groom, 13 Earl Street.—The Military having offered a discharged soldier as a substitute, the Tribunal allowed 28 days for the exchange to be effected.-The appeal of Leonard Page (33, single), butcher and farmer, Wolston, for a long term of exemption was dismissed, but he was given 28 days.-Mr W Howkins, farmer, Hillmorton Grounds, desired to retain the services of Fred Shaw (36, married), cowman, &c.—The Chairman said he would get to April 1st in any event, and an exemption was given to that date.

A letter was read from Joseph Evan Walters, fruiterer and fishmonger, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, asking for his exemption to be extended until his wife had gained her strength.—Mr Wratislaw offered no objection, and he was given 28 days.

With respect to an application by Mr Robt Bucknill, threshing machine proprietor, Marton, for his son, Francis John Bucknill (19, single), described as a stockman and wagoner, Mr. Wratislaw said appellant had refused a substitute to go with his threshing machine because he could not patch a boiler, so he did not deserve any consideration at all.—Mr Bucknill said this statement was not correct.—The Chairman said they could quite see appellant’s attitude—he wanted to keep that boy—and if he was going to take that line there was a very easy way of dealing with him.—Mr Worthington submitted it was a case for substitution, and the case was adjourned till the next meeting for the Military to see what they could do.

Henry James Hopkins (31, married), thatcher and manager of the Co-operative Stores at Broadwell, had been granted an exemption by the local Tribunal, the Military appealing.—Mr Wale said he was a grocer, but he had never heard of a grocer and thatcher.—Mr Worthington : It is rather a peculiar combination.—Adjourned for medical examination.

DEATHS.

GLENN.—On the 7th inst., in France, of asthma and bronchitis, Pte. JOHN GLENN (Warwicks), beloved husband of Nellie Glenn, 35 Rowland Street, aged 40 years.

MAYES.—On December 6th, at Bristol Hospital (died of wounds received in action), Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, of the 3rd Oxford and Bucks L.I., the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Mayes, 28 Abbey Street ; aged 20 years.
“ One less at home, one more in heaven ;
Our Saviour has taken the bloom He has given.
Flowers may wither and die of decay,
But the love of our son will for ever stay.”

IN MEMORIUM.

TURNER.—In affectionate and loving remembrance of our dear son, Pte. Joseph Lewis Turner ; killed in action on September 25, 1915 ; aged 19 years.—From Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters, & Gladys.

Read, Charles George. Died 15th Dec 1916

Charles George Read “joined up” in 1914 aged 19, giving his birth as 1895. His service number was 11383 in the Kings Royal Rifle Corps.

Charles George Read

Charles George Read

The 2nd battalion King’s Royal Rifles took part in most of the Battle of the Somme. The last action was the Battle of Morval which ended on 28th September 1916. Charles George must have died in later shelling, as he has no marked grave.

Charles George Read died on 15th December 1916 and is remembered on the Thiepval Monument.

Charles George Read was born Q2 1894 in Great Bowden, Market Harborough Leicestershire. His parents were Charles John and Minnie Read nee Howarth.

His parents marriage was registered 1893 Q4 Billesdon Leicestershire.

His father Charles John Read and his mother Minnie nee Howarth had 7 children between 1893 and 1911, their first child was Charles George born 1894 Great Bowden Market Harborough, James William born 1895 Great Bowden Market Harborough, Colin Edmund born 1897 Great Bowden Market Harborough, Gladys Maud born 1898 Great Bowden Market Harborough, Herbert born 1901 Great Bowden Market Harborough, Ivy Marion born 1904 Rugby, and Reginald Stanley born 1907 Rugby.

In 1901 UK census Charles J Read age 30 is living 5 Station Road Great Bowden Leicestershire and was a railway engine stoker with his wife Minnie age 31 and 4 children:- Charles G age 6, James W age 5, Colin E aged 3 and Gladys M aged 2.

By 1911 Charles and his family had moved to live at 46 Rokeby Street Rugby, father Charles was still a railway locomotive stoker living with his wife Minnie age 41 and 7 children, Charles George was age 16 and a railway engine cleaner his brother James William aged 15 was a winder in electrical works, his other brother Colin Edmund aged 13 was at school and also a newsboy the 3 additional children all born after 1901 are Herbert born 1901 Great Bowden, Ivy Marion born 1904 Rugby and Reginald Stanley born 1907 Rugby.

Taking a step backwards to 1891 UK census we find his father Charles J Read age 20 single and a lodger who is a Railway Engine Cleaner born North Crawley Buckinghamshire lodging at Station Road Great Bowden the home of Elizabeth Sharpe aged 30 a widow and her family + 3 lodgers a railway carman, a railway shunter and railway engine cleaner.

Going back even further to 1881 UK census we find Charles age 10 living in a shepherds lodge in Castle Ashby Northamptonshire with parents James age 35 and who is a shepherd and his mother Ann Read age 32 and 4 siblings, William age 8, Emma age 6, Herbert aged 4 and George aged 1 + visitor Mary A Smith aged 22 born North Crawley Buckinghamshire. In 1871 UK census Charles John Read aged 3 months living High Street North Crawley Buckinghamshire with parents James age 25 a bricklayers labourer and Ann Read age 22 a lace maker.

And in 1891 UK census Minnie Howarth aged 21 single and a servant born Brighton Sussex living Northampton Road Little Bowden Leicestershire working for William Symington age 81 a widow and coffee merchant and his family.

Going back even further to 1881 UK census we find his mother Minnie Howarth aged 11 living with parents James and Eliza Howarth and sister Maud Eliza Howarth aged10 living Alma Road Reigate Foreign Surrey together with 2 lodgers William Adey age 23 under gardener domestic born Reading Berkshire and Jesse Hawkins aged 24 groom domestic born Nutfield Surrey and a gardener servant Walter Cainfield age 27 born Brighton.

In 1871 UK census Minnie Howarth age 17 months is living North Bruton Mews St. George parish of Hanover Square London with parents James and Eliza Howarth plus her sister Maud E Howarth aged 5 months, her father James is a coachman, we find James Read born abt 1867 Cranfield Bedfordshire his parents are Joel and Ann Read.

The 1939 register tells us that his father Charles J Read was age 69 giving his date of birth as 19th July 1870 and a retired railway engine driver and his wife Minnie aged 70 giving her date of birth as 23rd December 1869 and unpaid household duties and living 46 Rokeby Street Rugby.

His father died in 1946 in Rugby, his mother Minnie in 1954 in Rugby.

Charles George Read’s parents published an announcement in the Rugby Advertiser in 1921. on the anniversary of his death.

In loving memory of Charles George Read, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Read of 46 Rokeby Street, 2nd K.R.R., who was killed in action in France, Dec. 15th 1916, aged 22 years. “Until the day dawn, and the shadows flee away.” – From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Bubb, Edwin. Died 12th Dec 1916

Private Edwin Bubb
Service No: – 22092
Gloucestershire Regiment
2nd Battalion
Cemetery/Memorial Name Struma/Military Cemetery Greece
Grave/Memorial Reference IX.

Private Edwin Bubb was born in 1892 and baptised 2nd February 1892 at St. Michaels and All Saints Church Bugbrooke, Northamptonshire.   His parents were John and Susannah Bubb. On the 1901 census, Edwin and his brothers John, Charles, Albert, Henry, George and sisters Mary and Lucy are living in the High Street, Bugbrooke (Camp Hill Cottages), with their parents. Edwin’s father is a Railway Signalman, John is a cattleman on a farm, Charles is a carter on a farm and the rest of the children, including Edwin are at school.

By the 1911 census Edwin is in Rugby at 39 South Street, living with his eldest brother, Richard, who is his senior by 22 years, Richard’s wife, Emma, and niece Mary Mabel. According to the census Richard is a Greengrocer and Edwin’s occupation is also given as a Greengrocer. His father John and mother Susannah are at 65 Upper Street Hillmorton, John at this time is a Railway Labourer. Some of the family were born at Bugbrooke, others were born at Gayton, Northamptonshire. Edwin’s brother Richard was born in Hillmorton, Rugby Warwickshire and was aged 9 months.

Edwin volunteered in August 1914 and was in the 10th Hussars (Prince of Wales Own) and then proceeded to France in the following July. His brother Henry had enlisted at the same time and they had consecutive service numbers and served in Salonika together. Both were transferred to 2nd Gloucester Regiment in October 1915 and saw heavy fighting at Ypres. Edwin was drafted to Salonika, Greece where he was in action on the Doiran and Vardar fronts. On 9th December 1916, he was severely wounded and unhappily succumbed to his injuries three days later on the 12th December. He was buried in Struma Military Cemetery. He is listed as Edward on the CWGC website.

He was entitled to the 1914-15 Star and the General Service and Victory Medals. In the Register of Soldiers Effects for Edwin the sum of £11 17s 8d was sent to a Miss Nellie M. Hugh authorised 19th April 1917.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

Henry also took part in the fierce fighting on the Struma, the Doiran and Vardar fronts. He was demobilised on his return to England in July 1919. A second brother, Charles, on May 14th 1909 had travelled to Australia on the Ormuz, and had volunteered to serve whilst in Australia in October 1914. He embarked as part of the Australian Imperial Force being in the 8th Infantry Brigade and was drafted to France in July the following year. He like his two brothers took part in the fighting at Ypres and at Loos, Albert, the Somme and Cambrai and in the Retreat and Advance of 1918. He was wounded in 1915 and again in 1917 was sent to England for treatment on each occasion. Charles was demobilised in December 1919. On the Australian Imperial Nominal Roll it shows him as a Corporal in the 35th Battalion. Charles had been born in 1885 at Gayton, Northamptonshire; he later died in Australia in 1954.

There is a War Memorial in Bugbrooke Church for all Bugbrooke men that survived and for those who died in the Great War and each name is linked to a presentation sheet which is kept in the Church at the Memorial window. Also on the Bugbrooke Church web page is a list of all Bugbrooke men who served in WW1 and gives a brief account of their war service.

 

 

 

9th Dec 1916. An Urban Council Employee’s Wages

AN URBAN COUNCIL EMPLOYEE’S WAGES.

Leave to appeal for a further extension was asked for Mr M J H Sharp, surveyor under the Rugby Urban District Council, in respect of Arthur Williams (35, married), chargehand at the refuse destructor, living at 58 Bennett Street.—In a letter Mr Sharp said he had advertised the post six times, and had not received a single application. The Military Authorities had supplied substitutes, who had refused to take on the work after visiting the destructor and seeing what was required of them. If the man joined up before a suitable substitute was obtained, the Council would be left in an awkward position, and no doubt the destructor would have to be closed down, as neither of the three men left was fit to take charge. Seeing the man was passed for garrison duty only, the Surveyor considered he would be doing good service by remaining in his present employment.

The Chairman : What wages are you offering ?-Mr Sharp : Thirty shillings.—The Chairman : I think you ought to be ashamed of yourself to offer a wage like that. Do you know what the ordinary labourer gets at the Coventry destructor works ?—Mr Sharp : Ninepence an hour.—The Chairman : He gets £2 3s per week.-Mr Sharp : How many hours do they work ?—The Chairman : Fifty-four.—Mr Sharp said the average of the men at the Rugby destructor was less than that.

The Chairman asked if it was true that the Military sent a man who would have gone for £2 a week, and they would not have him ?—Mr Sharp : Not that I am aware of.-Mr Wratislaw : It is true.

Mr Sharp enquired who the man referred to was ?—The Chairman read a statement by the Military to the effect that Mr Sharp asked them to send the man up, and on his return he informed them he would have taken the place, only 30s a week was offered, and he would not agree to take it under £2.—The Chairman (to Mr Sharp : Did you offer him £2 a week ?—Mr Sharp : I said, “ Come down to the destructor and see what work you have got to do.” He went down, and he would not take the job.

The Chairman : The chargehands at our destructor are earning £3 10s a week. Leave to appeal refused. It is a disgraceful thing. You say the man is absolutely indispensible to Rugby. You say if he goes you will have to shut down, and the health of Rugby will be jeopardised, and yet you offer 30s a week. Leave to appeal is not allowed in this case. I do not think the Urban District Council of Rugby can really understand it.

Mr Sharp : I am placed in an awkward position. One of the men is away from work, and if Williams has to go I shall have to close down to-night.—The Chairman : Well, you will have to close down. You thoroughly deserve it. You have asked for it.—Mr Sharp : Thank you, Sir.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER CORPS.

The entertainments at the Co-operative Hall on Thursday and Friday last week were of a highly enjoyable character, and must have entailed a large amount of time and trouble on the part of the organisers. The colour scheme adopted for the costumes and stage (black and scarlet) was striking and pleasing to the eye. The members of the party are local ladies and gentlemen, who, however, prefer to remain anonymous.

“ Jacques ” with his patter was a source of mirth, and “ Coquette ” for her song “ Come and cuddle me,” was quite successful. The rich baritone voice of “ Pierre ” was heard to advantage in “ Sailor’s Paradise.” “ Babette ” was at her best in “ Whoops 1 lets do it again,” and Paulette” captivated the audience with her songs, “ Plumstones ” and “ God send you back to me,” which were rendered with ability. The concarted pieces were pleasingly rendered. “ Jeau ” was quite at home with “ Every morn you’ll hear him say Good-night,” and made a good hit. “ Little Reggie,” the pet of the party, caused roars of laughter on Friday, evening in a Charlie Chaplin make-up, and also did useful work as a programme seller.

The financial result was satisfactory ; it is expected, to clear about £30.

A collection was made each evening to provide, tea for the wounded soldiers, who were entertained at a special matinee on Saturday. The whole of the sum realised—vis, £3 7s 9d—will be given to the Rugby Infirmary V.A.D Hospital Fund.

The secretarial work was successfully carried out by Mr G O Watson, the hon secretary of the Corps.

The thanks of the Corps to the members of the party were expressed by Mr C H Fuller, Commandant, in a short speech at the performance on Thursday. Mr Fuller also urged on the public the usefulness of the Corps, as evidenced by Lord French’s interest and support. More men are urgently needed to bring the Corps up to Company strength. At present the Corps has Atherstone attached to it to form the “ B ” Company of the 2nd (County) Battalion.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has come to hand that Second-Lieut E F Lawlor, of the Monmouthshire, grandson of Mr John Lawlor, of 7 Charlotte Street (a member of the Rugby Board of Guardians), has been killed in action. He was with other soldiers killed by a shell on the parapet of a trench. Lieut Lawlor was well known in Marton and the vicinity.

Pte George H Dunstone, of the R.A.M.C, who at the time he enlisted was a clerk in the Traffic Department at Rugby under Mr Bolton, has won the Military Medal for his bravery in rescuing wounded soldiers when under fire. He has recently had ten days’ leave, and on visiting his friends at Rugby was heartily congratulated by them on the honour conferred upon him.

Captain E W E Kempson, commander of the unit of the Army Troops Corps, R.E, which was raised in Rugby, and originally known as the “ Rugby Fortress Company,” has been mentioned in despatches.

The parcels sent this week on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to the Rugby and District men in prison camps in Germany, contained the following :— ½lb biscuits, 1 tin herrings, 1 tin Oxo cubes, ¼ tin cocoa, ½lb cooked ham in tin, 2oz tobacco. ½lb sugar, ½lb milk, pepper, salt, and mustard, 1 tin sausages, ½lb dripping in tin.

ANOTHER LONG LAWFORD SOLDIER KILLED.

Official information has been received by Mr and Mrs Elkington, of Long Lawford, that their son, Rifleman J Elkington, of the Rifle Brigade, was killed in action November 10th. Previous to the war, Rifleman Elkington was employed at the Carpenter’s Shop at the B.T.H, and had been in France for the past eighteen months.

PRESENTATION OF D.C.M.

At Bilton Hall Red Cross Hospital on Thursday, Colonel Johnstone presented to Gunner Roberts, R.G.A, the Distinguished Conduct Medal, won in Gallipoli in January, 1915, for carrying a wounded comrade to safety under very heavy fire. Col Johnstone, who was accompanied by Major Neilson, made a very appropriate speech, and pinned on the medal in the presence of the Commandant, the Quartermaster, the in-patients, and Staff.

LANCE-CORPL BOB MAYS AWARDED THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Mr J Mays, of 17 South Street, Rugby, has received a letter from his son, Lance-Corpl Bob Mays, of the Royal Berkshire Regiment, describing how he won the Military Medal. He says : “ We endeavoured three times, Corpl Hester, Pte Sullivan, and myself, to obtain a sample of the German barbed wire. It was during the third attempt that Corpl Hester was shot through both thighs, and his cry of pain brought very heavy rifle and machine-gun fire from the enemy’s line. After dressing Corpl Hester’s wounds, I left Pte Sullivan with him, whilst I tried to find my way back to our trenches—a very difficult task in the black darkness. Three times I found myself in the German line, and eventually I managed to find our line, and returned to Corpl Hester and Pte Sullivan, and we managed to drag him along on his back whilst we crawled on our stomachs, for to kneel or stand meant certain death. Corpl Hester being 6ft in height, and Pte Sullivan and myself only 5ft 4in, he was a good load to carry ; but at last we managed to get him in, after being in “ No Man’s Land ” for over five hours. Pte Sullivan and myself were recommended for the Military Medal, and have both received our reward. Lance-Corpl Mays was formerly a Staff-Sergeant in the Boy’s Life Brigade and had previously been wounded.

BRINKLOW.

SOLDIER’S DEATH AND MILITARY FUNERAL.—The death of Lance-Corpl William Robert Everton, aged 27, of the Military Foot Police, occurred at Brinklow on November 27th. The deceased, who was a native of Tottenham, came from France on special leave on November 11th to stay at the home of Mr S Heath, to whose daughter he was engaged. He caught a cold, which developed into pneumonia. He was originally in the King’s Own Scottish Borderers, and had served five years in India. His regiment took part in the disastrous Gallipoli campaign, where he was wounded. He was afterwards drafted into the Military Police. The deceased was accorded a military funeral, which took place at the cemetery on November 30th. A special firing party came from Rugby for the purpose. The Rev G A Dawson was the officiating clergyman. In addition to the family mourners, a large number of the villagers and the school children gathered round the graveside, when the “ Last Post ” was sounded, many floral tributes were afterwards placed upon his grave.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
SOLDIERS’ GRAVES IN FRANCE.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—In my conversations with friends whilst on a few days’ leave from France I find out how very few people know of the Graves Registration Units of the British Army.

I am often asked the question : “ How are our soldiers buried and graves attended to ? ” I think the following information will put any uneasy mind at rest if you will be kind enough to insert it in your paper :—

The work of the Graves Registration Units is carried on by officers, N.C.O’s, and men who are otherwise unfit for fighting. Land is bought at various spots along our line, is surveyed and marked out for cemeteries. Hedges, trees, shrubs, &c, are being planted, so that the cemeteries are permanent resting-places for our dead soldiers. The bodies are laid in separate graves, or side by side, one foot apart. The graves are carefully tended, and flowers planted, &c. The grave is registered, and the records filed for enquiries. A cross is erected over every grave with the man s number, name, regiment, &c, inscribed upon it. Photographs are taken of any grave when applied for, providing the grave can be reached without undue exposure to the enemy.

Any enquiries or applications should be addressed to : THE DIRECTOR, G.R Units, G.H.Q, B.E.F,

I am, sir, yours truly,
A E AINSWORTH,
Attached G.R Units, France.
84 Manor Road, Rugby.

DEATHS.

ELKINGTON.—In ever-loving and affectionate remembrance of our dear son, John Thomas Elkington, who was killed in action on November 10, 1916 ; aged 27 years.—“ God’s will be done.”—From his sorrowing MOTHER and FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.