7th Jul 1917. Baby Week at Rugby

BABY WEEK AT RUGBY.

The War has led to a quickening of the public conscience in many directions ; and several much-needed reforms, which have long been advocated, but which only three years ago seemed almost unattainable, have already been elected ; while others are daily becoming inevitable. Few subjects have of late met with more sympathetic consideration than that of the welfare of the children ; and in order to seize the favourable opportunity for securing the adoption of measures to arrest the terrible rate of infant mortality which has occasioned so much concern to all thinking people, the past week has been observed throughout the kingdom as a propaganda week for “ baby,” and lectures and demonstrations emphasising the importance of the proper care of the babies have been given in most towns. Rugby has not been behind in the good work, and for some weeks past a committee of ladies has been arranging a local campaign, which opened on Sunday, when sermons bearing on the subject were preached at most of the places of worship.

On Wednesday afternoon a meeting for mothers was held in the Empire. There was a large attendance, and many of the mothers were accompanied by “ His Majesty the Baby ” ; and, despite the infantile accompaniment which was maintained by a number of the little guests, they were heartily welcomed.

Dr A A David presided, and he was supported by Mrs Nevinson (London), Rev R 8 & Mrs Mitchison, Mrs A A David, Mr & Mrs J J. McKinnell, Dr & Mrs Crookes, Mrs F Merttens (President) and Mrs Waddy (secretary of the movement).

The Chairman who addressed the audience as “ Ladies, gentlemen, and babies,” after a few remarks in a lighter vein, said they were there not only to think about their own babies but to be moved to a sense of responsibility about other people’s babies. Every child born in England belonged to the nation. If it grew up into a strong and healthy life the nation was the richer and the stronger, but if it was sickly the nation had to suffer with it, and if it died when it need not have died, then England had lost something which nothing on earth could ever replace. They were told that every year 50,000 babies died in England who need not die. It was not inevitable. He was always suspicious of that word “ inevitable.” Things happened, and people thought they must happen, whereas if they bestirred themselves they need not happen. This week had been set apart to set in motion forces to remedy this state of affairs. When every man and woman in England knew about these things they would care, and when they cared they would find the time would not be long distant when this grievous waste of life and health would be stopped. Then would come a day of new happiness for England, and also of new strength—strength not only for war—if the need ever arose again, which God forbid—but strength also for peace.

[Full report continues in original newspaper]

PROPAGANDA BY CINEMA.

The great value of the moving pictures as an educational force is well illustrated at the Empire this week, where two excellent propaganda films are being screened. The first, entitled “ Motherhood,” is shown under the auspices of the National Baby Week Council. The picture is remarkably interesting, especially to women, and the correct and incorrect ways of bringing up children.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.-At Coventry Munition Tribunal on Tuesday, H Boult, fitter, Rugby, employed in a Rugby firm, made an unsuccessful application for a leaving certificate. Boult contended that he could be used to better advantage in national service.

RUGBY BAKING TRADE NOT TO RE DEPLETED.

At the Rugby Urban Tribunal on Thursday evening the exemptions granted to the Rugby bakers, 30 in number, were reviewed at the instance of the Military. After a lengthy hearing, the Tribunal decided to make no change, and all the exemptions were allowed to stand.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte S C Howkins, of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, son of Mr H Howkins, of 9 Manor Road, has been seriously wounded, and as a result his left leg has been amputated. Pte Howkins, who is in a Military Hospital at Newcastle-on-Tyne, is making good progress.

Sapper George Alfred Wright, Royal Engineers, who prior to joining the Army at the beginning of the War was employed in the Controller Department at the B.T.H, was killed in action on June 7th.

News has been received from the War Office that Pte Jack Beech is in hospital with sand fly fever at Amara. He is the son of Mr W G Beech, New Bilton, and has been 3½ years in the Army, which he joined before he was 17 years of age in February, 1914. He has been through the fighting in the Dardanelles, Mesopotamia, and at the capture of Bagdad. In a recent letter from him he writes :—“ We have taken Bagdad, but my pal, Walter Scarlett, of Long Lawford, got killed by my side, poor chap. He died smiling, and I saw him buried.”

ANOTHER OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Pte Arthur William Woods, son of the late Mr Joseph Woods, of 153 Grosvenor Road, was killed in action on June 10th. Pte Woods, who was 21 years of age and an Old Murrayian, enlisted in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry in August, 1914 ; but he afterwards transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. He was invalided home in December, 1916, suffering from septic poisoning, caused by a shrapnel wound, and he returned to France in April.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Two more local men have been taken prisoners of war, and the facts have been communicated to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, who has made arrangements for these men to receive, on behalf of the Rugby Committee, the standard parcels of food and bread. They are : Pte A Brown, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, interned at Dolmen, whose home is at Dunchurch, and Pte W Line. Buffs Regiment, interned at Soltau, whose home is at Napton. This makes the sixth addition to the Rugby list within a fortnight.

WAR SHRINE.-A war shrine has recently been unveiled at St. Andrew’s Mission Church. The ceremony was performed by the Rector, the Rev C M Blagden, who delivered a brief but inspiring address. This is the first of the shrines to be erected in Rugby.

BRANDON.

DEATH OF PTE ELLOITT G HALFORD.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford, who for about 20 years were in employ of Mr Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, have received news of the death of their fourth son, Elliott, of the Cheshire Regiment, who fell in action. He had only been out at the front for seven weeks. Two of his elder brothers—Pte Sidney and Corpl Thomas Halford—have been on service for a long time, but nothing has been heard of Sidney for nearly 12 months, and he is reported missing. Deep sympathy is felt for the parents. In a long letter to the parents Elliot Halford’s Platoon Commander say :— “ He was killed about eight o’clock on the morning of the 7th. We had just turned the enemy out of one of our strongholds, and captured one of the highest points of the ridge. Halford was in the foremost line of our attacking troops, and was conducting himself, as he has done all along with the utmost bravery and devotion. A piece of bursting shrapnel overhead caught him, and the only consolation was that he suffered no pain—it was so sudden. . . . He was an exceptionally nice, good fellow. During the short time he was with us your son showed proof of those good qualities of courage, energy, endurance, and good comradeship which would have made him one of the best.”

WOLSTON.

RIFLEMAN W FLOWERS.-Mr & Mrs John Flowers, of Brook Street, Wolston, have received news of the death of their son, William. He joined up in September, 1914, and was on service in France for about 18 months, being attached to the 10th Rifle Brigade. He fought at Ypres in May, 1915, and in the Battle of Guillemont, and had been missing since September 3, 1916. His parents were thinking that he might be a prisoner of war until a letter came from the War Office announcing his death. Deceased was well known in local cricket and football circles. For the Brandon and Wolston Cricket Club he was a tower of strength in the field, and a daring football player and very popular.

BRINKLOW.

RED CROSS ACTIVITIES.—The Brinklow Branch of the British Red Cross Society has recently been making requisites for the wounded, and the following articles have been sent to the Central Depot in London :—104 comfort bags, 27 mufflers, 22 pairs day socks, 14 shirts, one vest, five pyjamas, seven pairs bed socks, and one feather pillow. Ninety-six of the comfort bags were made by the school children, the mothers giving the material for 23 ; 24 of the mufflers and 14 of the day socks were also made by the children.

DEATHS.

PARKINSON.—On 1st inst., at the Military Hospital, Cambridge, of wounds received in action in France, Second-Lieut. HORACE J. A. PARKINSON, the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. S. Parkinson, of the Old Bank House, Southam.

SANDS.—On June 17th, in Egypt, of diphtheria, Pte. HARRY SANDS, dearly beloved husband of Jennie Sands ; aged 34.—Deeply mourned.

WOOD.-On June 10th (killed in action in France), Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, Machine Gun Corps, son of the late Joseph Wood, 153 Grosvenor Road ; aged 21 years.—
From his loving Brother and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

BLAND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. C BLAND who was killed in action July 1st, 1916, aged 18 years.
Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.
From his loving Mother & Father, Sisters & Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of FREDERICK ROBERT, youngest son of the late Reuben & Mrs. Cashmore, of Hillmorton, who died from wounds in France on July 5, 1916. “ The love that lingers round his name is more than fame.”—From his sorrowing MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS, and his brother JACK in France.

FACER.—In loving memory of my dear husband Lance-Corpl. FREDERICK FACER, who was killed in action on July 3,1916.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—From his loving WIFE and CHILD.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. H. E. COLLINS, who was killed in action in the Battle of Labosal on July 3, 1916, in France ; aged 25. Gloucestershire Regiment.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS, New Street, New Bilton.

EADON.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother GEORGE, of the R.W.R., who was killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Our home has never been the same
Since thy voice has silent been ;
Nor is the world the same to us
Since death has come between.”
—Never forgotten by his loving PARENTS, SISTERS and BROTHER.

HAMMOND.—In loving memory of PTE. ARTHUR HENRY HAMMOND, Church Lawford, 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Peace, perfect Peace.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

SEENEY.-In loving memory of SIGNALLER W. SEENEY who was killed in France July 2nd, 1916.
Where is our soldier boy to-night ?
Laid in a soldiers grave,
Far, far away in a foreign land
He died like a soldier brave.
Oh, may we meet our boy again
Far up in that home above,
Where war and strife will be no more,
But all will be peace and love.
—From his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of GEORGE BERRY, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thompson, Braunston, who fell in action on July 1st, 1916, aged 21, years.—From Father, Mother, and Brother Sid.— “ They miss him most who loved him best.”

WATSON.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR JAMES WATSON, jun., son of Thomas and the late Harriet Watson, of 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Killed in  action in France on July 2, 1916 ; aged 19 years.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file—he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—From his FATHER & BROTHERS & SISTERS.

28th Apr 1917. Eat Less Bread and Avoid Waste

EAT LESS BREAD AND AVOID WASTE.

The wheat crop of 1916 was a failure the world over. How intimately that shortage affects this country is obvious when we remember that before the War we imported four-fifths of our wheat supplies. Indeed of all the food we ate we brought three-fifths across the   seas. To-day we are short of food ships to bring our[?] wheat ; hundreds of the vessels which formerly carried food are plying purely in the interests of our Army, and those of our Allies. The keynote of the campaign must, therefore, be ; CONCENTRATE ON THE SAVING OF BREAD. That, first and foremost, is the necessity of the moment.

The mass of the population must have bread. To the poor it is the chief necessity of life, for it to cheap and needs no cooking. Not only people of means, but those who at present are earning high wages, can afford to buy and cook other foods. Let the cheaper foods—cheap rabbits, the cheaper cuts of meat, the more popular kinds of fish—be left for those who cannot afford to buy anything else. The rich can endure breadless days, but the poor cannot.

Another aspect of the campaign is TO CHECK WASTE. Waste of any kind of food is, under the present stress of war, not only selfish and disloyal, but criminal. Before the War, it has been said, the nation could have lived on the food it wasted, and the waste is still very great. Waste of meat, of vegetables, waste in over-cooking or in over-eating-the campaign aims at checking all the forms of helping Germany.

To bring home to the people the enormous losses in the food supply by the apparently trivial waste of food which goes on daily, the Food Controller has issued a series of leaflets, of which the following is an example :

MR SLICE-o’-BREAD.
“ I am a slice of Bread.
I measure three inches by two-and-half, and my thickness is half-an-inch.
My weight to exactly an ounce.
I am wasted once a day by 48,000,000 people in Britain.
I am the “ bit left over;” the slice eaten absent mindedly when really I wasn’t needed ; I am the waste crust.
If you collected me and my companions for a whole week you would find that we amounted to 9,380 tons of good bread—WASTED !
Two Shiploads of Good Bread !
Almost as much—striking an average—as two German submarines could sink—even if they had p[?] luck.
When you throw me away or waste me you are adding twenty submarines to the German Navy.”

TO UTILISE WASTE PAPER.
A LOCAL SCHEME.

Probably no result of the War has been brought home to the public generally more emphatically than shortage of paper, due to the great reduction in the quantity of pulp and other materials for making it being imported from abroad. There are, however, in the country vast accumulations of paper which might be used up and re-manufactured if it could only find its way to the mills. Any white paper, whether printed or written upon or not, such as newspapers, letters, old receipts, and other documents too numerous to describe, old account books, magazines, novels, &c, can be utilised ; and in order to facilitate the collection of these materials and have them forwarded to the proper quarters for re-manufacture, an organisation has been formed in Rugby, which, if adequately supported, cannot fail to have gratifying results. In conjunction with Mrs Blagden, of The Rectory, Mr J Reginald Barker has undertaken to receive all waste paper of the kind mentioned, and see that it is properly baled and sent off to certain mills, the owners of which will pay good price per ton for it—much higher than the rates which have usually been paid on waste paper.

All the proceeds will be devoted to Rugby charities, so that no one will make a personal profit, and all who help will know they are gaining a twofold advantage by helping to maintain the paper supply and assisting charity.

Mr W T C Hodges, headmaster of Murray School, and Mr W T Simmonds, headmaster of Elborow Schools, have made arrangements to collect the waste from people’s houses, and a postcard addressed to either of these gentlemen will receive prompt attention.

Those who turn out old letters, documents, account books, &c, are assured that they will be carefully baled, despatched, and destroyed without being subjected to the scrutiny of prying eyes.

All stiff covers should be removed from books before being handed over to the collectors. It is estimated that several tons per month can be collected in Rugby, and a very handsome sum may in due course be available for disposal in charitable objects.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Frank Leslie Hogg, second son of Mr and Mrs George Hogg, of the Eagle Hotel, has passed as a Second Air Mechanic into the Royal Flying Corps, and is now stationed at Farnham.

A PURE BRED BELGIAN HARE rabbit, belonging to Harry Redgrave Lovell, the infant son of P C Lovell, was sold by Mr W Wiggins in Rugby Cattle Market on Monday for the Red Cross Funds, £5 being realised.

Mr T Johnson, High Street, has received information that his son, 2nd-Lieut H T Johnson, of the 129th Field Company, Royal Engineers, was wounded in the shoulder last week in France. He has now been removed to a London hospital.

A letter has been received from Pte Huckle, R.A.M.C — a member of the Rugby St John Ambulance Brigade — whose home is at 14 Spring Street, Rugby, stating that he was on a hospital ship that was recently torpedoed.

Pte T Lane, Durham Light Infantry, of Bridget Street, formerly employed at the Newbold Road Co-operative Stores, has sustained a badly shattered arm and other wounds ; Corpl L G Archer, Bennett Street, has been severely wounded, and his right arm has been amputated ; and Lance-Corpl W Labraham, Little Pennington Street, has been wounded in Palestine. All three are Old St Matthew’s boys.

Lieut R C Herron, of the Second Anzacs Supply Column (whose marriage with Miss Thompson, of Paradise Street, Rugby, we recently announced), has been promoted to the rank of captain and adjutant.

Corpl Bert Wilkins (bandsman), of the Rifle Brigade, was killed on the 4th inst. He was brought up from childhood by Mrs Kempton, 67 King Edward Road, and before joining Kitchener’s Army at the age of 16 was employed at the B.T.H Works, and was a drummer in the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade. Mrs Kempton’s eldest son has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the Battle of Mons. Her youngest son had been twice wounded, and went back to the front as recently as a month ago.

RUGBY PLATELAYER WINS D.C.M.

Corpl Ernest W Hallam of the Railway Section of the Royal Engineers, whose wife lives at the New Station, has won the D C M. Before joining the army he was a platelayer in Rugby Coal Yard.

LIEUT J J McKINNELL AGAIN WOUNDED.

Mr J J McKinnell has received news that his son, Lieut J J McKinnell, of the R.W.R, has been seriously wounded in the ankle. Some time ago Lieut McKinnell was wounded, and he had only returned to the front a fortnight when he received his present injury.

BRANDON.

PRIVATE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs T Ward have received news that their son, Pte J Ward, of the Warwicks, has been wounded in the left shoulder and face. ‘Mr and Mrs Ward’s four sons joined up—one, Charlie, has been killed ; Jack has lost the sight of one of his eyes from wounds, and the other son was invalided home. Much sympathy is felt for them in their trouble. Mr Ward himself has been ill for some length of time.

RUGBY WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, SATURDAY, JUNE 2.

WILL YOU HELP THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR COMMITTEE TO MAKE THIS EFFORT A SUCCESS BY TAKING UP A COLLECTION IN YOUR OWN HOME EVERY WEEK UNTIL SATURDAY, JUNE 2nd ?

It is very necessary that Generous Support be given to ensure that the Men from Rugby and District who have fallen into the hands of the enemy shall not lack the Food necessary to keep them in Health and Strength.

ANOTHER RUGBY HOSPITAL.

Colonel and Mrs Mulliner recently offered to lend and to entirely equip Clifton Court as a hospital, and this generous offer has now been accepted by the Military Authorities, who will devote it to wounded officers of the Royal Flying Corps.

Mrs Mulliner will act as commandant, and the voluntary aid detachment will consist entirely of local ladies.

The charming situation and beautiful gardens of Clifton Court make it an ideal place for convalescent patients.

ONE MAN BUSINESSES.

Dear Mr Editor,-—A conference comprising committees appointed by the Urban and Rural District Councils of Rugby, and the Rugby Chamber of Trade, has been formed with a view to framing a scheme for assisting owners of one man businesses in Rugby, in the event of their being called up for military or national service. Will anyone interested in the scheme kindly communicate with the secretary, at the address given below, by Wednesday, the 2nd May ? Yours faithfully, T Wise, Chairman, H LUPTON REDDISH, Secretary, Market Place, Rugby.

DEATHS.

PYWELL.—Killed in action, on Easter Monday, Sergt. F. W. Pywell, of London (Middlesex) Regiment, youngest son of E. Pywell, 23 Sandown Road, Rugby ; aged 30.

THORNEY.—Died in France on April 10th of wounds received in action, ALFRED, the second and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Thorney, Rose and Crown, Basingstoke.

IN MEMORIAM.

DAVIS.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private ROLAND DAVIS, of New Bilton, who was killed in action in France on April 27, 1916.-Not forgotten by his loving FATHER, MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS.

GREEN.—In loving memory of Private JOHN GREEN, of Catthorpe, who died in Tidworth Military Hospital on April 16, 1914 ; aged 35 years.—“ His memory is as fresh to-day as the hour in which he passed away.” — Never forgotten by his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTER.

GRIFFITH.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother, HERBERT, who was killed in action at Ypres on April 27, 1915.
“ Two years have passed since Jesus called him ;
As time goes on we miss him more.
His loving smile, his kindly face,
No one can fill his vacant place.
Not dead to those who love him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory,
And will for ever more.”
—From PARENTS, SISTERS and BROTHER, Kilsby.

OGBURN.—In loving memory of my dear husband. Pte. CHARLES ROBERT OGBURN, who died April 26, 1916.—“ He is gone but not forgotten.”

OWEN.—In loving memory of our dear son and brother. GEO. ERNEST OWEN (TAS), Royal Warwicks., who fell in action at Ypres on April 25, 1915. — “ He nobly answered duty’s call, and gave his life for one and all.”—Never forgotten by DAD, MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS.

ROBBINS.—In affectionate remembrance of Lance-Corpl. F. ROBBINS, Royal Warwicks., who was killed in action in France on April 30, 1916.
“ Sleep on, beloved, in a far-off grave :
A grave I may never see ;
But as long as life and memory last
I will remember thee.”
—From EM.

27th Jan 1917. Very Drunk at the Station

VERY DRUNK AT THE STATION.—On Thursday last, before T Hunter, Esq, Bernard Nutt, second air mechanic (R.F.C), Regent Street, London, was summoned for being drunk on the L & N-W Railway Station, at Rugby, on January 24th.—He pleaded guilty, and William S Laughton, ticket examiner, stated that the man was so intoxicated that a doctor was sent for, who, on account of his condition, ordered his removal to the Police Station for safety. Defendant travelled from London with an Australian soldier, who had a big bottle of whiskey.—Defendant informed the Magistrate that he was a teetotaller, and had only just come out of hospital. He had a little drop of whiskey, and that upset him.—Discharged on paying doctor’s fee, 5s.

PRESENTATION.—On Saturday last an interesting presentation took place at the establishment of Mr J J McKinnell, Sheep Street, when Mr Horace Sanderson was the recipient of a very nice wristlet watch and a pair of silver vases. Mr J J Thompson, in making the presentation on behalf of his fellow-employees, spoke of the very efficient manner in which Mr Sanderson had discharged his duties during the 18 years that he had served as assistant and traveller, and felt sure that he would continue to serve as faithfully now he had responded to the call of his King and country. Mr Sanderson has also received a very useful letter wallet in recognition of his services as registrar at the Rugby Brotherhood, in which capacity he has done a good and faithful work.

THE PARCELS sent on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners War Help Committee this week to local men in German prison camps contained : 1 large tin rations, 1 tin tripe, 10-oz tin sardines, ½-lb margarine, 1lb milk, 1lb rolled oats, 1lb cake, 1 tin fruit, ½-lb chocolate, ¼-lb tea, 30 cigarettes, ½-lb sugar, mustard.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R W Barnett, acting Brigade Major of a Naval Brigade, son of Mr Walter Barnett, of Bilton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

Mr W W Peberdy, Lansdowne House, Rugby, has received intimation from the Admiralty that his son. Flight Sub-Lieut W H Peberdy, R.N, failed to return from a scouting flight in the East on the 14th inst. At present he is reported missing.

LOCAL SOLDIER DECORATED BY KING PETER.

Flight-Sergt A Forsyth, of the Royal Flying Corps, son of Mrs Forsyth, of 8 Murray Road, Rugby, has been decorated by the King of Serbia with the Silver Star in recognition of his distinguished services during the campaign in that country. Sergt Forsyth has since been promoted sergeant-major. He was for a number of years employed at the B.T.H Works, but at the time he enlisted he was assistant works manager at the Aluminium Works, Birmingham.

NEW BILTON MAN WINS THE MILITARY MEDAL.

Sergt George King, R.E, youngest son of Mr and Mr Tom King, 89 Lawford Road, New Bilton, and a native of the parish, has been awarded the Military Medal for devotion to duty with the Forces in France. When he joined the Army, Sergt King belonged to the Coventry City Police, but he is well known at New Bilton, and formerly played both for the Cricket and Football Clubs. His father has worked at the Portland Cement Works for 53 years, having served under five successive managers, and he has lived in his present home since the time of his wedding 43 years ago.

MR J E COX’S SON SLIGHTLY WOUNDED.

Information has been received this week by Mr J E Cox, of Lodge Farm, Long Lawford, that his son. Trooper G H Cox, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has been slightly wounded in the right thigh, and is in a General Hospital in Egypt. Another of Mr Cox’s sons (E E Cox) joined the 3rd Gloucesters last week. Mr Cox has now three sons serving in the Army.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs J Nicholas, of Lime Kiln Farm, who have received news that their eldest son, Lance-Corpl John Nicholas, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, has again been wounded in the chest in action in Egypt ; also that their third son, Stewart, is officially reported wounded and missing since September 29th—the same day that his youngest brother, Percy, was wounded.—Trooper Alf Falconbridge, of the Warwickshire Yeomanry, who enlisted with Lance-Corpl Nicholas, has sustained a fractured arm.

BRANDON.

Mr and Mrs Reuben Banbrook have received the news that their son, Pte Bert Banbrook, has been badly wounded in the back and shoulder. He had not long returned to the front, having been previously wounded in the leg. He is one of five brothers upholding the honour of their country. He is now in hospital in France.—Pte J Ward, son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward, has also been home for the first time after his wounds. Unfortunately the poor fellow has completely lost the sight of an eye. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward, who have already had one son killed.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
THE GREAT WAR LOAN.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—The Chancellor of the Exchequer has addressed an appeal to War Savings Committees throughout the country to assist in promoting the new War Loan. He suggests first that they should stimulate the purchase of War Savings Certificates during the next few weeks by all means in their power. But he also asks us, further, to extend our activities so as to include persons of moderate incomes to whom the plan of co-operative investment by means of War Savings Associations does not specially appeal, and particularly those who might be able to invest at once any sum between £5 and £50. Such people are often not familiar with the machinery of investment, and it is felt that in order to secure their help it is necessary not only to advertise the appeal to lend, but also to make available some means of obtaining information or advise, and especially assistance in filling up the necessary forms. For this purpose the Rugby Central War Savings Committee have, with the consent of the Rugby Urban District Council, established an Information Bureau in the Benn Buildings every day from 12.15-1.15, and from 7-9 o’clock ; also on Saturday afternoons. The Bureau will be opened on Monday next, Jan. 29th.

The committee are also arranging a public meeting, to be held in the Temple Speech Room at 8 o’clock on Saturday, February 3rd, at which Major J L Baird, M.P, has promised to speak. The Schools and Boy Scouts are being asked to assist in the work of advertising. Other measures are in preparation by which we hope to make this national appeal so widely known and understood that no money which can possibly be lent to the Government will remain in Rugby uninvested on February 16th. To this end we ask with confidence for the help of all classes of our fellow-townsmen.

The time is short, and the need is very urgent. Let Rugby take a worthy part in meeting it-and at once.—Yours very truly,

J J McKINNELL (Chairman).

A A DAVID (Hon. Secretary),

Rugby War Savings Central Committee.

IN MEMORIAM.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of our dear lad, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Sadly missed by his loving MOTHER, FATHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

WALDUCK.—In loving memory of my dear brother, ERN., who died of wounds in France, January 28, 1916.—Deeply mourned by MET.

 

16th Dec 1916. Dr Hoskyn Recommended for the Albert Medal

DR. HOSKYN RECOMMENDED FOR THE ALBERT MEDAL.

Capt C R Hoskyn, R.A.M.C, of Rugby, has been recommended for the Albert Medal of the First Class—the highest medal for saving life outside the fighting line. The act for which Dr Hoskyn has been recommended was on the occasion of a serious railway accident at Gezaincourt on the 24th November, 1916, and it is referred to in the general orders issued to the Fifth Army by the General commanding in the following terms :—

Capt C R, Hoskyn, R.A.M.C.—In addition to other plucky acts he crawled under some burning debris at great risk and commenced to amputate the leg of a man who was pinned down. In doing so he loosened the man’s body, and he was got out alive.

The Commanding Officer wishes to express his appreciation of the gallantry and initiative displayed by the officers and N.C.O.’s mentioned in the report.

The Director-General of Medical Services, British Armies in France, also mentions Dr Hoskyn and others in his orders, and adds : “ I wish to express to you the greatest admiration which I feel for your splendid conduct under conditions calculated to try the courage of the bravest. You all showed courage, resource, and coolness, and I consider that your behaviour is an honour to yourselves and a credit to your Corps.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr F Turner, of 6 West Street, has this week received official news that his son, Pte J L Turner, who has been posted as missing since September 25th last year, was killed in action on that date. Before the war Pte Turner was in the Machine Shop at the B.T.H., and was only 19 years of age.

Corpl Harold Orchard, youngest son of the late Councillor Joseph Orchard, formerly of Rugby, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant and distinguished conduct in the field. He was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s despatch of April 30, 1916. Corpl Orchard enlisted in the Royal Engineers in December, 1914.

Major J L Baird, M.P, C.M.G, D.S.O, has been appointed Parliamentary Secretary to the Air Board in the new Ministry, and Mr Steel Maitland, M.P, a former Unionist candidate for the Rugby Division, is to be Under-Secretary for the Colonies.

The war is now costing the country upwards of 5½ millions per day.

THE parcels sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : 1 tin fruit, 1 tin salmon. ½lb ration biscuits, 1 tin syrup, ½lb tin cafe au lait, 1 tin beef, 3 soup squares, 1 tin prunes, ¼lb chocolate, ½lb figs. ½lb margarine.

STRETTON-UNDER-FOSSE.
DEATH OF A SOLDIER HERO.—Deep sympathy is extended toward the parents of Pte Fergus Benson, of the 7th Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action last week. Pte Benson went out to France with the second draft of the 7th Warwicks, and was very popular with his fellow-soldiers.

HARBOROUGH MAGNA.
CHRISTMAS PARCELS FOR THE TROOPS.—At a meeting held recently the Whist Committee decided to arrange a house-to-house collection to provide funds for sending a Christmas parcel to each of the thirty-five soldiers from the parish. The following school girls—Lizzie Hickman, Lily Isom, Edith Davenport, Evelyn Thompson, Nancy Lane, Edith Neal, Olive Gamble, Kate Lane, and Maggie Ritch—acted as collectors. The sum collected, with the balance from the last whist drive, amounted to £5 1s 11d, and this was expended on the parcels and postage (£1 4s 3d). The parcels contained oxo cubes, cocoa and milk tablets, chocolate and cigarettes or tobacco, with a note of good wishes from the parishioners.

BRANDON.
PTE J WARD WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs Thomas Ward have received news, that their son, Pte J. Ward 4th Worcesters, has been wounded in the eye and thigh rather severely, and is now in hospital in France. Much sympathy is felt for the parents, as it is only recently that they lost their son, Charles Ward. They also have another son in the Army.

CATTHORPE.
In order to provide parcels for the men who have joined H.M Forces, two whist drives have lately been promoted for that purpose, and have been very successful. The proceeds were further augmented by gifts, and altogether £5 10s was collected for providing the 25 parcels which have been sent off this week.

CHURCHOVER.
A SUCCESSFUL whist drive and dance was held in the School to raise money to provide Christmas parcels for Churchover soldiers. Twenty-four tables were occupied. Mrs Arthur James and Col Forkus came down from Coton House, and took part in the drive. Mr E W Berrington was M.C. The prize-winners were :—Ladies : 1 Miss L Grundy (148), 2 Miss D Davis (145), 3 Miss A Skeet (142). Gentlemen : 1 Mr F Leatherland (144), 2 Mr C Whitehead (143), 3 Mr F Gibbs (143). Messrs Whitehead and Gibbs cut for second prize. Mrs James gave the prizes away, and said that Mr James had asked her to tell them how sorry he was that he could not be with them. He sent £1, and hoped the effort would be a success. About 150 then commenced dancing to the strains of Mr Ash’s band. Mr W W Mathews and Mr W Sutton were the M.C’s. The arrangements were admirably carried out by the following committee :— Mrs B Berrington, Mrs Semple, Mrs Rimmington, Miss M Beesley, Rev L G Berrington, Mr E Berrington (hon secretary and treasurer), Mr W W Mathews, Mr W Sutton, and Mr A Daynes. The sum of £22 12s 6d was cleared, so that each soldier will be able to have a nice parcel.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
OUR BRAVE SOLDIERS.—Pte Arthur Priest, Coldstream Guards, who was wounded on September 8th is now in the King George’s Hospital, Stamford Street, London. His wounds consist of a bad fracture of the right leg and flesh wounds in the left leg, hip and side. His parents, who have visited him, found him in good spirits.—This week-end Pte Tom Hunt has paid a visit home. He and his brother Richard are both in the Rifle Brigade. They are sons of the Kandahar veteran, Mr Richard Hunt.—The Long Itchington roll of honour now contains 159 names of local soldiers. Of these ten have given their lives for their country, one is missing, one is a prisoner of war, and over thirty have been wounded.

DUNCHURCH.
P.C Cox, who was formerly stationed at this village, and who is now in the Army, paid a visit to Dunchurch, on Tuesday, and was warmly welcomed by the villagers, amongst whom he was always very popular.

GERMAN PRISONERS TO WORK ON THE LAND.—Warwickshire Chamber of Agriculture at Warwick on Saturday passed a resolution approving the employment of prisoners of war in agriculture. A letter from the officer commanding the Southern Command, which was read to the meeting, stated that only selected men of good character would be sent—with an interpreter. The Government would find rations, and charge the farmers the average rate of wages for the prisoners’ services.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

OTHER CASES.

An appeal was made by Mr F Sharpe, of Bath Street, for John George Bennett, carriage builder and wheel[wright] 7 Gladstone Street, New Bilton.—Adjourned for the Military representatives to find out whether the Army is in need of wheelwrights.

On behalf of Mr Chas Wilson, Three Horse Shoes Hotel, Mr Eaden appealed for Bertram Henry Waring (36, married), shepherd and stud groom, 13 Earl Street.—The Military having offered a discharged soldier as a substitute, the Tribunal allowed 28 days for the exchange to be effected.-The appeal of Leonard Page (33, single), butcher and farmer, Wolston, for a long term of exemption was dismissed, but he was given 28 days.-Mr W Howkins, farmer, Hillmorton Grounds, desired to retain the services of Fred Shaw (36, married), cowman, &c.—The Chairman said he would get to April 1st in any event, and an exemption was given to that date.

A letter was read from Joseph Evan Walters, fruiterer and fishmonger, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, asking for his exemption to be extended until his wife had gained her strength.—Mr Wratislaw offered no objection, and he was given 28 days.

With respect to an application by Mr Robt Bucknill, threshing machine proprietor, Marton, for his son, Francis John Bucknill (19, single), described as a stockman and wagoner, Mr. Wratislaw said appellant had refused a substitute to go with his threshing machine because he could not patch a boiler, so he did not deserve any consideration at all.—Mr Bucknill said this statement was not correct.—The Chairman said they could quite see appellant’s attitude—he wanted to keep that boy—and if he was going to take that line there was a very easy way of dealing with him.—Mr Worthington submitted it was a case for substitution, and the case was adjourned till the next meeting for the Military to see what they could do.

Henry James Hopkins (31, married), thatcher and manager of the Co-operative Stores at Broadwell, had been granted an exemption by the local Tribunal, the Military appealing.—Mr Wale said he was a grocer, but he had never heard of a grocer and thatcher.—Mr Worthington : It is rather a peculiar combination.—Adjourned for medical examination.

DEATHS.

GLENN.—On the 7th inst., in France, of asthma and bronchitis, Pte. JOHN GLENN (Warwicks), beloved husband of Nellie Glenn, 35 Rowland Street, aged 40 years.

MAYES.—On December 6th, at Bristol Hospital (died of wounds received in action), Lance-Corpl. HORACE MAYES, of the 3rd Oxford and Bucks L.I., the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. D. Mayes, 28 Abbey Street ; aged 20 years.
“ One less at home, one more in heaven ;
Our Saviour has taken the bloom He has given.
Flowers may wither and die of decay,
But the love of our son will for ever stay.”

IN MEMORIUM.

TURNER.—In affectionate and loving remembrance of our dear son, Pte. Joseph Lewis Turner ; killed in action on September 25, 1915 ; aged 19 years.—From Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters, & Gladys.

5th Jun 1915. Casualties from the villages

BARBY.

RIFLEMAN BERRIDGE KILLED IN ACTION.

The Rector has received the following letter :-“ Reverend Sir,-To-day the enclosed card arrived from you for No 419 Rifleman G Berridge, of my Company, who, I deeply regret to inform you, was killed in action on the 13th inst, while serving in the Company in the trenches. I shall be grateful if you will inform his relatives and convey to them the deepest sympathy of the N.C.O’s and riflemen of C Company. We can only hope that the knowledge of his death in the service of his country will afford them some little consolation in their sorrow.-Yours very truly, T Sherwood, C.G.M.S, C Company, R.B.

On Sunday afternoon a memorial service was held in conjunction with the afternoon service in the Parish Church. Special psalms and hymns were sung, the lesson in the Burial Service was read, and the sentences and prayers in the service were used. In front of the pulpit was hung the picture, “ The Great Sacrifice,” representing the   soldier dying for his country, trusting in Christ.-The Rector took as his text Rev iv, 1, “ After this I looked, and behold a door was opened in heaven,” The Rector said something like this : There were times in the lives of all people and countries when in their sorrows and losses and anxieties they scarcely knew where to go for help. Worldly things seemed to crumble away and fail, and the world’s hollowness was seen by the world’s incapacity to help in time of need. At such times the Church teaches us to lift up our eyes and look not to this earth for help, but to heaven. Then, as we pray in the Saviour’s Name and look upwards, the door of heaven seems to open to us, and we see the vision which St John saw, the glory there, the great throne, and the vision of Him who sat on the throne. There we get comfort, there we get help. This terrible war has claimed one more noble young man from among us-George Berridge. He had seen a very great deal of fighting, having been at the front and in the trenches a long time. Everybody liked him. No one could say a word against him ; one felt it was the best who were going first. He has gone, but as he goes he leaves behind him this message to all who knew him, and others as well : “ Go and do as I have done, I have trusted in my God, I have given my all for my country. You go and do the same.” His mother, overwhelmed with sorrow at her loss, must feel proud she had reared such a son, and we who have known him feel proud. The Rector asked everyone to pray to the Heavenly Father to comfort her. George Berridge would be much missed by his many friends. In the future, if God gave us the victory and preserved our Church, when a painted window or tablet was placed in the Church and the names of those who had fought and died for their country were inscribed, the second name would be Rifleman George Berridge.

There was a very large congregation, and the great number of people showed the esteem in which he was held.

CHURCHOVER.

Mr and Mrs W Webb, of Churchover, on Thursday last week received intimation from the Chaplain of the South Midland Casualty Clearing Station to the effect that their younger son, Corpl J W Webb, of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, had been wounded in the groin. The wound is not dangerous. The battalion to which Corpl Webb belongs has been engaged in heavy fighting of late, and his friends have received some very interesting letters from him. In one, dated May 9th, he says :-” I expect you have heard from Mrs Matthews (Churchover) that John was wounded this week. I must say he was very lucky. Tell him the last battle we had was a thousand times worse than the one he was in. They shelled us with shrapnel, and I had my rifle smashed, my pack cut open, and my overcoat was torn all to pieces. I escaped myself with only a scratch on the face.”

On May 16th he wrote:-“ We went up to reinforce a battalion of another regiment that was being shelled all to pieces. We went up in broad daylights across an open ploughed field, and I   have only to thank God that I am alive to tell you of it. We were enfiladed with rifle fire, shell fire, machine gun fire, and that dreadful shrapnel. Shells were bursting all around, over, and in front, and still we went on. It lasted about half-an-hour. You can’t imagine what war is like. . . . We have had 36 days in the trenches straight off. We can beat them (the Germans) on the open ground, but they are masters at trench work.”

In a third letter, dated May 21st, Corpl Webb says:-“ We were inspected by General French yesterday, and he praised our brigade wonderfully. This big battle that we have been in will rank as one of the biggest in history, and our losses were heavy. I got through myself with only a few scratches. We have had five weeks of hard work, never out of shell fire the whole time, and I shall never forget it.” Corpl Webb , and his brother joined the Army at the outbreak of war.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Webb, 4th Rifle Brigade, of Churchover, who, as we announced last week, has been wounded, has been sent to England, and is now in hospital at Reading.

NEWBOLD TERRITORIAL KILLED IN ACTION.

Another member of “ E ” Company, 7th R.W.R, Pte Lewis Hill, second son of Mr E I Hill, of Newbold, has been killed. The sad news was contained in a letter sent from a friend, who stated that Pte Hill was killed by a sniper while on patrol duty on May 29th. The writer added that a comrade had since accounted for the sniper, and had his coat as a memento. Pte Hill, who was 19 years of age, had been a member of “ E ” Company for several years, and previous to the war was employed at the Newbold Cement Works.

BRANDON.

PRIVATE F WEBB.—Some short time back Mr and Mrs Webb, of the Railway Cottages, were notified from the headquarters at Warwick, that their son had been wounded in the left arm and was in hospital. Since that date his parents have heard from him on two occasions, and were delighted to find that the report was not correct. He had been in hospital suffering from his legs, but had not been injured. He is now quite convalescent, and has re-joined his regiment—the 1st Warwicks. As his two cousins—Lee-Corpl T Webb and Pte W Webb, of Wolston, had both been wounded in the arm, it is thought that is how the error occurred. They all belong to the 1st Royal Warwickshire.

BRINKLOW.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—We regret to announce that Private Thomas Clifton, of the Worcestershire Regiment, was killed in action on May 9th. Joining the army immediately after the outbreak of the war, he soon became popular among his new comrades, and showed his ability at the regimental sports. His love of sport, however, did not eclipse his devotion to the sterner side of his soldier life, and although but a few months in the ranks he was very successful with the rifle, and he volunteered to go to France to strengthen his regiment. Prior to the war he was a member of the local Football Club, and was greatly esteemed. The village people sympathise most deeply with his parents in their loss.