12th May 1917. Food Economy Campaign

FOOD ECONOMY CAMPAIGN.—In connection with the Food Economy Campaign in Rugby a series of cookery demonstrations has been arranged. A central establishment will be opened very shortly in High Street, where demonstrations will be given during the afternoons and evenings. This will probably be followed by local demonstrations in other parts of the town. A scheme for the establishment of communal kitchens for Rugby is also well in hand.

AN ALLOTMENT HOLDERS’ ASSOCIATION for Rugby is in course of formation (see advt).

THE KING’S PROCLAMATION urging the necessity of economising in food consumption was read at various places of worship at Rugby on Sunday last.

NEW BILTON.

A COMMUNAL KITCHEN.—The War Economy Food Committee having applied for the use of the Wesleyan. Schoolroom at New Bilton as a communal kitchen, the trustees met on Monday night to consider the matter, and unanimously decided to place the school at the disposal of the committee, subject to certain details to be arranged by the stewards.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut E Wilson, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mrs Wilson, of Bridget Street, is in hospital at Rouen suffering from a broken leg.

Second-Lieut H H H Lister, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, only son of Mr and Mrs H L Lister, Clifton Road, Rugby, is reported missing on May 4, 1917.

Pte Longney, writing from France, says :—“ By a curious coincidence, it was my pleasure, when passing down the street of the town where I am stationed, to see the Red Cross ambulance car presented by the Rugby and District Farmers’ Association. It is doing a splendid did work, and looks in good condition.”

Mr R George Hudson, son of Mr R S Hudson, York Street, who has been with the Artists’ Rifles in France for the past twelve months, has been given commission, and posted to a Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. News has since been received that Second-Lieut. Hudson, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, has been severely wounded.

Rifleman J C Smith, K.R.R, the eldest son of Mr J C Smith, has been admitted to hospital with gun-shot wounds in the right shoulder.

Capt T Marriott, son of the late Mr J Marriott, of Stanford-on-Avon, who was recently awarded the Military Cross, has been promoted to the rank of Major. He is an “ old boy ” and former member of the staff of St Matthew’s Boys’ School.

The relatives of Pte F H Watts, of 21 Cross Street, Rugby, have received intimation that he was wounded on April 25th for the third time. On this occasion he received injuries in the thigh, arm, and chest through an accident. He is now in the General Hospital, Birmingham, and is making favourable progress.

Official news has been received by Mr T H Cleaver, late of the Horse and Jockey Inn that his son Joseph V Cleaver has been killed in action in France on April 11th. Before the war he was employed by the Leamington Brewery Company. He was one of the first to join up under Lord Derby’s Group System. This is the second son Mr Cleaver has lost in action, and two more, George and Austin, were wounded earlier in the War.

Evan P Biddles, gunner in the R.F.A, youngest son of the late Mrs John Biddles, Newton, Rugby, and of Estancia Loma-Pora, Villa Concepeion, Republic del Paraguay, South America, has died from wounds in France. Less than a year ago he returned to England to enlist after giving up an important post as Majordomo for the Paraguay Land and Cattle Company, and in December last crossed to France, and has practically been in action ever since. His age was 22.

News has just been received by Mr and Mrs Bull, 49 Manor Road, Rugby (late of Lower Shuckburgh, near Daventry), that their only son, Bombardier Bull, was killed in action on the night of May 3rd. At the age of 16 he joined the Warwickshire R.H.A in November, 1915, and went to France in the following May, where he has been in the fighting line ever since. A letter was received on Wednesday morning from his Officer, who writes :-“ Your son, Bombardier Bull, was gallantly doing his duty under heavy shell-fire, and a 4.2 shell just caught him and another man, Fitzgerald. You can be perfectly certain that his death was quite instantaneous and completely without pain. I have known your son since he was under me in the 3rd Warwick Battery, nearly two years ago. He showed signs of being a very fine soldier then, and has since very fully redeemed that early promise. I cannot say how deeply your son is regretted both by officers and men.”

NEWS FROM A RUGBY OFFICER REPORTED KILLED.

Capt S E Jones, of the 10th Yorkshire Regiment, formerly a bank manager at Rugby, who was officially reported killed on February 27th, is evidently a prisoner of war in Saxony. Mr Mason, his successor at Rugby, has just received a card from him stating that his eyes are getting better (so that he was apparently wounded in the face), and adding: “ Do send us food and clothing.”

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary,
Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER,
9 Regent Street, Rugby,
who will gratefully acknowledge same.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.

WOUNDED.—Mrs Parr at the Three Horse Shoes, Newbold, has received official information that her husband, Private F Parr, Oxford & Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in France, and is in hospital at Rouen.—Mrs T Harris of Newbold learns that her husband, Pte Thos Harris, belonging to a Northampton Regiment, had been wounded in the head and right arm on April 23rd in Egypt, and was lying in hospital seriously ill.—Mr and Mrs West of Rugby (late of Newbold) have also received intimation that their son, Pte C West, Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has been wounded in France.

LONG LAWFORD.

Mr and Mrs Elkington, Long Lawford have received the following official note concerting their son :- “ The Major-General, 20th (Light) Division, has received a report of the gallant conduct of R G Elkington, K.R.R.C, on April 4, 1917, in courage and personal bravery in the storming of the village of Métz, and he wishes to congratulate him on his fine behaviour.” This is the second occasion that Sergt Elkington has been mentioned for his conduct in the field, the last time during a night attack, on August 23, 1916, at Guillemont. His parents have been pleaded to learn that he has received the ribbon for the Military Medal from the General Commanding.

BRANDON.

MAJOR D C M BEECH.—The many friends of Mr Douglas Beech, the only surviving son of Colonel R J Beech, J.P, D.L, will be pleased to hear that he has been acting as Brigadier Major and is on Foreign Service.

RUSSIAN FLAG DAY AT RUGBY.
A SPLENDID RESULT.

Rugby’s effort on behalf of the Russian wounded on Saturday last was crowned with success ; and, despite the fact that this time the appeal was made only in Rugby and New Bilton, upwards of 25,000 flags were sold, realising £110 16s 6d—the highest sum ever obtained by a flag day restricted to the town. The effort was held under the auspices of the Rugby Urban District Council, and the organisation was again ably carried out by Mr J R Barker, who, at the special request of the Chairman of the Council, has consented to organise all official flag days in Rugby. He was assisted by a willing band of 150 fair vendors, and by means of a system of relays sellers were to be found in the streets all day. The Council placed the Benn Buildings at the disposal of Mr Barker for a depot ; and here Mrs B B Dickinson and Mrs J R Barker rendered yeoman service in handing out fresh supplies and receiving the collecting tins as they were retained. Mr R P Mason, manager of the London City and Midland Bank, again undertook the duties of treasurer, and supervised the counting of the money, in which he was assisted by Mr J Ferry and the Hon Organiser. The £110.16s 6d was made up as under :- Coppers, £76 19s (the largest sum, received in coppers on a flag day) ; silver, £32 17s 6d ; and one Treasury note for £1, .which was placed in the box of Mr Barker’s daughter. The highest amount (£2 15s) was collected by Miss G Woods in the B.T.H district, and she was closely followed by Miss Sparkes (£2 14s 2d), of the same district.

DEATHS.

BIDDLES.—Died of gas poisoning just behind the lines in France, April 22nd, from wounds received in action same day, EVAN P. BIDDLES, gunner in the R.F.A., youngest son of the late Mrs. John Biddles, Newton, Rugby, and Estancia Lomapora, Villa Concepcion, Republic del Paraguay, S. America ; aged 22 years.

BULL.—Killed in action, on May 3rd, in France, THOMAS HENRY BULL, late of Shuckburgh ; aged 18.
“ Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off grave ;
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts
We will remember thee.
—From FATHER, MOTHER, and SISTERS.

HINCKS.—Lance-Corpl. E. W. HINCKS, Middlesex Regiment, youngest son of Mr and Mrs. Marlow Hincks, Southam Holts, officially reported killed in action in France on 12th April ; aged 20.—Deeply mourned.

ROBINSON.—In loving memory of OWEN, the dearly beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. C. Robinson, Catthorpe, who died from wounds received in action on March 28th. Laid to rest in the British Military Cemetery, near Arras,-“ Loyal to duty even onto death.”

IN MEMORIAM.

MASON.—In loving remembrance of ARTHUR ALEC MASON, of Long Buckby, who was lost on H.M.S. Goliath in the Dardanelles on May 13, 1915.—“ Till the day breaks and the shadows flee away.”

SMITH.—In loving memory of Trooper WILLIAM SMITH, son of James and Elizabeth Smith, of Lutterworth, reported missing May 13, 1915,—“ Greater love hath no man than this.”

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30th Dec 1916. Military Cross for Old St Matthew’s Boy

MILITARY CROSS FOR OLD ST. MATTHEW’S BOY.

The Military Cross has been awarded to Capt Tom Marriott, son of the late Mr J Marriott, who resided at Stratford-on-Avon for nearly 40 years.

Capt Marriott was in charge of a small post at Malingali, East Africa, and being attacked by superior German forces under General Wahle, put up an unexpected resistance. He held the post for four days, until the arrival of a relief force, which drove General Wahle’s forces back. Capt Marriott was promptly awarded the Military Cross.

Capt Marriott was a scholar at St Matthew’s School, under the late Mr Phillips. He was a Lieutenant in the United States Army at that time of the Spanish-American War, subsequently volunteering in the British army for the Boer War. He was one of the first to ride into Ladysmith at the relief of that town, and rose to the rank of Captain in the South African Light Horse. Since the Boer War he has been engaged in farming in South Africa, and on the outbreak of hostilities in 1914, again volunteered for active service, and was engaged with General Botha in German West Africa. On the subjugation of that colony his regiment was transferred to German East Africa. He was wounded in the arm at Malingali in July, the same place where in December he has gained the distinction of the award of the Military Cross.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr PC Longney, deputy-organist at Catthorpe Parish Church, and a member of the choir of St Andrew’s Church, Rugby, has joined the A.S.C, and is proceeding to France this week.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

HOWITZER BATTERY MAN KILLED.

Mrs Ingram, of 68 Victoria Street, New Bilton, has just received official information from the War Office that her son, Driver E (Ben) Ingram, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, was killed by a shell on December 8th. He was an old New Bilton Council School boy and a former member of the Boys’ Brigade, in which he was a stretcher bearer. He had been a member of the Howitzer Battery for six years, and prior to the outbreak of the war was an assistant in Mr J J McKinnell’s shop. He was 22 years of age, and was held in high esteem by all who knew him. In a letter to his parents, Capt Lister says : “ I can assure you that his death came as a great blow to the Battery. He was a great favourite, and always willing to do any work that was to be done. Personally, I feel the blow very much. He had been my servant ever since the Battery left England, and I know full well what a very good fellow he was.” Mrs Ingram has three other sons serving, or who have served. Corpl B Ingram, Coldstream Guards, who has gone all through the present War, is well known in local football circles ; Corpl T Ingram, R.W.R, has served since the commencement of the War ; and Corpl R Ingram, of the same regiment, has been discharged through injuries received on active service.

VICAR OF ST. MATTHEW’S GOING TO THE FRONT.

Arrangements have been made for the Rev C T Aston, vicar of St Matthew’s, to take charge of a hut in France, under the auspices of the Soldiers’ Christian Association. He expects to leave Rugby in the second or third week of January, and will probably be away for five or six months. The hut to be placed under Mr Aston’s charge is a new one, now approaching completion, and is nearer the trenches than any others provided by this association. Mr Aston will take with him the good wishes of his many friends in Rugby. During his absence the work at St Matthew’s will be under the care of the Rev P E Warrington (curate). The Rev Dr David and some of the masters at Rugby School have promised to help and other clergymen from a distance are giving assistance for week-ends.

THE WEATHER.

The weather during the Christmas season has been of a wintry character, but not exactly the kind that people usually like to see at this time of the years. Following a spell of frosty weather, there was a considerable fall of snow on Friday last week. On Saturday morning rain came down for a time, and this gradually changed to snow, and when this began to accumulate in a partly melted condition, roads and footpaths were before nightfall inches deep in slush, making it most uncomfortable for people to get about to do their shopping. During the night the remaining snow became frozen, and the surface was covered with ice. This state of affairs continued till Thursday, when a thaw set in. Vehicular traffic on the ice-bound roads was carried on with difficulty, and pedestrians found it necessary to walk with the greatest care. The temperature was not particularly low, but the air was at times very raw, and only for a few moments occasionally was a glimpse of the sum obtainable. On Wednesday there was a dense fog.

A FOOD INVENTORY.

The Food Control Department is engaged on an inventory of the national stocks, resources, and expected supplies of each of the principal articles of food. This is a necessary preliminary to the devising of plans for the equitable distribution of food, and when the stock-taking is completed, as it will be shortly, the exact form of these plans in the way of preventing wasteful and extravagant misuse of food will be devised. Meatless days and sugar rationing will be first taken into consideration.

SEED POTATOES.—Arrangements have been made by the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries with the Treasury to finance a scheme for the distribution of seed potatoes. The President has invited the County War Agricultural Committees to request Borough and Urban Councils and Parish Councils to ascertain what quantity of seed potatoes is required in each village ; to collect cash with orders and to distribute seed. It is proposed that arrangements should be made to deliver the potatoes at convenient distributing centres in 1-cwt bags. Not more than 5-cwt may be supplied to each grower and the range of varieties will necessarily be limited