22nd Dec 1917. The Rector of Rugby and the Capture of Jerusalem

THE RECTOR OF RUGBY AND THE CAPTURE OF JERUSALEM.

Preaching at the Parish Church on Sunday morning the Rector (Rev C M Blagden) referred to the capture of Jerusalem. He said they rejoiced in the fact that Jerusalem was now in Christian hands after 739 years, and that British Armies had recovered it without damaging a single stone. The strategic effect of this would be considerable, and the moral effect of this tremendous ; but they must beware of assuming that too great political results could come from the return of the Jews in any number to Jerusalem. They had to think of the Moslem population, who had the Sacred Mosque of Omar standing on the site of the Altar of Burnt Offering, and they also had to think of the Christian connection with Jerusalem. Everything in the Holy City had been re-hallowed by our Lord. Jerusalem was the first centre of the Christian Church ; it claimed the first Bishop and the first council. From Jerusalem began the first preaching of the Gospel. The return of the Jews would produce new difficulties. They were no longer a nation but only a race. They had wonderfully kept their Faith, but the heart of their Faith had disappeared with the disappearance of the sacrifice. The real point was that there was no new covenant between God and man. The Jewish religion doomed, and Christ was the end of the law. The Jews had contributed much to the religion the world, but their religion had no future in front of it. It had had its day and ceased to be, and there was no future for Jerusalem at the centre of that religion. The only future to which they could look forward was that Jerusalem should be once more the centre of the Christian Church, and the only hope for the Jews lay in their becoming Christians and being once more the missionaries of the East. The Mohammedans might listen to them when they would not listen to the Christians. Then there might be in solid fact a new Jerusalem, “ Zion the City of our solemnities, the City of God Himself.”

A TOMMY’S LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

SIR,—You can imagine our feelings in reading the papers of the strikes in Coventry over such trifles, when the men are earning wages which were only earned by very few in pre-war time, and under the most favourable conditions, with a home and home comforts to go to after working-hours. Can they realise what a Tommy is going through out here to protect them and theirs from being treated the same as Belgium, Serbia, Montenegro, and parts of France ?

Here are a few conditions which they might compare with those under which they work at home. I speak as an artilleryman ; the infantry are in a position to claim more sympathy. Firstly, the wages are less per day than the average munitions worker earns per hour. Then, the hours are not eight a day, but all God sends ; still they smile. We are not in a factory warmed or cooled according to the weather, and run under the eyes of health inspectors. It is open air—hail, rain, snow, or shine, and if up to the knees in mud and water, or numbed with cold, one cannot hear anything but cheers and jokes from the men who are proving themselves men in a cause on which stands the future destiny of dear old England. Then the comforts. No, the lads have not a daintily prepared meal, their slippers warmed, a nice fire, a nice bed, and all that a home provides. They have either a ruined building, hut, tent, bivouac, or dug-out, which they make as comfortable as circumstances allow. And do they realise at home that whilst they are in bed, from which they never get disturbed, unless the baby cries or something similar, the men out here are straining every nerve either on the look out, at the guns, or feeding them with ammunition. Some journeys to and from the guns, for instance, occupy four, six, even eight hours, which means another nights’ sleep lost. They can thank God it has been their lot stay at home, but it makes one think who has had two or three years out here that the heads are encouraging such thoughtlessness, and makes one wish that they are made to come here and relieve some of the thousands who have either done their bit or who are unfit to undergo such conditions and strain. Still, those who we hold dear to us can rest assured that the British Tommy, never minding the conditions, is going to do all in his power to protect the flag and the country which gave him birth. All he asks in return is that the men who are left at home to provide the necessities of war will stand by them and uphold Lord Nelson’s motto, “ England expects every man to do his duty,” and so abolish strikes and petty grievances, which are prolonging the war and assisting the enemy.

Kindly excuse writing this epistle, but it tends to discourage those are doing their bit out here.
Yours truly.
ONE WHO WENT OUT WITH THE RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

LORD DENBIGH’S CHRISTMAS MOTTO.

The Earl of Denbigh, lecturing to a large audience of soldiers and civilians at Bury St Edmunds, said it was no time to talk of peace, because we could stick it and had to. In reply to a questioner, who asked him to give a motto for Christmas, Lord Denbigh said : “ Stick it, England, or go under for ever.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In Sir D. Haig’s list of names, published on Tuesday last, of those deserving special mention is that of Lt.-Col. W. Elliott Batt, R.F.A.

Corpl F Evans, son of Mr Evans, 13 James Street, Rugby, was wounded on November 30th, and is probably a prisoner of war. It is quite believed he is in hospital behind the German lines.

Mrs Lamb, 17 St Marie’s Terrace, Rugby, has received notification from the War Office that her eldest son, Gunner W Lamb, of the R.F.A, has been severely wounded in the left leg. He was pupil at St Marie’s School.

The list of successful candidates for admission to the R.M.A, Woolwich, was published on Thursday, and contained the name of F R Kittermaster, captain of the Rugby School Football XV.

Major H H Neeves, D.S.O., M.C., was mentioned in Sir D Haig’s despatch, published in the “ London Gazette ” on December 14th, for gallant service on the Western’ Front.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C W Horley, 2nd Sherwood Foresters, recently died from wounds. Before enlisting Corpl Horley was employed in the Winding Department.

Mrs Neville had received a telegram from the King and Queen regretting the loss she has sustained by the death of her son (Capt Frank Neville) in the service of his country and sympathising with her in her sorrow.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, of East Haddon (formerly of Rugby), have been notified that their eldest son, Second-Lieut James E Baskott, died of wounds in France on December 11th. Second-Lieut Baskott who was 27, years of age, was educated at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, Rugby, and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery as a private early in the War, being gazetted to a commission in the same regiment about six months ago. He had been in most of the recent heavy fighting, and had built up a reputation for coolness and bravery, being regarded as a general favourite and an officer of considerable promise.

Pte Hugh Lissimore, Coldstream Guards, son of Mrs Lissimore, 23 Lodge Road, was killed in action on November 28th in the Battle for Bourlon Wood. Pte Lissimore was 19 years of and an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School. In announcing his death his officer writes to Mrs Lissimore :—“ Your son was very popular with the men in his platoon always cheerful and bright, and was a very brave soldier and a good man. He was keen on his work, knowing his Lewis gun thoroughly. I shall miss him very much.”

NEWS OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Mr & Mrs Alfred Webb have returned home after visiting their son, Rifleman Wm Webb, who was lying badly wounded in hospital at Etaples. He was the victim of a terrific blow at close quarters from the butt-end of a German rifle, and was afterwards hit in the back by shrapnel. The visit of his parents (who are loud in praise of the hospitality and kindness they experienced in France and en route) cheered the gallant soldier greatly, and he has since been removed to a London hospital.—Mrs Frank Lane has now received a communication from her son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane, K.R.R. He is still in hospital at Rouen. He has lost a leg, and is very seriously ill. There is great hope that these two brave men will pull through.

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT.

An inquest was held on Thursday by Mr E F Hadow, touching the death of Second-Lieut Charles Robert Rawbone (20), R.F.C, son of Mr C T Rawbone, Civil servant, of 4 Templar Street, Myerts Park, London, which took place at the Brookfield Nursing Home as the result of an accident on December 7th.

Evidence was given to the effect that deceased had been in the R.F.C for nine or ten months. On December 7th he went up in an aeroplane, the rigging, control, and engine of which had been previously tested and found to be in good order. He was practising with a machine gun, and while doing so engine trouble developed; and he turned, evidently with the intention of going to have it seen to. As he turned the engine “ picked up,” and this brought the nose of the machine down, and caused it to dive to the ground. An eye-witness, Second-Lieut Claude E Mayors expressed the opinion that turning while so close to the ground—the machine was about 100 ft up—showed a lack of judgment. Lieut Rawbone was immediately attended to by Dr Chester Collins, and was subsequently removed to the Brookfield Nursing Home and treated by Drs Collins and Hoskyn; but, despite every care and skilful nursing, he died ten days after the accident, meningitis having set in.

The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said the cause of the accident was not very clear, although Lieut Mayors had shown them that Lieut Rawbone chose to take a very grave risk when banking by relying on the impetus gained from the dive rather than on the engine, and had it come off all right it would probably have been applauded. The Jury would join with him in sympathising with the parents, and would feel that they had lost one of their young flying men who, after all, were the bravest of the brave.

The Jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death.”

The witnesses were Mr C T Rawbone, Second-Lieut C E Mayors, Dr Chester Collins, 2nd A/M Thos Staines, A/M Geo Nicholls, and Corpl G E Southcott.

BROADWELL.
WOUNDED.—Mr T Gulliver has received news that his son, Harry Gulliver, of the Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the back. Mr Gulliver’s younger son was killed in action in France about two months ago.

WOLSTON.
CHRISTMAS GIFTS.—All soldiers who left Messrs Bluemel’s Works to fight for their country will be again well remembered this Yuletide. Messrs F Stevenson, L Jeacock, S Everton, T Boneham, H Chater. and J Satchwell have acted as a committee, under the able guidance of Mr W R Glare, the genial works manager. A collection was made amongst the employees and staff, which realised £22 11s. Forty soldiers each received a tuck box, 27 stationed in England received a 5s P.O each, and two prisoners of war in Germany each received an 8s parcel of food through the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee. Each employee who is now, or has been, with the Colours received a fine Christmas card, which had been specially designed by Mr W R Glare. The directors have independently sent each soldier a postal order for £1.

FLECKNOE.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Only last week the sad news was received in Flecknoe that another of its young inhabitants had given his life for his country. Pte Charles Frank Rose was the son of Mr Charles Rose, who has long held the position of postmaster and assistant overseer in the parish, and was most popular among young and old. He was one, too, who could ill be spared from the life of the village. Frank, whose age was only 25, was attached to the Machine Gun Section of the King’s Own Yorkshire Regiment, and was killed in action on the Western Front on November 24th. The general respect felt for his memory and the sympathy for his sorrowing parents, brothers and sisters, was well shown by the number who attended the memorial service held in the Village Church of St Mark’s on Sunday last.

TERRITORIALS’ FAMILIES AND WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

The third annual tea and entertainment to the wives, sisters, mothers, and families of members of the 7th R.W.R, Howitzer Battery and Yeomanry was given by the Territorial Committee on Wednesday last. As on the last occasion, about 300 wounded soldiers and nurses from the local Red Cross Hospitals, “ Te Hira,” Infirmary, St John’s, Bilton Hall, Cawston House, Pailton House, and the officers from Clifton Court Hospital were invited, and everything possible was done to make the occasion a really enjoyable one.

The proceedings began with an entertainment at the Empire, kindle provided by Mr B Morris, who procured a special film for the occasion. The variety artistes also gave their services, and the excellent programme was thoroughly enjoyed. After the entertainment the guests repaired to the Co-operative Hall, where, by special permission of the Food Controller, an excellent tea was served. About 600 sat down, and among the visitors were the Rev C M & Mrs Blagden, Rev Bernard McNulty (Leamington) “ padre,” to the Division, of which the 7th Royal Warwicks and the Howitzer Battery form a part ; Major C P Nickalls and Lieut Matheson (Rugby Howitzer Battery), Col F F Johnstone, Col G M Seabroke, Mr Pridmore (Coventry), Mr J J McKinnell, Capt C H Fuller, Lieuts Wharton and Yates (Rugby V.T.C), Mr A E & Miss Donkin, Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs P Nickalls, Mrs Marsham, &c. During tea, crackers were distributed, and as these were exploded the beaming faces of the children bore eloquent testimony to their enjoyment, and gave ample recompense to all who had worked so hard in the organisation of the entertainment. After tea a variety programme was given by the Clifton Court Hospital Party and the members the V.A.D there, under the direction of Mr Yardley ; and, needless to sy, this was much appreciated.

The committee responsible for the arrangements consisted of Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs West, Mrs Claude Seabroke, Mr A W Adnitt, Mr F E Hands, assisted by Major Nickalls. The staff of the Co-operative Society and friends of the committee rendered useful service by waiting at the tables.

BAPTIST CHURCH.—A “ Dickens’ Evening ” was held in the Large Hall on Wednesday, and was largely attended. The Rev J H Lees presided. Three sketches were given in an excellent manner from Dickens’ Christmas carol, viz, “ Scrooge in His Office,” “ Visit of Marley’s Ghost,” and “ Cratchit’s Christmas Dinner.” Miss W Davidson two solos, and during intervals there were refreshments and games.

MILK DELIVERY IN RUGBY.—In the New Year there will be only one delivery of milk per day in Rugby.

WINTER.—Severe frost set in on Wednesday night, 14 degrees being registered. During Thursday night the thermometer recorded 9 degrees.

CHRISTMAS POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS.—To ensure delivery for Christmas parcels should be posted not later than Saturday evening, and letters and cards by Sunday night or early Monday morning. [Christmas Day was Tuesday]

HIGH PRICES FOR POULTRY.—In Messrs Tait, Sons & Pallant’s Smithfield on Monday a fine lot of 500 birds came under the hammer, and prices were the highest known. Turkeys made up to 52s each, geese 24s, ducks 8s, cockerels 8s 6d, hens 6s.

DEATHS.

LISSIMORE.—In loving memory of Pte. HUGH LISSIMORE, the beloved son of Mrs. and the late Wm. Thos. Lissimore, 23 Lodge Road, Rugby, who was killed in Bourlon Wood, France, on November 28, 1917.—“ Thy will be done.”

ROSE.—Killed in action on November 24, 1917, in France, CHARLES FRANK ROSE, M.G.S., King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, aged 25, second and dearly beloved son of Charles and Catherine Rose, of Flecknoe.
“ Father, in Thy gracious Keeping, Leave we now our dear on sleeping.”—CHAS. ROSE, Post Office, Flecknoe.

 

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29th Jul 1916. Some After Effects of the Great Offensive

SOME AFTER EFFECTS OF THE GREAT OFFENSIVE.

An artillery officer who is in the great offensive writes to a friend in Rugby :- “ For days before the attack we were firing continuously, and on the actual day we got rid of a prodigious amount of ammunition. Fortunately[?], there was a bit of a lull after the attack, and we got some well-needed rest. So tired was one of my Sergeants that a rat gnawed at his face as he was lying in his dug-out. In a sleepy way he brushed it on one side, but it only returned, and finally he slept on, to find his face a mass of blood in the morning.

“ As for my Subalterns, they did nothing but eat and sleep for many days.

“ The Battery did very well, especially —who was complimented on the “ gallantry and initiative ” which he displayed.

“ It was rather sad to see our wounded come back, but they all seemed very cheery, and generally were hugging a German helmet, cap, pistol, or something as a souvenir. We escaped very fortunately in the casualty line, only having one N.C.O and two horses wounded, but on the day of the attack the Bosches fired gas shells at us, which made us all very sick and faint. On the whole, however, our worst enemy is the rain. There have been some extraordinary heavy showers, which have flooded our gun-pits and dug-outs at times. We are experts at mud shovelling, but it takes a lot of work and ingenuity to keep our homes from washing down. Getting out of bed in the morning is a work of fine art. We sleep in bunks in two rows, and the puzzle is, how to get into your boots without stepping on the floor, which, has or three inches of mud. It’s Wonderful how clever one gets at standing on one leg. The trenches are of course, very often waist deep in water, and it is often a choice between staying in and getting wet through, or jumping, out and risking a bullet. All the same we manage to keep merry and bright.”

WOLSTON.

AT CONTALMAISON.—Pte T Webb, writing to a friend says : “ Just to let you know I and the Wolston boys are still in the pink after a few days with the Germans. No doubt you have been having good news of the ‘boys’ this last few days. I shall never forget it. Talk about the Loos and Neave Chapelle battles, this was the worst I have ever been in. It was on July 8th when we had orders to get ready and stand-to. For five hours our artillery, with all sorts of shells, bombarded the village of Contalmaison, till there was hardly a wall or house left standing. The time came, and over we went with fixed bayonets and bombs. We had about 250 yards to go. We got there, and what a game we had chasing the Germans in and out of cellars and dug-outs. After holding on to the village a little time we had to retire owing to shells and machine gun fire from the Germans, but a little later on we made again for the village, and secured it this time. It was a sight to see the Germans lying about. We made 60 prisoners, and they seemed glad to be taken. One of them, who could speak rather good English, said they had just come from Verdun for a rest, and then the English started on them. One chap had the chance to get back to his lines, but refused to do so. They were rather tall, but only old men and boys, 16 or 50. We were up to our knees in mud and water, but they could not shift the Worcester sauce, which was a bit too strong for them. We hung on until we got relieved by another division the next night. We have pushed them back a few miles this time. It was a treat to look round their dug-outs. One I went down was about 40ft under the ground, fitted up with several compartments. It was more like an hotel, with spring beds, tables, and everything for use. On the walls were all sorts of photos and picture postcards from relatives and friends from Germany. The kitchen took our eye most ; it was fitted up with cooking stoves, boilers for making soup, and pots of all sorts. I think they were there, as they thought, for the duration of the War ; but we caught them napping, and use their hotel for ourselves now. We are having a quiet rest, and hope to be with them again very soon.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Evan Percy Biddles, of Clifton, who has been in Paraguay, South America, for four years, his given up a good post there, and has returned home to serve his country.

Second-Lieut S A Miller-Hallett, South Wales Borderers, killed on July 11th, was in the Rugby School Cricket XI in 1908 and 1909. He was the second son of Mr A Miller-Hallett, of Chelsfield, whose XI provided very good club cricket in Kent some years ago.

Lieut A H Hales, Wiltshire Regiment, killed on July 5th, was a versatile athlete. Educated at Rugby and Corpus, Oxford, he gained his rowing Blue, and was at No. 3 in the Varsity crews of 1904 and 1905. As a Rugby footballer he was in his School XV in 1900, and afterwards played for the Harlequins and Monkstown. He was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in March, 1915.

Tuesday was the last day for unattested men who had not received calling up papers to report under the Military Service Act, but, probably owing to the thorough manner in which the calling-up process has been gone through locally, only one man reported at Rugby Drill Hall.

Mr Harry Hoare, so well known a few years ago in connection with the Rugby, Football, Cricket, and Hockey Clubs, now holds the rank of Major in the Army Service Corps, and Acts as Senior Supply Officer to the 38th Welsh Division.

SERGT J SOMERS, V.C, WOUNDED.

Sergt James Somers, of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, formerly billeted with Mrs Burns, Corbett Street, Rugby, who gained the Victoria Cross in the Dardenelles, was wounded for the third time in the great advance, and is at present in hospital at Newcastle.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following Rugby men, belonging to the Rifle Brigade, have been reported wounded :—Rifleman J F Earl (5556), Rifleman J Hughes (235), Rifleman F P Liddington (751), Acting-Corpl A Packer (1283), Rifleman H Fulham (8), and Rifleman T C Smith (2426).

Corpl P Hammond, of E Co, R.W.R, son of Mr W D Hammond, 1 Kimberley Road, was wounded in the face on June 19th, but has now recovered and returned to the firing line.

Mr and Mrs W Aland, of 30 Arnold Street, received news on Sunday that their son, Pte Roy Aland, of the Warwicks, had been severely wounded by gun shot, the head, shoulders, back, and both arms and both legs being involved. The parents went over to France to see their son without delay. Pte Aland was employed as a foreman at Rugby when he enlisted, and has spent sixteen months in the trenches.

William Ewart Davenport, only son of Mr and Mrs A Davenport, of Harborough Magna, was killed in action on July 19th. Deceased was 18 years of age, and previous to the war was employed by the L & N.-W Railway as a cleaner. In a letter to the bereaved parents, his officer says : “ An officer and three telegraphists, including your son, were engaged on telephone work. The shelling was so severe that they took shelter in a dug-out. Immediately a shell dropped on this dug-out, killing all the occupants. The bodies were recovered and buried in a cemetery back of the lines.” The officer adds : — “ He was always cheerful, kind, obliging, and willing to do anything to help and further his work. Your son was a hard-working telephonist, who took a keen interest in his work, and was not afraid to go into the danger zone if it was necessary in the course of his duty.”

Flags were flying half-mast at the L & N.-W Stations and at sub-stations to Rugby, early in the week, as the result of the news that two of the late employes—C W Standish, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, and C A Jeeves, of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry—had been killed in the general advance in France. Standish was a cleaner, whose home is at Peterborough. He had a leg amputated in France, and was brought to a hospital in England, where gangrene set in, and he died. Jeeves came from Bedford. This makes six men connected with the Rugby Engine Shed who have been killed, and, in addition, nineteen have been wounded.

Mrs Ward, of 170 Lawford Road, New Bilton, received on the 7th inst. an official communication that her son, Pte Thomas Walter Ward, who has been reported missing since August 6, 1915, is now regarded as dead. Pte Ward, who enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks Regiment in September, 1914, was home on sick leave in June of last year, and, re-joining his regiment, was shortly afterwards transferred to the Hampshire Regiment, and left England for the Dardanelles. Pte Ward was a prominent member of the New Bilton Rugby Football and Cricket Clubs, and was very popular with all who knew him. Previous to the War he worked at Willans & Robinson’s. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward in their great loss. They have a younger son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Ward, serving in France.

Lieut J Greenwood, of the Northampton Regiment, the well-known Rugby and Newbold footballer, is in hospital at Birmingham suffering, from wounds. Lieut Greenwood, who before the War was a teacher at Eastlands School, took part in the fighting at Fricourt during the first stage of the advance, and was wounded by a sniper in a tree on July 12th. His collar-bone is badly fractured, and he is also suffering severely from shock ; but his many friends will be pleased to hear that he is now making good progress.

CORPL A M BLADES, OF BROWNSOVER.

On Thursday Mr. Tom Blades, of Brownsover, received the sad news that his son, Corpl Albert Moisey Blades, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has died of wounds received during the recent fighting in France. Deceased, who was 21 years of age, enlisted early in the war.

B.T.H MEN KILLED.

Acting Sergt C F Miller, R.E, and Pte Pearson, Siege Co, R.E, two employes of the B.T.H, have been killed in the recent advance. Sergt Miller, who was an Irishman, was formerly in the Test, and Pte Pearson was employed in the Generator Dept.

A BRAVE SOLDIER.

Corpl Doyle, whose death was reported last week, lost his life under the following circumstances :—After the attack on the German trenches volunteers were called for to bring in the wounded. Corpl Doyle was one of the first to volunteer. He brought in one wounded soldier safely, and was bringing in another when he was shot dead. His Commanding Officer (Capt Lucas) says : “ His conduct was beyond all praise. A better or braver soldier never lived.”

RIFLEMAN JOHN LAMBOURNE, OF CLIFTON.

The death took place, as the result of founds received in the great offensive on July 9th, of Rifleman John Lambourne, Rifle Brigade, son of Mr Wm Lambourne, of Clifton. Rifleman Lambourne, who was only 17 years of age, joined the Army when he was 16, and had been in France since last December. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H Works.

DUNCHURCH

PTE J HUGHES, of the K.R.R, has arrived in Birmingham suffering from wounds. Of two companies of his regiment, in one of which he was fighting, there were only seven men left. He it the eldest son of Mr and Mrs J Hughes, Daventry Road, Dunchurch.—Pte R Elkington, Mill Street, who has been in many engagements, is home for a few days before going to Egypt.—Lieut J W Barnwell, R.W.R, Daventry Road, is suffering from wounds in France. Mr Barnwell has gone to see him.— Pte Carter, of the Territorials has also been injured, and is in London.

BRINKLOW.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—The parishioners of Brinklow extend their deepest sympathy to Mr and Mrs T Kenney and family in their grief at the loss of their son, Roland Kenney, who has been killed in action during our great offensive. Roland joined the Territorials just prior to the War, and like many others, volunteered for service abroad, where he has been for over twelve months. He was of a particularly lively nature, and was always a prominent figure in all the outdoor sports the village. He undoubtedly made a good soldier, and was accordingly promoted to the rank of sergeant.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

MONTAGU PEARSON KILLED.—On Monday morning the news was officially confirmed of the death of Lance-Corpl Montagu Pearson (South Staffs Regiment), eldest son of Mr and Mrs W J Pearson. He was killed while fighting in France on the 1st inst. Previous to the War he had been employed at the B.T-H Works at Rugby, and enlisted from there on August 17, 1914. He took part in the operations in Gallipoli, where he was wounded on August 9, 1915. Last January he paid a short visit home. He was 23 years old. Lance-Corpl Pearson was of fine athletic build and a keen lover of sport. For several years he had done good service for the local Football Club, of which he latterly held the position of captain. He will be greatly missed by many.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—On Sunday the Vicar (Rev W E Ellis) made feeling reference to the three deaths which have, within the past three weeks, occurred in the ranks of our local soldiers—Rowland Evetts, Montagu Pearson, and Sutton Russell. The loss of the latter he particularly instanced as one which touched himself very keenly. From the time when a very little lad he attended the Church Schools he found Joseph Sutton Russell a very regular attendant there, and also as a member of the Church Choir. From the time of his confirmation he had always been a devout and regular communicant. The sermon was followed by the singing of Dr Neale’s hymn, “ They whose course on earth is o’er.”

SOUTHAM.

KILLED IN ACTION.—News was received on Friday last week of the death in action of Pte Arthur Adams, of the Manchester “ Pals ” Regiment. Deceased, who was highly respected in Southam, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs H Adams, of Oxford Street, was of a bright and cheery disposition. Before the War Pte Adams was a grocer in Manchester. He leaves a widow, for whom much sympathy is felt.

DEATHS.

DAVENPORT.—On July 19th (killed in action), William Ewart, R.F.A, only son of Mr and Mrs. A. Davenport, Post Office, Harborough Magna. Aged 18 years.
“ He sleeps not in his native land.
But neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving mother, father, and sisters Jess and Della.

LENTON.—In loving memory of William Henry (Will), dearly beloved son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Lenton, Wood Street, who died from wounds in France, July 19,1916, aged 36 years.
“ Lord, ere I join the deadly strife,
And battles terrors dare ;
Fain would I render heart and life
To Thine Almighty care.
And when grim death in smoke wreaths robed,
Comes thundering o’er the scene,
What fear can reach a soldier’s heart
Whose trust in Thee has been.”

MANNING.—On July 11, 1916, died of wounds in France, Thomas Manning, Northants Regiment, of Braunston, beloved husband of Georgina Manning, of Leamington Spa.

SEENEY.—Killed in action in France, July 2, 1916, Signaller W. Seeney, R.W.R.,of Bourton, aged 18.
“ We loved him—oh! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well ;
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldiers grave.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

TOMLINSON.—In loving Memory of William Tomlinson, K.R.R.’s, killed in action at Hooge, July 30,1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving father, mother, sisters, and brothers.

PRESTON.—In loving Memory of Rifleman Jack Preston, 7th K.R.R., killed in action, July 30, 1915.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Father, mother, and sisters.

REDFEARN.—In loving Memory of Rifleman Joseph Charles (Tim) Redfearn, 7th K.R.R., died of wounds, July 21, 1915.
“ Had he asked us, well we know
We should cry, ‘ O spare this blow.’
Yes, with streaming tears should pray,
‘ Lord, we love him ; let him stay.’”
—His wife and daughters, High Street, Thame.

SMITH.—In loving memory of Herbert, the dearly loved son of Frederick Smith. Killed in action in Flanders, July 30, 1915.—“ We loved you well ; God loved you best.”—FATHER, SISTER and BROTHERS.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

A BRITISH SOLDIER.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—I was talking to a wounded boy of the Hampshire Regiment on the platform of Rugby Station the other day. I asked him what his wounds were ? He replied : “ My right arm is shattered, three fingers off left hand,” and he also had a large gash across one cheek. He had been at Loos, Hulluck, and Ypres ; and, as he termed it, had had the biggest part of a shell. He added : “ I am no more use, sir; but I am glad I went.” A little thing like this, I think, helps to show the spirit of our men and the stuff they are made of.—I am, yours faithfully,

CORBET SMITH.
July 26, 1916.

EGGS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—At Rugby Railway Mission a collection of eggs was made on Sunday afternoon, and no fewer than 250 were received, including 64 from the men working in the Locomotive Department at Rugby Station, to whom a special appeal had been made. Mr J J Thompson gave the address at the service, which was well attended, and the eggs, having been received by Mr Frank Ward, were placed in a large nest, made of hay and decorated with the national colours by Mrs Beard. The eggs were afterwards distributed between the three local Red Cross Hospitals.

PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The usual monthly meeting of the Executive Committee of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held on Wednesday.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J R Barker) reported that to date the subscriptions amounted to £545 13s 10d, and the expenditure on food parcels &c, was £432 11s 5d, leaving a balance in hand of £113 2s 5d, sufficient for six weeks’ parcels. During the week subscriptions amounted to £18 17s 4d, including the sum of £8 3s collected at the V.T.C Sports on Saturday last. This was the first week for some time that the receipts exceeded the expenditure.

All outstanding accounts were passed for payment, and as this would be the last meeting of the financial year, the Secretary was instructed to prepare the accounts for audit, so that a balance-sheet could be issued early next month.

This week’s parcels contained ¼-lb tea, jar of marmalade, one large tin salmon, one large tin fruit, one tin of cafe au lait, one tin potted meat, one tin condensed milk, tin cocoa, tablet of soap, ¼-lb sugar.

RAILWAY CONCESSION TO MUNITION WORKERS.—For the convenience of munition workers who have to go from Rugby to Coventry in the early morning the L & N-W Railway have arranged to run a train from Rugby at 5.5 a.m, and arrive at Coventry at 5.20 a.m. It will commence on Monday, July 31st, and be continued for a fortnight to see whether the number of passengers justifies permanent running of the train.

5th Jun 1915. Casualties from the villages

BARBY.

RIFLEMAN BERRIDGE KILLED IN ACTION.

The Rector has received the following letter :-“ Reverend Sir,-To-day the enclosed card arrived from you for No 419 Rifleman G Berridge, of my Company, who, I deeply regret to inform you, was killed in action on the 13th inst, while serving in the Company in the trenches. I shall be grateful if you will inform his relatives and convey to them the deepest sympathy of the N.C.O’s and riflemen of C Company. We can only hope that the knowledge of his death in the service of his country will afford them some little consolation in their sorrow.-Yours very truly, T Sherwood, C.G.M.S, C Company, R.B.

On Sunday afternoon a memorial service was held in conjunction with the afternoon service in the Parish Church. Special psalms and hymns were sung, the lesson in the Burial Service was read, and the sentences and prayers in the service were used. In front of the pulpit was hung the picture, “ The Great Sacrifice,” representing the   soldier dying for his country, trusting in Christ.-The Rector took as his text Rev iv, 1, “ After this I looked, and behold a door was opened in heaven,” The Rector said something like this : There were times in the lives of all people and countries when in their sorrows and losses and anxieties they scarcely knew where to go for help. Worldly things seemed to crumble away and fail, and the world’s hollowness was seen by the world’s incapacity to help in time of need. At such times the Church teaches us to lift up our eyes and look not to this earth for help, but to heaven. Then, as we pray in the Saviour’s Name and look upwards, the door of heaven seems to open to us, and we see the vision which St John saw, the glory there, the great throne, and the vision of Him who sat on the throne. There we get comfort, there we get help. This terrible war has claimed one more noble young man from among us-George Berridge. He had seen a very great deal of fighting, having been at the front and in the trenches a long time. Everybody liked him. No one could say a word against him ; one felt it was the best who were going first. He has gone, but as he goes he leaves behind him this message to all who knew him, and others as well : “ Go and do as I have done, I have trusted in my God, I have given my all for my country. You go and do the same.” His mother, overwhelmed with sorrow at her loss, must feel proud she had reared such a son, and we who have known him feel proud. The Rector asked everyone to pray to the Heavenly Father to comfort her. George Berridge would be much missed by his many friends. In the future, if God gave us the victory and preserved our Church, when a painted window or tablet was placed in the Church and the names of those who had fought and died for their country were inscribed, the second name would be Rifleman George Berridge.

There was a very large congregation, and the great number of people showed the esteem in which he was held.

CHURCHOVER.

Mr and Mrs W Webb, of Churchover, on Thursday last week received intimation from the Chaplain of the South Midland Casualty Clearing Station to the effect that their younger son, Corpl J W Webb, of the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, had been wounded in the groin. The wound is not dangerous. The battalion to which Corpl Webb belongs has been engaged in heavy fighting of late, and his friends have received some very interesting letters from him. In one, dated May 9th, he says :-” I expect you have heard from Mrs Matthews (Churchover) that John was wounded this week. I must say he was very lucky. Tell him the last battle we had was a thousand times worse than the one he was in. They shelled us with shrapnel, and I had my rifle smashed, my pack cut open, and my overcoat was torn all to pieces. I escaped myself with only a scratch on the face.”

On May 16th he wrote:-“ We went up to reinforce a battalion of another regiment that was being shelled all to pieces. We went up in broad daylights across an open ploughed field, and I   have only to thank God that I am alive to tell you of it. We were enfiladed with rifle fire, shell fire, machine gun fire, and that dreadful shrapnel. Shells were bursting all around, over, and in front, and still we went on. It lasted about half-an-hour. You can’t imagine what war is like. . . . We have had 36 days in the trenches straight off. We can beat them (the Germans) on the open ground, but they are masters at trench work.”

In a third letter, dated May 21st, Corpl Webb says:-“ We were inspected by General French yesterday, and he praised our brigade wonderfully. This big battle that we have been in will rank as one of the biggest in history, and our losses were heavy. I got through myself with only a few scratches. We have had five weeks of hard work, never out of shell fire the whole time, and I shall never forget it.” Corpl Webb , and his brother joined the Army at the outbreak of war.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Webb, 4th Rifle Brigade, of Churchover, who, as we announced last week, has been wounded, has been sent to England, and is now in hospital at Reading.

NEWBOLD TERRITORIAL KILLED IN ACTION.

Another member of “ E ” Company, 7th R.W.R, Pte Lewis Hill, second son of Mr E I Hill, of Newbold, has been killed. The sad news was contained in a letter sent from a friend, who stated that Pte Hill was killed by a sniper while on patrol duty on May 29th. The writer added that a comrade had since accounted for the sniper, and had his coat as a memento. Pte Hill, who was 19 years of age, had been a member of “ E ” Company for several years, and previous to the war was employed at the Newbold Cement Works.

BRANDON.

PRIVATE F WEBB.—Some short time back Mr and Mrs Webb, of the Railway Cottages, were notified from the headquarters at Warwick, that their son had been wounded in the left arm and was in hospital. Since that date his parents have heard from him on two occasions, and were delighted to find that the report was not correct. He had been in hospital suffering from his legs, but had not been injured. He is now quite convalescent, and has re-joined his regiment—the 1st Warwicks. As his two cousins—Lee-Corpl T Webb and Pte W Webb, of Wolston, had both been wounded in the arm, it is thought that is how the error occurred. They all belong to the 1st Royal Warwickshire.

BRINKLOW.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—We regret to announce that Private Thomas Clifton, of the Worcestershire Regiment, was killed in action on May 9th. Joining the army immediately after the outbreak of the war, he soon became popular among his new comrades, and showed his ability at the regimental sports. His love of sport, however, did not eclipse his devotion to the sterner side of his soldier life, and although but a few months in the ranks he was very successful with the rifle, and he volunteered to go to France to strengthen his regiment. Prior to the war he was a member of the local Football Club, and was greatly esteemed. The village people sympathise most deeply with his parents in their loss.

 

29th May 1915. Rugby Soldier’s Experiences

RUGBY SOLDIER’S EXPERIENCES.

Pte George Randall, of the 2nd Rifle Brigade, formerly of Barby, who has been out at the front since January 19th, has returned to his home, 48 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, for a few days’ leave. Pte Randall was wounded in the left arm on May 9th, while the British artillery were shelling the German positions, preparatory to the recent successful advance. This is the second time he has been wounded, the previous occasion being at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle. This was only of a slight nature, however, and did not necessitate his leaving the trenches. The bombardment preceding the attack at Neuve Chapelle, Pte Randall describes as “ hell on earth.” The whole sky was lighted up with flames, the roar of the guns was deafening, and the destruction to life and property appalling. The Rifle Brigade was the first regiment to enter Neuve Chapelle, and they immediately commenced to dig themselves in, in the belief that they had cleared out all the Germans. Bullets were continually falling around them, however, and a strict look out was kept. Eventually a flash was observed to come from one of the few houses that was standing, and a party was immediately dispatched to this point. On arriving here they discovered that the Germans had taken refuge in the cellar, and a hand grenade was thrown down. The English corporal then enquired how many were there, and the reply came back “ Four.” Then divide that amongst you,” shouted the corporal as he threw another grenade down. It was afterwards discovered that there were eleven Germans in the cellar, of whom three were killed and eight wounded. The Rifle Brigade had to remain in the trenches at Neuve Chapelle for eleven days. Alluding to the recent British advance, Pte Randall stated that the fighting was much fiercer than at Neuve Chapelle.

Speaking of the terrible destruction which was occasioned by the heavy artillery, our informant stated that one evening when they were going to the trenches they saw a church which had been completely destroyed, and the only thing which was standing was a crucifix. This was absolutely unscathed, despite the fact that the case in which it had been enclosed was smashed to atoms. Needless to say this made quite an impression on all the men who passed by in absolute silence. He saw two other crucifixes at other places which were standing desolate, but unharmed, amid wholesale ruins. Pte Randall mentioned that he had only one experience of poison gas, and on that occasion the wind was very unsteady, and he believed that it did as much, if not more, damage to the Germans than to the English. Only one man in their section was affected, and he but slightly.

The question of the attacks upon Lord Kitchener then came up, and Pte Randall expressed in the most emphatic terms the confidence which all the men at the front place in the War Secretary. “ He is worshipped out there, and his detractors won’t get much support from the men at the front.” There are quite a number of Rugbeians in the Rifle Brigade. Corpl G Reynolds, the Rugby footballer, joined this Battalion, but has now been drafted to the artillery.

LONG LAWFORD MAN KILLED IN ACTION.

Lance-Corpl Harry Payne, of Long Lawford aged 20, was three years in the army, and belonged to the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He went to France in August, and had seen a good deal of the fighting. He was killed in action on 25th April at Ypres. His brother, Private George Payne, of the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been a prisoner in Germany since October. His father, N Payne, an old soldier, has re-enlisted with the Royal Warwicks, and is now at Coventry.

WOLSTON.

PRIVATE W WEBB WOUNDED.—Only last week we recorded the fact that Lance-Corporal J T Webb, the son of Mr and Mrs Charles Webb had been wounded. On Monday they received a post card to say that their other son had been wounded. The only notification was from the British Red Cross Society, that he was at the Military Hospital, Cardiff. Private W Webb belongs, like his brother, to the 1st Worcester Regiment. He volunteered early after the war began, but was not sent to the front so soon as his brother. For several years he was a capital member of the Brandon and Wolston Boy Scouts, of which he became one of the patrol-leaders. His parents not hearing from him feared he was dangerously wounded, but a communication somewhat relieved them. It stated that he was getting on very well, but his right arm, having a bullet wound, he was unable to write himself. He was very bright, and but for his arm looked very well.

NEW BILTON SOLDIER KILLED.

As we briefly announced last week, Mr J R Porter, of 56 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has received intimation that his younger son, Rifleman George R Porter, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action on May 8th. Rifleman Porter, who was 21 years of age, had been in the K.R.R four years, and at the outbreak of war was stationed in India. His regiment landed in England in November, and was drafted to the front before Christmas. Early in the New Year Rifleman Porter was invalided home with a frostbitten and poisoned foot, and returned to France on Easter Sunday. He was an excellent shot, and in 1913 held the regimental medal for boxing (novices, 9st 6lb). Before joining the K.R.R he served four months in the Royal Warwicks Special Reserve, and he formerly belonged to the j Boys’ Brigade.

KILSBY.

PRIVATE HERBERT GRIFFITHS, of the Rifle Brigade, who, as reported last week, was killed in action on April 27th.

P.C CLIFFORD WOUNDED.

Pte Clifford, of the Grenadier Guards, has written to say that he has been wounded, and is in the base hospital. He is doing well. This is the second time that Pte Clifford, who previous to the war was a member of the Rugby Police Force, has been wounded.

P.C NICHOLLS KILLED IN ACTION.

We regret to hear that Pte Nicholls, of the Gloucester Regiment, who previous to the outbreak of war was a member of the Rugby Police Force, has been killed in action. The news was contained in the following letter, written to a friend by the platoon sergeant:—“ I am very sorry to inform you that Pte Nicholls died in battle on the 15th inst. A brave man he lived, a brave man he died. We were ordered to re-take a trench, and he lost his life in the operation.” Pte Nicholls’ death will be generally regretted in the town, where as a constable he was well known and highly respected. In February last he was badly wounded, and was invalided home, returning to the front on his recovery.

THE RUGBY INFANTRY MEN AT THE FRONT.

Ptc L Stewart, of the Rugby Territorial Company “ somewhere in France,” writes :- “ You cannot realise how keep the chaps are to scan the Rugby Advertiser. They went into the trenches last night (May 16) after a four days’ rest—well, supposed to be a rest. The previous time in the trenches lasted six days, and they had a warm time of it, during which they lost Corpl Johnson. Everyone feels his loss keenly. He was one of the most popular men in the Company. The weather this week has been unsettled, and we have experienced some heavy rains. A few days’ rain makes everything so rotten, especially when living under canvas. . . . I think the finest column in the Advertiser this week is the one containing the Rev 0 T B McNulty’s letter headed “ Religious ministrations at the front.” Every word was true to the letter, I have seen him several times.”

PRINTERS AT THE FRONT.

No less than 24 employees of Messrs Frost & Sons, printers, Warwick Street, Rugby have responded to their country’s call, and four of them have been promoted to the non-commissioned ranks. They are : F Tucker, joined Rifle Brigade in September, Sergeant ; C Roberts, joined K.R.R in September, Sergeant, and now in France ; A G Towell, joined Howitzer Battery in January last, Corporal ; and W McKay, joined Lincolnshires in September, Corporal.-Unfortunately, E A Piper, 1st Batt Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who joined in August, and has been out in France since October, has been officially reported as missing since April 25th, on which date the Warwicks lost a lot of men at Hill 60. To keep the employees at home in touch with those at the front the firm print for circulation amongst them from time to time a little brochure, in which the roll of honour, the casualties, and the last dates from which news was received from any of the men, are recorded. Interesting extracts from letters, and notes skilfully made up in technical phraseology, together with encouraging words of approval, encouragement, and appreciation from the proprietors, help to fill the twelve pages, which are enclosed in stout khaki covers, printed in patriotic design. The get-up is in keeping with the high standard of work turned out by Messrs Frost, and is no doubt eagerly welcomed by their representatives at the front.

WOUNDED SOLDIERS AT “ ASHLAWN.”

Ashlawn Red Cross Hospital was re-opened on Friday last week to receive wounded soldiers. About 25 arrived in the evening, and were met by the Ambulance Brigade and conveyed to the hospital. Three of them belong to the K.O.S.B and two to the Inniskillings ; the remainder to other regiments. Only three are from the Dardanelles ; the others received their injuries at Ypres. Some of them have been badly wounded.

Twelve Canadians arrived on Wednesday evening. Their wounds are not serious, and they hope to go out again soon. All the others are doing well.

Gifts for the patients at the hospital have been received from the following :—Mr Badham, Mrs Fenwick, Mr Flint, Mr Garrett, Mrs Giddons, Hon Mrs Hastings, Mrs Horton, Mrs Little, Miss Lucking, Mr Mallam, Mrs Neilson, Mr Graham Paterson, Lady Rowena Paterson, Mrs Rose, Miss Stanley, Mrs G Sumner, Mrs Saunders, Mrs Stevens, Miss Varnish, Mrs Wheeler, Mrs West, and Miss Irwin.

Surgical Instruments, from Dr Roche, Dunchurch.

The Rugby Hairdressers’ Association has promised to attend the patients every week.

Miss Buckley has kindly consented to attend three days a week for massage, and the Misses Fenwick are continuing to do all laundry work for the soldiers free of charge.

Number of patients now in hospital, 37.

SALE OF ARMY MARES FOR BREEDING.

With a view to encouraging and assisting the breeding of light horses, the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries have been authorised by the War Office to arrange for the sale of some mares which have been returned from abroad as no longer suitable for use with the Expeditionary Force, and which have been specially selected by the Board as of types suitable for breeding purposes.

The mares will be kept under the care and observation of the Board for a month after their return from abroad, and will then be sold by public auction on the express condition that they are not at any time to be exported out of the country.

Webb, George William. Died 27th Apr 1915

George William Webb’s birth was registered in the first quarter of 1885 in Dunton Bassett near Lutterworth, Leicestershire.

Picture of George William Webb from Rugby Advertiser 1st May 1915

Picture of George William Webb from Rugby Advertiser 1st May 1915

In 1891 he was aged 6 and at home with his parents William (Labourer) and Mary Ann Webb (nee Crane) in Dunton Bassett, with siblings Emma aged 7, Carrie aged 4 and Leonard aged 1.

In 1901 he was boarding with Mr and Mrs Hall at 43 Lawford Road, Rugby and was working as a Labourer at the Cement Works in Rugby.

He joined the militia of the 1st Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment (Regimental number 6548) in 1902, aged 17, having signed up for 12 years.   In 1905 his military record states he was fit for India.

However by 1911, aged 26, he was back living with his parents and younger brothers Alfred, aged 14 and Lewis, aged 10, and was working as a Bricklayers Labourer.

He married Carrie in about 1912 (name and date not verified) and had two children, one of whom was born after his death. He was working in the winding department of BTH when called up in August 1914, again into the 1st Battalion of the Leicester Regiment.  

On 19 August 1914 the Battalion moved to Cambridge and left for France landing at St Nazaire on 10 September 1914.

In the Spring of 1915 it appears George was involved in the action of Bois Grenier, which was a diversionary attack coinciding with the Battle of Loos.

On 28 April 1915 George was killed, aged 30, and is buried at

Y Farm Military Cemetery
Bois-Grenier
Departement du Nord
Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
Plot: C

Bois Grenier is a small village in the Department of the Nord, about 4 kilometres due South of Armentieres.

George William Webb’s name also appears on the Memorial Cross, Main Road, Dunton Bassett.

Dunton Bassett War Memorial

Dunton Bassett War Memorial

 

A report of George Webb’s death was published in the Rugby Advertiser on 1 May 2015 stating that Lance Corporal G Webb was killed by the bursting of a shrapnel shell in his trench on Wednesday afternoon April 28th. Death was stated as instantaneous. He served 8 years in the Army, five of which were in India and four in reserve.

Following his death his wife was delivered of his effects, listed below, and later his War and Victory Medals.

1 I Disc
2 photos, 1 purse
English money one half crown
farthing
French money 64 cents
1 watch (glass broken)
1 shilling stamp
1 fourpenny stamp

From November 1915 Carrie Webb was granted a pension of 18/6 per week for her and her two children.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM