Webb, Arthur Edward. Died 23rd Oct 1918

Arthur Edward WEBB’s birth was registered in Q3, 1896 in Rugby.  He was the son of Frederick Webb, b.c.1861 in Rugby, (d. 4 January 1947), and Fanny, née Shaw, Webb, b.c.1862 in Dunchurch, (d. 25 October 1945).  They had married on 11 June 1885 in Dunchurch when Frederick was a printer and Fanny a servant.

In 1901 Arthur was four, and the family was living, as they had in 1891, at 81 James Street, Rugby.  Arthur’s father was not at home on census night 1901, as that night he and his brother were with their widowed mother in Yardley, Worcestershire.

Arthur attended the ‘Murray School’, Rugby.

By 1911, his father, now 50, had been married for 25 years.  He was a ‘Compositor’ in the ‘Advertiser office’ and the family had moved to 16 Alexandra Road, Rugby – a six room house.  Arthur Edward, now 14, was an ‘office boy’ at a steel works; his eldest sister, Hilda Annie was 25 and was working at ‘etching BTH Works’; the next eldest, Alice Jessie was 22 and was a ‘clerk at BTH Works’; and the youngest, Elsie Newman, was 18 and a ‘Clerk in Coop Society’.  Two of the original six siblings had died before 1911.

Arthur later served an apprenticeship at Messrs. Willans & Robinson’s as a turner and fitter.  Prior to joining up, he was employed at Leicester.

Arthur apparently enlisted in November 1915, under ‘Lord Derby’s Scheme’, as indicated by an item in the Rugby Advertiser.
Lord Derby’s Recruiting Scheme, Local Enlistments under the Group System.
The following have enlisted at the Rugby Drill Hall under the Group system.  A considerable number of the men have enlisted under Reserve B for munition workers.
… Webb, Arthur Edward, 16 Alexandra Road, Rugby.[1]

Arthur would become a Private No:48241 in the 1st Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment.  Arthur’s Medal Card did not have any date for when he went to France, and he did not gain the 1914-15 Star, which both support the date he enlisted under Lord Derby’s Scheme, and confirm that this would have been after late 1915.  However, it seems likely that he was in the ‘Reserve B’ list as his work was probably involved with Munitions.  This is confirmed in a later item in the Rugby Advertiser (obituary below) which stated that he was ‘… joining up, early in May [1916] …’, and that when he was killed in October 1918, he ‘… had been in France just over a fortnight’.

1st Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment was in Fermoy, Ireland, when war broke out in August 1914.  They were mobilised with 16th Brigade and returned to England, where 6th Division concentrated near Cambridge for training.  They proceeded to France on 10 September 1914, landing at St. Nazaire.  They marched to the Aisne to reinforce the hard-pressed BEF before moving north to Flanders.  They were in action at Hooge in 1915.  On 17 November 1915 the battalion transferred to 71st Brigade, but were still in 6th Division.  In 1916 they were again in action at Battle of Flers-Courcelette on the Somme, and again in the Battle of Morval and the Battle of Le Transloy.  In 1917 they were in action at Hill 70 and Cambrai.  In 1918 they saw action in the Battle of St Quentin, the Battles of the Lys, the Advance in Flanders, the Battles of the Hindenburg Line [12 September – 12 October 1918] and the Pursuit to the Selle [prior to the Battle of the Selle (17-25 October 1918)].[2]

It seems that Arthur might only have joined the Battalion towards the middle of October 1918 and would probably have missed the actions at the end of the Hindenburg battles, namely:
The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, 29 September – 2 October 1918,
The Battle of Beaurevoir, 3 – 5 October 1918,
The Battle of Cambrai, 8 – 9 October 1918,
The Pursuit to the Selle, 9 – 12 October 1918.

The War Diary of the 1st Battalion[3] provides information on the Battalion’s positions and actions in October 1918.  There is very considerable detail of the movements in some 20 poorly legible handwritten pages, which include map references but a paucity of actual place names.  However, the general progress of the Battalion can be followed as they advanced in a north-easterly direction, some 20 miles south-east of Cambrai.

On 3 October the battalion was preparing to move to Magny-la-Fosse, where they were on 6-7 October.  By 12 October they had moved to Bohain-en-Vermandois, and were in billets there on 16 October until 19 October when they received 43 O.R.s as ‘new recruits’ – 20 were immediately sent for Lewis gun training.

Bearing in mind Arthur had only been in France for two weeks when killed, he may well have been one of those new recruits, as it would probably have taken some days to travel from the coast to join his Battalion.

The next day the Battalion seems to have moved back westward to Brancourt, and then very quickly up to St. Souplet and on to Le Quennelet, a distance of some ten miles.  The next day, 21 October, shelling was observed at Bazuel, about a mile ahead of them.  They were coming into the front line of the advance and on 22 October, four men were wounded, two by shellfire and two by rifle fire.  They prepared for an attack on Pommereuil on 23 October, and the Diary gives detailed dispositions.

By midday on 23 October, the Regimental Aid Post had already dealt with 3 Officer and 74 Other Rank casualties which, from later figures, suggests that the majority of the casualties were incurred in the initial part of the attack.

At 21.15 the Battalion was relieved.  Because of the muddy state of the road from Bazuel, the guides were delayed in reaching the Battalion at the front and the relief was not completed until the early hours.  The move back was competed at 4.15am, when tea and rations awaited the men.  At noon the Battalion moved to billets at St. Souplet.

By 25 October, the casualties suffered during operations from 20-24 October 1918 were listed.
Killed         Wounded         Missing
Officers               0                  5                     nil
O.R.s                 8                  85                    33

It seems that Arthur Webb would have been among those eight O.R.s ‘Killed in Action’ during the attack on Pommereuil.

A report in the Rugby Advertiser noted,
ANOTHER OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED IN ACTION
Much sympathy is felt for Mr. and Mrs F. Webb of 16 Alexandra Road, who received news on Sunday of the death of their only son, Pte. Edward Webb of the 1st Leicestershire Regt. The sad event has been conveyed to the lad’s parents by the Chaplain of his battalion in a sympathetic letter.  Pte. Webb who was 22 years of age, was educated at the Murray School, where he was most popular with his schoolmates.  He served an apprenticeship at Messrs. Willans & Robinson’s as a turner and fitter.  Prior to joining up, early in May, he was employed at Leicester.  He had been in France just over a fortnight.  His chum, Pte. Percy Tyers,[4] of Leicester (who was also apprenticed at Messrs. Willans & Robinson’s) was killed a week previously.[5]

In the same issue of the Rugby Advertiser, the family posted an ‘Acknowledgement’,
MR and MRS. F. WEBB and DAUGHTERS, of 16 Alexandra Road, wish to thank all Friends who have shown sympathy with them, and sent Letters of Condolence in their sad bereavement in the loss of their only son, killed in action.

Arthur was killed in action, aged 22, on 23 October 1918 and was buried in grave ref: I. B. 4., at St Souplet British Cemetery, very near to the Battalion Headquarters for the action on 23 October.  When his temporary cross was replaced with a memorial headstone, the family had the following inscription engraved on it – ‘REUNION OUR ABIDING HOPE’.

St. Souplet is a village about 6 kilometres south of Le Cateau, which is a small town approximately 20 kilometres south-east of Cambrai.  St. Souplet village was captured by the American 30th Division on the 10 October 1918.  The American troops made a cemetery of 371 American and seven British graves on the South-West side of the village, on the road to Vaux-Andigny.  A smaller British cemetery was made alongside.  The American graves were removed after the Armistice and the seven British graves were moved into the British cemetery.  Further British graves were brought in from the surrounding battlefields.

Because of the Battalion’s location, it is likely that Arthur was buried in the cemetery soon after his death, and was not one of those moved to the cemetery later.  Certainly his position in the central ‘Plot I’ suggests that he was one of the first to be buried there.  There is also no record on the CWGC site of him being ‘concentrated’ from any of the other cemeteries, most of which contained burials from much earlier in the advance, and which are fully documented.

Arthur Edward WEBB’s Medal Card showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.  He is also commemorated on a pillar of the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Arthur Edward WEBB was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, August 2018.

[1]      https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2015/11/27/27th-nov-1915-lord-derbys-scheme/, and Rugby Advertiser, 27 November 1915.

[2]      Edited from: https://wartimememoriesproject.com/greatwar/allied/battalion.php?pid=4905.

[3]      UK, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, Leicestershire Regiment, 6th Division, Piece 1622/1-5: 71 Infantry Brigade: 1 Battalion Leicestershire Regiment (1918 Jan – 1919 Apr).

[4]      This was Private TYERS, H. P., No: 48242, who died on 10 October 1918; he was buried at Tincourt New British Cemetery, some 10 miles west of the 1st Leicester’s positions on 3 October.  It is likely that he had been wounded and evacuated to one of the Casualty Clearing Stations located at Tincourt.

[5]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 16 November 1918.

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14th Sep 1918. Rugby Volunteers Complimented

RUGBY VOLUNTEERS COMPLIMENTED.

The Rugby (“ D ”) Company. 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment still continue to make rapid progress, and was warmly complimented by the new District Army Inspecting Officer, Lieut-Col Adrian Wayte. King’s Own Regiment, after an inspection on Sunday. Col Wayte, who was accompanied by the Battalion Commanding Officer, Lieut-Col F F Johnstone, inspected the Company in platoon in the various branches of training, and said he was very pleased with what he had seen. He added that he had never seen a Volunteer unit turned out so well as the Rugby Company, and it would be a great pleasure for him to send in a favourable report with regard to their progress.

Lieut-Col Johnstone distributed three of the silver spoons offered for the six highest individual scorers at the recent Battalion shooting competition at Wedgnock for the Lincoln-Chandler Cup. The recipients were : Sergt Murray, Corpl Seymour (who made a “ possible ” at the 200 yards range), and Pte Edwards. Col Johnstone congratulated the Company on having three such good shots in their ranks, and he expressed the hope that they would win the cup next year.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lance-Corpl George John Plant, M.M, Coldstream Guards, formerly of Pailton, died of wounds on Aug 27.

Sergt F T Gambrell, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, of 174 Cambridge Street, who was taken prisoner during the German offensive in March last, has been repatriated, and is now in hospital in London, where his wounds are being treated. A bullet went in the right side of his hip, and his thigh was broken. Before joining the Army he worked in the Winding Department at the B.T.H.

A commission in the Regular Forces (3rd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry) has been obtained by Mr T Eaton-Shore, who has been on active service since June, 1915, and will join his regiment at Dover. He is a son of the late Mr James Eaton-Shore, formerly works manager at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Engineering Works.

Mr H Fretter, of Kilsby Station, has secured a commission in the Regular Forces (King’s Royal Rifles). For two years and three months he was with the Rifle Brigade in France, and was in the Battles of Ypres (1915), Somme (1916), and Cambrai (1917). It was after the last engagement that he was recommended for a commission.

Rifleman Horace Wilson, London Regiment, late of the K.R.R, son of Mrs Wilson, 41 Bridget Street, has been seriously wounded in France. He has lost his right leg and his left arm has been badly fractured. He joined the Army in September, 1914, and has served three years in France. He was formerly employed by the B.T.H.

Pte H E Haddon, Coldstream Guards (39), was killed in action on August 28th. He was a native of New Bilton, where he worked for a time as a bricklayer. His wife and four children reside at Yardley, Birmingham.

Pte Thomas Goodyer, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, a native of Barby, was killed in action on August 31st. He was 19 years of age, and joined the Army twelve months ago, previous to which he was employed as a window cleaner in Rugby. He had been in France five months.

Sapper T H Overton, Welsh Field Company, brother of Mrs R Bubb, Cambridge St., is down with dysentery in Egypt.

Mrs Bax, of 21 Oliver Street, Rugby, has received news that her youngest son, Stanley Bax (29371), 1st Battalion Somerset Light Infantry, has been wounded in the left hand, and is now in hospital at Sheffield.

The names of Sir Michael Lakin, Bart, D.L, J.P. of the Warwickshire Territorial Force Association, and Mr J Hartwell, Remount Depot, Rugby, have been brought to the notice of the Secretary of State for War for valuable services rendered in connection with the War.

Pte A Backler, R.W.R, and Pte S A Orland, Machine Gun Corps, both of Rugby, have been taken prisoners by the Germans.

Lance-Corpl G Biddels, Yeomanry, Rugby, has been awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for distinguished and gallant services rendered on the occasion of the destruction or damage by enemy action of hospital ships, transports, and storeships.

Several months ago we recorded the fact that Sergt J Webb, 1st Warwicks, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, had been awarded the D.C.M. The official account of the action for which this distinction was awarded has now been published as under :—For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty in handling his platoon. While trying to establish posts in a wood, he was twice surrounded, and it was only by his courage and skill that enabled the platoon to fight their way back. Later, during an attack, he again displayed the greatest courage and ability, penetrating far into the enemy’s position, and when forced to withdraw bringing back prisoners.

An intimation has been received by Mr & Mrs Williams, of 1 Market Street, Rugby, from the War Office, stating that their son, Harry Cecil Williams, of the 1st Royal West Kent Regiment, who was reported missing on October 26th last, is now believed to have been killed in action on that date.

COVENTRY APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

There were only three Rugby cases before this Tribunal on Wednesday, when there were present : Messrs H W Wale (chairman), K Rotherham, P G Lovett , S J Dicksee. and W Johnson, jun. Mr T Meredith was the National Service representative.

George Francis Harris (41, C3), licensed victualler, Newbold-on-Avon, applied for exemption.—Mr Meredith explained that this case was adjourned at Easter for the man to get work of national importance, but nothing further had been heard of the this.—Applicant stated that he was now working as a semi-skilled mechanic at Willans & Robinson a and a national utility order to cover this work was made for six months.

Arthur John Tapley (28, Grade 3), watchman, 35 King Edward Road, Rugby, appealed against the decision of the Rugby Rural Tribunal to exempt him till October 15th on condition that he engaged in agriculture. He said he was now a watchman at the B.T.H, and when he took up this work he released an ex-soldier for productive work.—The Chairman : Are you a skilled gardener ? Tapley : I am an expert.—The Chairman : Obviously a skilled gardener in this phase of the country’s history cannot be allowed to look after a gate, which in all probability could very well look after itself.—Tapley then save his reasons for objecting to the decision of the Lower Tribunal, and criticised a newspaper report of the proceedings before that body.—The Chairman : Now, do not make any allegations, against the Press. They are very long-suffering people and my experience of the press representatives is that they are uniformly fair. They do not report things which people do not say, neither do they, as some people allege, put inferences into people’s mouths which they do not intend.—A national utility order was made, Tapley’s services to be used for food production in his own trade.

The National Service representative appealed against the Urban Tribunal’s decision in the case of Philip Singer (38), tailor, 199 Railway Terrace.—Mr Meredith said the appeal was against the adjournment of this case on a technical legal point, which, he contended, was not arguable before that Court. Mr Eaden might argue that because his client was born in Ukrania or Lithuania he was not amenable to the Military Service Acts. Ukrania might not be a part of Russia. but that was a point which must be argued before a Court of Summary Jurisdiction. Under the convention made with the Allied States in July, 1917, Russian subjects were given the option of returning to their own country, or coming under the operation of the Military Service Act. Therefore, leaving all legal arguments out, he did not care whether the man came from Lithuania, Ukrania, or the moon ; if he had elected to reside in this country and to accept all the advantages of the country in times at peace, this carried an obligation to defend the country against its enemies in times of war.—Mr Eaden submitted that the duties of that Tribunal laid within limited bounds, and were restricted to the Military Service Acts, and in this case the Allied Countries Convention Act, under which it was contended his client was liable. As a matter of fact, the whole point as to whether this man, in company with 45 or 47 other men, similarly situated, came within this Act, was sub judice, and the test case on which they all depended had been adjourned till after the long vacation. He contended that at present the Ttibunal had no jurisdiction in this matter, but immediately the test case was settled in the High Court they would know how to deal with this case on its merits.—The Tribunal unanimously upheld the contention of Mr Meredith, and refused to sanction an appeal to the Central Tribunal.—Singer was given two months’ calling-up notice to enable him to complete the orders he has on hand.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
CASUALTY.—Mrs J Seymour has received news that her husband, Corpl J Seymour, of the 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade, is wounded and lying seriously ill with enteric fever at No. 9 Clearing Station, Italy.

NAPTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs George Alsop received the sad news this week that their only son, Wilfred Alsop, Berks Regt., was killed in France on August 21st. He was only 19, and had just returned to France after being previously wounded. Much sympathy is felt with Mr & Mrs Alsop.—Gunner J Makepeace and Pte W Griffin have both been gassed, and are now in hospital.—Pte Leonard Sheasby is wounded.

STOCKTON.
Wilfred Warner, who is in Italy, has had the unpleasant experience of being buried by a shell, which exploded in the trench. He was dug out after being a few minutes under ground, and was fortunate to escape with no worse injury than a sprained back.—William Bicknell has been awarded the Military Medal for good work in a raid, when about 400 Austrians were captured and a number of mules and horses.—Cyril Sheasby, who has been missing since March 21st, has been posted as killed on that date. He was a well-developed lad of 18 years.

MINISTRY OF FOOD.

NEXT ISSUE OF RATION BOOKS.

The attention of the Public is particularly drawn to the necessity of filling in the Green Reference Leaf at the end of the present Ration Book. Particular attention should be paid to the following five points :—

(1.) That the name and address of the holder and the holder’s signature is duly filled in.

(2.) If the holder is in possession of a Supplementary Ration Book the number must be inserted.

(3.) The serial number given on the front cover of the present Ration Book MUST BE FILLED IN.

(4.) If the holder has changed his or her address since the present book was issued, the space in the bottom left-hand corner of the reference leaf must be filled in and duly signed.

(5.) In the case of children under 18 years of age the date of birth and occupation or school must be inserted.

When the above directions have been complied with the reference leaf may be handed over the counter at the nearest POST OFFICE. If returned by post direct to your Local Food Office, the envelope must hear a 1½d. stamp. ON NO ACCOUNT MUST A REFERENCE LEAF BE PLACED IN A PILLAR BOX OR POST OFFICE LETTER BOX. Unless your local Food Office receive this reference leaf ON OR REFORE SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21st, there is a grave possibility of your not receiving a New Ration Book, which would mean you would be unable to purchase rationed foods when the present Ration Book expires. In the case of households all reference leaves should be pinned together before handing them in. If in doubt what to do, enquire at your Local Food Office at once.

DIVISIONAL FOOD COMMISSIONER
(North Midland Division),
Westminster Buildings,
Parliament Street, Nottingham.

The Rugby Town V.A.D. Hospital, “ Te-Hira.”
This hospital re-opened on Monday, September 9th, with its full complement of 44 patients. We shall be very grateful for gifts of any kind, and we especially want a gramophone.  The following friends have already sent us welcome presents, for which we thank them :—Mrs Higginbotham, Mrs C Bluemel, Bourton parish, and Leamington Hastings parish.
CAMILE PRIOR (Quartermaster).

DEATHS.

ALSOP.—In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother, Pte. WIFRED ALSOP, Royal Berks. Regt. killed in action on August 21, 1918 ; aged 20.
“ A faithful son, a loving brother,
One of the best toward his mother ;
He nobly answered his country’s call,
He gave his young life for one and all.”
—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, and Sisters.

ALSOP.—In loving memory of our dear nephew, Pte. W. E. ALSOP, Napton, who was killed in action “ somewhere in France ” on August 21, 1918 ; aged 20.
“ No one knows the silent heartache,
Only those can tell
Who have lost a loved one
Without saying ‘ Farewell.’
We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand,
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in that Better Land.”
—From his loving Aunt and Uncle and dear Cousin Will in Italy.

GOODYER.—In ever-loving memory of my dearest and eldest son.,Pte. THOMAS H. GOODYER, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in action “somewhere in France ” on August 31, 1918 ; aged 19 years.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but our aching hearts can tell.”
“ Peace, perfect peace.”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

HADDON.—Killed in action on August 28th, Pte. H. E. HADDON, Coldstream Guards, aged 39, the dearly beloved husband of Florence Haddon, Church Road, Yardley.
“ Only those who have lost a loved one
Know the bitterness of ‘ Gone’ ”
—Deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and dear Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Pte. J. W. BARNETT, 6399 1/24th Queen’s London Regiment, who fell in action in France on September 11, 1916.
“ Not dead to us who love him still,
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory still,
And will for evermore.”
—From his loving Wife, Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

COLING.—In loving memory of Gunner JOHN THOMAS COLING, R.F.A., the beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. John Coling, Grandborough, who died of wounds at Rouen on September 10, 1916.
“ Anchored by love, death cannot sever ;
Sadly we miss thee, and will for ever.
Too far away thy grave to see,
But not too far to think of thee.”

PEARCE.—In loving memory of Gunner H. C. PEARCE, the beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, Dunchurch, who was killed in action on September 11, 1917.
“ We do not forget him, nor do we intend ;
We think of him daily, and will to the end.
We miss him and mourn him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the memory of days that have been.”
—Not forgotten by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

VEARS.—Killed in action in France on September 11, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest grandson of Mrs. F. Draper, Long Buckby ; aged 21 years.
“ Not dead to us, we love him still ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory still,
And will for evermore.”
—From Grandma, Aunts and Uncles.

20th Apr 1918. Low-Flying Aeroplanes

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. . . . .LOW-FLYING AEROPLANES.

Mr F E Hands reminded the Council that at an inquest held on an airman killed at Rugby recently the jury protested against the low flying which took place and he thought a similar protest should go from the Council. On the morning before the accident he saw a pony start to run away twice owing to an airman flying so close to the tops of the houses.—Mr Loverock supported, and said he saw the airman in question come down. He was flying very low, and another aeroplane which accompanied him almost struck the top of some cottages in Temple Street. He had also seen an aeroplane fly between two houses at a lower level than the roofs.—Mr Walker corroborated this, and said the incident caused a great deal of alarm amongst some ladies.—It was decided to write to the Commanding Officer on the matter.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.
[Note: these reports were printed on the edge of the page and the reproduction is very feint.]

Lieut the Hon J H P Verney, Lancers, the only son of lord Willoughby de Broke, has been wounded.

Pte Alfred William Elson, Hampshire Regt, son of Mrs Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, died from wounds received in action on April 6th. Prior to the war he was employed in the winding department of the B.T.H.

Corpl T J Smith, of the Royal Field Artillery, who was formerly employed in the Main Drawing Office of the B.T.H, died from wounds on March 22nd.

Pte Douglas Hay, York & Lancashire Regt, son of[?] Mrs Hay, 102 Murray Road, was killed in action March 18th.

Second-Lieut Sidney Torrance, Lancashire [?] son of Mr W J Torrance, Warwick Street, has been severely wounded in the head and ankle during recent heavy fighting.

Sapper E Wagstaffe, Royal Engineers, an [?] in the Tool Room at the B.T.H, was killed on [?] April 6th.

Mr & Mrs J G Wilson, of 52 York Street, have received a telegram from the War Office, saying that their son, R V Wilson (O.L), Second-Lieutenant 2/7[?] Royal Warwicks (late H.A.C), had died of wounds on the April 18th. No further confirmation has yet been received.

News has reached Mr J P Lennon, [?] Rugby, that his eldest son, E P Lennon, [?] in France. He was totally blind for several days, [?] has been sent to a hospital behind the lines. [?] information says that he is now regaining his sight, and is recovering very favourably.

A BELATED COMMISSION.

A letter found in the possession of Sapper W H Linnell, jun, Pioneer Battalion, King’s [?] Regiment, a partner in the firm of Messrs Linnell [?], Rugby, whose death from wounds received in action was recorded last week, has been forwarded to his [?] by the matron of the hospital. This was evidently [?] shortly before he was wounded, and that he [?] on the previous day had been informed [?] Colonel that he was recommending him for a commission as his work had been so very satisfactory. Mr. Linnell, who was an Old Laurentian and Old Rugbian. [?] until he joined the Colours mainly responsible for management of the business. He was vice-chairman of the Rugby Master Builders’ Association and [?] of the Rugby Building Society.

HILLMORTON.
MRS RATHBONE (Hillmorton) received a telegram from the War Office on March 30th, saying that her son, Lieut G P Rathbone, North Staffs Regiment, was reported missing on March 21st, and has not heard any more news of him at present. He has not been officially reported killed, as stated in last week’s edition.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.
PTE HARRY KERRY, of the 2nd Royal Berkshire Regiment, third son of Mr & Mrs Amos Kerby, has been severely wounded in the left forearm, but is progressing favourably. He has served two years in France.

BRANDON.
WOUNDED.—Pte G Saunders, who for several years was manager at the Royal Oak, has been badly wounded. Although much over age, he volunteered for service, and has been in action on many occasions. This is the second time he has been wounded.

WOLSTON.
CORPL T WEBB, son of Mr & Mrs Charles Webb, Wolston, has now returned to Wolston after serving upwards of three year on active service. He joined the 1/7/ Worcesters in 1914, and was sent out to France on January 4, 1915. He went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle in 1915, and in the battle of fleur Beixin May of the same year was wounded in the left arm. He was soon again on active service at the battle of Armentieres in September. His next big battle was at the Somme in 1916, at Contamassion, where, after fighting hard for four days, he had two fingers on his left hand broken, and was sent to England. Regaining convalescence, he again went into the firing line; but at the battle of Passendale ridge was wounded by shrapnel. He had a finger partly blown off and two broken, whilst his hand was also badly smashed. Arriving in England, he was a patient at a Manchester hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the finger. He has now received his discharge, and undoubtedly richly deserves it after the many vicissitudes he has gone through. Corpl Webb was one of the first men in the village to volunteer, and he is somewhat sad at the thought that several of his friends who joined up with him are killed. He says that one of the chief grievances of the men at the front is the single slackers at home in our large towns, who let the married men go out to fight while they hide in munition factories. He believes that we should not worry over our recent reverses, but place our confidence in our soldiers, who fight magnificently, and will eventually get the upper hand. Pte W Webb, a brother of the above, has also been crippled.

DUNCHURCH.
PRISONER OF WAR FUND.—There is being a house-to-house collection on behalf of the Prisoners of War Fund in Dunchurch and Thurlaston. Pte G Richardson, Mill Street, Dunchurch, who offered his services to take the envelopes round to all the houses, was once a prisoner of war, but has got his discharge after serving several years in the Army, his eyes being affected. When the envelopes were collected they were found to contain the large sum of £63, and there are several more to come in.

THE POTATO POSITION.
INCREASED ACREAGE PROBABLE THIS YEAR.

Already the appeal which Mr Lloyd George issued three weeks ago to the farmers of Great Britain to largely increase the acreage of potatoes is having its effect in many counties. The latest reports of the Commissioners of the Food Production Department contain numerous evidences of this fact.

The Council of the Central and Associated Chambers of Agriculture have unanimously passed a resolution “ urging on all farmers the paramount necessity of increasing the acreage of potatoes to at least the million acres appealed for by the Prime Minister.” Last year the farmer of England and Wales and Scotland grew no less than 655,704 acres of potatoes—a record planting and an increase of 97,637 acres over the area of 1916, representing an additional supply of 1,400,000 tons of potatoes. These results, achieved despite a shortage of labour and other adverse circumstances, go far to justify the faith of the Prime Minister that the British farmer will once more accomplish the impossible.

So far as can be ascertained at the moment, there already seems likely to be slight increase in the acreage both in England and Wales and in Scotland. Indeed, it may very well turn out that already we have nearly 600,000 acres of potatoes planted this year, or ready for planting, in England and Wales, and almost 170,000 acres in Scotland. But even if this year’s yields are as good as last year’s, it is extremely improbable that this acreage will supply all our requirements for 1918. Accordingly the Government asks the farmer to do his best to add another 230,000 acres, and so reach the million-acre mark which, in combination with other crops, should make the country absolutely safe so far as its food supply is concerned.

The appeal of Mr Lloyd George appeared in the Press on March 18th. It would hardly be surprising if the response of the farmers was not general and immediate. Outside one or two counties potato growing conditions is attended with definite amount of risk ; the yield is very uncertain ; there is the possibility of disease, and proper cultivation entails a good deal of extra labour, whereas labour just now is scarce on the countryside. Moreover, many farmers have had an unfortunate experience with their 1917 potato crop owing to the difficulties of transport and of marketing.

No one knowing all the facts would blame the agriculturist for thinking hard before he planted an additional acreage of potatoes without some sort of guarantee as to their sale when grown, and this guarantee has been given in the fixing of minimum prices.

A WELCOME OFFER.

An unusual request was received by the Rugby Fool Control Committee at their meeting on Thursday, when a lady wrote stating that she had the chance of purchasing a quantity of cheese, but only if she bought about ton, and she asked for permission to buy this. There were 140 members in her household, and if she obtained the cheese and the committee would allow her to retain so much as they thought was fair, she would be prepared to dispose of the remainder to the grocers in the town.—The Chairman : Tons of Cheese ! I have not seen a quarter of a pound for a long time. It seems ridiculous that a private individual should have the chance of buying tons of cheese, when a good many of us have not seen any for some time.—Mr Humphrey did not think it was fair to allow this when other people were only having half-a-pound a month.—Mr Cooke thought if there was so much cheese about Lord Rhondda should take it over, so that it could be distributed more equitably.—Mr Gay suggested that the permit should be given, and that the lady should be allowed to keep enough to last her for a certain period, and that at the end of that time they would appreciate it if she could get them some more (laughter).—The permit given, the lady to surrender 75 per cent. for distribution amongst local retailers.

DEATHS.

BATES.—Killed in Action on March 31st, Lance-Corpl. THOMAS BATES, of 1st Warwicks, only son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Bates, Ryton-on-Dunsmore ; aged 27 years.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching heart can know.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving Mother, Father and Sisters.

CHAMBERS.—Pte. C. CHAMBERS, killed in action on March 21, 1918, aged 31 years, son of William and Amy Chambers, Abbotts Farm, Hillmorton.—“ Thy will be done.”

CHAMBERS.—Sergt. F. CHAMBERS, died of wounds in France on April 4, 1918, aged 24 years, beloved husband of Amy Chambers, Hillmorton Paddox.—“ Thy will be done.”

HARDMAN.—Gunner C. H. HARDMAN, the dearly beloved husband of Mrs. C. H. Hardman, 57 Rugby Road, Leamington, killed in action on March 21, 1918 ; aged 26 years.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—Sadly missed and deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and Children.

HARDMAN.—In loving memory of our son, Gunner C. H. HARDMAN, who was killed in action in France on March 21, 1918.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him ;
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Sisters & Brothers.

HODGES.—Killed in action on March 26th, Sapper SIDNEY J. J. HODGES, of the Royal Engineers, beloved and youngest son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Hodges, of 82 Claremont Road.

MATTHEWS.—Rifleman JOHN MATTHEWS, 3rd Rifle Brigade, died of wounds in hospital in France on March 25th, beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. William Matthews, Churchover, aged 23 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

DRAGE.—In loving memory of Pte. CHARLES HERBERT DRAGE, the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. C. Drage, of Yelvertoft ; killed in action in Egypt, April 19, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ Death can hide him, but not divide ;
Thou art but on Christ’s other side.
Thou with Christ, and Christ with us,
So together still are we.”
—From his ever-loving Mother, Father & Brother.

GUPWELL.—Also our dear brother, Pte. BENJAMIN GUPWELL, who died of wounds in France, April 20th, 1917.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—From his loving Sister and Brother.

 

23rd Feb 1918. Local Elections Postponed

LOCAL ELECTIONS POSTPONED.
A HINT ON THE SAVING OF PAPER.

A memorandum issued by the Local Government Board to local authorities points out that the Parliament and Local Elections (No. 2) Act which received the Royal Assent last November, provides that the next statutory elections of county and borough councillors, district councillors, guardians, and parish councillors, which would ordinarily take place in March and April, shall be postponed, or in the case of elections already postponed under previous Acts further postponed for a year, and that accordingly the term of office of the existing councillors and guardians shall be extended by one year.

Having regard to the importance of economy in paper, it is desirable that local authorities in any notices, &c, which are issued by them should use as little paper as possible by, for instance, having the matter printed on both sides of a sheet and in as small a type as is convenient. Small envelopes should also be used whenever practicable.

THE DISPOSAL OF SURPLUS PRODUCE.—A Fruit and Vegetable Collecting Society has recently been formed in the county for assisting small growers to dispose of their surplus garden produce. In connection with this local branches or depots will be formed in various parts of the county, and it is hoped that a branch will be started for the Rugby Rural District. Each branch depot will have to employ a local manager, whose duty will be to collect, pack, market, and consign the produce, and a minimum profit of 15 per cent. will be aimed at in all transactions. The nett profits will be used first to pay dividend on the share capital of the society and a bonus will be paid to the members in proportion to the amount of business done through the society. A general manager will be appointed by the County Society to assist local branches with advice or by finding markets for produce.

THE TEMPORARY MARGARINE RATIONING SCHEME.
EXTENSION DECIDED UPON.

At a meeting of the Joint Urban and Rural Food Control Committees, on Monday, Mrs Dewar asked if the period of the temporary margarine rationing scheme would be extended ?—Mr F M Burton replied that when they fixed the period of the temporary scheme at four weeks they had hoped that by the end of that time the permanent scheme would be in operation. Unfortunately, however, this would not be the case, and he had discussed the matter with Mr Fellows, as a result of which asked for power to have a further supply of coupons printed. These would be sent round to the tradesmen, who would issue them to the people when they lodged their last coupons with them. He thought it would take a month or six weeks to get the scheme in force.—This was agreed to.

SUGAR FOR JAM.
SAVING IS NOT HOARDING.

The Director of Sugar Distribution, on behalf of the Food Controller, wishes it to be understood that sugar proved to have been saved from weekly rations will not be regarded as hoarded, and that if the purpose of this saving is for jam-making it is immaterial whether the fruit to be preserved is grown or purchased by the preserver.

COVENTRY’S TANK TOTAL.—The official return of Coventry Tank Week is £1,370,236, representing £10 10s 9d per head of the census population of 130,000. A feature of the week’s subscription is the huge issue of 15s 6d certificates through the Post Office. There were 155,907 transactions, representing £120,827. The Bank of England section of the Tank took £775,265.

HUNTING SEASON TO CLOSE EARLY.

At a largely attended meeting of the M.F.H Association, held at Tattersall’s, Knightsbridge, London, on Thursday, February 14th, it was unanimously resolved :— “ That owing to the short supply of cereals and to assist in economising the stock of provender in the country, this meeting of the Masters of Foxhounds’ Association has voluntarily agreed to stop hunting on Saturday, March 2nd, for this season.”

SUMMER TIME TO BE FIVE WEEKS LONGER.

Summer-time (putting the clock on an hour) is to begin on Sunday, March 24, a fortnight earlier than last year, and to end on September 29, three weeks later than last year.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The parents of Rifleman Leonard Thompson, Rifle Brigade, who reside at 12 Union Street, have received official intimation that their son, who has been missing since May 3rd last, is now presumed to have been killed on that date. He was only 19 years of age, and was an old St Matthew’s boy.

Mr R E Driver, 137 Newbold Road, has received official notice from the War Office that his son, J C Driver, Air Mechanic, Royal Flying Corps, who has been missing since December 31st, is now believed drowned on the occasion of the sinking of the Osmanieh in the Eastern Mediterranean. Before joining up he was employed in the L & N-W Railway Loco Department, and was a general favourite with his shopmates. He was an old Elborow boy.

BRANDON.

PTE F BLACKMAN WINS MILITARY MEDAL.—Pte F Blackman (of the 29th Division, Essex Regiment) has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct and devotion to duty in the field on the 20th-22nd November, 1917. His name and deeds have been entered in the records of the 29th Division. Pte Blackman is a son-in-law of Mr Horace Amos, of Brandon, and for several years was in the gardens at Brandon Hall. He was wounded twice and gassed once in 1917. He won his present distinction for running with messages through streets infested with snipers, and nor giving in until absolutely exhausted, and thereby greatly assisting the advance. His wife and son are still residing at Brandon.

NORTH KILWORTH.
GERMAN PRISONERS.—About 40 German prisoners arrived here on Tuesday night, and were located in commodious premises in the village secured for the purpose. They are to be utilised in ploughing and agriculture, having been specially selected. They are a small type of men, and comprise Germans, Prussians, and Bavarians. Mr H B Finch (Lutterworth) is in control of the agricultural arrangements for the breaking up of the land and supply of the horses, &c.

CHURCHOVER.
A MEMORIAL SERVICE was held at the Parish Church on Thursday evening, February 14th, for Sergt John Webb, R.B, who died in German East Africa from enteric fever. The service was conducted by the Rev L G Berrington, and there was a good congregation. Hymns 537 and 716 were sung. On Sunday evening the Rector preached a very impressive sermon, in which he referred to Sergt Webb. Mr & Mrs W Webb have received the usual telegram from the Secretary of State expressing the sympathy of his Majesty and the Queen.

IN MEMORIAM

PHILLIPS.—In loving memory of ERIC SUTHERLAND PHILLIPS, Captain, 8th Battalion Border Regiment, eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. J. A. Phillips, St. Aubyn, Hillmorton Road, who died of wounds received in action in France on February 21, 1917 ; aged 22.
“ There laid the world away ; poured out the red
Sweet wine of youth ; gave up on the years to be
Of work and joy, and that unhoped serene,
That men call age ; and those that would have been,
Their sons, they gave, their immortality.”

 

16th Feb 1918. Tank Bank at Coventry

TANK BANK AT COVENTRY.

The Coventry Tank Bank was opened on Monday by the Mayor, who was accompanied by the Mayoress, Lord and Lady Aylesford, Lord Leigh, and large a number of representatives of commercial and Labour, interests. Before the Tank arrived the local bond subscription amounted to over £1,000,000, and the new announcements after Monday’s ceremony included the contributions of Courtaulds, Ltd, £100,000 ; the Mayor, £5,000 ; Lord Aylesford, £3,000 ; Lady Aylesford, £1,000 ; and Lord Leigh, £l,000.

Corpl Hutt, the Coventry man who recently received the V.C. appeared on the Tank, and handed the cheque for the citizens’ gift of £l,000, made in recognition of his bravery, to the Tank bank.

The Tank Bank results continue to be very satisfactory. Some big investments were announced on Tuesday, and more are expected.

Employees and workpeople are showing a gratifying realisation of the need to act generously. Coventry Ordnance employees, for instance, invested £33,300.

Farmers’ Day on Tuesday realised £107,303. Thus the opening two days of the Tank Bank produced £509,303.

Wednesday was Women’s Day. The opening ceremony was gracefully performed by the Mayoress.

The Earl of Denbigh, who appeared in uniform as a Colonel of the British Army, was one of the speakers. He spoke with experience of actual warfare upon the menace which faces this country if a peace of “ shreds and patches ” is arrived at.

The figures for the week up to Thursday are :—
Monday . . . . . . . . . £402,000
Tuesday . . . . . . . . . .£107,303
Wednesday . . . . . . . £100,390
Thursday . . . . . . . .. . .£72,038

Total for the four days . . £681,731

FRESH VEGETABLES FOR THE FLEET !

The following committee has been formed to help supply H.M. Navy with fruit and vegetables : —Mrs Brooke, Mr Burdekin (hon treasurer), Mrs Dickinson, Mr Gough, Mr A R Taylor, Mrs Paramore, Miss K Whitelaw, and Mrs H C Bradby (hon secretary).

Admiral Beatty writes that fresh vegetables have done much to maintain the health of the Fleet.

Contributions urgently required. Fruit and vegetables may be sent to the old Council Chamber, Windmill Lane (kindly lent by the Rugby Urban District Council), every Monday, between 10 a.m and 6 p.m, beginning February 18th. If contributors are unable to send their fruit and vegetables they should send a postcard to Mr Gough, Eastlands School, Clifton Road, and he will let his boys call for them weekly. Contributions of money may be sent to Mr H P Burdekin, Dalkeith Avenue, Bilton.

CONSCIENCE WEEK FOR HOARDERS.

During the present week all persons who think they have excessive supplies of food are requested to furnish details to the Local Food Committee. A number of enquiries have already been made at the Rugby Food Office, and in each case the persons have been advised to submit a list of their stock to the committee, several of these have been received but in no case was the quantity excessive.

PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS OR MONEY.

Previous to Christmas it was given that it was advisable to money instead of parcels of food to soldiers at the front because it had been made possible for them to purchase goods at their canteens at cheaper rates than they could be procured at home ; and, furthermore, the risk of damage or loss was not so great, and it lessened the strain on the transport service. A letter has come to hand from a trooper in the Warwickshire yeomanry, now in Palestine, which shows that the question is affected by the circumstances and locality in which the troops are situated. He writes :—

“ We have come down for a rest, and have received a quantity of mails, letters, papers and parcels, including one of your Christmas parcels. The cake and plum pudding were A1, and we enjoyed them very much indeed ; also the mince pies. Unfortunately some these were soaked owing to the heavy rain, but enough were eatable to remind us that there were still such things. I was sorry to see a letter in the Advertiser, saying that we prefer money ; but I can tell you that nothing pleases us out here more than to receive something from home, and I think it a great shame to infer that we do not appreciate a parcel from home. If these people could see us when the mail arrives I feel sure that their opinion would alter. . Of course, there are some fortunate people who are at the bases and get good food issued, but are never certain, and are frequently on bully and biscuit. It is then that your parcels are doubly appreciated. If things are very short, then we would not mind going without, and would do without rather than take everything from home.”

FATAL ACCIDENT TO LIEUT. F. G. SMITH, R.F.C.

The funeral, with full military honours, of Lieut F G Smith, R.F.C, took place on Wednesday at Coventry. This promising young officer, a former resident of Rugby, met with a fatal accident while flying on February 8th. Lieut Smith was educated at Rugby School, and Dr David (headmaster of Rugby) with Canon Robinson (Coventry), conducted the Funeral Service. Owing to his widespread popularity, much sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Henry Smith. Previous to going to Rugby School he passed by County Scholarship from St. Matthew’s to the Lower School.

CHURCHOVER.

Quite a gloom was cast over this village on Tuesday when the sad news was received that Sergt J Webb had died of enteric fever in German East Africa. Sergt Webb belonged to the Rifle Brigade and had seen a lot of hard fighting in France, where he went on 1915. He was badly wounded, and had to undergo several operations, as a shrapnel had to be taken from his stomach. But he made a splendid recovery, and after a rest was called upon once more for duty, this time in German East Africa, where he helped to drive the Germans into Portuguese territory. Here he was promoted to acting Sergt-Major, and was attached to the King’s African Rifles to train natives. Prior to the war he was under-gamekeeper for Mr Leo Bonn, of Newbold Revel.

MARTON.

SOLDIER HONOURED.—Corpl H H Seeley, Signal Section, R.E, has been awarded the Mons Ribbon in France.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

THE LATE LANCE-CORPL. WM RAVEN.— Since the official report of the death of Lance-Corpl Wm F Raven, letters have come to hand from his Regimental officer and comrades. Capt A Loader Hall, the officer commanding, writes that he was his own personal runner, and was a man for whom he had the greatest admiration, and he finishes thus : “ This letter is, I am afraid, only a poor appreciation of one of the finest men I have ever had in my Company.” Lieut Burton G Scrase states that his memory “ will live for ever in the minds of all who knew him,” and adds this testimony, “ I have no hesitation in saying that he has never once failed to do his duty as a soldier.” The Chaplain (Rev G C R Cooke) says that was very highly thought of also as a religious man. He was killed instantly by a bullet through the head, so he would not have suffered and I am quite sure he was ready and prepared. L-Corpl Raven’s chum, Pte A Hutton, in returning his Bible to his friends, says he read it every night before going to rest, and used to take pride in doing so.

GEORGE WINDSOR, PRISONER OF WAR.—Good news continues to be received by his parents, Mr and Mrs H Windsor, from Pte George Windsor (R.W), who has been a prisoner of war in Germany since May 3, 1917. He is now located at Gustrow in Mecklenburg. In a recent letter he say: “ I had quite a surprise packet last week. The officer I was servant to in France was wounded and captured the same day as I was, and is in a camp in Germany a prisoner war. He has found out where I am and has sent me 100 marks, German money, to the value about £3 10s English money.”

DUNCHURCH.

DANCE.—On Saturday evening a very successful dance was held at the Village Hall in aid of the Red Cross Hospital, Bilton, and amongst the company was a good number of wounded soldiers, who remained till about eight o’clock. There was a large company. Mrs W H Heap and Miss Commons presided at the piano ; while Mrs Powell and Mrs Shadwell had charge of the refreshments.

DEATHS.

SMITH.—On February 8th, Lieut. F. G. SMITH, R.F.C, killed while flying ; aged 20 years.—Deeply mourned by all.

WEBB.—On February 6th, in German East Africa, of enteric fever, JOHN HENRY, second son of Mr. & Mrs. W. Webb, of Churchover, aged 24.

IN MEMORIAM.

CLEWLOW.—In loving memory of Pte. HARRY CLEWLOW, who died of wounds received in action on February 15, 1917.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
And gave his life for one and all.”

DUNN.—In loving memory Pte. JAMES DUNN, the dearly beloved husband of Clara Dunn, who died of wounds received in action on February 13, 1917 ; aged 27 years.
“ Somewhere in Belgium there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved gave his all.”

22nd Dec 1917. The Rector of Rugby and the Capture of Jerusalem

THE RECTOR OF RUGBY AND THE CAPTURE OF JERUSALEM.

Preaching at the Parish Church on Sunday morning the Rector (Rev C M Blagden) referred to the capture of Jerusalem. He said they rejoiced in the fact that Jerusalem was now in Christian hands after 739 years, and that British Armies had recovered it without damaging a single stone. The strategic effect of this would be considerable, and the moral effect of this tremendous ; but they must beware of assuming that too great political results could come from the return of the Jews in any number to Jerusalem. They had to think of the Moslem population, who had the Sacred Mosque of Omar standing on the site of the Altar of Burnt Offering, and they also had to think of the Christian connection with Jerusalem. Everything in the Holy City had been re-hallowed by our Lord. Jerusalem was the first centre of the Christian Church ; it claimed the first Bishop and the first council. From Jerusalem began the first preaching of the Gospel. The return of the Jews would produce new difficulties. They were no longer a nation but only a race. They had wonderfully kept their Faith, but the heart of their Faith had disappeared with the disappearance of the sacrifice. The real point was that there was no new covenant between God and man. The Jewish religion doomed, and Christ was the end of the law. The Jews had contributed much to the religion the world, but their religion had no future in front of it. It had had its day and ceased to be, and there was no future for Jerusalem at the centre of that religion. The only future to which they could look forward was that Jerusalem should be once more the centre of the Christian Church, and the only hope for the Jews lay in their becoming Christians and being once more the missionaries of the East. The Mohammedans might listen to them when they would not listen to the Christians. Then there might be in solid fact a new Jerusalem, “ Zion the City of our solemnities, the City of God Himself.”

A TOMMY’S LETTER FROM THE FRONT.

SIR,—You can imagine our feelings in reading the papers of the strikes in Coventry over such trifles, when the men are earning wages which were only earned by very few in pre-war time, and under the most favourable conditions, with a home and home comforts to go to after working-hours. Can they realise what a Tommy is going through out here to protect them and theirs from being treated the same as Belgium, Serbia, Montenegro, and parts of France ?

Here are a few conditions which they might compare with those under which they work at home. I speak as an artilleryman ; the infantry are in a position to claim more sympathy. Firstly, the wages are less per day than the average munitions worker earns per hour. Then, the hours are not eight a day, but all God sends ; still they smile. We are not in a factory warmed or cooled according to the weather, and run under the eyes of health inspectors. It is open air—hail, rain, snow, or shine, and if up to the knees in mud and water, or numbed with cold, one cannot hear anything but cheers and jokes from the men who are proving themselves men in a cause on which stands the future destiny of dear old England. Then the comforts. No, the lads have not a daintily prepared meal, their slippers warmed, a nice fire, a nice bed, and all that a home provides. They have either a ruined building, hut, tent, bivouac, or dug-out, which they make as comfortable as circumstances allow. And do they realise at home that whilst they are in bed, from which they never get disturbed, unless the baby cries or something similar, the men out here are straining every nerve either on the look out, at the guns, or feeding them with ammunition. Some journeys to and from the guns, for instance, occupy four, six, even eight hours, which means another nights’ sleep lost. They can thank God it has been their lot stay at home, but it makes one think who has had two or three years out here that the heads are encouraging such thoughtlessness, and makes one wish that they are made to come here and relieve some of the thousands who have either done their bit or who are unfit to undergo such conditions and strain. Still, those who we hold dear to us can rest assured that the British Tommy, never minding the conditions, is going to do all in his power to protect the flag and the country which gave him birth. All he asks in return is that the men who are left at home to provide the necessities of war will stand by them and uphold Lord Nelson’s motto, “ England expects every man to do his duty,” and so abolish strikes and petty grievances, which are prolonging the war and assisting the enemy.

Kindly excuse writing this epistle, but it tends to discourage those are doing their bit out here.
Yours truly.
ONE WHO WENT OUT WITH THE RUGBY HOWITZER BATTERY.

LORD DENBIGH’S CHRISTMAS MOTTO.

The Earl of Denbigh, lecturing to a large audience of soldiers and civilians at Bury St Edmunds, said it was no time to talk of peace, because we could stick it and had to. In reply to a questioner, who asked him to give a motto for Christmas, Lord Denbigh said : “ Stick it, England, or go under for ever.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

In Sir D. Haig’s list of names, published on Tuesday last, of those deserving special mention is that of Lt.-Col. W. Elliott Batt, R.F.A.

Corpl F Evans, son of Mr Evans, 13 James Street, Rugby, was wounded on November 30th, and is probably a prisoner of war. It is quite believed he is in hospital behind the German lines.

Mrs Lamb, 17 St Marie’s Terrace, Rugby, has received notification from the War Office that her eldest son, Gunner W Lamb, of the R.F.A, has been severely wounded in the left leg. He was pupil at St Marie’s School.

The list of successful candidates for admission to the R.M.A, Woolwich, was published on Thursday, and contained the name of F R Kittermaster, captain of the Rugby School Football XV.

Major H H Neeves, D.S.O., M.C., was mentioned in Sir D Haig’s despatch, published in the “ London Gazette ” on December 14th, for gallant service on the Western’ Front.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Corpl C W Horley, 2nd Sherwood Foresters, recently died from wounds. Before enlisting Corpl Horley was employed in the Winding Department.

Mrs Neville had received a telegram from the King and Queen regretting the loss she has sustained by the death of her son (Capt Frank Neville) in the service of his country and sympathising with her in her sorrow.

Mr & Mrs Baskott, of East Haddon (formerly of Rugby), have been notified that their eldest son, Second-Lieut James E Baskott, died of wounds in France on December 11th. Second-Lieut Baskott who was 27, years of age, was educated at St Matthew’s Boys’ School, Rugby, and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery as a private early in the War, being gazetted to a commission in the same regiment about six months ago. He had been in most of the recent heavy fighting, and had built up a reputation for coolness and bravery, being regarded as a general favourite and an officer of considerable promise.

Pte Hugh Lissimore, Coldstream Guards, son of Mrs Lissimore, 23 Lodge Road, was killed in action on November 28th in the Battle for Bourlon Wood. Pte Lissimore was 19 years of and an “ old boy ” of St Matthew’s School. In announcing his death his officer writes to Mrs Lissimore :—“ Your son was very popular with the men in his platoon always cheerful and bright, and was a very brave soldier and a good man. He was keen on his work, knowing his Lewis gun thoroughly. I shall miss him very much.”

NEWS OF WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—Mr & Mrs Alfred Webb have returned home after visiting their son, Rifleman Wm Webb, who was lying badly wounded in hospital at Etaples. He was the victim of a terrific blow at close quarters from the butt-end of a German rifle, and was afterwards hit in the back by shrapnel. The visit of his parents (who are loud in praise of the hospitality and kindness they experienced in France and en route) cheered the gallant soldier greatly, and he has since been removed to a London hospital.—Mrs Frank Lane has now received a communication from her son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Lane, K.R.R. He is still in hospital at Rouen. He has lost a leg, and is very seriously ill. There is great hope that these two brave men will pull through.

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT.

An inquest was held on Thursday by Mr E F Hadow, touching the death of Second-Lieut Charles Robert Rawbone (20), R.F.C, son of Mr C T Rawbone, Civil servant, of 4 Templar Street, Myerts Park, London, which took place at the Brookfield Nursing Home as the result of an accident on December 7th.

Evidence was given to the effect that deceased had been in the R.F.C for nine or ten months. On December 7th he went up in an aeroplane, the rigging, control, and engine of which had been previously tested and found to be in good order. He was practising with a machine gun, and while doing so engine trouble developed; and he turned, evidently with the intention of going to have it seen to. As he turned the engine “ picked up,” and this brought the nose of the machine down, and caused it to dive to the ground. An eye-witness, Second-Lieut Claude E Mayors expressed the opinion that turning while so close to the ground—the machine was about 100 ft up—showed a lack of judgment. Lieut Rawbone was immediately attended to by Dr Chester Collins, and was subsequently removed to the Brookfield Nursing Home and treated by Drs Collins and Hoskyn; but, despite every care and skilful nursing, he died ten days after the accident, meningitis having set in.

The Coroner, addressing the Jury, said the cause of the accident was not very clear, although Lieut Mayors had shown them that Lieut Rawbone chose to take a very grave risk when banking by relying on the impetus gained from the dive rather than on the engine, and had it come off all right it would probably have been applauded. The Jury would join with him in sympathising with the parents, and would feel that they had lost one of their young flying men who, after all, were the bravest of the brave.

The Jury returned a verdict of “ Accidental death.”

The witnesses were Mr C T Rawbone, Second-Lieut C E Mayors, Dr Chester Collins, 2nd A/M Thos Staines, A/M Geo Nicholls, and Corpl G E Southcott.

BROADWELL.
WOUNDED.—Mr T Gulliver has received news that his son, Harry Gulliver, of the Royal Warwicks, has been wounded in the back. Mr Gulliver’s younger son was killed in action in France about two months ago.

WOLSTON.
CHRISTMAS GIFTS.—All soldiers who left Messrs Bluemel’s Works to fight for their country will be again well remembered this Yuletide. Messrs F Stevenson, L Jeacock, S Everton, T Boneham, H Chater. and J Satchwell have acted as a committee, under the able guidance of Mr W R Glare, the genial works manager. A collection was made amongst the employees and staff, which realised £22 11s. Forty soldiers each received a tuck box, 27 stationed in England received a 5s P.O each, and two prisoners of war in Germany each received an 8s parcel of food through the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee. Each employee who is now, or has been, with the Colours received a fine Christmas card, which had been specially designed by Mr W R Glare. The directors have independently sent each soldier a postal order for £1.

FLECKNOE.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Only last week the sad news was received in Flecknoe that another of its young inhabitants had given his life for his country. Pte Charles Frank Rose was the son of Mr Charles Rose, who has long held the position of postmaster and assistant overseer in the parish, and was most popular among young and old. He was one, too, who could ill be spared from the life of the village. Frank, whose age was only 25, was attached to the Machine Gun Section of the King’s Own Yorkshire Regiment, and was killed in action on the Western Front on November 24th. The general respect felt for his memory and the sympathy for his sorrowing parents, brothers and sisters, was well shown by the number who attended the memorial service held in the Village Church of St Mark’s on Sunday last.

TERRITORIALS’ FAMILIES AND WOUNDED SOLDIERS ENTERTAINED.

The third annual tea and entertainment to the wives, sisters, mothers, and families of members of the 7th R.W.R, Howitzer Battery and Yeomanry was given by the Territorial Committee on Wednesday last. As on the last occasion, about 300 wounded soldiers and nurses from the local Red Cross Hospitals, “ Te Hira,” Infirmary, St John’s, Bilton Hall, Cawston House, Pailton House, and the officers from Clifton Court Hospital were invited, and everything possible was done to make the occasion a really enjoyable one.

The proceedings began with an entertainment at the Empire, kindle provided by Mr B Morris, who procured a special film for the occasion. The variety artistes also gave their services, and the excellent programme was thoroughly enjoyed. After the entertainment the guests repaired to the Co-operative Hall, where, by special permission of the Food Controller, an excellent tea was served. About 600 sat down, and among the visitors were the Rev C M & Mrs Blagden, Rev Bernard McNulty (Leamington) “ padre,” to the Division, of which the 7th Royal Warwicks and the Howitzer Battery form a part ; Major C P Nickalls and Lieut Matheson (Rugby Howitzer Battery), Col F F Johnstone, Col G M Seabroke, Mr Pridmore (Coventry), Mr J J McKinnell, Capt C H Fuller, Lieuts Wharton and Yates (Rugby V.T.C), Mr A E & Miss Donkin, Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs P Nickalls, Mrs Marsham, &c. During tea, crackers were distributed, and as these were exploded the beaming faces of the children bore eloquent testimony to their enjoyment, and gave ample recompense to all who had worked so hard in the organisation of the entertainment. After tea a variety programme was given by the Clifton Court Hospital Party and the members the V.A.D there, under the direction of Mr Yardley ; and, needless to sy, this was much appreciated.

The committee responsible for the arrangements consisted of Mrs Cecil Nickalls, Mrs West, Mrs Claude Seabroke, Mr A W Adnitt, Mr F E Hands, assisted by Major Nickalls. The staff of the Co-operative Society and friends of the committee rendered useful service by waiting at the tables.

BAPTIST CHURCH.—A “ Dickens’ Evening ” was held in the Large Hall on Wednesday, and was largely attended. The Rev J H Lees presided. Three sketches were given in an excellent manner from Dickens’ Christmas carol, viz, “ Scrooge in His Office,” “ Visit of Marley’s Ghost,” and “ Cratchit’s Christmas Dinner.” Miss W Davidson two solos, and during intervals there were refreshments and games.

MILK DELIVERY IN RUGBY.—In the New Year there will be only one delivery of milk per day in Rugby.

WINTER.—Severe frost set in on Wednesday night, 14 degrees being registered. During Thursday night the thermometer recorded 9 degrees.

CHRISTMAS POSTAL ARRANGEMENTS.—To ensure delivery for Christmas parcels should be posted not later than Saturday evening, and letters and cards by Sunday night or early Monday morning. [Christmas Day was Tuesday]

HIGH PRICES FOR POULTRY.—In Messrs Tait, Sons & Pallant’s Smithfield on Monday a fine lot of 500 birds came under the hammer, and prices were the highest known. Turkeys made up to 52s each, geese 24s, ducks 8s, cockerels 8s 6d, hens 6s.

DEATHS.

LISSIMORE.—In loving memory of Pte. HUGH LISSIMORE, the beloved son of Mrs. and the late Wm. Thos. Lissimore, 23 Lodge Road, Rugby, who was killed in Bourlon Wood, France, on November 28, 1917.—“ Thy will be done.”

ROSE.—Killed in action on November 24, 1917, in France, CHARLES FRANK ROSE, M.G.S., King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, aged 25, second and dearly beloved son of Charles and Catherine Rose, of Flecknoe.
“ Father, in Thy gracious Keeping, Leave we now our dear on sleeping.”—CHAS. ROSE, Post Office, Flecknoe.

 

29th Jul 1916. Some After Effects of the Great Offensive

SOME AFTER EFFECTS OF THE GREAT OFFENSIVE.

An artillery officer who is in the great offensive writes to a friend in Rugby :- “ For days before the attack we were firing continuously, and on the actual day we got rid of a prodigious amount of ammunition. Fortunately[?], there was a bit of a lull after the attack, and we got some well-needed rest. So tired was one of my Sergeants that a rat gnawed at his face as he was lying in his dug-out. In a sleepy way he brushed it on one side, but it only returned, and finally he slept on, to find his face a mass of blood in the morning.

“ As for my Subalterns, they did nothing but eat and sleep for many days.

“ The Battery did very well, especially —who was complimented on the “ gallantry and initiative ” which he displayed.

“ It was rather sad to see our wounded come back, but they all seemed very cheery, and generally were hugging a German helmet, cap, pistol, or something as a souvenir. We escaped very fortunately in the casualty line, only having one N.C.O and two horses wounded, but on the day of the attack the Bosches fired gas shells at us, which made us all very sick and faint. On the whole, however, our worst enemy is the rain. There have been some extraordinary heavy showers, which have flooded our gun-pits and dug-outs at times. We are experts at mud shovelling, but it takes a lot of work and ingenuity to keep our homes from washing down. Getting out of bed in the morning is a work of fine art. We sleep in bunks in two rows, and the puzzle is, how to get into your boots without stepping on the floor, which, has or three inches of mud. It’s Wonderful how clever one gets at standing on one leg. The trenches are of course, very often waist deep in water, and it is often a choice between staying in and getting wet through, or jumping, out and risking a bullet. All the same we manage to keep merry and bright.”

WOLSTON.

AT CONTALMAISON.—Pte T Webb, writing to a friend says : “ Just to let you know I and the Wolston boys are still in the pink after a few days with the Germans. No doubt you have been having good news of the ‘boys’ this last few days. I shall never forget it. Talk about the Loos and Neave Chapelle battles, this was the worst I have ever been in. It was on July 8th when we had orders to get ready and stand-to. For five hours our artillery, with all sorts of shells, bombarded the village of Contalmaison, till there was hardly a wall or house left standing. The time came, and over we went with fixed bayonets and bombs. We had about 250 yards to go. We got there, and what a game we had chasing the Germans in and out of cellars and dug-outs. After holding on to the village a little time we had to retire owing to shells and machine gun fire from the Germans, but a little later on we made again for the village, and secured it this time. It was a sight to see the Germans lying about. We made 60 prisoners, and they seemed glad to be taken. One of them, who could speak rather good English, said they had just come from Verdun for a rest, and then the English started on them. One chap had the chance to get back to his lines, but refused to do so. They were rather tall, but only old men and boys, 16 or 50. We were up to our knees in mud and water, but they could not shift the Worcester sauce, which was a bit too strong for them. We hung on until we got relieved by another division the next night. We have pushed them back a few miles this time. It was a treat to look round their dug-outs. One I went down was about 40ft under the ground, fitted up with several compartments. It was more like an hotel, with spring beds, tables, and everything for use. On the walls were all sorts of photos and picture postcards from relatives and friends from Germany. The kitchen took our eye most ; it was fitted up with cooking stoves, boilers for making soup, and pots of all sorts. I think they were there, as they thought, for the duration of the War ; but we caught them napping, and use their hotel for ourselves now. We are having a quiet rest, and hope to be with them again very soon.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Mr Evan Percy Biddles, of Clifton, who has been in Paraguay, South America, for four years, his given up a good post there, and has returned home to serve his country.

Second-Lieut S A Miller-Hallett, South Wales Borderers, killed on July 11th, was in the Rugby School Cricket XI in 1908 and 1909. He was the second son of Mr A Miller-Hallett, of Chelsfield, whose XI provided very good club cricket in Kent some years ago.

Lieut A H Hales, Wiltshire Regiment, killed on July 5th, was a versatile athlete. Educated at Rugby and Corpus, Oxford, he gained his rowing Blue, and was at No. 3 in the Varsity crews of 1904 and 1905. As a Rugby footballer he was in his School XV in 1900, and afterwards played for the Harlequins and Monkstown. He was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in March, 1915.

Tuesday was the last day for unattested men who had not received calling up papers to report under the Military Service Act, but, probably owing to the thorough manner in which the calling-up process has been gone through locally, only one man reported at Rugby Drill Hall.

Mr Harry Hoare, so well known a few years ago in connection with the Rugby, Football, Cricket, and Hockey Clubs, now holds the rank of Major in the Army Service Corps, and Acts as Senior Supply Officer to the 38th Welsh Division.

SERGT J SOMERS, V.C, WOUNDED.

Sergt James Somers, of the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, formerly billeted with Mrs Burns, Corbett Street, Rugby, who gained the Victoria Cross in the Dardenelles, was wounded for the third time in the great advance, and is at present in hospital at Newcastle.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

The following Rugby men, belonging to the Rifle Brigade, have been reported wounded :—Rifleman J F Earl (5556), Rifleman J Hughes (235), Rifleman F P Liddington (751), Acting-Corpl A Packer (1283), Rifleman H Fulham (8), and Rifleman T C Smith (2426).

Corpl P Hammond, of E Co, R.W.R, son of Mr W D Hammond, 1 Kimberley Road, was wounded in the face on June 19th, but has now recovered and returned to the firing line.

Mr and Mrs W Aland, of 30 Arnold Street, received news on Sunday that their son, Pte Roy Aland, of the Warwicks, had been severely wounded by gun shot, the head, shoulders, back, and both arms and both legs being involved. The parents went over to France to see their son without delay. Pte Aland was employed as a foreman at Rugby when he enlisted, and has spent sixteen months in the trenches.

William Ewart Davenport, only son of Mr and Mrs A Davenport, of Harborough Magna, was killed in action on July 19th. Deceased was 18 years of age, and previous to the war was employed by the L & N.-W Railway as a cleaner. In a letter to the bereaved parents, his officer says : “ An officer and three telegraphists, including your son, were engaged on telephone work. The shelling was so severe that they took shelter in a dug-out. Immediately a shell dropped on this dug-out, killing all the occupants. The bodies were recovered and buried in a cemetery back of the lines.” The officer adds : — “ He was always cheerful, kind, obliging, and willing to do anything to help and further his work. Your son was a hard-working telephonist, who took a keen interest in his work, and was not afraid to go into the danger zone if it was necessary in the course of his duty.”

Flags were flying half-mast at the L & N.-W Stations and at sub-stations to Rugby, early in the week, as the result of the news that two of the late employes—C W Standish, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, and C A Jeeves, of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry—had been killed in the general advance in France. Standish was a cleaner, whose home is at Peterborough. He had a leg amputated in France, and was brought to a hospital in England, where gangrene set in, and he died. Jeeves came from Bedford. This makes six men connected with the Rugby Engine Shed who have been killed, and, in addition, nineteen have been wounded.

Mrs Ward, of 170 Lawford Road, New Bilton, received on the 7th inst. an official communication that her son, Pte Thomas Walter Ward, who has been reported missing since August 6, 1915, is now regarded as dead. Pte Ward, who enlisted in the Oxford and Bucks Regiment in September, 1914, was home on sick leave in June of last year, and, re-joining his regiment, was shortly afterwards transferred to the Hampshire Regiment, and left England for the Dardanelles. Pte Ward was a prominent member of the New Bilton Rugby Football and Cricket Clubs, and was very popular with all who knew him. Previous to the War he worked at Willans & Robinson’s. Much sympathy is felt for Mr and Mrs Ward in their great loss. They have a younger son, Lance-Corpl Sidney Ward, serving in France.

Lieut J Greenwood, of the Northampton Regiment, the well-known Rugby and Newbold footballer, is in hospital at Birmingham suffering, from wounds. Lieut Greenwood, who before the War was a teacher at Eastlands School, took part in the fighting at Fricourt during the first stage of the advance, and was wounded by a sniper in a tree on July 12th. His collar-bone is badly fractured, and he is also suffering severely from shock ; but his many friends will be pleased to hear that he is now making good progress.

CORPL A M BLADES, OF BROWNSOVER.

On Thursday Mr. Tom Blades, of Brownsover, received the sad news that his son, Corpl Albert Moisey Blades, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has died of wounds received during the recent fighting in France. Deceased, who was 21 years of age, enlisted early in the war.

B.T.H MEN KILLED.

Acting Sergt C F Miller, R.E, and Pte Pearson, Siege Co, R.E, two employes of the B.T.H, have been killed in the recent advance. Sergt Miller, who was an Irishman, was formerly in the Test, and Pte Pearson was employed in the Generator Dept.

A BRAVE SOLDIER.

Corpl Doyle, whose death was reported last week, lost his life under the following circumstances :—After the attack on the German trenches volunteers were called for to bring in the wounded. Corpl Doyle was one of the first to volunteer. He brought in one wounded soldier safely, and was bringing in another when he was shot dead. His Commanding Officer (Capt Lucas) says : “ His conduct was beyond all praise. A better or braver soldier never lived.”

RIFLEMAN JOHN LAMBOURNE, OF CLIFTON.

The death took place, as the result of founds received in the great offensive on July 9th, of Rifleman John Lambourne, Rifle Brigade, son of Mr Wm Lambourne, of Clifton. Rifleman Lambourne, who was only 17 years of age, joined the Army when he was 16, and had been in France since last December. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H Works.

DUNCHURCH

PTE J HUGHES, of the K.R.R, has arrived in Birmingham suffering from wounds. Of two companies of his regiment, in one of which he was fighting, there were only seven men left. He it the eldest son of Mr and Mrs J Hughes, Daventry Road, Dunchurch.—Pte R Elkington, Mill Street, who has been in many engagements, is home for a few days before going to Egypt.—Lieut J W Barnwell, R.W.R, Daventry Road, is suffering from wounds in France. Mr Barnwell has gone to see him.— Pte Carter, of the Territorials has also been injured, and is in London.

BRINKLOW.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—The parishioners of Brinklow extend their deepest sympathy to Mr and Mrs T Kenney and family in their grief at the loss of their son, Roland Kenney, who has been killed in action during our great offensive. Roland joined the Territorials just prior to the War, and like many others, volunteered for service abroad, where he has been for over twelve months. He was of a particularly lively nature, and was always a prominent figure in all the outdoor sports the village. He undoubtedly made a good soldier, and was accordingly promoted to the rank of sergeant.

LONG ITCHINGTON.

MONTAGU PEARSON KILLED.—On Monday morning the news was officially confirmed of the death of Lance-Corpl Montagu Pearson (South Staffs Regiment), eldest son of Mr and Mrs W J Pearson. He was killed while fighting in France on the 1st inst. Previous to the War he had been employed at the B.T-H Works at Rugby, and enlisted from there on August 17, 1914. He took part in the operations in Gallipoli, where he was wounded on August 9, 1915. Last January he paid a short visit home. He was 23 years old. Lance-Corpl Pearson was of fine athletic build and a keen lover of sport. For several years he had done good service for the local Football Club, of which he latterly held the position of captain. He will be greatly missed by many.

THE ROLL OF HONOUR.—On Sunday the Vicar (Rev W E Ellis) made feeling reference to the three deaths which have, within the past three weeks, occurred in the ranks of our local soldiers—Rowland Evetts, Montagu Pearson, and Sutton Russell. The loss of the latter he particularly instanced as one which touched himself very keenly. From the time when a very little lad he attended the Church Schools he found Joseph Sutton Russell a very regular attendant there, and also as a member of the Church Choir. From the time of his confirmation he had always been a devout and regular communicant. The sermon was followed by the singing of Dr Neale’s hymn, “ They whose course on earth is o’er.”

SOUTHAM.

KILLED IN ACTION.—News was received on Friday last week of the death in action of Pte Arthur Adams, of the Manchester “ Pals ” Regiment. Deceased, who was highly respected in Southam, was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs H Adams, of Oxford Street, was of a bright and cheery disposition. Before the War Pte Adams was a grocer in Manchester. He leaves a widow, for whom much sympathy is felt.

DEATHS.

DAVENPORT.—On July 19th (killed in action), William Ewart, R.F.A, only son of Mr and Mrs. A. Davenport, Post Office, Harborough Magna. Aged 18 years.
“ He sleeps not in his native land.
But neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those that loved him best.
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving mother, father, and sisters Jess and Della.

LENTON.—In loving memory of William Henry (Will), dearly beloved son of the late Mr. and Mrs. T. Lenton, Wood Street, who died from wounds in France, July 19,1916, aged 36 years.
“ Lord, ere I join the deadly strife,
And battles terrors dare ;
Fain would I render heart and life
To Thine Almighty care.
And when grim death in smoke wreaths robed,
Comes thundering o’er the scene,
What fear can reach a soldier’s heart
Whose trust in Thee has been.”

MANNING.—On July 11, 1916, died of wounds in France, Thomas Manning, Northants Regiment, of Braunston, beloved husband of Georgina Manning, of Leamington Spa.

SEENEY.—Killed in action in France, July 2, 1916, Signaller W. Seeney, R.W.R.,of Bourton, aged 18.
“ We loved him—oh! no tongue can tell
How much we loved him and how well ;
His fresh young life could not be saved,
And now he sleeps in a soldiers grave.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, SISTERS and BROTHERS.

IN MEMORIAM.

TOMLINSON.—In loving Memory of William Tomlinson, K.R.R.’s, killed in action at Hooge, July 30,1915.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all.
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow :
None but aching hearts can know.”
-From his loving father, mother, sisters, and brothers.

PRESTON.—In loving Memory of Rifleman Jack Preston, 7th K.R.R., killed in action, July 30, 1915.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one amid the brave.
One of the rank and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—Father, mother, and sisters.

REDFEARN.—In loving Memory of Rifleman Joseph Charles (Tim) Redfearn, 7th K.R.R., died of wounds, July 21, 1915.
“ Had he asked us, well we know
We should cry, ‘ O spare this blow.’
Yes, with streaming tears should pray,
‘ Lord, we love him ; let him stay.’”
—His wife and daughters, High Street, Thame.

SMITH.—In loving memory of Herbert, the dearly loved son of Frederick Smith. Killed in action in Flanders, July 30, 1915.—“ We loved you well ; God loved you best.”—FATHER, SISTER and BROTHERS.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

A BRITISH SOLDIER.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—I was talking to a wounded boy of the Hampshire Regiment on the platform of Rugby Station the other day. I asked him what his wounds were ? He replied : “ My right arm is shattered, three fingers off left hand,” and he also had a large gash across one cheek. He had been at Loos, Hulluck, and Ypres ; and, as he termed it, had had the biggest part of a shell. He added : “ I am no more use, sir; but I am glad I went.” A little thing like this, I think, helps to show the spirit of our men and the stuff they are made of.—I am, yours faithfully,

CORBET SMITH.
July 26, 1916.

EGGS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.—At Rugby Railway Mission a collection of eggs was made on Sunday afternoon, and no fewer than 250 were received, including 64 from the men working in the Locomotive Department at Rugby Station, to whom a special appeal had been made. Mr J J Thompson gave the address at the service, which was well attended, and the eggs, having been received by Mr Frank Ward, were placed in a large nest, made of hay and decorated with the national colours by Mrs Beard. The eggs were afterwards distributed between the three local Red Cross Hospitals.

PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

The usual monthly meeting of the Executive Committee of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held on Wednesday.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J R Barker) reported that to date the subscriptions amounted to £545 13s 10d, and the expenditure on food parcels &c, was £432 11s 5d, leaving a balance in hand of £113 2s 5d, sufficient for six weeks’ parcels. During the week subscriptions amounted to £18 17s 4d, including the sum of £8 3s collected at the V.T.C Sports on Saturday last. This was the first week for some time that the receipts exceeded the expenditure.

All outstanding accounts were passed for payment, and as this would be the last meeting of the financial year, the Secretary was instructed to prepare the accounts for audit, so that a balance-sheet could be issued early next month.

This week’s parcels contained ¼-lb tea, jar of marmalade, one large tin salmon, one large tin fruit, one tin of cafe au lait, one tin potted meat, one tin condensed milk, tin cocoa, tablet of soap, ¼-lb sugar.

RAILWAY CONCESSION TO MUNITION WORKERS.—For the convenience of munition workers who have to go from Rugby to Coventry in the early morning the L & N-W Railway have arranged to run a train from Rugby at 5.5 a.m, and arrive at Coventry at 5.20 a.m. It will commence on Monday, July 31st, and be continued for a fortnight to see whether the number of passengers justifies permanent running of the train.