20th Apr 1918. Low-Flying Aeroplanes

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL. . . . .LOW-FLYING AEROPLANES.

Mr F E Hands reminded the Council that at an inquest held on an airman killed at Rugby recently the jury protested against the low flying which took place and he thought a similar protest should go from the Council. On the morning before the accident he saw a pony start to run away twice owing to an airman flying so close to the tops of the houses.—Mr Loverock supported, and said he saw the airman in question come down. He was flying very low, and another aeroplane which accompanied him almost struck the top of some cottages in Temple Street. He had also seen an aeroplane fly between two houses at a lower level than the roofs.—Mr Walker corroborated this, and said the incident caused a great deal of alarm amongst some ladies.—It was decided to write to the Commanding Officer on the matter.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.
[Note: these reports were printed on the edge of the page and the reproduction is very feint.]

Lieut the Hon J H P Verney, Lancers, the only son of lord Willoughby de Broke, has been wounded.

Pte Alfred William Elson, Hampshire Regt, son of Mrs Anderson, 39 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, died from wounds received in action on April 6th. Prior to the war he was employed in the winding department of the B.T.H.

Corpl T J Smith, of the Royal Field Artillery, who was formerly employed in the Main Drawing Office of the B.T.H, died from wounds on March 22nd.

Pte Douglas Hay, York & Lancashire Regt, son of[?] Mrs Hay, 102 Murray Road, was killed in action March 18th.

Second-Lieut Sidney Torrance, Lancashire [?] son of Mr W J Torrance, Warwick Street, has been severely wounded in the head and ankle during recent heavy fighting.

Sapper E Wagstaffe, Royal Engineers, an [?] in the Tool Room at the B.T.H, was killed on [?] April 6th.

Mr & Mrs J G Wilson, of 52 York Street, have received a telegram from the War Office, saying that their son, R V Wilson (O.L), Second-Lieutenant 2/7[?] Royal Warwicks (late H.A.C), had died of wounds on the April 18th. No further confirmation has yet been received.

News has reached Mr J P Lennon, [?] Rugby, that his eldest son, E P Lennon, [?] in France. He was totally blind for several days, [?] has been sent to a hospital behind the lines. [?] information says that he is now regaining his sight, and is recovering very favourably.

A BELATED COMMISSION.

A letter found in the possession of Sapper W H Linnell, jun, Pioneer Battalion, King’s [?] Regiment, a partner in the firm of Messrs Linnell [?], Rugby, whose death from wounds received in action was recorded last week, has been forwarded to his [?] by the matron of the hospital. This was evidently [?] shortly before he was wounded, and that he [?] on the previous day had been informed [?] Colonel that he was recommending him for a commission as his work had been so very satisfactory. Mr. Linnell, who was an Old Laurentian and Old Rugbian. [?] until he joined the Colours mainly responsible for management of the business. He was vice-chairman of the Rugby Master Builders’ Association and [?] of the Rugby Building Society.

HILLMORTON.
MRS RATHBONE (Hillmorton) received a telegram from the War Office on March 30th, saying that her son, Lieut G P Rathbone, North Staffs Regiment, was reported missing on March 21st, and has not heard any more news of him at present. He has not been officially reported killed, as stated in last week’s edition.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.
PTE HARRY KERRY, of the 2nd Royal Berkshire Regiment, third son of Mr & Mrs Amos Kerby, has been severely wounded in the left forearm, but is progressing favourably. He has served two years in France.

BRANDON.
WOUNDED.—Pte G Saunders, who for several years was manager at the Royal Oak, has been badly wounded. Although much over age, he volunteered for service, and has been in action on many occasions. This is the second time he has been wounded.

WOLSTON.
CORPL T WEBB, son of Mr & Mrs Charles Webb, Wolston, has now returned to Wolston after serving upwards of three year on active service. He joined the 1/7/ Worcesters in 1914, and was sent out to France on January 4, 1915. He went through the battle of Neuve Chapelle in 1915, and in the battle of fleur Beixin May of the same year was wounded in the left arm. He was soon again on active service at the battle of Armentieres in September. His next big battle was at the Somme in 1916, at Contamassion, where, after fighting hard for four days, he had two fingers on his left hand broken, and was sent to England. Regaining convalescence, he again went into the firing line; but at the battle of Passendale ridge was wounded by shrapnel. He had a finger partly blown off and two broken, whilst his hand was also badly smashed. Arriving in England, he was a patient at a Manchester hospital, where it was found necessary to amputate the finger. He has now received his discharge, and undoubtedly richly deserves it after the many vicissitudes he has gone through. Corpl Webb was one of the first men in the village to volunteer, and he is somewhat sad at the thought that several of his friends who joined up with him are killed. He says that one of the chief grievances of the men at the front is the single slackers at home in our large towns, who let the married men go out to fight while they hide in munition factories. He believes that we should not worry over our recent reverses, but place our confidence in our soldiers, who fight magnificently, and will eventually get the upper hand. Pte W Webb, a brother of the above, has also been crippled.

DUNCHURCH.
PRISONER OF WAR FUND.—There is being a house-to-house collection on behalf of the Prisoners of War Fund in Dunchurch and Thurlaston. Pte G Richardson, Mill Street, Dunchurch, who offered his services to take the envelopes round to all the houses, was once a prisoner of war, but has got his discharge after serving several years in the Army, his eyes being affected. When the envelopes were collected they were found to contain the large sum of £63, and there are several more to come in.

THE POTATO POSITION.
INCREASED ACREAGE PROBABLE THIS YEAR.

Already the appeal which Mr Lloyd George issued three weeks ago to the farmers of Great Britain to largely increase the acreage of potatoes is having its effect in many counties. The latest reports of the Commissioners of the Food Production Department contain numerous evidences of this fact.

The Council of the Central and Associated Chambers of Agriculture have unanimously passed a resolution “ urging on all farmers the paramount necessity of increasing the acreage of potatoes to at least the million acres appealed for by the Prime Minister.” Last year the farmer of England and Wales and Scotland grew no less than 655,704 acres of potatoes—a record planting and an increase of 97,637 acres over the area of 1916, representing an additional supply of 1,400,000 tons of potatoes. These results, achieved despite a shortage of labour and other adverse circumstances, go far to justify the faith of the Prime Minister that the British farmer will once more accomplish the impossible.

So far as can be ascertained at the moment, there already seems likely to be slight increase in the acreage both in England and Wales and in Scotland. Indeed, it may very well turn out that already we have nearly 600,000 acres of potatoes planted this year, or ready for planting, in England and Wales, and almost 170,000 acres in Scotland. But even if this year’s yields are as good as last year’s, it is extremely improbable that this acreage will supply all our requirements for 1918. Accordingly the Government asks the farmer to do his best to add another 230,000 acres, and so reach the million-acre mark which, in combination with other crops, should make the country absolutely safe so far as its food supply is concerned.

The appeal of Mr Lloyd George appeared in the Press on March 18th. It would hardly be surprising if the response of the farmers was not general and immediate. Outside one or two counties potato growing conditions is attended with definite amount of risk ; the yield is very uncertain ; there is the possibility of disease, and proper cultivation entails a good deal of extra labour, whereas labour just now is scarce on the countryside. Moreover, many farmers have had an unfortunate experience with their 1917 potato crop owing to the difficulties of transport and of marketing.

No one knowing all the facts would blame the agriculturist for thinking hard before he planted an additional acreage of potatoes without some sort of guarantee as to their sale when grown, and this guarantee has been given in the fixing of minimum prices.

A WELCOME OFFER.

An unusual request was received by the Rugby Fool Control Committee at their meeting on Thursday, when a lady wrote stating that she had the chance of purchasing a quantity of cheese, but only if she bought about ton, and she asked for permission to buy this. There were 140 members in her household, and if she obtained the cheese and the committee would allow her to retain so much as they thought was fair, she would be prepared to dispose of the remainder to the grocers in the town.—The Chairman : Tons of Cheese ! I have not seen a quarter of a pound for a long time. It seems ridiculous that a private individual should have the chance of buying tons of cheese, when a good many of us have not seen any for some time.—Mr Humphrey did not think it was fair to allow this when other people were only having half-a-pound a month.—Mr Cooke thought if there was so much cheese about Lord Rhondda should take it over, so that it could be distributed more equitably.—Mr Gay suggested that the permit should be given, and that the lady should be allowed to keep enough to last her for a certain period, and that at the end of that time they would appreciate it if she could get them some more (laughter).—The permit given, the lady to surrender 75 per cent. for distribution amongst local retailers.

DEATHS.

BATES.—Killed in Action on March 31st, Lance-Corpl. THOMAS BATES, of 1st Warwicks, only son of Mr. & Mrs. T. Bates, Ryton-on-Dunsmore ; aged 27 years.
“ He bravely answered duty’s call,
His life he gave for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching heart can know.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving Mother, Father and Sisters.

CHAMBERS.—Pte. C. CHAMBERS, killed in action on March 21, 1918, aged 31 years, son of William and Amy Chambers, Abbotts Farm, Hillmorton.—“ Thy will be done.”

CHAMBERS.—Sergt. F. CHAMBERS, died of wounds in France on April 4, 1918, aged 24 years, beloved husband of Amy Chambers, Hillmorton Paddox.—“ Thy will be done.”

HARDMAN.—Gunner C. H. HARDMAN, the dearly beloved husband of Mrs. C. H. Hardman, 57 Rugby Road, Leamington, killed in action on March 21, 1918 ; aged 26 years.
“ He sleeps, not in his native land,
But under foreign skies ;
Far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—Sadly missed and deeply mourned by his sorrowing Wife and Children.

HARDMAN.—In loving memory of our son, Gunner C. H. HARDMAN, who was killed in action in France on March 21, 1918.
“ We have lost him, we who loved him ;
And, like others, must be brave ;
For we know that he is sleeping
In a British soldier’s grave.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Sisters & Brothers.

HODGES.—Killed in action on March 26th, Sapper SIDNEY J. J. HODGES, of the Royal Engineers, beloved and youngest son of the late Mr. & Mrs. Hodges, of 82 Claremont Road.

MATTHEWS.—Rifleman JOHN MATTHEWS, 3rd Rifle Brigade, died of wounds in hospital in France on March 25th, beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. William Matthews, Churchover, aged 23 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

DRAGE.—In loving memory of Pte. CHARLES HERBERT DRAGE, the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. C. Drage, of Yelvertoft ; killed in action in Egypt, April 19, 1917 ; aged 19 years.
“ Death can hide him, but not divide ;
Thou art but on Christ’s other side.
Thou with Christ, and Christ with us,
So together still are we.”
—From his ever-loving Mother, Father & Brother.

GUPWELL.—Also our dear brother, Pte. BENJAMIN GUPWELL, who died of wounds in France, April 20th, 1917.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—From his loving Sister and Brother.

 

2 thoughts on “20th Apr 1918. Low-Flying Aeroplanes

  1. Pingback: Linnell, William Henry. Died 8th Apr 1918 | Rugby Remembers

  2. Pingback: Elson, Alfred William. Died 6th Apr 1918 | Rugby Remembers

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