4th May 1918. Local Heroes in the Zeebrugge Raid

LOCAL HEROES IN THE ZEEBRUGGE RAID.

Chief Motor Mechanic W Gilbert, who as stated in our last issue, was one of those who volunteered and took part in the naval raid on Zeebrugge, is the son of Mr T Gilbert, who resides at the picturesque old cottages near Bilton Church. He was one of the first Bilton lads to volunteer for Kitchener’s Army, but when in training he unfortunately received injuries while trench digging, in consequence of which he was, much to his disappointment, eventually discharges. He came home, and worked at Messrs Robbins’ Motor Garage, Warwick Street, as motor mechanic, and was one of the first to drive the Southam mail van when the motor was adopted by the Postal Authorities in lieu of the old horse-driven vehicle. But his desire to get back into active service was keen, and his skill as a mechanic and driver enabled him to find his way into the Navy. After passing his examination at Southampton promotion soon followed, and ultimately, he was appointed chief motor mechanic on one of the motor launches engaged in the important work of patrolling the Channel off Dover. He had taken part in several hazardous runs, and when the Zeebrugge business came along it afforded him an opportunity he could not resist. On a postcard to his parents afterwards he briefly wrote :—“ I have been and come back again O.K. Zeebrugge is a hot place. We had a shell through the deck, but no one was hit. We were more lucky than some. It was hell. Got back at 12 o’clock—just 24 hours’ run.” In a subsequent letter he says :—“ I am pleased I was there on Monday night. It was worth seeing. We ‘smoked’ for the Vindictive, so you can guess how far we were in. I think it is the finest bit of work that has been done in this War ;” and he winds up humorously : “ Talk about ——’s birthday and the fireworks—that’s washed out now.”

Mr W T Coles Hodges, headmaster of the Murray School, has received a cheery postcard from Pte Will Clark, R.M.L.I, now an inmate of a military hospital at Dover, who took part in the Zeebrugge Raid. He writes :—“ As you see by my address, I am ‘ in dock’ again once more, and, by the way, having a grand time. The last time I told you I told you I should have another go before long. Well, I volunteered to be one of the landing party at Zeebrugge, and we visited the Huns on Monday last (midnight). We had rather a warm time while it lasted, but they did not like the look of when we got on the Mole. Do you think it was my face that frightened them? My sister said it was. Anyhow, I know what it was—so many of us had had a good schooling like you always gave us. We had several Rugger players of note aboard us, including Lieut-Commander Harrison and Lieut Walker. I am pleased to say I have played against both. Really, sir, I am a very lucky man, as my wounds are quite light—a few small pieces in the head, slight concussion, and sprained back. I am looking forward to seeing you and the school again very soon.”

Pte Clerk is a grandson of the late Mr E Allen, for many years stationmaster at Rugby.

Pte Clerk, who is a son of Mr H Clark, 8 Winfield Street, Rugby, and an Old Murrayian, joined the R.M.L.I eight years ago. In a letter his sister, who has visited him at the hospital, says :—“ He has got shrapnel wounds about the head and face, and has hurt his back ; a shell exploded and blew him off a scaling ladder. There were 40 killed round him, but he was lucky. Unfortunately he any on the deck all night soaked in blood and rain, as they were all mixed up anyhow—dead, dying and wounded. . . . They had a dreadful time, but did what they set out to do.”

FATAL AEROPLANE ACCIDENT AT RUGBY.

While flying near Rugby on Thursday evening last week Second-Lieut David Percival McIntyre (19), of the Royal Air Force, whose home is at Broughton Ferry, Scotland, collided with some telegraph wires, and received injuries from which he died shortly afterwards in the Brookfield Nursing Home.

At the inquest, which was held on Monday by Mr E F Hadow, Second-Lieut Norman Maximilian Smith said his attention was attracted to the deceased officer by the fact that he was flying very low down and diving over hedges and trees. He then turned towards the sun, and came down lower, apparently trying to fly under the telegraph wires which were set back a considerable distance from the road. He crashed into the wires and the machine toppled over.

The Coroner : Have you ever seen this done before ?—Answer : No. but I have heard some wild stories about it, and I have heard of pilots who have flown under the wires and have lived to tell the tale. He added that there should have been 2ft of space under the wheels and 2ft between the top of the plane and the wires had deceased been flying straight.—The Coroner : That is cutting things very fine.—Witness expressed the  opinion that deceased made a mistake in judgment. He was not flying right in the face of the sun at the time of the accident.

Major Leslie Frederick Forbes deposed that the deceased officer had graduated as a pilot and was very competent.

The Coroner enquired whether trick flying low down was necessary.—Witness said not altogether, but overseas a pilot is supposed to do a certain amount of low flying. He added that when a pilot was competent he was allowed to fly rather low. After the accident he visited the spot and concluded that deceased had fallen from a height of 20 to 30 feet, while travelling at 100 miles an hour. He must have been going very fast because some parts of the machine were found some distance away. The top part of the plane struck the under part of the wires and deceased was evidently trying to fly underneath them. This was often done by pilots, but in this case he was not sufficiently competent. Deceased was flying against the sun and might not have seen the wires.

The Coroner enquired whether there were any restrictions on young officers playing such tricks.—A : We have restrictions for officers who have not completed their time, but others have rather more latitude, and are sent up to do as they like. It is strictly against the regulations to fly at low altitudes over towns.

Air Mechanics Coles and Muir deposed that the engine and rigging were in good condition before the ascent.—Surgeon Major Cester Collins deposed that deceased was found 20 yards away from the machine. He had a fracture at the base of the skull, partial dislocation of the vertebrae of the neck, fracture of the left leg, and rupture of the internal organs. His machine must have struck the wires with a tremendous impact.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental death.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Gunner W E Wellens, R.F.A, who removed from an ambulance train in a dying condition, died at the Hospital of Cross on Wednesday.

Pte Alfred Charles Williams, R.W.R, son of Mr A Williams, 29 William Street, has written home stating that he was taken prisoner by the Germans during the heavy fighting of March 22nd.

Pte C W Oakley, R.W.R, only son of Mr & Mrs Oakley, 21 Sandown Road, Rugby, has been wounded in three places. Before joining up in 1917 he worked at Rainsbrook.

Pte T H Bosworth, Lancashire Fusiliers, youngest son of Mr Samuel Bosworth, Lutterworth, of whom nothing had been heard since March 17th, has now written to say that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He has served in Egypt and France for three years.

Mr A D Stocks, formerly of Misterton, Lutterworth, and later with Messrs Seabroke & Son, solicitors, of Rugby, has for some time been in training at Bushey in the Officers’ Cadet Battalion in preparation for joining the Coldstream Guards.

Mrs J Lee, Regent Street, Lutterworth, received news last Saturday that her brother, Pte H W Lee, Royal Berkshire Regiment, has been missing since March 21st. He is 19 years of age, and had only been in France five weeks. Any news of him will be gratefully received by his brother and sister at the above address.

Second-Lieut C Pridmore Dunn, son of Mr F Dunn, at one time on the staff of the National Provincial Bank, Rugby, and later with the Cement Company, is reported missing. In a letter to his parents the Colonel says that he had fought well, and that he had recommended him for his gallantry.

Mr & Mrs Cowley, of 17 James Street, Rugby, have received a postcard from their only son, Pte W F Cowley, of the Wiltshire Regiment, saying that he is a prisoner of war in Germany, and is slightly wounded by a bullet in the stomach. He is 19 years of age, and was before joining up employed at Messrs Badham’s, High Street.

News been received by Mrs Joseph E Walker, 41 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, that her husband, a lance corporal in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was killed action on March 30th. Lance-Corpl Walker, who was 29 years of age and joined the Army in January, 1916, formerly carried on business as a greengrocer in Bridget Street.

Pte T Eaton-Shore, son of the late Mr J Eaton-Shore, formerly works manager for Messrs Willans & Robinson, who been out in France for two years and seven months with the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has recently been offered a commission. He is now in training with the 18th Officers’ Cadet Battalion at Bath. Before the War he was well-known in Rugby, especially in cricket and hockey circles.

In their report to the Warwickshire County on Wednesday the General Purposes Committee reported :—“ We regret to learn that Lieut J Greenwood, formerly assistant master at Rugby Eastlands Boys’ School, has been invalided out of the Army, and that he will never able to resume work as a teacher. We regret to find that the Local Government (Emergency Provisions) Act, 1916, makes no provision for the Council to pay any allowance in such a case. We understand that Mr Greenwood will receive a pension.”

Miss E G M Bryant, daughter of Mr William Bryant, of Rugby, who was appointed matron of the Queen Victoria Memorial Hospital, Mont Boron, Nice, A.M. In 1908, has been decorated with the French Medaille d’Argent des Epidemics, the hospital having during the War been taken over by the French Government for military purposes. Last year, when dressing wounds, Miss Bryant contracted blood poisoning in the right hand, and in consequence had to have the little finger amputated and thumb shortened. It is now hoped that she will ultimately regain the use the remaining portion, which at one time it was feared she would lose altogether.

SERGT J. FREEMAN.

Sergt John Freemen, R.W.R, Bennett Cottage, Bennett Street, a son of Mrs Freeman, Lancaster Road, has been reported missing since March 22nd. He had been a member of “ E ” Company for 12 years when war broke out, and held several shooting cups which he had won. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H. as a carpenter. He had been in France a little over twelve months.

B.T.H MEN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H that Rifleman H Corbett, Rifle Brigade, late of the Works Stores, was killed in action on March 28th, and that Pte J E Garner, Leicestershire Regiment, formerly employed in the Pattern Shop, died from wounds on April 24th.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS H EDMONDS, The Heath, Dunchurch, who received official news on April 18th that her husband had been wounded, has since received a card from him saying he is a prisoner of war in Badam, Germany, with bullet wounds in shoulder and face. He writes very cheerfully, and says he is going on all right, and being treated well. Pte H Edmonds has served 18 months in France, and has been through some hard fighting on the Western front. He was in the Cambrai attack in November, 1917. Before joining up he was employed at Messrs Alcock & Sons, tailors, Dunchurch.

BRANDON & BRETFORD.
SIGNALLER A L IRESON WOUNDED.—Mr and Mrs E W Ireson have received news that their son, Signaller A L Ireson, of the R.F.A, has received a shrapnel wound in the head. Before volunteering, at the age of 17¼ years, he was a draughtsman at the Drawing Office of Coventry Ordnance Works. He had been in France for nearly two years, where he had seen much fighting. His elder brother, who was similarly wounded, has now got his discharge and returned to Canada, from whence he came to fight  for the Old Country.

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
On Sunday, which happened to be Hospital Sunday in the parish, a Memorial Service was held at the Parish Church in the afternoon for Gunner Henry Howkins, of the Royal Garrison Artillery, the eldest son of Mr and Mrs Chas Howkins, who was officially reported as having died in hospital in France on March 30th. The family being members of the Primitive Methodist body, the memorial was really a joint service of the two congregations, and the Rev W Vaughan, of the Primitive Methodist Church, Rugby, attended it and took part by reading the Lesson, the Service used being the one authorised in the Diocese, and the Vicar giving an address. A very large congregation assembled to show their sympathy with and respect for the family, including a numerous deputation from the Village Benefit Club. A substantial addition to the Hospital Fund was collected, in view of its work amongst wounded soldiers.

GRANDBOROUGH.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr & Mrs W Coling have received official notice that their eldest son, Sergt P Coling, has died from wounds received on April 10th. He joined the Army on the outbreak of war, and had participated in much of the fighting, and had had some very narrow escapes. This is the second son Mr & Mrs Coling have lost in the War, and much sympathy is felt for them locally.

REMARKABLE REDUCTION OF VAGRANTS IN WARWICKSHIRE.

At the annual meeting of the Warwickshire County Vagrancy Committee it was reported that during the quarter ended March 31st the number of casual poor relieved in the county was 2,581 men, 604 women, and 6 children, making a total 3,191, as compared with a total of 7,086 for the corresponding quarter of last year. The total number of food tickets issued by the unions during the quarter was 2,256, of which 1,938 were produced to tradesmen.—The Chairman moved the approval of the statistics, saying that they revealed a healthy reduction in the number of admissions.—The annual report, which was approved, recorded a pronounced reduction in vagrancy in the county.

DEATHS.

BENFIELD.—Died at 39 Stationary Hospital, Aire, France, from wounds received in action on April 16th, 1918, Pte. BERTRAM GEORGE BENFIELD, of the D.C.L.I., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Benfield, Northend.
“ God takes our loved ones from our homes,
But never from our hearts.”
—Deeply mourned by his Father (in France), Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

CHANT.—In loving memory of my dear husband, who fell in action on March 22, 1918 ; aged 37 years.
“ There is a link death cannot sever ;
Love and remembrance last for ever.”
—From his loving Wife and Baby.

COLING.—In ever-loving memory of Sergt. P. Coling, who died of wounds received in action on April 10th ; aged 24 years. Deeply lamented.

HALL.—In ever-loving memory of SYDNEY GEORGE, only dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. G. Hall, 31 Alexandra Road, Rugby, who killed in action on April 12th ; aged 21 years.

JONES.—E. H. JONES, Second-Lieut., R.F.A., 87th Brigade, killed in action on April 25th ; son of Mr. John Jones, Cosford.

PACKWOOD.—In loving remembrance of WILLIE, the very dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Packwood, St. Matthew’s Street, who was killed in action on April 12, 1918.

TABOR.—In loving memory of ALICK JOHN TABOR, aged 19, of the Durham Light Infantry, killed in action on March 25, 1918 ; youngest son of Mr. G. Tabor, of Woolscott.—Deeply mourned by his Father, Mother, Brothers and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

DEMPSEY.—In loving memory of Sergt. P. DEMPSEY, K.O.S.B., who died of wounds in France on April 30th, 1916.

HOPCRAFT.— In loving memory of JOHN ANDREW HOPCRAFT, who was accidentally killed whilst on duty on May 3, 1915.
“ We pictured your safe returning,
And longed to clasp your hand ;
But God postponed that meeting
Till we meet in the Better Land.
Some may think that we forget him
When at times they see us smile ;
But they little know the sorrow
Which is hid behind that smile.”
—From his devoted Wife and Children.

STEBBING—In loving memory of Gunner SYDNEY REGINALD STEBBING, Motor Machine Gun Section, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action at Zonnebeke on May 4, 1915.—From his sorrowing Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.—R.I.P.

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7th Jul 1917. Baby Week at Rugby

BABY WEEK AT RUGBY.

The War has led to a quickening of the public conscience in many directions ; and several much-needed reforms, which have long been advocated, but which only three years ago seemed almost unattainable, have already been elected ; while others are daily becoming inevitable. Few subjects have of late met with more sympathetic consideration than that of the welfare of the children ; and in order to seize the favourable opportunity for securing the adoption of measures to arrest the terrible rate of infant mortality which has occasioned so much concern to all thinking people, the past week has been observed throughout the kingdom as a propaganda week for “ baby,” and lectures and demonstrations emphasising the importance of the proper care of the babies have been given in most towns. Rugby has not been behind in the good work, and for some weeks past a committee of ladies has been arranging a local campaign, which opened on Sunday, when sermons bearing on the subject were preached at most of the places of worship.

On Wednesday afternoon a meeting for mothers was held in the Empire. There was a large attendance, and many of the mothers were accompanied by “ His Majesty the Baby ” ; and, despite the infantile accompaniment which was maintained by a number of the little guests, they were heartily welcomed.

Dr A A David presided, and he was supported by Mrs Nevinson (London), Rev R 8 & Mrs Mitchison, Mrs A A David, Mr & Mrs J J. McKinnell, Dr & Mrs Crookes, Mrs F Merttens (President) and Mrs Waddy (secretary of the movement).

The Chairman who addressed the audience as “ Ladies, gentlemen, and babies,” after a few remarks in a lighter vein, said they were there not only to think about their own babies but to be moved to a sense of responsibility about other people’s babies. Every child born in England belonged to the nation. If it grew up into a strong and healthy life the nation was the richer and the stronger, but if it was sickly the nation had to suffer with it, and if it died when it need not have died, then England had lost something which nothing on earth could ever replace. They were told that every year 50,000 babies died in England who need not die. It was not inevitable. He was always suspicious of that word “ inevitable.” Things happened, and people thought they must happen, whereas if they bestirred themselves they need not happen. This week had been set apart to set in motion forces to remedy this state of affairs. When every man and woman in England knew about these things they would care, and when they cared they would find the time would not be long distant when this grievous waste of life and health would be stopped. Then would come a day of new happiness for England, and also of new strength—strength not only for war—if the need ever arose again, which God forbid—but strength also for peace.

[Full report continues in original newspaper]

PROPAGANDA BY CINEMA.

The great value of the moving pictures as an educational force is well illustrated at the Empire this week, where two excellent propaganda films are being screened. The first, entitled “ Motherhood,” is shown under the auspices of the National Baby Week Council. The picture is remarkably interesting, especially to women, and the correct and incorrect ways of bringing up children.

MUNITIONS TRIBUNAL.-At Coventry Munition Tribunal on Tuesday, H Boult, fitter, Rugby, employed in a Rugby firm, made an unsuccessful application for a leaving certificate. Boult contended that he could be used to better advantage in national service.

RUGBY BAKING TRADE NOT TO RE DEPLETED.

At the Rugby Urban Tribunal on Thursday evening the exemptions granted to the Rugby bakers, 30 in number, were reviewed at the instance of the Military. After a lengthy hearing, the Tribunal decided to make no change, and all the exemptions were allowed to stand.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte S C Howkins, of the King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, son of Mr H Howkins, of 9 Manor Road, has been seriously wounded, and as a result his left leg has been amputated. Pte Howkins, who is in a Military Hospital at Newcastle-on-Tyne, is making good progress.

Sapper George Alfred Wright, Royal Engineers, who prior to joining the Army at the beginning of the War was employed in the Controller Department at the B.T.H, was killed in action on June 7th.

News has been received from the War Office that Pte Jack Beech is in hospital with sand fly fever at Amara. He is the son of Mr W G Beech, New Bilton, and has been 3½ years in the Army, which he joined before he was 17 years of age in February, 1914. He has been through the fighting in the Dardanelles, Mesopotamia, and at the capture of Bagdad. In a recent letter from him he writes :—“ We have taken Bagdad, but my pal, Walter Scarlett, of Long Lawford, got killed by my side, poor chap. He died smiling, and I saw him buried.”

ANOTHER OLD MURRAYIAN KILLED.

Pte Arthur William Woods, son of the late Mr Joseph Woods, of 153 Grosvenor Road, was killed in action on June 10th. Pte Woods, who was 21 years of age and an Old Murrayian, enlisted in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry in August, 1914 ; but he afterwards transferred to the Machine Gun Corps. He was invalided home in December, 1916, suffering from septic poisoning, caused by a shrapnel wound, and he returned to France in April.

MORE LOCAL PRISONERS OF WAR.

Two more local men have been taken prisoners of war, and the facts have been communicated to Mr J Reginald Barker, hon secretary of the Rugby Prisoners of War Help Committee, who has made arrangements for these men to receive, on behalf of the Rugby Committee, the standard parcels of food and bread. They are : Pte A Brown, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, interned at Dolmen, whose home is at Dunchurch, and Pte W Line. Buffs Regiment, interned at Soltau, whose home is at Napton. This makes the sixth addition to the Rugby list within a fortnight.

WAR SHRINE.-A war shrine has recently been unveiled at St. Andrew’s Mission Church. The ceremony was performed by the Rector, the Rev C M Blagden, who delivered a brief but inspiring address. This is the first of the shrines to be erected in Rugby.

BRANDON.

DEATH OF PTE ELLOITT G HALFORD.—Mr & Mrs Thomas Halford, who for about 20 years were in employ of Mr Rankin, of Brandon Grounds Farm, have received news of the death of their fourth son, Elliott, of the Cheshire Regiment, who fell in action. He had only been out at the front for seven weeks. Two of his elder brothers—Pte Sidney and Corpl Thomas Halford—have been on service for a long time, but nothing has been heard of Sidney for nearly 12 months, and he is reported missing. Deep sympathy is felt for the parents. In a long letter to the parents Elliot Halford’s Platoon Commander say :— “ He was killed about eight o’clock on the morning of the 7th. We had just turned the enemy out of one of our strongholds, and captured one of the highest points of the ridge. Halford was in the foremost line of our attacking troops, and was conducting himself, as he has done all along with the utmost bravery and devotion. A piece of bursting shrapnel overhead caught him, and the only consolation was that he suffered no pain—it was so sudden. . . . He was an exceptionally nice, good fellow. During the short time he was with us your son showed proof of those good qualities of courage, energy, endurance, and good comradeship which would have made him one of the best.”

WOLSTON.

RIFLEMAN W FLOWERS.-Mr & Mrs John Flowers, of Brook Street, Wolston, have received news of the death of their son, William. He joined up in September, 1914, and was on service in France for about 18 months, being attached to the 10th Rifle Brigade. He fought at Ypres in May, 1915, and in the Battle of Guillemont, and had been missing since September 3, 1916. His parents were thinking that he might be a prisoner of war until a letter came from the War Office announcing his death. Deceased was well known in local cricket and football circles. For the Brandon and Wolston Cricket Club he was a tower of strength in the field, and a daring football player and very popular.

BRINKLOW.

RED CROSS ACTIVITIES.—The Brinklow Branch of the British Red Cross Society has recently been making requisites for the wounded, and the following articles have been sent to the Central Depot in London :—104 comfort bags, 27 mufflers, 22 pairs day socks, 14 shirts, one vest, five pyjamas, seven pairs bed socks, and one feather pillow. Ninety-six of the comfort bags were made by the school children, the mothers giving the material for 23 ; 24 of the mufflers and 14 of the day socks were also made by the children.

DEATHS.

PARKINSON.—On 1st inst., at the Military Hospital, Cambridge, of wounds received in action in France, Second-Lieut. HORACE J. A. PARKINSON, the dearly beloved son of Mr. & Mrs. S. Parkinson, of the Old Bank House, Southam.

SANDS.—On June 17th, in Egypt, of diphtheria, Pte. HARRY SANDS, dearly beloved husband of Jennie Sands ; aged 34.—Deeply mourned.

WOOD.-On June 10th (killed in action in France), Pte. ARTHUR WOOD, Machine Gun Corps, son of the late Joseph Wood, 153 Grosvenor Road ; aged 21 years.—
From his loving Brother and Sisters.

IN MEMORIAM.

BLAND.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. C BLAND who was killed in action July 1st, 1916, aged 18 years.
Not dead to those who loved him,
Not lost but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.
From his loving Mother & Father, Sisters & Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of FREDERICK ROBERT, youngest son of the late Reuben & Mrs. Cashmore, of Hillmorton, who died from wounds in France on July 5, 1916. “ The love that lingers round his name is more than fame.”—From his sorrowing MOTHER, BROTHER and SISTERS, and his brother JACK in France.

FACER.—In loving memory of my dear husband Lance-Corpl. FREDERICK FACER, who was killed in action on July 3,1916.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before.
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—From his loving WIFE and CHILD.

COLLINS.—In loving memory of our dear son, Pte. H. E. COLLINS, who was killed in action in the Battle of Labosal on July 3, 1916, in France ; aged 25. Gloucestershire Regiment.
“ Not dead to those who loved him ;
Not lost, but gone before ;
He lives with us in memory,
And will for evermore.”
—Never forgotten by his loving FATHER and MOTHER, BROTHERS and SISTERS, New Street, New Bilton.

EADON.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son and brother GEORGE, of the R.W.R., who was killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Our home has never been the same
Since thy voice has silent been ;
Nor is the world the same to us
Since death has come between.”
—Never forgotten by his loving PARENTS, SISTERS and BROTHER.

HAMMOND.—In loving memory of PTE. ARTHUR HENRY HAMMOND, Church Lawford, 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, killed in action in France on July 1, 1916.
“ Peace, perfect Peace.”
—From his loving Wife and Children.

SEENEY.-In loving memory of SIGNALLER W. SEENEY who was killed in France July 2nd, 1916.
Where is our soldier boy to-night ?
Laid in a soldiers grave,
Far, far away in a foreign land
He died like a soldier brave.
Oh, may we meet our boy again
Far up in that home above,
Where war and strife will be no more,
But all will be peace and love.
—From his loving Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.

THOMPSON.—In loving memory of GEORGE BERRY, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Thompson, Braunston, who fell in action on July 1st, 1916, aged 21, years.—From Father, Mother, and Brother Sid.— “ They miss him most who loved him best.”

WATSON.—In loving memory of Pte. ARTHUR JAMES WATSON, jun., son of Thomas and the late Harriet Watson, of 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Killed in  action in France on July 2, 1916 ; aged 19 years.
“ Somewhere in France there is a nameless grave,
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave ;
One of the rank and file—he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.”
—From his FATHER & BROTHERS & SISTERS.

17th Mar 1917. High French Honour for Miss Ivens

HIGH FRENCH HONOUR FOR MISS IVENS.

The French Government has awarded a gold medal, the Medaille des Epidemies, to Miss Mary Hannah Frances Ivens, medical superintendent of the Auxiliary Hospital No. 301 Royaumont Abbey. Miss Ivens, formerly of Harborough Parva, holds the degrees of Master of Surgery and Batchelor of Medicine, and is curator of the Museum and demonstrator in practical pathology at the Royal Free Hospital, and a Fellow of the Obstetric Society of London. Silver, silver-gilt and bronze medals have also been awarded to several nurses at the Royaumont Abbey Hospital.-“ Paris Daily Mail.”

THE LATE LIEUT MACLEHOSE.

The “ British Weekly ” for last week contained the following :- “ Warm sympathy is expressed for Mr James Maclehose, the distinguished publisher to the University of Glasgow, who has lost his elder son in the War. The young officer was only 19, and he was killed in France on St. Valentine’s Day, 1917. His short career was full of promise and od performance. He was head of the School House at Rugby, where he was a cadet officer in the Rugby Officers’ Training Corps.”

ANOTHER OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY DEAD.

Pte Arthur K Reeve, 13th Royal Berkshire Regiment, died in Queen Alexandra Hospital, Dunkirk, France, on Sunday, March 4th, from spotted fever after two days’ illness. Before joining the Army he was employed by Mr Hollowell, builder, and lived at 16 Cambridge Street. He leaves a wife and two children. Pte Reeve was the third son of Mrs Reeve, 168 Murray Road, and was 41 years of age and an old St Matthew’s boy. The Captain of his Company, in a letter to Mrs Reeve, says her husband’s illness was quite short, and he died after being in hospital two days. The writer adds : ” Your husband was a good soldier and liked by all who knew him. I trust you will find consolation in the fact that he died whilst doing his duty and fighting for King and country, just as much as if he had died in the firing line.”

NATIONAL SERVICE.

In response to a request by the President of the Local Government Board and the Director-General of National Service, a committee has been formed by the Urban District Council to conduct the National Service recruiting campaign in Rugby. The Rev T F Churlich and Mr J T Clarke have been appointed joint honorary secretaries, and the headquarters of the committee will be at the Benn Buildings.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut B F McMurtrie has recently been promoted to Lieutenant and transferred to the Headquarters Staff of the Division.

Mr Wm Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds has received from the War Office an expression of the King’s appreciation of the services of the late Lieut Maurice Howkins, of the Royal Field Artillery, who was mentioned in a despatch from Sir A Murray in October last year for gallant and distinguished service in the field. The letter adds : “ His Majesty trusts that their public acknowledgment may be of some consolation in your bereavement.” Lieut Howkins, it will be remembered, was killed in Egypt.

Second-Lieut Maurice Lewis George Richardson, South Lancashire Regiment, attached to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action on the 28th ult., was the only son of the Rev Lewis Richardson and Mrs Richardson, of Binley Parsonage, Coventry, and was 19 years of age. Lieut Richardson, who was educated at Oakfield, Rugby, and St. Edward’s School, Oxford, received his commission in June, 1915, and went to the front a year later. For good work done as a bombing officer in January of this year he was mentioned in Despatched.

DEATHS.

ELLIOTT.-Killed in action on February 12th, L.-Corpl. HARRY JOHN ELLIOTT, Rifle Brigade, second son of Henry and Ann Elliott, of Bubbenhall.

REEVE.-On March 4th, in the Queen Alexandra Hospital, Dunkirk, France, ARTHUR KIMBALL REEVE, Royal Berkshire Regiment, beloved husband of Frances Amanda Reeve, 16 Cambridge Street, Rugby ; aged 41 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

ATKINS.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son, who was killed at St. Eloi, France, March 16, 1915.
“ Dear son, we miss thy hand-clasp ; we miss thy loving smile.
Our hearts are broken, but wait a little while,
And we shall pass thy golden gates.
God, comfort us, my son ; God, help us to wait.”
-Ever in the thoughts of his MOTHER & DAD.

ATKINS.-In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, who was killed at St. Eloi, France, March 16, 1915.
“ Had we but one last fond look
Into his loving face,
Or had we only got the chance
To kneel down in his place,
To hold your head, dear brother,
While your life’s blood ebbed away.
Our hearts would not have felt so much
The tears we shed to-day.
So ready to answer the call to the brave,
Altho’ you now rest in a far distant grave.
More or better could any man give
Than to die for his country that others might live.”
-From his loving SISTERS and BROTHERS.

SKINNER.-In loving memory of Pte. GEORGE GAULD SKINNER, 19th Canadians, who was killed by a sniper “ somewhere in Belgium,” March 14, 1915.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again.
Here life to me without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could I have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For me who loves you well.”
-Sadly missed by his sorrowing wife, CHARLOTTE.

STEEL.-In loving memory of our dear son, EDWARD, who was killed in action somewhere in France, March 16, 1915.
It would ease our hearts to know
How he met his fatal blow ;
But we know he was doing his share
For King and country in the foreign land over there.
-His ever loving father, Mother, Sister & Brothers.

11th Nov 1916. Inspection of Warwickshire Volunteers by Lord French

INSPECTION OF WARWICKSHIRE VOLUNTEERS BY LORD FRENCH.

At 8.45 on Sunday last the members of the Rugby Volunteer Corps fell in at the Drill Hall under Mr C H Fuller, the Commanding Officer of No 2 Company (comprising Rugby, Nuneaton, and Atherstone) of the 2nd Battalion of the Warwickshire Volunteer Regiment, to take their part in the inspection of the Warwickshire Regiment by the Field-Marshal, Lord French, at Calthorpe Park, Birmingham.

In due course the Battalion reached their allotted position, forming, together with the 1st, 3rd, 4th, and 5th Battalions, and a Company of Engineers, a Regiment some 3,000 in strength, under command of Col D F Lewis, C.B, Lieut-Col F F Johnstone (Commander of the 2nd Battalion) acting as Parade Commander.

Shortly after the Lord-Lieutenant of the County—the Earl of Craven—had arrived, Lord French, who had been met at the Station and accompanied by the Lord Mayor of Birmingham, entered the Park with his Staff, and was received with a General Salute. Without loss of time Lord French proceeded to inspect thoroughly each Battalion and Company of the Regiment, and afterwards in a clear strong voice addressed the Volunteers in terms which left no shadow of doubt in the minds of his hearers that they had won the appreciation of that gallant soldier and of the Authorities, and that they would be called upon to fill a role in the national defence which would release the more active soldier for services abroad. The discomforts of the pouring rain and the depressing weather were forgotten when words of praise for the soldierly bearing of the whole Regiment fell from the Field-Marshal’s lips ; words backed by his very emphatic statement, “ I mean what I say.”

Immediately after the inspection, and before addressing the Regiment, Lord French sent a special message to the 2nd Battalion, saying how pleased he was with them, and that from the way they stood they might have been soldiers all their lives. To the Rugby men this message was particularly gratifying, for they formed almost one complete Company of the Battalion to whom that message was sent.

The Rugby Corps arrived back in Rugby about 6.31 p.m, every man feeling that he had taken part in an historic event, marking one of the milestones on the road which Volunteers have set out to traverse- the road which shall lead them to be of service to their country whenever she may require it.

Notwithstanding the extremely bad weather, the conduct and general bearing of the men throughout the day was splendid.

The success of the inspection, and the keenness shown by the Rugby men, ought to have the effect of bringing new recruits, and enable the Rugby Corps to form itself into a complete Company.

THE POSSIBILITY OF AN INVASION.

On the same day Lord French inspected Volunteer at Bletchley, Oxford, and Wolverhampton.

In his address following the inspection at Birmingham, Lord French said the more men be saw of the Volunteer regiments the more he realised their enormous value to the country. Unless he had seen it himself, he never would have believed of the existence in this country to-day of such an extraordinary residue of latent military strength.

At Wolverhampton he said that whenever they heard of naval engagements near our coasts, and there was one in the Channel only the other day-it was always possible that behind the enemy ships of war transports might be bringing troops to land in this country at some unoccupied point. The whole history of war taught us that what happened was something that we did not expect. Therefore he wanted them to remember that invasion was possible. He did not say it was probable or imminent, or menacing ; but it was possible. Hence the great importance of the Volunteer movement.

“ OUR OWN DAY.”

£150 RAISED FOR RED CROSS.

All previous Flag Day records in Rugby were eclipsed on Saturday, when £150 8s 8d was collected on behalf of the new auxiliary hospital for wounded soldiers, which is to consist of eighty beds, and is to be located at the Institution Infirmary. About 130 ladies, including 30 Red Cross Nurses, sold flags in the streets, and upwards of 20,000 of these small tokens were disposed of. The arrangements, as usual, were entrusted to Mr J R Barker, and although he had only ten days in which to carry through the effort, his organisation was so complete that everything passed off smoothly, and a good deal of the credit for the success of the effort was due to his experience in these matters. He received valuable assistance from Miss D E Wood, who acted as Hon Secretary, and from members of the Boys’ Brigade, who delivered supplies of flags, etc, to the various sellers, all of whom received their flags on Friday evening. Mr R P Mason, London City and Midland Bank, was the Hon Treasurer, and he was assisted in the counting of the money, which took place at the supply depot, the Benn Buildings (kindly lent by the Urban District Council), by Messrs J Ferry, W G Mitchell, J R Barker, and Miss Dickinson. Throughout the morning Mr Barker visited the various districts, and so complete were the arrangements that it was almost impossible for anyone to escape buying a flag. The efforts organised by Mr Barker during the past sixteen months have produced over £2,000, and we believe few towns of the size of Rugby can show such a result.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Captain Thomas Ainsworth Townsend, R.A.M.C, of Clifton, has been awarded the Military Cross.

There are 200 conscientious objectors in Warwick prison.

Pte A Godwin (South Staffordshires), who, when in Rugby, was engaged at Mr A Dicken’s, hairdresser, Clifton Road, is now a prisoner of war at Dülmen, Germany. He was a member of the Conservative Club.

THE RUGBY FARMERS’ MOTOR AMBULANCE.

An officer belonging to Rugby, now at the front, was recently returning from the firing line when he met a motor ambulance, and on it he saw with pleasurable surprise the inscription, “ Presented by the Rugby and District Farmers’ Association.” The officer is probably the only Rugby man in that locality.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

MR G F HOWKINS LOSES ANOTHER SON.

Sincere sympathy will be felt with Mr G F Howkins, of Crick, in the fact that his youngest son, Mr Sidney Howkins, has been killed in France. The young soldier, who was about 25 years of age, was formerly employed in the Northamptonshire Union Bank, and when war broke out he joined the Northamptonshire Yeomanry, Going with them to the front in the following November, he was killed on October 30. This is the second son Mr Howkins has lost owing to the war.

WOUNDED.—Pte H Lee, R.W.R, Clarence Road, New Bilton, gun shot in left leg ; Pte A Parkinson, Worcesters, Ringrose Court, gun shot wound and severe fracture of right leg.

PTE W STRATFORD, OF HARBOROUGH MAGNA.

Mrs Davenport, of Harborough Magna, has received official news that her brother, Pte W Stratford, of the R.W.R, died of wounds on October 29th. Pte Stratford, who was a native of Badby, and about 32 years of age, enlisted at the commencement of the war, and had been in France eighteen months.

SUDDEN DEATH OF AN OLD SOLDIER.

An inquest was held by the Deputy Coroner, Dr Day, at the Rugby Police Court on Monday, touching the death of Q.M.S William Henry Jones, Observer Co, which took place suddenly at his lodgings, 4 Frederick Street, on Friday morning. The deceased, who was 45 years of age, was, before he enlisted in September, 1914, a schoolmaster at Birkenhead. He was married shortly afterwards. For some years he had suffered very badly from rheumatism, but had not had rheumatic fever, although on one occasion he kept his bed for two months. He was not allowed to proceed to the front on account of his heart being weak. Since he had been at Rugby he had suffered a good deal from indigestion. His wife stated that at eight o’clock on Friday morning he went to the bathroom and locked the door. She afterwards heard him groaning, and called the landlady, Mrs Louch. A man was also summoned, a panel of the door was smashed, and they found deceased lying on the ground with his head towards the door.

Dr Patrick, who made a post-mortem examination, said the heart was very much enlarged, and one of the valves was diseased. In his opinion death was due to syncope.—Lieut Fergusson, of the Observer Co, said deceased was an old soldier, and went through the South Afrian War. His work was only of a sedentary nature.—A verdict was returned in accordance with the medical testimony, and the jury expressed sympathy with the widow.

The funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon, when, despite a heavy downpour of rain, there was a large number of spectators. The coffin was preceded by a firing party from Budbrooke Barracks, and the deceased’s comrades, of the Observer Company, under Lieut Fergusson, followed after the mourners. The first part of the service was conducted by the Rev C M, Blagden, Rector, and was held in the Parish Church. The coffin, which was covered with the Union Jack, and deceased’s belt and hat, was borne to the grave by his fellow N.C.O’s. After the service three volleys were fired, and the “ Last Post ” was sounded. Beautiful floral tributes were sent by his wife, his mother, and sister; Major B D Corbet and Lieut Fergusson ; from the headquarter staff, No 6 Observer Company, with a card attached, “ Mourning deeply a true and faithful comrade ” ; Mr and Mrs C F Louch ; Howard W Clayton, 11th King’s Regiment ; Harold and Tom ; Sergt-Major Rowland, R.F.C ; a few civilian friends ; Mrs D Barnwell ; J H Lane, Miss Bull, and Mrs F Solomon; and Mrs A Thomas.

RUGBY SOLDIER HONOURED.-Pte J Enticott, Oxford and Bucks L.I, has been awarded the military Medal for bravery shown on September 15th by attending wounded single handed under heavy shell fire. He is the youngest son of Mr A Enticott, of Union Street, and was formerly employed at the B.T.H. Works.

ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court on Friday morning, before T Hunter, Esq, George Henry Smith, of Rugby, was charged with being an absentee from the R.W.R, and was remanded to await an escort

THE PARCELS sent by the Rugby Prisoners of War Committee to local men who are prisoners of war in Germany this week contained : tea, condensed milk, baked beans, 1lb sugar, grape nuts, fish paste, herrings in tomato sauce, margarine, cocoa, and 2lbs biscuits.

THE BATTLE OF THE SOMME. — A SPECIAL ATTRACTION AT THE EMPIRE.—For six days commencing November 20th, a film giving pictures of the Battle of the Somme — Official War Pictures of the British Army in France, taken by permission of the War Office, 5,000 feet in five reels to be shown at The Empire, Rugby.

EPIDEMIC OF BIGAMY IN WARWICKSHIRE. — At the Warwickshire Assizes on Monday, Mr Justice Bailhache commented on the fact that four out of the seven prisoners for trial were charged with bigamy. He said there seemed to be an epidemic of bigamy in Warwickshire.

IN MEMORIAM

CLARKE.—In ever loving memory of Walter, younger son of the late E. T. Clarke, and of Mrs. Clarke, 19 Temple Street, Rugby, who was killed in action. November 15th, 1915.
“ Greater love hath no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends.”
—Never forgotten by his Mother, Brother, and Sisters

Howkins, Maurice. Died 4th Aug 1916

Ernest Howkins was born   on 19th July 1894. Almost a year later on 28th July 1895 he was baptised Maurice at Woolscott Church. His parents were William and Emma (nee King) who married in late 1893. William was a farmer at Manor Farm, Woolscott.

Around 1892 the family moved to Hillmorton, where William had taken over the farm at Hillmorton Grounds, in Barby Road. Maurice was aged 16 and at school (Lawrence Sheriff). He had a younger brother Charles, aged 6. After leaving school he became a pupil in the engineering works at Crewe.

At the outbreak of war he joined the Honourable Artillery Company and in February 1915 given a commission in the Royal Field Artillery. He later transferred to the Royal Horse Artillery and promoted to 2nd Lieutenant, 1st/5th (Lowland) Brigade. He arrived in Egypt on 2nd March 1916. He was killed on the first day of The Battle of Romani which was part of the Palestine Campaign. It is likely that he was killed by the Turkish artillery attack on Romani.

The Suez Canal was a vital supply route for goods and the ANZAC and Indian troops and equipment. Early in the War the Allies had to defend it against Turkish troops and then against the Senussi Arabs in the Western Desert, it increased in importance following the failure of the Gallipoli Campaign and defeat at Kut-al-Amra in Mesopotamia (Iraq).

In April 1916 the Turks made a strong raid at Oghratine and Katie but did not follow up the success.

This gave Lt. General Sir Archibald Murray time to build up strength.

Aerial reconnaissance showed a large enemy force leaving Beersheba on 9th July 1916.It included the Turkish 3rd Division, a German Pasha 1 Group with 5 machine gun Companies, 2 trench mortar companies plus heavy and anti-aircraft artillery. It reached Bir al Abd on 19th July.

The enemy could not attack along the coast, but had to come from the south across a waterless desert with soft sand dunes. The 52nd Division moved to Romani when the railway was completed and were joined by the 53rd Welsh Division. The Commander in charge was Major-General the Hon. Sir Herbert Lawrence. He chose to wait until the Turks attacked. They approached to 10 miles from Romani and halted for 10 days.

Late on the 3rd of July a Turkish Force followed the retreat of the 2nd Australian Light Infantry but failed to scale the Wellington Ridge. On the 4th they shelled the Allied positions but did not attack directly. It is likely that he was killed by the Turkish artillery attack on Romani.

The Turkish forces withdrew having suffered 8,000 casualties, and 4,000 prisoners were taken by the Allies. The Allies had 1,100 casualties. Lawrence did not commit to an attack quickly enough on the retreating force, missing an excellent opportunity.

He is buried in the Kantara War Memorial Cemetery grave D8. Kantara is on the east bank of the Suez Canal 160 km north-east of Cairo.

Kantara was a major base and Hospital. In January 1916 a new railway was built eastwards from Kantara to Sinai and Palestine.

Maurice Howkins is remembered on the Lawrence Sheriff School Plaque and the Hillmorton War Memorial, as well as Rugby Memorial Gates.

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

1st Jul 1916. Charge Against an “Enemy Alien” Dismissed

CHARGE AGAINST AN “ ENEMY ALIEN ” DISMISSED.— Arthur E A Bierderman, canvasser, was charged with that he, being an alien enemy, did furnish false particulars for the purposes of registration in contravention of the Aliens’ Restriction (Consolidation) Order, 1916, at Rugby, on June 23rd.—Mr Eaden appeared, for the defendant, and pleaded not guilty.—P.S Ghent stated that on June 22nd defendant registered himself at the Police Station as a German, and signed the register produced, and gave an address in Bath Street. He returned later, and said he was staying at 138 Bath Street. On June 24th he called again, and was granted a travelling permit. Subsequently witness received from Mrs Smith, 138 Bath Street, the registration form produced. On that form defendant had written “ Australia,” and there was no mention of the fact that he was a German. Defendant was subsequently arrested at Banbury. He was charged with giving false information; and, in reply, he said, “ I feel relieved that that is all.”—By Mr Baden : In his identity book defendant had entered his nationality as “ Australia ” ; but someone had crossed that out, and substituted the word “ German.”—Mr Eaden asked what the nationality was of a man born in a British colony of a German parent naturalised in that colony ?—Witness said he thought he would be British, but defendant had to prove this.—Mr Wise pointed out that defendant’s father was naturalised after defendant was born.—P.S Ghent said the man was a “ German under protest,” and he did not like being called one. He added that when he asked defendant what has nationality was he said, the police said he was a German, but he believed he was an Australian. The man said unfortunately he had nothing to prove that he was born in Australia.—Supt Clarke said the man always travelled as a German, and he called at the Police Station and informed them that he was a German. He afterwards deceived his landlady by saying that he was an Australian.—Mr Baden pointed out that the defendant’s father and mother were unquestionably German, and had lived there. Defendant’s elder brother was born while they lived in Germany, and after this they went to Australia, where defendant was born. He was brought up at an English school, and was afterwards employed by a Mining Company in Australia. He lived in Australia 36 years, and during that time his father became naturalised, and his mother also became English automatically. Defendant and his brother, subsequently came to England, and as there was no question that the latter was a German, he became naturalised. There was no necessity for this in defendant’s case, because, as he was born in a British colony, he had the opportunity of adopting which country he would become a citizen of when he came of age, and he then chose to become an Australian. He had lost his birth certificate, and when he was before the Wandsworth police they insisted upon registering him as a German. He had never been to Germany, nor had he any German connections. He submitted that the man had only committed a technical offence, and if the Bench wished to adjourn the case defendant’s brother, who was the secretary of a large Insurance Company in London, could attend and give evidence to the effect that he was born in Australia.—The Chairman said defendant had committed a technical offence. He was in his present unfortunate position because he had lost his birth certificate, but they believed that he was an Australian, and they would dismiss the case. They thought the police did quite right in bringing the case forward.

PROGRESS OF THE WAR.

A message from the British Headquarters, sent on Thursday night, states that activity continues to increase along the whole of the British front.

The Russians have had another victory in the south. On a front of about 25 miles, east of Kolomea, they have defeated the Austrians, taking prisoners 221 officers and 10,285 men.

Sir Roger Casement was found guilty of high treason on Thursday, and the Lord Chief Justice pronounced upon him sentence of death by hanging.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Official intimation has been received by Mr and Mrs D Conopo, of Kilsby, that their son, Stoker Conopo, went down with H.M.S Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland on May 31st. Stoker Conopo, who was 26 years of age, joined the Navy four years ago, and visited his parents on leave in March last.

Gunner F Bosworth, D Battery, 241st (S.M Brigade) R.F.A, an Old Murrayian, was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s last despatch. In a letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, he says :— “ I am a telephonist in our Battery, and in this work we have many opportunities of taking part in some of the exciting incidents of this War, and it is in these little stunts that they have evidently thought me worth mentioning.”

Miss F E Knight, who was trained at the Hospital of St Cross, Rugby, was mentioned in the list of the King’s Birthday Honours, and has been awarded the decoration of the Royal Red Cross. Miss Knight joined the Territorial Nursing Force in 1914, and is at present working in Brighton.

Lance-Corpl J Jordan, R.F.A, son of Mr H J Jordan, railway inspector, of 84 Abbey Street, who has been missing for some time, is now reported to have been taken prisoner at Kut. He was an old 1st Rugby Co Boys’ Brigade member.

Mr W Seaton, of 134 Grosvenor Road, has received news that his son, Gunner Harry Seaton, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been severely wounded in the head. Gunner Seaton is the secretary of the Old Murrayians’ F.C, and is well known in local football circles.

RUGBY FOOTBALLER WOUNDED.

The list of casualties published on Wednesday includes the following men from this district who have been wounded :—Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry : Lance-Sergt F.G Judge and Sergt E Watts, Rugby. F G Judge played for Rugby F.C. He was a very useful forward, and showed great promise. Formerly he was vice-captain of the Junior XV. His home is at the Old Station.

Other local casualties reported in recent lists are :—

Wounded: Lance-Corpl J Faichnie, Oxon and Bucks L.I (B.T.H Foundry) ; Rifleman B Banbrook, Rifle Brigade ; Trooper R Goodfellow, Hussars. Taken prisoner at Kut : Corpl F C Jordan, R.F.A.

ANOTHER PRISONER OF WAR.

Mr W C Hitchcox, of 96 Abbey Street, has received a postcard from his son, Sergt Bernard Geo Hitchcox, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. The postcard is dated June 10th, and as a field card was received from him dated June 6th, he must have fallen into the hands of the enemy between those dates. Sergt Hitchcox belongs to the 2nd Canadian Contingent. A younger brother (Pte Clifford Hitchcox, of the same contingent) was killed in action in August last. Both were Old Murrayians.

OLD MURRAYIAN AWARDED THE D.C.M.

Rugbeians in general, and Old Murrayians in particular, will be interested to hear that Bomb W K Freeman, 73rd Battery, 5th Brigade R.F.A, son of Mrs Freeman, 6 Lancaster Road, has been awarded the D.C.M for “ Conspicuous gallantry. When some men were wounded in the town by the enemy’s fire, he took the medical haversack, although telegraphist, and rendered every assistance under heavy fire. Later, when himself wounded, he went to two dressing stations to get stretchers. He had previously displayed great bravery.” Bomb Freeman has also been awarded a French Military decoration.

THE LATE MR. JIM HOWKINS.

At Monday’s meeting of the Rugby Board of Guardians touching reference was made to the loss sustained by Mr G F Howkins, of Crick (a member of the Board), in the sad death of one of his soldier sons, reported in the Advertiser last week.

At Rugby Cattle Market (where Mr Jim Howkins for several years sold the sheep for Messrs Howkins & Sons) the buyers, after hearing of the sad news, proceeded to bid for the next few lots with their hats off to his memory. They also sent Mr and Mrs Howkins a letter of sympathy, which about 40 or more signed.

A memorial service was conducted by the Rev W C Roberts at Crick Parish Church on Sunday afternoon. A good number of Lance-Corpl Howkins’s friends from Rugby, Long Buckby, Murcott, West Haddon, and Crick attended. Suitable hymns were used, and the service was of a solemn and impressive character.

ANOTHER BARBY MAN GIVES HIS LIFE FOR HIS COUNTRY.

William Elkington, a driver in the R.H.A, was killed in action on June 17th. Mr Elkington received the following letter :-

“ I regret to say-your son Will has passed away to-day. We have had a terrible day to-day ; we have got four or five wounded. Poor little Will was one of the unlucky ones, and got a fatal hit with a bursting shell. He was riding his horse at the time ; his horse was killed outright. We (his comrades) had the care of burying him, and I can assure you he was buried in the very best way. He is lying in a soldier’s grave behind the firing lines. We shall all miss him very much ; he was such a jolly fellow. He died doing his duty for his King and country; he was a thorough soldier all through.”

On Sunday a memorial service was held in St Mary’s Church, Barby. There was, of course, a large congregation, including eight soldiers, who came over from the Daventry Hospital. Special hymns and psalms were sung, and the lesson from the Burial Service was read. The Rector (Rev R S Mitchison) preached from Rev iv 1, “ Behold a door was open in heaven.” He said they must look on all the pain, sorrow, and anxiety which came to us through this terrible War as warnings from God to make us think less of this world and more of the Heavenly Father. Another of our brave man had gone. Before he left,.after his last leave, he attended many of the services in the church ; he returned thanks to God for his life. He attended the Intercession service ; he partook of the Holy Communion ; he received the Church’s Blessing before he went in the little service all take part in before they go to the Front. Now they would see him no more on this earth, but he left behind him a good example.

WOMEN FARM WORKERS.

In many parts of the country there appears to exist a suspicion that, if women register their names for farm work, they may be subjected to some form of compulsory service.

The War Office and the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries desire to assure all women who are engaged in work on the land, or who may be willing to undertake such work, that the registration of their names for that purpose will in no way be used to compel them to undertake either agricultural or any other form of work. Such work is entirely voluntary. In no case will they be asked or expected to work on farms outside their own neighbourhood unless they are willing to do so. But it is necessary, in order that the most efficient use may be made of their services, to have a list of the names and addresses of women who are prepared in the emergency to undertake work in the place of the men who are fighting in the trenches. As there is a great need for the services of patriotic women who are willing to assist in the home production of food, it is hoped that all women who can see their way to offer their services, either whole or part time, will at once have their names registered at the local Labour Exchange or by the village Registrar.

RUGBY CASES AT COVENTRY MUNITIONS COURT.

The following cases were dealt with on Friday last week by Coventry Munitions Tribunal

Annie and Mary Sleath, Clifton, v Rugby Lamp Co, Ltd.—This was a complaint in each case of withholding certificate.—Certificates were refused.

W W Wilson. 94 Holyhead Road, v Willans & Robinson, Ltd.—Similar complaint.-The case was struck out.

The cases heard at Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Tuesday included the following :—

Joseph Thomas Lindsell, Rugby, v Willans & Robinson, Rugby.—This was a complaint of withholding certificate. He said he wished to go back to his home at Stoke, where his mother lived, she being a widow and he being an only child. He said he was told there was plenty of work in the Stoke district.—The Chairman suggested that a man at Stoke who wanted to come to Rugby might be exchanged for Lindsell. The case was adjourned for four weeks to see if an exchange could be effected.

James Henry Ball, Rugby, v B.T.H, Rugby.—This was a complaint of withholding certificate. He said he was doing the work of a millwright, though engaged as an assistant millwright, but was refused the district rate. The firm said he was a skilled labourer. It was stated that the man had been offered a fully qualified situation, and that the A.S.E was supporting him. The certificate was granted. It was intimated that an appeal might be lodged.

B.T.H Co, Rugby, v F Dexter, Rugby.—This was a complaint of time losing. He said he was ill, but did not inform the firm.—He was fined 40s.

B.T.H Co v W J Price, Rugby.—Complaint of being absent without leave. He pleaded illness.—Fined 25s.

B.T.H Co v D Conopo, Kilsby.—Similar complaint. He said he walked six miles to his work every morning, and sometimes walked back to his home. It transpired that the man lost his son, who was on the Queen Mary, and the firm said they did not know that, and would not press the case under the circumstances.—The case was withdrawn.

Two other employees of the same firm, J A Grimes, 18 Hunter Street, Rugby, and Alfred Day, 3 Bridge Street, Rugby, were also before the Court for breach of rules.—Day was fined 10s, and the case against Grimes dismissed with a caution.

ABSENTEES.—At- Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before T A Wise, Esq, two young Hillmorton soldiers, Alfred Giddings (3rd Royal Berks) and John Saddler (Durham Light Infantry), pleaded guilty to being absentees from their units, and were remanded to await an escort.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. Herbert Wm. Astill, 10744, Oxon and Bucks L.I., stretcher bearer, who died of wounds, June 29, 1915.—Deeply mourned by his widowed MOTHER.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. Arthur Coombes, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last.
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son Arthur, who died February 26,1915.
—From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

LEESON.—Previously reported missing, now killed in action on the 25th of September, 1915, Sergt Fred Leeson (Bob), Oxford and Bucks L.I., dearly loved second son of Mr. and Mrs. Leeson, 70 Hartington Road, Leicester (late of Hunter Street, Rugby), aged 23 years.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a voice that is still.”

 

24th Jun 1916. Damage to Crops by Aircraft

DAMAGE TO CROPS BY AIRCRAFT.

The Board of Agriculture and Fisheries desire to call the attention of farmers to the possibility of loss of, or damage to, growing crops by hostile aircraft.

No liability can be accepted by the Government, and no claim can be entertained in respect of damage to property by aircraft or bombardment unless the property has been insured under the Government scheme, particulars of which can be obtained at any Post Office or from any Fire Insurance Company.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Roland R Tait, of the firm of Messrs Tait, Sons, & Pallant, and a well-known local footballer and cricketer, has enlisted in the 7th Worcesters, and has gone to headquarters this week.

Second-Lieut E G Passmore, Northampton Regiment (son of Mr S A Passmore, of Ashby St Ledgers), was wounded in France on June 18th.

Capt Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, was “ mentioned ” for the second time in the last despatches, and was promoted to Brevet Major in the last list of honours. He has for some months been on the staff of the Second Division in France as D.A.A, Q.M.G, having previously done some 11 months in the trenches with the Third Battalion Coldstream Guards.

Lieut Hon Henry S Feilding has been transferred to the Coldstream Guards, and has how joined the depot at Windsor. He served till about a year ago in the K.E.H, and went to France with them in May 1915, and about July was taken as A.D.C by General Horne, R.A (of East Haddon), commanding the Second Division, and went to Egypt with him in December, 1915, when General Horne was promoted to Lieutenant General to command an Army Corps, and recently returned to France, when the General was appointed to command an Army Corps there. Lieut Feilding has now resigned A.D.C, and transferred as described.

Engine-room Artificer Stanley Liddington, who took part in the Battle of Jutland, recently visited Murray School, where he was formerly a pupil. Three other Old Murrayians—W L Holmes, C Cooper, and W Clarke—also went through the battle, and the former has sent a very interesting letter to his old schoolmaster.

L G Colbeck, the old Cambridge Cricket Blue—formerly a Master at Rugby School—is now in training with the O.T Corps (Artillery) at Topsham, near Exeter.

Lieut J A Hattrell, Royal Warwicks, who has been in charge of the Registration Department of the Rugby Recruiting Office for the past six months, leaves the district this week. Immediately upon war being declared, Lieut Hattrell, who was in the legal profession in Coventry, joined the local Territorial Battalion of the Loyal Warwicks. Lieut Hattrell is the son of the Rev G P Hattrell, Free Church Minister, formerly of Stretton-under-Fosse, and now of Welford.

Second-Lieut William Roy Elphick (O.R), Indian Infantry, who died from cholera on June 7th, was born in 1894, and gazetted in August, 1914. He was the eldest son of the late Major. H W Elphick, L.M.S, and Mrs Elphick, of 82 Hereford Road, Bayswater. When at the School deceased got his colours for football, and also played with the XI, at cricket, being a particularly good bowler. He also assisted the town clubs in both branches of sport.

Lady Craven, of Combe Abbey, has just given, through Mr Chandler (head gardener), all the men on the estate 2s a week increase of wages. This is the third advance the men have had since the War began.

Mrs Frankton, of 20 Lawford Road, Rugby has received a letter from the War Office, stating that her husband, Pte Walter Fredk Frankton, 3rd Grenadier Guards, who has been missing since the Battle of Loos, must now be presumed to have been killed in September last. Pte Frankton, who before the war was employed by the Public Health Committee of the Urban District Council, enlisted in January, 1915, and was at the front about two months before his death. He a native of Rugby, and was educated at the Wesleyan School.

DEATH OF MR JAMES F HOWKINS.

We much regret to record the death from enteric fever of Mr James F Howkins, second son of Mr and Mrs Fred Howkins, of Crick, which occurred last Saturday at Alexandria. The deceased, who was 27 years of age, served his articles with Messrs Howkins & Sons, auctioneers and estate agents of this town, with whom he was engaged until last August, when he joined the Honourable Artillery Company. As an auctioneer deceased was well known especially in Rugby Cattle Market. He was a very hard worker, and possessed first-class business capabilities. He was a Fellow of the Auctioneers and Estate Agents Institute, and a member of the Midland Counties Valuers Association. His loss will be very greatly felt by all those who knew him, and especially at Crick, where he was a great favourite. The deceased has two brothers, and both are now serving abroad-the younger with the Northants Yeomanry, and the elder with the Royal Engineers.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Information has been received that Pte Bertie John Cleaver, of Hill, has died of disease in Mesopotamia. He was 19 years of age, and with his brother Archie joined the 19th Hussars soon after war broke out, but both were transferred to the Gloucester Regiment, with which he was serving at the time of his death. The father of deceased, an old soldier, is serving in the Warwickshire Regiment at Maidenhead, and his brother, Sergt Wm Cleaver, has been in France since the War commenced.

BRANDON.

WOUNDED.—Rifleman Bert Banbrook, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr and Mrs Reuben Banbrook, has been wounded in the thigh, and is now making satisfactory progress at Epsom Hospital.—Mr and Mrs E W Ireson received news on Sunday that their elder son had been wounded. He was hit by shrapnel in the head, but luckily his steel helmet saved his life. He came over from Saskatoon, Canada, with Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, and was one of those who succeeded in taking trenches from the Germans last week. Before proceeding to Canada he was for several years a clerk in Lloyds Bank, Rugby.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

PRIVATE GOUGH KILLED.—News was received last week that Pte J Gough, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, had been killed in action on June 2nd. Deceased joined the Army in December, 1914, and was sent to France the following July, where he had been for ten months. He was native of Church Stretton, but for some years had lived at Bourton, where he had gained the respect of all who knew him. A memorial service was held in Bourton Church on Sunday.

DISTRICT APPEALS’ TRIBUNAL.

Held at the Benn Buildings, Rugby, on Friday last week. Present: Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, P G Loveitt, and K Rotherham. Agricultural representative: Mr J E Cox. Military representative: Mr M E T Wratislaw.

ESTATE CARPENTER SECURES A TEMPORARY EXEMPTION.

Mr Lupton Reddish supported the appeal of Walter, Congreve, estate carpenter for Capt Henry Boughton-Leigh, Brownsover Hall. The local Tribunal held that he could be replaced by someone not eligible for military service.—The Chairman said it was important, if the man was engaged on the work described, that he Should be retained to keep the farms going, and temporary exemption, to September 30th was granted.

MR W ELLIOTT’S BOTTLING BUSINESS.

The Military appealed against the temporary exemption granted to Chas John Elliott, 8 Vicarage Road, Rugby, manager of a mineral water and bottling business.—Mr Wratislaw said there had been no attempt to get a substitute, and appellant had been passed for general service at home or abroad.—Given till August 1st, with no further extension.

MESSRS FOSTER & DICKSEE’S SECRETARY.

Mr Sidney J Dicksee appealed on behalf of Herbert Watson, builder’s clerk and acting secretary to Messrs Foster & Dicksee, living at 20 Arnold Street, Rugby. He pointed out that six members of the clerical staff had joined the Army, and that to carry on the work of acting secretary required great experience.—Appeal dismissed, but given till September 1st.

BADLY ADVISED BY FRIENDS.

Herbert Southby Vowles, commercial traveller, 279 Clifton Road, Rugby, who had been allowed till July 1st by the local Tribunal, asked for three months’ postponement to settle up his affairs.—Mr Eaden said appellant was anxious to get into the Army. He was advised by his friends if he asked the Tribunal for one month’s exemption they would be generous, and possibly give him more (laughter). He should have asked for a little more than he expected to get.—The Chairman : Is that what he is doing now ? (laughter).—Allowed till September 15th.

 

A NOURISHING ARTICLE.

Appealing for his son, Mr Bromwich, milk producer and retailer, of Newton, said milk was a most nourishing article of food and drink combined.-Given to August 1st and told it was doubtful if any further extension would be allowed.

BRANDON ESTATE HAND.

A final temporary exemption till August 1st was given to Harry Giles, estate hand, 6 Bridget Street, New Bilton, appealed for by T Hirons, of Brandon.

WOMEN FARM WORKERS CRITICISED.

Frank Chester, Moorland Cottage, Newbold, was given till August 1st, the Tribunal being of opinion that on the face of it his single brother Anthony, now exempted as a shepherd, ought to go into the Army.— The question of women labour was raised, and appellant said they had employed four women on the farm, but he did not think they would stay.-Mr Worthington said the experience of one farmer was that of two women he employed at hoeing one left at 12 o’clock the first day ; the other stayed till 4 p.m, and never came again.

DISSATISFIED WITH HIS JOB.—At Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Monday a fine of 10s was imposed upon Fred Hanks, 2 Russell Street, Rugby, for losing time at Willans & Robinsons. He stated that he wanted his discharge to get into the Army. His earnings were only 26s 6d a week, and he was dissatisfied. The Chairman suggested that the firm might give the man an advance so that he might be more satisfied with his job.

ABSENTEES UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM AND Military Service Acts, 1916.

LIST OF ABSENTEES FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE FIRST MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1916.

The following are their last-known addresses :—

  1. W. West, 5 James Street, Rugby, age 20.
  2. A. Oldroyd, 41 Newbold Road, Rugby, age 25.
  3. G. Hodge, 30 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 26.
  4. W. Barnett, 176 Murray Road, Rugby, age 28.
  5. Pickles, Railway Hotel, Rugby, age 28.
  6. Smith, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 29.
  7. Hewitt, “ Zotha House,” Park Road, Rugby age 30.
  8. W. Walker, 37 Wood Street, Rugby, age 30.
  9. G. Smith, c/o Punter, Clifton Road, Rugby, age 33.
  10. Owen, 6 Drury Lane, Rugby, age 36.
  11. Ross, Spring Hill, Rugby, age 18.
  12. Jackson, White Lion, Warwick Street, Rugby, age 38.
  13. Francis [or Heeney], 186 Murray Road, Rugby, age 29.
  14. Bartlett, 23 Graham Road, Rugby, age 18.
  15. Twywood, 17 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 38.
  16. Widdell, 48 Bilton Hill, near Rugby, age 32.
  17. A. Lines, Bilton, age 33.
  18. P. Coleman, 16 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, age 28.
  19. H. Cox, 72 Lawford Road, New Bilton, age 18.
  20. W. Ellerton, Bridget Street, New Bilton, age 24.
  21. E. Capewell, Wharf Farm, Hillmorton, age 34.
  22. F. Flowers, 18 Vicarage Hill, Clifton, age 21.
  23. J. Ireton, Deana Lodge, Kineton, age 19.
  24. T. Tuckey, Post Office Lane, Long Itchington, age 25.
  25. J. Barnes, Kington Farm, Lighthorne, age 28.
  26. J. Thomicroft, Napton-on-the-Hill, age 18.
  27. Cooper, Radford, age 39.
  28. Field, Mount Pleasant, Stockton, age 27.
  29. Ansill, Tysoe, Warwick, age 29.

LIST OF ABSENTEES FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM.

The following are their last-known addresses:—

  1. Malin, 89 Murray Road, Rugby, age 33, married.
  2. R. Walker, 11 Union Street, Rugby, age 27, single.
  3. Mitchell, 26 Northcote Road, Rugby, age 35, married.
  4. H. Williams, 15 Park Road, Rugby, age 34, single.
  5. Partridge, 76 Windsor Street, Rugby, age 18, single.
  6. L. Smith, 7 Lodge Road, Rugby, age 29, married.
  7. Slater, 47 Wood Street, Rugby, age 35, married.
  8. Kennard, Wolston Grange Cottages, Old Bilton, age 23, single.
  9. A. Cole, 13 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, age 26, married.
  10. R. Macgregor, May Cottage, Newton, age 20, single.
  11. E. Fruce, 17 Boughton Road, Brownsover, age 26 married.

The Public are invited to give all the assistance in their power to the Military Authorities by giving any INFORMATION in their possession which they consider would assist in the tracing of these absentees.

The Information should be given or sent to the

RECRUITING OFFICER, DRILL HALL, RUGBY.

The names of all giving information will be regarded as strictly
F. F. JOHNSTONE, LiEUT.-COLONEL,
RECRUITING OFFICER.
June 22nd, 1916.

THANKS FROM A D.C.M HERO.

A letter was received from Sniper A Norman, D.C.M, thanking the Health Committee for their letter of congratulation, which he said he received with great pleasure and a certain amount of pride. To know that their efforts were appreciated by kind friends at home made them all the keener to reach that victory and honour which was fast approaching into sight.—The Chairman : The Council are very pleased to receive that letter from Pte Norman. They are proud of him.

IN MEMORIAM

WALE.—In loving memory of John Wale, 1st Leicesters, who was killed in action near Ypres, June 23,1915.
“ We cannot, Lord, Thy purpose see,
But all is well that’s done by Thee.”
—From his loving WIFE and DAUGHTER.