24th Jul 1915. Rugby Man Arrested by Sentry

PHOTOGRAPHY IN WAR TIME.

RUGBY MAN ARRESTED BY SENTRY.

At Bangor, on Saturday, Frank James Hawkins, 59 Regent Street, Rugby, electrical engineer, a visitor to Llandudno, was charged under the Defence of the Realm Act (a) with taking a photograph in the neighbourhood of Menai Bridge without authority or sanction of a competent military officer, with intent to assist the enemy, and (b) with being in possession of photographic instruments in the shape of a hand camera, etc.

Accused pleaded not guilty to the first charge, but admitted the second.

Private Jones, a sentry at the Carnarvonshire end of the Menai Suspension Bridge, said he saw the accused on top of a wall, apparently taking a photograph of the opposite side of the Straits, which included a view of the Anglesey end of the suspension bridge.

Hawkins said he was totally ignorant of the regulations on this subject. He was staying at Llandudno, and on the day in question went on a motor-cycle through the Pass of Llanberis, and came to Carnarvon, and thence towards Bangor, and seeing a road marked “ To Menai Bridge,” he took that road, as he wished to see the bridge. He got on a wall and saw a nice view of the village, and he thought he would photograph it.

The Bench expressed themselves quite satisfied that defendant had acted in ignorance imposed a light fine of 20s.

FROM AN INTERNMENT CAMP IN GERMANY.

“ TAFFY, THE CRANE DRIVER,” A PRISONER OF WAR.

The Rev F Potter, of St Marie’s College, Rugby, has received an interesting communication from Pte Wm Turner, of the Royal Munster Fusiliers, who formerly worked as a crane-driver at Messrs Willans & Robinson’s Works, and is now a prisoner in Germany. He says :-

“ I am going on quite well, hoping you and all the old country are the same. I am interned in a camp composed of Irishmen and Roman Catholics. Our camp is situated on a hill in the beautiful valley of the Rhine overlooking the city of Limburg on the Lahn. The treatment and the accommodation is all that can or could be desired in this camp. There are also Russian and French prisoners interned here, but separated by barbed wire from us. We do a little light work daily as exercise. You may probably be aware of the object in having all Irishmen together ; we are in the Catholic district.

“ I should like my friends and workmates of Messrs Willans & Robinson to know that I am still alive and well, after ten months on the Continent, but am now, unfortunately, guest of the German Government. They are sure to remember ‘Taffy, the crane-driver,’ as I was known at the Victoria Works. Probably you may have amongst your congregation in or around Rugby some good Samaritan who would like to help the prisoners here by sending a few little comforts, such as cigarettes, tobacco, or food-stuffs, as we depend chiefly on our good peopled for such luxuries. I ask nothing for myself, as my wife, who as you know lives at Ashby, sends me all I require, but for those who have neither relatives or friends. Should any be sent through me, I shall be only too pleased to distribute them amongst the most deserving causes, and will acknowledge all gifts to the best of my ability. We receive a little occasionally from ladies in England, but as the number of men is great (about 2,000), and by far exceed the supply received, the individual quantity is very infinitesimal. I trust that men from Rugby and district now serving at the front are quite well. My prayers and those of my comrades interned here are offered for their safe return to their homes in the near future. I trust you are quite well, and shall be only too pleased to hear from you or anyone wishing to communicate with me. Our treatment is very fair. We have every facility for cleanliness, and the German Authorities supply change of underclothing as required, so we have nothing very much to complain about. Wishing you and all the old country the best of luck and good wishes, and a speedy conclusion to the terrible war. I remain, Rev Sir, Yours very respectfully. No 7242 William Turner, Royal Munster Fusiliers (late crane-driver Victoria Works), Limburg, Lahn.”

The Catholic Chaplain, Father Crotty, Dominican at Limburg, writing to Father Potter about this man, among other things says : “ You may assure Mrs Turner that her husband is being well cared for. Yesterday, with the other prisoners of war, he took part in our grand procession of the Blessed Sacrament through the Irish Quarter of the lager.” This chaplain is an Englishman. Since this above was written, Pte Turner has sent a post-card saying that he has been removed from the above camp.

B.T.H. MAN KILLED.

Mr and Mrs Davenport, of the Home Farm, Lindley Lodge, Nuneaton, have received the sad news that their son, Pte Henry Herbert Davenport, was killed by a German sniper on the morning of June 22nd. At the time he enlisted deceased was working at the B.T.H, and formerly at Churchover, where he was a schoolboy.

The following sympathetic letter from his captain has been received by Mrs Davenport, and we are sure the acquaintances of the young soldier will share the regret expressed by the officer :-“ Dear Madam,—It is with the deepest regret that I have to write and tell you of the death of your son, No 10608, Pte H Davenport. He was shot through the head by a German sniper, and died almost at once. He was buried close to where he fell, just behind the trench, and the spot is marked with a cross. The ground becomes the property of the British Government, and the grave will be well cared for. The Officers and the Company deeply sympathise with you in your great loss, and we all respected your son for his fine character and soldierly qualities. He was killed on the morning of the 22nd.—Yours with deep sympathy, A W T WEBB, Captain.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte Bertie Cecil Mander (Rugby), of the 4th Battalion of the Canadian contingent, has been wounded in action in Flanders.

Mr W J Peddell, auctioneer, Rugby,has been gazetted to a second-lieutenant in in the 10th South Staffs Regiment. Lieut Peddell has arranged with Messrs Tait, Sons, & Pallant to carry on his business during his absence.

Lce-Corpl Stanley Hidden son of Mr and Mrs George Hidden, Moultrie Road, Rugby, late of the Leicestershire Yeomanry, has received a commission as second-lieutenant in the Warwickshire Yeomanry.

Messrs Hoare, Clench, Jones, West, and Reynolds, all employees of the Co-operative Society, Rugby, presented themselves for enlistment at Coventry this week for the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Unfortunately Clench, Jones, and West were rejected for medical reasons, but have signified their intention of offering their services in the manufacture of munitions.

SAPPER SNOOK WOUNDED.

Mrs Snook, of 40 Lodge Road, has received news from the War Office that her second son, Sapper A E Snook, of the Royal Engineers, has been severely wounded in the scrotum and right thigh, and is now in a hospital in this country. Sapper Snook was with his brother and several friends when the shell which wounded him burst ; and although another Rugby man was wounded at the time, the rest had a marvellous escape. Mrs Snook has three sons with the colours. Two have been to the front, and the youngest is expecting to go shortly. All three enlisted at the commencement of the war, when they were employed at the B.T.H Works.

WOUNDED IN HAND AND FACE.

Pte Ernest Luthwaite, of the 1st Hampshire Regiment, son of Mr J Luthwaite, of 39 Lodge Road, Rugby, has been wounded in the right hand and the face. The news was communicated to Rugby by the Rev T L Bruce, chaplain of No. 1 Canadian General Hospital France, where Pte Luthwaite is under treatment as a patient. He is reported to be progressing favourably and to be comfortable and cheerful. Before he enlisted Pte Luthwaite was a glass blower in the Mazda Lamp Factory at the B.T.H Works. He joined the Army on the outbreak of the war, and has been in France about two months. When in Rugby he became a member of the Park Albions, and played at half-back for that club.

NEW BILTON MEN WOUNDED.

Mr E T Burton, of 35 Avenue Road, New Bilton has received an intimation from the War Office that his son, Pte M Burton, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was wounded (shot wound in right leg) on the 8th inst., “ somewhere in France.” He was taken to the 1st Canadian Hospital at Etaples, and has since been removed to the Military Hospital at Edmonton, Middlesex. Before enlisting in September he was engaged in the core-making department at Willans & Robinson’s Works. We understand that he is progressing favourably.

Mrs C H Wood, of 11 Campbell Street, New Bilton, has received intimation from the War Office that her husband, Pte Wood, of the 1st Royal Warwickshire Regiment, was wounded in the thorax by shrapnel on July 8th. Pte Wood, who joined the Army in January, and was previous to that time employed by Messrs Frost as a compositor, has written to his wife stating that he is going on well. He is at present in a General Hospital in France.

LANCE-CORPL. F. H. BOTTERILL WOUNDED.

“ A BULLET STRAIGHT IN THE EYE.”

Capt W F Wood, of the 1st Rugby Company Boys Brigade, has received a letter, dated County Hospital, Huntingdon, July 21st, from Lce-Corpl F H Botterill, of the 1st Royal Warwicks, announcing that he has been wounded, and giving some account of his experiences. We make the following extract from the letter:—“ As an old boy of your Company, I feel I am only doing my duty in writing to my Commanding Officer, and the one who first taught me the duties of a soldier. I have now been connected with the army for 12 years, but there has been far more stirring times this last twelve months than all the other, for I went to France last August. I have been with my old regiment, the 1st Royal Warwickshire, and I am proud to belong to it, for it has seen a lot of service, and we have always done our duty. I have seen very many of my old comrades go never to return, and my life has been spared on several occasions ; but they caught me at last, with a bullet straight in the eye. I am thankful it came out near my ear instead of going through my brain. I have lost my left eye, and it has been very hard to take my food, for I couldn’t open my mouth, but I am pleased to tell you I have had a wonderful recovery. My hearing has got normal also ; I can open my mouth much wider, and can see nicely to write a letter with my sound eye. I have seen a few exciting times, and the work was very hard last August and September. I went through the winter in the trenches, but they gave me a decent “ Easter Egg.” Still, I am very thankful my life has been spared, for the doctors all tell me I must have a “ strong spot,” but I am about “fed up.” This makes the fourth hospital I have been in, and it is rather monotonous after the life I have been leading, for I have never had anything worse than a cold. Still, I mustn’t worry, for I have always been in charge of a section, and I have seen many come and go, and some never to see the dear old home again.”

CAPTAIN OF RUGBY FOOTBALL CLUB BUSY IN FRANCE.

George Renshaw, captain of Rugby F.C, has had a busy time since he enlisted seven months ago in the Army Service Corps. He has been in France six months, and is engaged in clerical work. In a communication received by his brother on Thursday he states that he is working daily from 4 a.m till 8 p.m, so has little time for letter-writing. The popular Rugby full back is cheerful and well, in spite of the fact that he has not slept in a bed for several months.

COMMENDATION FOR A B.T.H RECRUIT.

Lance-Corpl F Keeley, 4th Battalion of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps has received commendation from his Commanding Officer and Brigade Commander for his conduct in the field with the British Expeditionary Force. Corpl Keeley enlisted in August at Rugby, where he was working as a pattern-maker for the British Thomson-Houston Company. He gained his promotion to corporal, and was transferred from B Company to C Company for his conduct in the second battle of Ypres.

A REQUEST FOR RAZORS.

Pte H Holmes, 1664 B Company, 1st Royal Warwicks, serving with the British Expeditionary Force, whose home is at 47 Wood Street, Rugby, has written us stating that there are twelve or more men in the regiment to his knowledge without razors, and if any of our readers have old razors that will shave the men referred to would be glad of them. We understand that all men have razors served out to them as part of their equipment, but apparently the men Pte Holmes refers to have lost theirs. Our correspondent informs us that he went out to France on November 11th last year, and has been in hospital twice. He adds:” We are out of the trenches now for a longer rest. Our regiment took part in that affair on July 6th. We were called up on the night we were going to be relieved, but had to stop owing to the Germans keeping on counter-attacking. The Old Warwicks helped to hold them back well.”

CREDITABLE RECORD OF A HILL FAMILY.

For a father, three sons, and a son-in-law to be serving with the colours is a record of which any family might well be proud. The hamlet of Hill, near Leamington Hastings, has a household that claims this distinction. Mr Wm Cleaver, the father, is in the 7th Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and is engaged in guarding bridges at Rugby. His eldest son is Sergt W H Cleaver, of the 19th Hussars, who went out to the front last August. He was slightly wounded in the foot, and has been home for a short time, but is now back again at the war. His injury was caused by shrapnel, and another piece of the shell became embedded in his cap. Both bits of metal are being retained as souvenirs. The other two sons, Privates A H Cleaver and B J Cleaver, are in the 3rd Gloucester Regiment, to which they have been transferred from the 19th Hussars. They are expecting to leave for the front this week. The son-in-law, Pte John Prestidge,is serving with the South Staffordshire Regiment at the Dardanelles.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following men have been attested at the Rugby Drill Hall this week :—J A Bryan, Royal Engineers ; Thos Hellier Edward, T H Johnson, and F Proctor, A.S.C ; A Hill and E Brown, A.V.C ; T Stewart, R.A.M.C ; C Denton and T Smith, R.F.A ; M A Adnitt, D Smith, and R Redding, R.W.R ; J Myers, K.O.Y.L.I ; J O’Donnell, 14th Gloucesters (Bantams) ; A Brown, Rifle Brigade.

FURTHER TIDINGS OF THE RUGBY HOWITZERS.

Sergt-Major Hopewell, of the Rugby Howitzer Brigade, has written to Mr W F Wood, of Market Place, Rugby, giving an account of recent fighting, in which the local Howitzers took part. The letter is dated, July 4th. Referring to the Boys’ Brigade, he says:—

“ I think it is a splendid organization, and the large number of men that we have who are past members of your Company show that the patriotic instinct instilled in them in youth grows up with them in after life. We all hope you will have an excellent camp and the very best of weather to enable you to enjoy it to the full.”

He then proceeds: “ I will just briefly relate what has occurred since I wrote to you last. We did our usual amount of firing up till Sunday, June 6th, 1915, when we had a good day’s “ sport,” which commenced by the Engineers exploding two mines under the German trenches. This was a signal for our artillery and machine-guns being turned on the enemy’s position, which was a network of trenches. In the report of the day’s action, which was issued by the General of our Army Corps, our battery was very favourably mentioned. The enemy made three different attacks since them, each preceded by the explosion of a mine, but in every case the saps were short, resulting in the mines exploding between the trenches instead of under our’s, so the damage to our people was practically nil. They sent over 400 shells in one of these spasms in about an hour, and we also had eight rounds in and about our gun position—one coming through a dug-out and another bursting it the edge of a gun platform. Luckily, no one was hurt, as all the men were at the other end of the gun position. We also had several close to the billet, but with nil results, and another farm near by was burnt down by their incendiary shells. Our observing party were shelled out of their station the other day, about 30 falling all round the place in the morning, and one hit the building in the afternoon, but they were all in the dug-out by then, so no harm was done. The village near to where we were also had a bad gruelling for about three weeks, but it didn’t make the civilians clear out, although a good many of them were wounded. The Germans attacked, very heavily for about two hours a week last Thursday night, and some of their infantry got as far as our trenches, but were repulsed, leaving twenty or thirty dead behind them. We have had a little recreation in the form of a ‘smoker’ now and again, and we also played another battalion at footer and beat them 1—0, and another battalion at cricket, and beat them by 11 runs, so you will see it is not all fighting here. We have very little fear from the gases now, as every man is supplied with a new pattern smoke helmet and respirator, and both have been proved very efficient by actual experiment. We moved from our position a week last Saturday for an alleged rest, so had our final hate in the morning by putting 15 rounds into their trenches, and started on trek in the evening, arriving at our present destination Tuesday night. The march was very interesting, as we saw a good deal of the country, marching from about 6 p.m until midnight each day, and having the days to ourselves except for stables and harness cleaning. We are at present staying in a mining village, which is very pretty, as it is so thickly wooded, and has evidently been part of a large estate at some time or other.

27th Mar 1915. Rugby Volunteer Training Corps

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

TWO DIFFICULTIES ELUCIDATED.

The present membership of the Volunteer Training Corps for Rugby is 235, More would, no doubt, have joined but for two points on which there has recently been information given of value to those interested in the movement. In the first place, men have been deterred from joining owing to the impression that they were not likely to be asked to perform any serious duties. With regard to this objection, we may state that the War Office has recently enquired from the Central Association of Volunteer Training Corps if the members of the various corps would do local patrol work, and how many men would be able to go away to undertake similar duties elsewhere. Further, that War Office has asked how many men would be able to go away for service in other parts of England in the event of invasion. Lord Crewe has expressed the hope that those corps would become a permanent organisation when the war is over, so that it may now be taken for granted that the value of such corps is recognised, and that those in authority are anxious to know what the members are able to do.

Another difficulty had been the declaration members are expected to sign. On this point Mr B B Cubitt, assistant secretary to the War Office, has written as follows respecting the declaration :—

“ This undertaking is not a mere formality, and the man signing it is expected to fulfil his obligation. If a man who may be called upon is not in a position to fulfil his engagement he can leave the corps.”

Mr Tennant, speaking in the House of Commons on March 1st, said : “ In cases where good and sufficient reasons are not shown a man ought not to be allowed to take the lesser obligation when he ought to fulfil the greater obligation of serving with the colours.” As to their powers, Mr Tennant pointed out that they could only use the power of persuasion. He also expressed appreciation of the self-sacrifice of the men who had joined the corps.

Col H R Vaughan, writing from the War Office on the question of railway men, points out that a railway employee, even if he joined a corps, could not be asked to join the Army unless he had the permission from his employers to go. There can be no doubt that the same condition applies equally to men who are engaged in Government contract work.

A County Committee for Warwickshire has now been formed by the Lord-Lieutenant and Col Wyley, of Coventry, has been appointed County Commandant.

ORDERS FOR NEXT WEEK.

RUGBY VOLUNTEER TRAINING CORPS.

“A” Company.

Till further notice.—No. 1 Platoon : Outdoor drill, Wednesdays (fall-in top Barby Road, town end), 8 0 p.m. Big School, Fridays (except Good Friday), 8.0 p.m.—No. 2 Platoon : Outdoor Tuesdays (fall-in top Murray Road, 7.30 p.m. ; Drill Hall, Thursdays, 8.0 p.m.- No. 3 Platoon : Outdoor Wednesdays and one other day as arranged.—No. 4 Platoon : Outdoor, Tuesdays (fall-in top Murray Road), 7.30 p.m ; Drill Hall, Fridays, 8.0 p.m.

Saturdays, fall-in 2.30 p.m top of Barby Road.

Shooting Range is open at Drill Hall, 7.30 to 9.30, every week-day except Saturday.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Seventy members of the Rugby Conservative Club are at present serving with the colours in various capacities.

It is estimated that the extra money put into circulation in Rugby during the stay of the soldiers was about £8,000 per week—probably more.

The 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, which includes the Rugby Infantry Company, left Essex this week, presumably for foreign service.

Harold Loverock, second son of Mr Lewis Loverock, who has been in South Africa for the past three years, has joined the Natal Light Horse, and is at the Front in German South-West Africa.

Maurice Howkins, son of Mr W Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds, who recently received a commission as second lieutenant in the 1st London Brigade Royal Field Artillery, has now been gazetted second lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery.

A son of Mrs Wheeler, of 135 Abbey Street, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry (Cycling Section). He is at present at Bradford-on-Avon, Wilts. Mrs Wheeler has three sons serving their country—two in the Royal Warwicks and one in the Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry. The latter has served 7 1/2 years in Africa.

Pte Alfred Hawkins, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr A Hawkins, of Harborough Magna, was wounded in the arm by shrapnel on March 11th, and is at present in a hospital at Rouen. His parents received a letter on Thursday, stating that he was progressing favourably.

Lce-Corpl G A Barrett, of the 5th Rifle Brigade, an old St Matthew’s boy, who, as stated in the Advertiser last week, had been wounded, is at present in a hospital in England. We understand that he has been seriously wounded in the lungs, and some time will necessarily elapse before he makes a complete recovery. His father, Mr F T Barrett, of 17 Stephen Street, visited him last Saturday, and Lce-Corpl Barratt has since, written a very cheerful postcard. Lce-Corpl Barrett, who formerly worked for Messrs Frost, joined the army on the outbreak of the war, and had only been at the front a short time before he was wounded. A rumour gained currency during the week that he had succumbed to his wounds, but this, happily, proved to be untrue.

Pte Albert Batchelor, of the 2nd Royal Warwickshire Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs B Batchelor, of 34 Arnold Street, Rugby, is again an inmate suffering from wounds received at the Front. On Saturday, March 6th, he was wounded at 10.30 a.m, and lay 8 1/2 hours before receiving attention. He is now at the Sailors’ Rest, Ramsgate. Pte Batchelor, who is an old St Matthew’s boy, was previously incapacitated in October with a bullet wound in the neck and shrapnel in the knee. His brother Oscar is a despatch rider in Lord Kitchener’s Army.

Lce-Corpl Sidney Hubert Hadfield, 1st King’s Royal Rifles (third son of Mr J Hadfield, of 4 Charlotte Street, Rugby), who was seriously wounded in the right leg, by shrapnel near Mons at the commencement of the war, has arrived home for a short time. The unfortunate young fellow, who is only 26 years of age, has been in a London Hospital for the past six months, but, despite the best of attention, it is feared that he is doomed to be a cripple for life. His general health has also been adversely affected, and he has been sent home to effect, if possible, an improvement in this before undergoing an operation. He has served eight years in the army.

WAR CASUALTIES.

Regret will be felt in Rugby by many people to learn of the death of Sapper Ernest Lawrence Manton, of the East Anglican Royal Engineers. A native of Bedford, Sapper Manton, whose age was 24, was employed for a time at the B.T.H Works. He then took a situation in Coventry, though still residing in Rugby, journeying to business each morning. He was also engaged to be married to a Rugby lady, with whom much sympathy will be felt. The last letter received from him stated that he expected to take part in a big battle next day, and it was probably in the fighting at Neuve Chapelle that he was killed.

Sapper Manton was a member of Bilton Football Club, for whom he kept goal. During last summer he won first prize in a billiard handicap at the Regent Street Billiard Rooms, and for several months was a member of St Matthew’s Church Choir.

From a Bedford contemporary we learn that deceased was the younger of two brothers who were in the Royal Engineers. He had been in the Bedford Engineers for four years, and has resigned, but on the outbreak of the war he rejoined his old regiment, and went to the Front with the 1st Company. His mother received a letter from Second-Lieut O H Keeling, of the E.A.R.E, stating that her son was killed in action on March 10th. “ He was in my section,” the officer continued, “ and in him the section has lost one of the best of its men. I have heard something of the sacrifice he made when volunteering in August. He was always so cheery and ready to do his duty. Only last week he struck me particularly in this respect, when he was working in mud and water up to his knees—working at draining a trench that others might walk dry shod in it. Please let me offer my sincere sympathy to you in your great loss, but I hope your sorrow may be in some way lessened by the thought that he died for his country.”

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

There has been a marked improvement in recruiting at Rugby during the past week, and 16 men have been attested. Suitable men are now required to be trained for non-commissioned officers in the 13th R.W.R ; and wheelwrights, shoeingsmiths, and saddlers are also wanted. Those who have enlisted this week are: Cavalry, S Dyson ; R.E, H Baines ; A S.C, H J Rowe, T Burns, R J Reaves, and H S Jude ; R.F.A, W G Fuller, J Cox and W Cox ; Northants, E Smith and G Southern ; 13th Gloucesters, W Moore ; Middlesex, A Page, R Philpott, and W A Walker ; Royal Welsh Fusiliers, W E Bennett.

REJECTED AT LEICESTER, ACCEPTED AT RUGBY.

The “ Leicester Daily Post ” for Wednesday remarks, with reference to the slackness in recruiting in that city, that it is stated that in Leicester and Leicestershire there have been a larger proportion of rejects than in other adjoining areas for medical reasons which to the would-be soldiers did not seem quite sufficient, and that from the beginning of the war up till now many men unable to enlist there have been accepted at Rugby.