17th Mar 1917. High French Honour for Miss Ivens

HIGH FRENCH HONOUR FOR MISS IVENS.

The French Government has awarded a gold medal, the Medaille des Epidemies, to Miss Mary Hannah Frances Ivens, medical superintendent of the Auxiliary Hospital No. 301 Royaumont Abbey. Miss Ivens, formerly of Harborough Parva, holds the degrees of Master of Surgery and Batchelor of Medicine, and is curator of the Museum and demonstrator in practical pathology at the Royal Free Hospital, and a Fellow of the Obstetric Society of London. Silver, silver-gilt and bronze medals have also been awarded to several nurses at the Royaumont Abbey Hospital.-“ Paris Daily Mail.”

THE LATE LIEUT MACLEHOSE.

The “ British Weekly ” for last week contained the following :- “ Warm sympathy is expressed for Mr James Maclehose, the distinguished publisher to the University of Glasgow, who has lost his elder son in the War. The young officer was only 19, and he was killed in France on St. Valentine’s Day, 1917. His short career was full of promise and od performance. He was head of the School House at Rugby, where he was a cadet officer in the Rugby Officers’ Training Corps.”

ANOTHER OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY DEAD.

Pte Arthur K Reeve, 13th Royal Berkshire Regiment, died in Queen Alexandra Hospital, Dunkirk, France, on Sunday, March 4th, from spotted fever after two days’ illness. Before joining the Army he was employed by Mr Hollowell, builder, and lived at 16 Cambridge Street. He leaves a wife and two children. Pte Reeve was the third son of Mrs Reeve, 168 Murray Road, and was 41 years of age and an old St Matthew’s boy. The Captain of his Company, in a letter to Mrs Reeve, says her husband’s illness was quite short, and he died after being in hospital two days. The writer adds : ” Your husband was a good soldier and liked by all who knew him. I trust you will find consolation in the fact that he died whilst doing his duty and fighting for King and country, just as much as if he had died in the firing line.”

NATIONAL SERVICE.

In response to a request by the President of the Local Government Board and the Director-General of National Service, a committee has been formed by the Urban District Council to conduct the National Service recruiting campaign in Rugby. The Rev T F Churlich and Mr J T Clarke have been appointed joint honorary secretaries, and the headquarters of the committee will be at the Benn Buildings.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Second-Lieut B F McMurtrie has recently been promoted to Lieutenant and transferred to the Headquarters Staff of the Division.

Mr Wm Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds has received from the War Office an expression of the King’s appreciation of the services of the late Lieut Maurice Howkins, of the Royal Field Artillery, who was mentioned in a despatch from Sir A Murray in October last year for gallant and distinguished service in the field. The letter adds : “ His Majesty trusts that their public acknowledgment may be of some consolation in your bereavement.” Lieut Howkins, it will be remembered, was killed in Egypt.

Second-Lieut Maurice Lewis George Richardson, South Lancashire Regiment, attached to the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action on the 28th ult., was the only son of the Rev Lewis Richardson and Mrs Richardson, of Binley Parsonage, Coventry, and was 19 years of age. Lieut Richardson, who was educated at Oakfield, Rugby, and St. Edward’s School, Oxford, received his commission in June, 1915, and went to the front a year later. For good work done as a bombing officer in January of this year he was mentioned in Despatched.

DEATHS.

ELLIOTT.-Killed in action on February 12th, L.-Corpl. HARRY JOHN ELLIOTT, Rifle Brigade, second son of Henry and Ann Elliott, of Bubbenhall.

REEVE.-On March 4th, in the Queen Alexandra Hospital, Dunkirk, France, ARTHUR KIMBALL REEVE, Royal Berkshire Regiment, beloved husband of Frances Amanda Reeve, 16 Cambridge Street, Rugby ; aged 41 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

ATKINS.-In ever-loving memory of our dear son, who was killed at St. Eloi, France, March 16, 1915.
“ Dear son, we miss thy hand-clasp ; we miss thy loving smile.
Our hearts are broken, but wait a little while,
And we shall pass thy golden gates.
God, comfort us, my son ; God, help us to wait.”
-Ever in the thoughts of his MOTHER & DAD.

ATKINS.-In ever-loving memory of our dear brother, who was killed at St. Eloi, France, March 16, 1915.
“ Had we but one last fond look
Into his loving face,
Or had we only got the chance
To kneel down in his place,
To hold your head, dear brother,
While your life’s blood ebbed away.
Our hearts would not have felt so much
The tears we shed to-day.
So ready to answer the call to the brave,
Altho’ you now rest in a far distant grave.
More or better could any man give
Than to die for his country that others might live.”
-From his loving SISTERS and BROTHERS.

SKINNER.-In loving memory of Pte. GEORGE GAULD SKINNER, 19th Canadians, who was killed by a sniper “ somewhere in Belgium,” March 14, 1915.
“ Oh ! just to clasp your hand once more,
Just to hear your voice again.
Here life to me without you
Is nought but grief and pain.
Could I have raised your dying head,
Or heard your last farewell,
The grief would not have been so hard
For me who loves you well.”
-Sadly missed by his sorrowing wife, CHARLOTTE.

STEEL.-In loving memory of our dear son, EDWARD, who was killed in action somewhere in France, March 16, 1915.
It would ease our hearts to know
How he met his fatal blow ;
But we know he was doing his share
For King and country in the foreign land over there.
-His ever loving father, Mother, Sister & Brothers.

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