6th Mar 1915. Military Boxing at the Rink

MILITARY BOXING AT THE RINK.

Some very good, and also some very poor, boxing was witnessed at the Rink on Friday evening last week in aid of the Belgian Relief Fund. There was fairly good attendance, wearers of khaki predominating.

The first contest was between Sergt Brady (Scottish) and Pte Larkin (English). From the start the Scotsman asserted his superiority, and the Englishman never had a chance. In the first two rounds Brady got some hard knocks home, and in the third he sent Larkin to the ropes with a terrific swing on the back of the head, and he was counted out.

A remarkably fine fight, and one of the best of the evening, was the contest between Lance-Corpl Connelly (Scottish) and Pte Martin (English). Connelly opened with a rush, and the fighting soon waxed fast and furious. Both men received some hard blows on the face, and Martin went down on the call of time. The second round was also very fast, and Martin did well to avoid a terrific upper-cut. The third and fourth rounds produced some very fine fighting, Connelly stretching Martin out at the commencement of the former with a heavy blow on the jaw. Severe punishment was administered and received by both men in the two last rounds, and both began to hit out rather wildly, and the call “Time” evidently was welcome to both men. The “draw ”—was very popular.

Pte Williamson (Irish) v Pte Flac Irish). This “ fight ” was in striking contrast to the one preceding it. Williamson, a veritable giant in bulk and strength, had his man well in hand, and administered a series of gentle taps, which at first evoked amusement, but subsequently raised the ire of some of the onlookers. In the second round the men were ordered by the officials to fight, whereupon Williamson laid his man out, and he was counted out. At first the judges declared “ no contest,” but “subsequently gave the fight to Williamson.

Sergt Brown (English) v Lance-Corp Sturgeon (Scottish). This was a very brief affair. Sturgeon knocked the sergeant down twice in the initial round, and the second time he was counted out.

Lance-Corpl Jones (Irish) v Pte Waddington (Scottish). This was a remarkably good fight, and there was very little to choose between the men. Each man inflicted a good deal of punishment on the other, and at times the fighting was very fierce ; indeed, it never became dull. Waddington had the advantage of weight, and landed some heavy blows, but Jones had a superb defence, and was also very quick on the attack. In the fifth round Waddington forced the pace, and drove Jones through the ropes, but the latter recovered well, and had the better of the final round. Jones was declared winner on points.

Pte Ott (Irish) was unable to meet Drummer Wood (English), and his place was taken by Pte Humphreys (English), The men were very unevenly matched, and the drummer had the advantage from the beginning, sending his opponent through the ropes twice in the first round. In the second round Wood put him down with a hard blow on the head. Humphreys, though plainly unable to do so, endeavoured to continue the fight, and struggled gamely, but was knocked down again and counted out.

Drummer Crone (English) v Pte Murphy (Irish). Crone, who is a first-rate boxer, was never extended, and had Murphy at his mercy from the beginning. After a pretty display by the drummer, in which Murphy received some hard knocks, the latter retired in the third round.

The officials were officers of the various regiments.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.
Tuesday.—Before Dr Clement Dukes (in the chair), A W Street, A E Donkin, and C G Steel, Esqrs.

“ DOING A BUNK.”—Ptes Jas W Burton and Wm Frisby, of “ B ”, Company, 5th Battalion, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Rugby, were charged with being absent from their regiment without leave on March 1st,—Defendants pleaded guilty.—P.C Rowbery met them on the London Road. They appeared to have come some distance, and having questioned them, he took them back to Braunston, where they admitted they had come from Northampton, and said they were “ doing a bunk.”—Prisoners were handed over to an escort that had been sent for them.

DUTY AT GUNPOWDER WORKS ENDS.

The detachment of the 7th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, under Captain Ewan Rotherham, who have been for the past six months on guard duty at a Royal Gunpowder Factory near London, were on Monday relieved by another regiment and were moved to the county town, where the 7th Reserve Battalion are under Col Nutt’s command. This detachment has had arduous duties to carry out, considering the trying winter weather and the cold nights which have been experienced. The men have been rather handicapped in the past month owing to an influenza epidemic, which fortunately is now disappearing. Although during the day time a certain amount of training has been gone through, it has been of a limited character, owing to the night work done. It is expected that the detachment will now take part in a more varied training, which is only possible when with a battalion.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

The following have been attested at the Rugby Drill Hall this week :—Royal Berks Regiment: C H Bland, F H Boyes, and C A Warner. A.S.C : A J Bromwich. R.F.A : J Hughes, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers (as band boy): C A Waddoups. Yorks L.I : G H Coates : and one for the Sportsman’s Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

In order to stimulate recruiting, it has been decided to grant an extra day’s leave of absence to all soldiers on furlough for each recruit accepted, obtained by their assistance. They will also be entitled to the recruiting award.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.
RUGBY RECRUITING.

SIR.—I fear there is justice for your remarks this week, that well as Rugby has already done there are still many eligibles “ holding back.”

The local Works sent heavy proportions in the early days of war, as figures demonstrate, with the result that some of use are hard-pressed to find sufficient hands to execute urgent demands for war munitions. Every possible hour is being worked to fill these needs.

Mr Asquith only last Monday, in reviewing the outlook, said the “ call for men was never more urgent or imperious than to-day.” What local scope remains ? Have the shopping and farming classes been fully encouraged by their employers to send their eligibles ? Are there not quantities of these young men whose duties in their absence can well be performed by the gentler sex ?

I feel sure the Prime Minister’s call, when realized, will find further answer in Rugby and district.—Your obedient Servant,
F R DAVENPORT.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The sum of £1 17s 7d has been collected at Kings Newnham during February for the Prince of Wales’s Fund, and £2 19s 4d at Grandborough.

The cost of the war bonus which the London and North-Western Railway are giving to their employees will amount to half a million sterling. The total amount for all the railways in Great Britain is £3,800,000.

Mr Maurice Howkins, son of Mr W Howkins, of Hillmorton Grounds, who, at the beginning of the war joined the Honourable Artillery Company as a private, has now been given a commission as Lieutenant in the 1st London Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.

We understand that A J Harris and Stanley Hidden, both of whom are at the front, accidentally met on the battle-field and exchanged greetings, which were interrupted by a German “ Jack Johnson.”

In our last issue we mentioned that it had been reported that William Derbin, a reservist, and formerly a railway worker, had been killed in action near Soissons. We are glad to hear that the report, like others, has proved incorrect, and that his relatives received a letter from him on Monday last, and dated February 25th.

In the historic effort which is now being made to force the Dardanelles, Rugby and New Bilton are represented by at least three of their sons. Leading-Seaman Gunner John Cash, an Old Murrayian, son of Mrs B Cash, of 25 Craven Road, Rugby, is on the mammoth “ Queen Elizabeth,” the most powerful warship afloat. He has also seen service on the “ Cressy,” “ Pegasus,” and another ill-fated vessel. Messrs J Harris and W H Cranch, of New Bilton, are on the “ Majestic.”

 

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2 thoughts on “6th Mar 1915. Military Boxing at the Rink

  1. Very interesting [as ever]. Strange, as I sit here typing this I can see a RED army recruitment balloon floating over the TA center !!!! It does make you think of those men all those years ago. Paul

  2. I have just realized there is another link on the subject of today’s recruitment. Part of the 4th Bn Parachute Rgt has just moved onto the site occupied by part of the 4th South Midland Howitzer Brigade in 1915. Paul

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