19th May 1917. A Rugby Lady Honoured

A RUGBY LADY HONOURED.

For good work at Caterham and other places, the Royal Red Cross has been bestowed by the King upon Miss E C Ellis, who for several years before the War commenced had been living in Horton Crescent, Rugby. Miss Ellis went up for investiture last week, and was received by the King and Queen at Buckingham Palace, and subsequently by Queen Alexandra at Marlborough House.

OLD ST MATTHEW BOY HONOURED.—P.C Herbert Archer, of the Metropolitan Police Force, son of Mr T Archer, of 41 York Street, has recently received the King’s Medal in recognition of bravery he displayed in March last year, when he rescued a boy from drowning in a caisson chamber at Rosyth Dockyard. The depth of the water was 40ft, and the constable showed conspicuous heroism in effecting the rescue. It was dark at the time, and he incurred great personal risk in entering the water. He has been presented already with the Royal Humane Society’s Medal and honoured by the Carnegie Hero Fund Trustees. The King’s Police Medal is usually handed to the recipient by his Majesty in person ; but owing to the War the presentation ceremony took place at the Dockyard, and the medal was handed to P.C Archer by the Rear Admiral Superintendent, who pointed out that this medal was not easily gained, but was only bestowed in cases of exceptional gallantry. P.C Archer, who was an old St Matthew’s boy and played in the first team from that school to win the Rugby School Shield in 1904-5, suitably replied.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The name of Sec.Lt. M H House (Rifle Brigade) is amongst the latest published list of officer casualties. At Rugby School he was in Mr G F Bradby’s house and was a prominent member of the 1916 Cricket XI.

Capt and Adjt R M Gotch, Sherwood Foresters, wounded and missing on July 1, 1916, now believed killed, gained his football cap at Rugby School, and during the 1913-14 season played forward for the Harlequin.

Sergt P G Miles, of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, for several years a constable in the County Police Force, has been wounded in France. Miles was formerly in the Rugby and Stratford-on-Avon Division.

Capt Percy H Hollick, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, is the fifth Coventry solicitor who has died at the front. A son of the late Mr Alfred Hollick, an Allesley farmer, the young officer was articled to his profession in Coventry, and early in the War joined the Honourable Artillery Co., and subsequently obtained his commission. He was wounded more than once.

NEW BILTON MAN KILLED.
Mr J Young, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, has received information that his only son, Pte W C Young, of the Worcester Regiment, was killed in action on April 24th. Pte Young, who was about 23 yearn of age, was employed at the B.T H Lamp Factory, and enlisted in March, 1916.

DEATH OF A FORMER B.T.H PUPIL IN FRANCE.
Members of the Rugby Men’s Adult School learnt with sincere regret on Sunday morning of the death of Mr Kenneth Smith, who until the War broke out was actively associated with the school, and was working as a student apprentice at the B.T.H Works. It was decided to ask Mr Herbert Edmundson, the school president, to send a communication to the bereaved relatives, indicating the sense of the loss sustained by the school, and expressing appreciation of the high character of the late Mr Smith.

SERGT-MAJOR CLEAVER DIES OF WOUNDS.
Company-Sergt-Major Cleaver, Royal Warwicks, was wounded in action on May 8th, and died the following day. He was a native of Stockton, and had served upwards of 21 years in the Army, during which period he saw much foreign service. He went all through the South African campaign, and gained the Queen’s Medal and six bars. He was also mentioned in despatches on September 4th, 1901. He had a medal for 19 years’ long service and good conduct. After a serious operation, he was appointed drill instructor to the 7th (T) Royal Warwickshire Regiment, and was two years at Coventry and five years with “ E ” Company at Rugby, residing at the Drill Hall Cottage. He was mobilised with the battalion on the outbreak of War ; and in June, 1915, was promoted warrant officer. Deceased who was 42 years of age, leaves a widow and five children, for whom much sympathy is felt.

Major Claude Seabroke, in a sympathetic letter to the widow, said the news came as a great blow to him, for he felt that he had lost one of his greatest and truest friends. It was difficult to realise all at once all that the regiment owed to her late husband ; but, without doubt, during all those years of devoted and loyal service he gave of this very best ungrudgingly. To all the members of “ E ” Company, whom he had trained and helped, he had left a memory of a splendid example of a zealous soldier, who had passed gloriously, as he would have wished. He was an example to them all of unflagging industry and of the highest integrity, and in all that he did ‘Honour was his guiding star.’

RUGBY & DISTRICT WAR PRISONERS’ DAY, Saturday, June 2nd.

There are sixty-seven men from Rugby and district who have fallen into the hands of the Enemy, and they are still calling for food.

For nearly two years the Rugby Committee have organised funds by means of which beyond any shadow of doubt many of these men have been saved from starvation.

To ensure they do not lack the food necessary to keep them in health and strength, further funds must be raised at once.

THE RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE therefore appeal to you to assist their efforts by sending a Donation now to the Hon. Organising Secretary, Mr. J. REGINALD BARKER, 9 Regent Street, Rugby, who will gratefully acknowledge same.

RUGBY AND RUSSIA.

In connection with the recent Russian Flag Day, held in Rugby, the hon organiser, Mr J Reginald Barker, has received the following letter, dated May 11th :-

“ DEAR SIR,—May I, on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Russian Flag Day, express our deep gratitude for your invaluable aid to our Red Cross work ? We feel we owe a deep debt to everyone who has assisted us, to the local authorities for their patronage, to the organisers for their brilliant ability, to the sellers for their generous self-sacrifice, and to the residents for their warm-hearted support. I can assure you that we shall not forget, nor will Russia, what has been done, and in time to some we hope that your efforts will remain a pleasant and gratifying memory to yourselves, so it will be a sources of permanent indebtedness on our part.—Yours faithfully, CHARLES WATNEY, Hon Secretary, the Russian Flag Day.”

THE FOOD PROBLEM IN RUGBY.

There can no longer be any doubt that the food position in this country is serious. If scarcity, amounting to real want, is to be avoided, every class must practice the strictest economy in the consumption of all bread-stuffs. The German submarine campaign, coupled with a short wheat harvest last season throughout the world, has brought our surplus stocks of corn to danger point.

It should be clearly understood that the officials of the Food Ministry are watching carefully from day to day the danger-line below which the stocks of cereals in this country cannot be allowed to fall ; and although preparations are in progress to establish rationing machinery when the point of danger has been reached, it is hoped that the success of the voluntary campaign may avert the necessity for compulsion. The issue really rests with the people.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

WAR CHARITIES ACT.
The Rugby Waste Paper Committee was registered under the above Act.—The Chairman said it would be very interesting to Council to learn that Mr Barker had already collected something like 3 tons of waste paper.—Mr Evers congratulated the General Purposes on the arrangements made.—The Chairman : No thanks are due to the committee. The arrangements were made by Mr Barker and Mrs Blagden.—Mr Yates : Then congratulations are due to the committee for not stopping these people in any way (laughter).

THANKS FROM THE V.T.C.
A letter was read from Captain Fuller, thanking the Council for their kindly recognition of the V.T.C and the promise of financial support voted at the last meet of the Council. He assured them that their help and expression of goodwill would be of great assistance to them. The A and B men of the Battalion had been selected with similar men from one of the other battalions in the regiment to into the front line in the event of any invasion emergency arising, and they looked upon this as a compliment, and hoped it would be the means of more men joining the Corps, whose past excuse had been that them was no use for the force. He hoped the Local Government Board would raise no difficulty to the amount voted being handed over for purpose of Rugby Corps, and he added that he had noticed lately that where similar grant was made by a council the money was refunded by the Territorial Force Association to the Corps in consequence of the intention of the gift being expressed to be for the benefit solely of particular a corps. With reference to the last paragraph, the Council agreed with the Chairman that it was their wish that the grant should be applied solely for the use of the Rugby Corps.—Mr Wise said he was sorry that so few members of the general public were present at the inspection on Sunday. Anyone who was there must have been struck by the smart appearance the Corps made and the wonderfully efficient way in which they did their drill.

IN MEMORIAM.

PORTER.-In loving memory of our dear son and brother, GEORGE RUPERT PORTER ; aged 21 years. Killed in action at St. Elia on May 8, 1915.

ROBINSON.-In ever-loving memory of FRED, who gave his life for his country on May 11, 1915.-“ Lost but never forgotten.”-BEATIE.

YOUNG.-In loving memory of PTE WILLIAM COTTERILL YOUNG, who was killed in action with the Forces in Salonika, on April 25th, 1917, the 25th year of his age. Deeply mourned.
Somewhere there is a nameless grave
Where sleeps our loved one among the brave.
One of the and file, he heard the call,
And for the land he loved he gave his all.
—From his FATHER and MOTHER and SISTERS, 37 Pinfold Street, New Bilton. Rugby.

 

 

Cleaver, William Thomas. Died 24th Apr 1917

William Thomas Cleaver was born in late 1885 and baptised at St Andrews Church Rugby on 9th May 1886. His parents were Joseph and Fanny (nee Wright) who had married there on 4th Mar 1884. Joseph was a fireman/driver on the railway and the family lived at 23 East Street, Rugby.

In 1901 William was aged 15 and a billiard marker, but by 1911 he had joined his father working for L & NW railway as a railway servant.

He joined the 2nd/6th Bn Royal Warwickshire Regiment, (Private no. 242260) in June 1916.

In April 1917 the Battalion was involved in the Second Battle of the Aisne, a Franco-British attempt to inflict a decisive defeat on the German armies in France. The objective of the attack was to capture the prominent 80-kilometre-long (50 mi), east–west ridge of the Chemin des Dames, 110 kilometres (68 mi) north-east of Paris, and then attack northwards to capture the city of Laon. When the French armies met the British advancing from the Arras front, the Germans would be pursued towards Belgium and the German frontier. The offensive met massed German machine-gun and artillery fire, which inflicted many casualties and repulsed the French infantry at many points. The French still achieved some substantial tactical successes and took c. 29,000 prisoners in their attacks on the Chemin des Dames and in Champagne but failed to achieve their strategic objective of a decisive defeat over the Germans.

On the 20th April, the 2nd/6th Bn RWR marched from Ugny to Savy.

War Diary of 2nd/6th RWR

SAVY  20.4.17             Battn marched to Savy and became reserve battn to 14th Inf Bde. 10. R. sent to Cooking(?) Class. CO & Company commanders reconnorted line.

21.4.17            Battn rested and CO and Company commanders visited line again.

22.4.17            Battn relieved 2nd Battn Manchester Regt taking over the line from S27 central to S15. d.1.5 (62 B SW) – 184th Inf Bde on our left.

BROWN Line S2 Section
23.4.17            Everything normal during the day – enemy shelled back areas. Battn relieved of part of the line – now holding line from S.21.b.5.0 to S.15.d.1.5 – 2/7th R WAR R relieved battn

Outpost Line
24.4.17            Battn relieved 2/8th Bn R.WAR.R in outpost  line taking over from S6 central to S23. b 9.5 French Army on our right and 184 Inf Bde on our left

The Battalion continued like this until the middle of May when they moved on to Beauvois. No mention is made of casualties, but a report in The Rugby Advertiser on 5th May 1917 states:
Mr Joseph Cleaver, of 17 East Street, Rugby, has received a letter from a chaplain informing him of the death of his eldest so, Pte William Thomas Cleaver, of the Royal Warwicks, which took place in a field ambulance in France on April 24th as the result of severe wounds caused by a shell the previous day. Pte Cleaver, who was 31 years of age, joined up in June last. He was employed on the L. & N-W Railway at Rugby for several years.

William Thomas Cleaver was buried at Foreste Communal Cemetery, situated approximately 14 kilometres west of St. Quentin and approximately 9 kilometres north of Ham. This cemetery was used by the 92nd Field Ambulance in April 1917. The village fell into German hands in the summer of 1918.

The cemetery contains 117 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War. 22 of the burials are unidentified and special memorials are erected to 23 casualties buried by the Germans whose grave cannot be traced.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Cleaver, Joseph Vincent. Died 11th April 1917

Joseph Vincent Cleaver was born in Oxford in 1878. His father was Thomas Howlett Cleaver who was born in Rugby and Jemima Mary (nee Vickers). Thomas met his wife in Alton, Staffordshire where her father worked at the stone quarry there. Thomas was a clerk and they married in 1870. By 1881, when Joseph was three, the family was living in Caldecote, near Nuneaton and Thomas was a builder’s agent. The family had returned to Rugby by 1891, living at Clifton Cottage in Bilton. Thomas was now a builder’s manager and thirteen year old Joseph was still at school. He was the third of nine children. In 1901 they were living at 51 Victoria Street and Thomas was a builder’s surveyor. Joseph was the eldest son still living at home. At 23 he was a brewer’s clerk.

By 1911 Thomas was a widower. He was a publican, living at the Horse and Jockey Inn in Lawford Road. Joseph was still living with him, a 33-year-old brewer’s clerk war (He was employed by the Leamington Brewery Company) together with his sister Zita, who was acting as housekeeper.

Joseph signed up in December 1915, one of the first to join up under Lord Derby’s Group System. He joined the 1st Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment (Private no. 17860). He would have fought in the Battle of the Somme and other actions on the western front.

From 1st April the Royal Warwicks was at Camblain-Chatelaine involved in training. On the 7th, there was a route march to Bethon-sart, continuing to “X” camp the next day. By 11th April they were in Dug-outs S of Athies

War Diaries of 1st Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment
11 April 1917

2-3 a.m. Conference at Brigade Head Quarters and orders issued that 10th Brigade will attack at 12 noon Operation Order attached.

8.30 a.m. Battalion moved  off to W. of Fampoux and arrived 10.00 a.m.

11.20 a.m. Battalion moved up to Assembly position on Sunken Road on E. edge of Fampoux and arrived 12 noon.

A & C Coys attack on 2 Coy frontage of 500x per Coy and B Coy follow in near as carriers.

12 noon Attack commences and 1st R. Irish Fus. and 2nd Seaforth Highlanders start going forward

12.10 p.m. A & C Coys followed by B Coy follow these Battalions, our Battalion supporting 1st R. Irish Fus. The enemy shelled our Assembly positions heavily and we had many casualties before starting.

The enemy’s M. Gun fire held up our attack almost from the start and the Brigade consolidated a line about 400x in front of the Assembly position.

Both Brigades on our right and left were held up also by M. Gun fire.

Enemy put up a heavy barrage on Assembly positions and vicinity.

Battalion dug in and held a line from Huddue Trench at H.18.a.0.9 to H.18.b,1,3 with Seaforth Highlanders on left and 1st R Irish Fus on right.

Enemy fairly quiet at night. Very cold and snow.

Officer casualties are given 2nd Lieuts 2 killed, 1 wounded and missing, 5 wounded.

Heavy shelling of Fampoux continued for several days and on the 20th Apr, the Battalion was relieved by the 8th Lincolnshire Regt.

Total casualties for the period 9th to 21st Incl.
Killed                             2 Officers            43 Other Ranks (includes 10 died of wds since)
Wounded and missing 1 Officer             – Other Ranks
Wounded                     5 Officers            173 Other Ranks
Missing                      – Officers              33 Other Ranks
Missing believed wounded -Officers       1 Other Ranks.

Both Joseph Vincent Cleaver and Charles Henry Read died on 11th April, probably in this action

Joseph Vincent Cleaver was buried at Point-Du-Jour Military Cemetery, Athies

Rugby Advertiser, 12th May 1917 states
… This is the second son Mr Cleaver (Gregory) has lost in action and two more, George and Austin were wounded earlier in the war.”

Thomas Howlett Cleaver died in 1919. Joseph’s next of kin was named, in the soldiers effects, as his sister Zita.

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Cleaver, Gregory Joseph. Died 18th Sep 1916

Gregory Joseph Cleaver was born in Rugby in 1890. His father was Thomas Howlett Cleaver and Jemima Mary (nee Vickers). Thomas met his wife in Alton, Staffordshire where her father worked at the stone quarry there. Thomas was a clerk and they married in 1870. By 1881 the family was living in Caldecote, near Nuneaton and Thomas was a Builder’s Agent; a job which involved a lot of travel judging by the birth places of his children. By 1890, when Gregory, their youngest child (of nine, two others had died) was born, they were back in Rugby and in 1901 Thomas was a Builder’s Surveyor living at 51 Victoria Street. Gregory Joseph was aged 11.

Gregory Joseph cannot be found in the 1911 census. He would have been with the army in India. His mother had died and is father was a publican at the Horse and Jockey Inn in Lawford Road.

By the start of the war, Gregory Joseph Cleaver returned to England with the 3rd Bn, Kings Royal Rifle corps. They arrived on 18th November 1914 and as a regular soldier probably helped to train the new recruits. He arrived in France in 2nd Feb 1915, private no 7792 in the 12th Bn KRRC.

He was wounded in two different engagements. Perhaps it was while recovering from one of these that he met and married Agnes Daisy Richardson. They married in the Ipswich registration district in the June quarter of 1915. A daughter Zita A Cleaver (named after Gregory’s sister) was born a year later, but died soon after.

In August/September 1916, the 12th Bn, Kings Royal Rifle Corps was in the trenches of the Somme. From the beginning of September they moved from Carnoy to Guillemont, back to Carnoy, then Corbie and Meaulte. On the 15th Sept they arrived in Carnoy again. At 3am on the morning of the 16th they moved up to Waterlot Farm and on the 18th they were in the front line “in front of Ginchy

The War Diary reports that at 2.30 pm:
“Enemy counter attacked in force. “B” Company forced to give way a little but our being reinforced immediately drove enemy back to his own trenches, inflicting considerable loss.”

It is in this action that Rifleman Gregory Joseph Cleaver must have died.

He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.

His death was reported in the Rugby Advertiser of 14th October 1916.

“Rifleman Gregory Cleaver Killed.
Mr T H Cleaver, late of the Horse and Jockey Inn, Rugby, has just received official information that his youngest son, Rifleman Gregory Cleaver, of the King’s Royal Rifles, was killed in action on September 18th. Rifleman Cleaver came from India, where he had served six years, after the War commenced. He had been wounded in two different engagements, and had only returned to the trenches a month   when he was killed.”

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

24th Jun 1916. Damage to Crops by Aircraft

DAMAGE TO CROPS BY AIRCRAFT.

The Board of Agriculture and Fisheries desire to call the attention of farmers to the possibility of loss of, or damage to, growing crops by hostile aircraft.

No liability can be accepted by the Government, and no claim can be entertained in respect of damage to property by aircraft or bombardment unless the property has been insured under the Government scheme, particulars of which can be obtained at any Post Office or from any Fire Insurance Company.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Roland R Tait, of the firm of Messrs Tait, Sons, & Pallant, and a well-known local footballer and cricketer, has enlisted in the 7th Worcesters, and has gone to headquarters this week.

Second-Lieut E G Passmore, Northampton Regiment (son of Mr S A Passmore, of Ashby St Ledgers), was wounded in France on June 18th.

Capt Viscount Feilding, D.S.O, was “ mentioned ” for the second time in the last despatches, and was promoted to Brevet Major in the last list of honours. He has for some months been on the staff of the Second Division in France as D.A.A, Q.M.G, having previously done some 11 months in the trenches with the Third Battalion Coldstream Guards.

Lieut Hon Henry S Feilding has been transferred to the Coldstream Guards, and has how joined the depot at Windsor. He served till about a year ago in the K.E.H, and went to France with them in May 1915, and about July was taken as A.D.C by General Horne, R.A (of East Haddon), commanding the Second Division, and went to Egypt with him in December, 1915, when General Horne was promoted to Lieutenant General to command an Army Corps, and recently returned to France, when the General was appointed to command an Army Corps there. Lieut Feilding has now resigned A.D.C, and transferred as described.

Engine-room Artificer Stanley Liddington, who took part in the Battle of Jutland, recently visited Murray School, where he was formerly a pupil. Three other Old Murrayians—W L Holmes, C Cooper, and W Clarke—also went through the battle, and the former has sent a very interesting letter to his old schoolmaster.

L G Colbeck, the old Cambridge Cricket Blue—formerly a Master at Rugby School—is now in training with the O.T Corps (Artillery) at Topsham, near Exeter.

Lieut J A Hattrell, Royal Warwicks, who has been in charge of the Registration Department of the Rugby Recruiting Office for the past six months, leaves the district this week. Immediately upon war being declared, Lieut Hattrell, who was in the legal profession in Coventry, joined the local Territorial Battalion of the Loyal Warwicks. Lieut Hattrell is the son of the Rev G P Hattrell, Free Church Minister, formerly of Stretton-under-Fosse, and now of Welford.

Second-Lieut William Roy Elphick (O.R), Indian Infantry, who died from cholera on June 7th, was born in 1894, and gazetted in August, 1914. He was the eldest son of the late Major. H W Elphick, L.M.S, and Mrs Elphick, of 82 Hereford Road, Bayswater. When at the School deceased got his colours for football, and also played with the XI, at cricket, being a particularly good bowler. He also assisted the town clubs in both branches of sport.

Lady Craven, of Combe Abbey, has just given, through Mr Chandler (head gardener), all the men on the estate 2s a week increase of wages. This is the third advance the men have had since the War began.

Mrs Frankton, of 20 Lawford Road, Rugby has received a letter from the War Office, stating that her husband, Pte Walter Fredk Frankton, 3rd Grenadier Guards, who has been missing since the Battle of Loos, must now be presumed to have been killed in September last. Pte Frankton, who before the war was employed by the Public Health Committee of the Urban District Council, enlisted in January, 1915, and was at the front about two months before his death. He a native of Rugby, and was educated at the Wesleyan School.

DEATH OF MR JAMES F HOWKINS.

We much regret to record the death from enteric fever of Mr James F Howkins, second son of Mr and Mrs Fred Howkins, of Crick, which occurred last Saturday at Alexandria. The deceased, who was 27 years of age, served his articles with Messrs Howkins & Sons, auctioneers and estate agents of this town, with whom he was engaged until last August, when he joined the Honourable Artillery Company. As an auctioneer deceased was well known especially in Rugby Cattle Market. He was a very hard worker, and possessed first-class business capabilities. He was a Fellow of the Auctioneers and Estate Agents Institute, and a member of the Midland Counties Valuers Association. His loss will be very greatly felt by all those who knew him, and especially at Crick, where he was a great favourite. The deceased has two brothers, and both are now serving abroad-the younger with the Northants Yeomanry, and the elder with the Royal Engineers.

LEAMINGTON HASTINGS.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Information has been received that Pte Bertie John Cleaver, of Hill, has died of disease in Mesopotamia. He was 19 years of age, and with his brother Archie joined the 19th Hussars soon after war broke out, but both were transferred to the Gloucester Regiment, with which he was serving at the time of his death. The father of deceased, an old soldier, is serving in the Warwickshire Regiment at Maidenhead, and his brother, Sergt Wm Cleaver, has been in France since the War commenced.

BRANDON.

WOUNDED.—Rifleman Bert Banbrook, of the Rifle Brigade, son of Mr and Mrs Reuben Banbrook, has been wounded in the thigh, and is now making satisfactory progress at Epsom Hospital.—Mr and Mrs E W Ireson received news on Sunday that their elder son had been wounded. He was hit by shrapnel in the head, but luckily his steel helmet saved his life. He came over from Saskatoon, Canada, with Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, and was one of those who succeeded in taking trenches from the Germans last week. Before proceeding to Canada he was for several years a clerk in Lloyds Bank, Rugby.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.

PRIVATE GOUGH KILLED.—News was received last week that Pte J Gough, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, had been killed in action on June 2nd. Deceased joined the Army in December, 1914, and was sent to France the following July, where he had been for ten months. He was native of Church Stretton, but for some years had lived at Bourton, where he had gained the respect of all who knew him. A memorial service was held in Bourton Church on Sunday.

DISTRICT APPEALS’ TRIBUNAL.

Held at the Benn Buildings, Rugby, on Friday last week. Present: Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, P G Loveitt, and K Rotherham. Agricultural representative: Mr J E Cox. Military representative: Mr M E T Wratislaw.

ESTATE CARPENTER SECURES A TEMPORARY EXEMPTION.

Mr Lupton Reddish supported the appeal of Walter, Congreve, estate carpenter for Capt Henry Boughton-Leigh, Brownsover Hall. The local Tribunal held that he could be replaced by someone not eligible for military service.—The Chairman said it was important, if the man was engaged on the work described, that he Should be retained to keep the farms going, and temporary exemption, to September 30th was granted.

MR W ELLIOTT’S BOTTLING BUSINESS.

The Military appealed against the temporary exemption granted to Chas John Elliott, 8 Vicarage Road, Rugby, manager of a mineral water and bottling business.—Mr Wratislaw said there had been no attempt to get a substitute, and appellant had been passed for general service at home or abroad.—Given till August 1st, with no further extension.

MESSRS FOSTER & DICKSEE’S SECRETARY.

Mr Sidney J Dicksee appealed on behalf of Herbert Watson, builder’s clerk and acting secretary to Messrs Foster & Dicksee, living at 20 Arnold Street, Rugby. He pointed out that six members of the clerical staff had joined the Army, and that to carry on the work of acting secretary required great experience.—Appeal dismissed, but given till September 1st.

BADLY ADVISED BY FRIENDS.

Herbert Southby Vowles, commercial traveller, 279 Clifton Road, Rugby, who had been allowed till July 1st by the local Tribunal, asked for three months’ postponement to settle up his affairs.—Mr Eaden said appellant was anxious to get into the Army. He was advised by his friends if he asked the Tribunal for one month’s exemption they would be generous, and possibly give him more (laughter). He should have asked for a little more than he expected to get.—The Chairman : Is that what he is doing now ? (laughter).—Allowed till September 15th.

 

A NOURISHING ARTICLE.

Appealing for his son, Mr Bromwich, milk producer and retailer, of Newton, said milk was a most nourishing article of food and drink combined.-Given to August 1st and told it was doubtful if any further extension would be allowed.

BRANDON ESTATE HAND.

A final temporary exemption till August 1st was given to Harry Giles, estate hand, 6 Bridget Street, New Bilton, appealed for by T Hirons, of Brandon.

WOMEN FARM WORKERS CRITICISED.

Frank Chester, Moorland Cottage, Newbold, was given till August 1st, the Tribunal being of opinion that on the face of it his single brother Anthony, now exempted as a shepherd, ought to go into the Army.— The question of women labour was raised, and appellant said they had employed four women on the farm, but he did not think they would stay.-Mr Worthington said the experience of one farmer was that of two women he employed at hoeing one left at 12 o’clock the first day ; the other stayed till 4 p.m, and never came again.

DISSATISFIED WITH HIS JOB.—At Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Monday a fine of 10s was imposed upon Fred Hanks, 2 Russell Street, Rugby, for losing time at Willans & Robinsons. He stated that he wanted his discharge to get into the Army. His earnings were only 26s 6d a week, and he was dissatisfied. The Chairman suggested that the firm might give the man an advance so that he might be more satisfied with his job.

ABSENTEES UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM AND Military Service Acts, 1916.

LIST OF ABSENTEES FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE FIRST MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1916.

The following are their last-known addresses :—

  1. W. West, 5 James Street, Rugby, age 20.
  2. A. Oldroyd, 41 Newbold Road, Rugby, age 25.
  3. G. Hodge, 30 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 26.
  4. W. Barnett, 176 Murray Road, Rugby, age 28.
  5. Pickles, Railway Hotel, Rugby, age 28.
  6. Smith, 18 Gas Street, Rugby, age 29.
  7. Hewitt, “ Zotha House,” Park Road, Rugby age 30.
  8. W. Walker, 37 Wood Street, Rugby, age 30.
  9. G. Smith, c/o Punter, Clifton Road, Rugby, age 33.
  10. Owen, 6 Drury Lane, Rugby, age 36.
  11. Ross, Spring Hill, Rugby, age 18.
  12. Jackson, White Lion, Warwick Street, Rugby, age 38.
  13. Francis [or Heeney], 186 Murray Road, Rugby, age 29.
  14. Bartlett, 23 Graham Road, Rugby, age 18.
  15. Twywood, 17 Abbey Street, Rugby, age 38.
  16. Widdell, 48 Bilton Hill, near Rugby, age 32.
  17. A. Lines, Bilton, age 33.
  18. P. Coleman, 16 Victoria Avenue, New Bilton, age 28.
  19. H. Cox, 72 Lawford Road, New Bilton, age 18.
  20. W. Ellerton, Bridget Street, New Bilton, age 24.
  21. E. Capewell, Wharf Farm, Hillmorton, age 34.
  22. F. Flowers, 18 Vicarage Hill, Clifton, age 21.
  23. J. Ireton, Deana Lodge, Kineton, age 19.
  24. T. Tuckey, Post Office Lane, Long Itchington, age 25.
  25. J. Barnes, Kington Farm, Lighthorne, age 28.
  26. J. Thomicroft, Napton-on-the-Hill, age 18.
  27. Cooper, Radford, age 39.
  28. Field, Mount Pleasant, Stockton, age 27.
  29. Ansill, Tysoe, Warwick, age 29.

LIST OF ABSENTEES FROM THE RUGBY SUB-AREA UNDER THE GROUP SYSTEM.

The following are their last-known addresses:—

  1. Malin, 89 Murray Road, Rugby, age 33, married.
  2. R. Walker, 11 Union Street, Rugby, age 27, single.
  3. Mitchell, 26 Northcote Road, Rugby, age 35, married.
  4. H. Williams, 15 Park Road, Rugby, age 34, single.
  5. Partridge, 76 Windsor Street, Rugby, age 18, single.
  6. L. Smith, 7 Lodge Road, Rugby, age 29, married.
  7. Slater, 47 Wood Street, Rugby, age 35, married.
  8. Kennard, Wolston Grange Cottages, Old Bilton, age 23, single.
  9. A. Cole, 13 Jubilee Street, New Bilton, age 26, married.
  10. R. Macgregor, May Cottage, Newton, age 20, single.
  11. E. Fruce, 17 Boughton Road, Brownsover, age 26 married.

The Public are invited to give all the assistance in their power to the Military Authorities by giving any INFORMATION in their possession which they consider would assist in the tracing of these absentees.

The Information should be given or sent to the

RECRUITING OFFICER, DRILL HALL, RUGBY.

The names of all giving information will be regarded as strictly
F. F. JOHNSTONE, LiEUT.-COLONEL,
RECRUITING OFFICER.
June 22nd, 1916.

THANKS FROM A D.C.M HERO.

A letter was received from Sniper A Norman, D.C.M, thanking the Health Committee for their letter of congratulation, which he said he received with great pleasure and a certain amount of pride. To know that their efforts were appreciated by kind friends at home made them all the keener to reach that victory and honour which was fast approaching into sight.—The Chairman : The Council are very pleased to receive that letter from Pte Norman. They are proud of him.

IN MEMORIAM

WALE.—In loving memory of John Wale, 1st Leicesters, who was killed in action near Ypres, June 23,1915.
“ We cannot, Lord, Thy purpose see,
But all is well that’s done by Thee.”
—From his loving WIFE and DAUGHTER.