1st Jul 1916. Charge Against an “Enemy Alien” Dismissed

CHARGE AGAINST AN “ ENEMY ALIEN ” DISMISSED.— Arthur E A Bierderman, canvasser, was charged with that he, being an alien enemy, did furnish false particulars for the purposes of registration in contravention of the Aliens’ Restriction (Consolidation) Order, 1916, at Rugby, on June 23rd.—Mr Eaden appeared, for the defendant, and pleaded not guilty.—P.S Ghent stated that on June 22nd defendant registered himself at the Police Station as a German, and signed the register produced, and gave an address in Bath Street. He returned later, and said he was staying at 138 Bath Street. On June 24th he called again, and was granted a travelling permit. Subsequently witness received from Mrs Smith, 138 Bath Street, the registration form produced. On that form defendant had written “ Australia,” and there was no mention of the fact that he was a German. Defendant was subsequently arrested at Banbury. He was charged with giving false information; and, in reply, he said, “ I feel relieved that that is all.”—By Mr Baden : In his identity book defendant had entered his nationality as “ Australia ” ; but someone had crossed that out, and substituted the word “ German.”—Mr Eaden asked what the nationality was of a man born in a British colony of a German parent naturalised in that colony ?—Witness said he thought he would be British, but defendant had to prove this.—Mr Wise pointed out that defendant’s father was naturalised after defendant was born.—P.S Ghent said the man was a “ German under protest,” and he did not like being called one. He added that when he asked defendant what has nationality was he said, the police said he was a German, but he believed he was an Australian. The man said unfortunately he had nothing to prove that he was born in Australia.—Supt Clarke said the man always travelled as a German, and he called at the Police Station and informed them that he was a German. He afterwards deceived his landlady by saying that he was an Australian.—Mr Baden pointed out that the defendant’s father and mother were unquestionably German, and had lived there. Defendant’s elder brother was born while they lived in Germany, and after this they went to Australia, where defendant was born. He was brought up at an English school, and was afterwards employed by a Mining Company in Australia. He lived in Australia 36 years, and during that time his father became naturalised, and his mother also became English automatically. Defendant and his brother, subsequently came to England, and as there was no question that the latter was a German, he became naturalised. There was no necessity for this in defendant’s case, because, as he was born in a British colony, he had the opportunity of adopting which country he would become a citizen of when he came of age, and he then chose to become an Australian. He had lost his birth certificate, and when he was before the Wandsworth police they insisted upon registering him as a German. He had never been to Germany, nor had he any German connections. He submitted that the man had only committed a technical offence, and if the Bench wished to adjourn the case defendant’s brother, who was the secretary of a large Insurance Company in London, could attend and give evidence to the effect that he was born in Australia.—The Chairman said defendant had committed a technical offence. He was in his present unfortunate position because he had lost his birth certificate, but they believed that he was an Australian, and they would dismiss the case. They thought the police did quite right in bringing the case forward.

PROGRESS OF THE WAR.

A message from the British Headquarters, sent on Thursday night, states that activity continues to increase along the whole of the British front.

The Russians have had another victory in the south. On a front of about 25 miles, east of Kolomea, they have defeated the Austrians, taking prisoners 221 officers and 10,285 men.

Sir Roger Casement was found guilty of high treason on Thursday, and the Lord Chief Justice pronounced upon him sentence of death by hanging.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Official intimation has been received by Mr and Mrs D Conopo, of Kilsby, that their son, Stoker Conopo, went down with H.M.S Queen Mary in the Battle of Jutland on May 31st. Stoker Conopo, who was 26 years of age, joined the Navy four years ago, and visited his parents on leave in March last.

Gunner F Bosworth, D Battery, 241st (S.M Brigade) R.F.A, an Old Murrayian, was mentioned in Sir Douglas Haig’s last despatch. In a letter to his old schoolmaster, Mr W T Coles Hodges, he says :— “ I am a telephonist in our Battery, and in this work we have many opportunities of taking part in some of the exciting incidents of this War, and it is in these little stunts that they have evidently thought me worth mentioning.”

Miss F E Knight, who was trained at the Hospital of St Cross, Rugby, was mentioned in the list of the King’s Birthday Honours, and has been awarded the decoration of the Royal Red Cross. Miss Knight joined the Territorial Nursing Force in 1914, and is at present working in Brighton.

Lance-Corpl J Jordan, R.F.A, son of Mr H J Jordan, railway inspector, of 84 Abbey Street, who has been missing for some time, is now reported to have been taken prisoner at Kut. He was an old 1st Rugby Co Boys’ Brigade member.

Mr W Seaton, of 134 Grosvenor Road, has received news that his son, Gunner Harry Seaton, of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, has been severely wounded in the head. Gunner Seaton is the secretary of the Old Murrayians’ F.C, and is well known in local football circles.

RUGBY FOOTBALLER WOUNDED.

The list of casualties published on Wednesday includes the following men from this district who have been wounded :—Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry : Lance-Sergt F.G Judge and Sergt E Watts, Rugby. F G Judge played for Rugby F.C. He was a very useful forward, and showed great promise. Formerly he was vice-captain of the Junior XV. His home is at the Old Station.

Other local casualties reported in recent lists are :—

Wounded: Lance-Corpl J Faichnie, Oxon and Bucks L.I (B.T.H Foundry) ; Rifleman B Banbrook, Rifle Brigade ; Trooper R Goodfellow, Hussars. Taken prisoner at Kut : Corpl F C Jordan, R.F.A.

ANOTHER PRISONER OF WAR.

Mr W C Hitchcox, of 96 Abbey Street, has received a postcard from his son, Sergt Bernard Geo Hitchcox, stating that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. The postcard is dated June 10th, and as a field card was received from him dated June 6th, he must have fallen into the hands of the enemy between those dates. Sergt Hitchcox belongs to the 2nd Canadian Contingent. A younger brother (Pte Clifford Hitchcox, of the same contingent) was killed in action in August last. Both were Old Murrayians.

OLD MURRAYIAN AWARDED THE D.C.M.

Rugbeians in general, and Old Murrayians in particular, will be interested to hear that Bomb W K Freeman, 73rd Battery, 5th Brigade R.F.A, son of Mrs Freeman, 6 Lancaster Road, has been awarded the D.C.M for “ Conspicuous gallantry. When some men were wounded in the town by the enemy’s fire, he took the medical haversack, although telegraphist, and rendered every assistance under heavy fire. Later, when himself wounded, he went to two dressing stations to get stretchers. He had previously displayed great bravery.” Bomb Freeman has also been awarded a French Military decoration.

THE LATE MR. JIM HOWKINS.

At Monday’s meeting of the Rugby Board of Guardians touching reference was made to the loss sustained by Mr G F Howkins, of Crick (a member of the Board), in the sad death of one of his soldier sons, reported in the Advertiser last week.

At Rugby Cattle Market (where Mr Jim Howkins for several years sold the sheep for Messrs Howkins & Sons) the buyers, after hearing of the sad news, proceeded to bid for the next few lots with their hats off to his memory. They also sent Mr and Mrs Howkins a letter of sympathy, which about 40 or more signed.

A memorial service was conducted by the Rev W C Roberts at Crick Parish Church on Sunday afternoon. A good number of Lance-Corpl Howkins’s friends from Rugby, Long Buckby, Murcott, West Haddon, and Crick attended. Suitable hymns were used, and the service was of a solemn and impressive character.

ANOTHER BARBY MAN GIVES HIS LIFE FOR HIS COUNTRY.

William Elkington, a driver in the R.H.A, was killed in action on June 17th. Mr Elkington received the following letter :-

“ I regret to say-your son Will has passed away to-day. We have had a terrible day to-day ; we have got four or five wounded. Poor little Will was one of the unlucky ones, and got a fatal hit with a bursting shell. He was riding his horse at the time ; his horse was killed outright. We (his comrades) had the care of burying him, and I can assure you he was buried in the very best way. He is lying in a soldier’s grave behind the firing lines. We shall all miss him very much ; he was such a jolly fellow. He died doing his duty for his King and country; he was a thorough soldier all through.”

On Sunday a memorial service was held in St Mary’s Church, Barby. There was, of course, a large congregation, including eight soldiers, who came over from the Daventry Hospital. Special hymns and psalms were sung, and the lesson from the Burial Service was read. The Rector (Rev R S Mitchison) preached from Rev iv 1, “ Behold a door was open in heaven.” He said they must look on all the pain, sorrow, and anxiety which came to us through this terrible War as warnings from God to make us think less of this world and more of the Heavenly Father. Another of our brave man had gone. Before he left,.after his last leave, he attended many of the services in the church ; he returned thanks to God for his life. He attended the Intercession service ; he partook of the Holy Communion ; he received the Church’s Blessing before he went in the little service all take part in before they go to the Front. Now they would see him no more on this earth, but he left behind him a good example.

WOMEN FARM WORKERS.

In many parts of the country there appears to exist a suspicion that, if women register their names for farm work, they may be subjected to some form of compulsory service.

The War Office and the Board of Agriculture and Fisheries desire to assure all women who are engaged in work on the land, or who may be willing to undertake such work, that the registration of their names for that purpose will in no way be used to compel them to undertake either agricultural or any other form of work. Such work is entirely voluntary. In no case will they be asked or expected to work on farms outside their own neighbourhood unless they are willing to do so. But it is necessary, in order that the most efficient use may be made of their services, to have a list of the names and addresses of women who are prepared in the emergency to undertake work in the place of the men who are fighting in the trenches. As there is a great need for the services of patriotic women who are willing to assist in the home production of food, it is hoped that all women who can see their way to offer their services, either whole or part time, will at once have their names registered at the local Labour Exchange or by the village Registrar.

RUGBY CASES AT COVENTRY MUNITIONS COURT.

The following cases were dealt with on Friday last week by Coventry Munitions Tribunal

Annie and Mary Sleath, Clifton, v Rugby Lamp Co, Ltd.—This was a complaint in each case of withholding certificate.—Certificates were refused.

W W Wilson. 94 Holyhead Road, v Willans & Robinson, Ltd.—Similar complaint.-The case was struck out.

The cases heard at Coventry Munitions Tribunal on Tuesday included the following :—

Joseph Thomas Lindsell, Rugby, v Willans & Robinson, Rugby.—This was a complaint of withholding certificate. He said he wished to go back to his home at Stoke, where his mother lived, she being a widow and he being an only child. He said he was told there was plenty of work in the Stoke district.—The Chairman suggested that a man at Stoke who wanted to come to Rugby might be exchanged for Lindsell. The case was adjourned for four weeks to see if an exchange could be effected.

James Henry Ball, Rugby, v B.T.H, Rugby.—This was a complaint of withholding certificate. He said he was doing the work of a millwright, though engaged as an assistant millwright, but was refused the district rate. The firm said he was a skilled labourer. It was stated that the man had been offered a fully qualified situation, and that the A.S.E was supporting him. The certificate was granted. It was intimated that an appeal might be lodged.

B.T.H Co, Rugby, v F Dexter, Rugby.—This was a complaint of time losing. He said he was ill, but did not inform the firm.—He was fined 40s.

B.T.H Co v W J Price, Rugby.—Complaint of being absent without leave. He pleaded illness.—Fined 25s.

B.T.H Co v D Conopo, Kilsby.—Similar complaint. He said he walked six miles to his work every morning, and sometimes walked back to his home. It transpired that the man lost his son, who was on the Queen Mary, and the firm said they did not know that, and would not press the case under the circumstances.—The case was withdrawn.

Two other employees of the same firm, J A Grimes, 18 Hunter Street, Rugby, and Alfred Day, 3 Bridge Street, Rugby, were also before the Court for breach of rules.—Day was fined 10s, and the case against Grimes dismissed with a caution.

ABSENTEES.—At- Rugby Police Court on Thursday, before T A Wise, Esq, two young Hillmorton soldiers, Alfred Giddings (3rd Royal Berks) and John Saddler (Durham Light Infantry), pleaded guilty to being absentees from their units, and were remanded to await an escort.

IN MEMORIAM.

ASTILL.—In loving remembrance of Pte. Herbert Wm. Astill, 10744, Oxon and Bucks L.I., stretcher bearer, who died of wounds, June 29, 1915.—Deeply mourned by his widowed MOTHER.

COOMBES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. Arthur Coombes, who died of wounds in King George’s Hospital, London, June 30, 1915.
“ Farewell, dear wife, my life is past ;
You loved me dearly to the last.
Grieve not for me, but to prepare
For heaven be your greatest care.”
Also my dear son Arthur, who died February 26,1915.
—From loving WIFE and MOTHER.

LEESON.—Previously reported missing, now killed in action on the 25th of September, 1915, Sergt Fred Leeson (Bob), Oxford and Bucks L.I., dearly loved second son of Mr. and Mrs. Leeson, 70 Hartington Road, Leicester (late of Hunter Street, Rugby), aged 23 years.—“ O for the touch of a vanished hand and the sound of a voice that is still.”

 

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