Hoare, James. Died 27th May 1918

James Hoare was born in the first quarter of 1887 in the civil parish of Monks Coppenhall, Crewe, Cheshire (Registration district Nantwich).

The 1891 census RG12/2851 page 25 records his father as George age 36, a Coach Man Domestic, born in Newport Pagnall, Bucks and his mother as Caroline age 42 from Wharton, Cheshire.  His uncle Joseph Hoare age 24, a Crane Driver, was living with them.

He had siblings Bertha age 11, Alfred age 9 and Louisa age 7.  He may also have had another brother Walter born 1885 who died age 3 in 1889.

At the 1901 census RG13/3358 page 37 he is 14 and still living in Monks Coppenhall. His father had become a Barman.

By 1911 he had moved to Rugby and was boarding in the home of John and Alice Law at 10, Grosvenor Road. He was age 24 and employed as a Shop Assistant with the Co-operative Society.

He initially appears to have enlisted in Coventry with R. Warwicks Regt with number 4478 but is later listed as Private James Hoare with the 271st infantry battalion of the Machine Gun Corps with number 43375.

He drowned at sea on Monday 27th May 1918 when the troop ship H.T. “Leasowe Castle” was torpedoed on the starboard side by German submarine UB51 with the loss of 83 or 93 lives.

HMS Leasowe Castle Troop Transport Ship

Some 2800 men survived the sinking by taking to the liferafts/boats.  The ship was hit at 0130 when she was travelling in a convoy 104 miles north-west of Alexandria and sank suddenly within 90 minutes when a bulkhead collapsed in the aft part of the ship gave way. Most of the men still on board were carried down with ship and not a single body was picked up. The dead included the ship’s captain and the officers organising the evacuation.

His death, along with eight other privates in the MGC who died on the “Leasowe Castle,” is recorded on stone No.14.A of the CWGC Chatby memorial at Alexandria, Eygpt. He is also recorded on Rugby’s War Memorial

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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25th May 1918. The Recent Flying Accident Near Rugby

THE RECENT FLYING ACCIDENT NEAR RUGBY.
URBAN COUNCIL RESENT CORONER’S STRICTURES.

At a meeting of the Rugby Urban Council, acting as a Burial Board, on Tuesday evening, Mr. Stevenson referred to the criticisms which had been levelled against the Council in connection with the charge of £11 for the ground for the burial of a Royal Air Force officer who was killed in a recent flying accident. He said he was sorry to see the remarks which appeared in one of the local papers condemning the Council for its unpatriotic action. In view of the town’s record all through the war he did not think such remarks were called for, and he was also very sorry indeed to see such an educated man as the Coroner using strong remarks, particularly as he had not made himself fully conversant with the whole facts. He also deprecated the Coroner’s action in asking the Press to take up the cudgels and to start a propaganda to slander the Council. No mention had been made of the fact that on a previous occasion a flying corps officer had been interned in the cemetery free of charge, and no request had been made by soldiers or their relatives which had not been granted. Had the gentleman who had impugned Rugby’s patriotism or any of his officers, communicated with the Clerk to the Council on the matter he had no doubt that the Council would have done its duty as it always did.

The Clerk said he regretted that such a thing had ever occurred. The Council would remember that some months ago they decided that a free site should be granted to any Rugby soldier who lost his life whilst serving with His Majesty’s forces, if it was the wish of his friends. This had been carried out, and had been much appreciated by the relatives of the men. Then, about a couple of months ago, a young officer of the R F.C. met with an accident and died in Rugby, and in his discretion he (the Clerk) decided that this case came under the purview of the Council’s resolution and a free internment was granted. It seemed strange that the Military, in their statement concerning the present case, entirely omitted to mention the fact. In the present case the undertaker informed Mr. Foxon, who consulted him (the Clerk) on the matter, that it was desired to bury the young man at Rugby. He ascertained that the death did not take place in the town. He explained the circumstances very fully to the undertaker, who quite understood the position, and telephoned the facts to the Commanding Officer. From that moment until after the inquest he (the Clerk) never heard any more about the matter ; the military never approached him, and so far as he knew the funeral was to be at Rugby, and the day before the funeral they borrowed the Council’s Union Jack. Although at the inquest the Coroner was asked to communicate with him (the Clerk) he had heard nothing from him. He did not wish to say anything which would cause a continuation of any controversy, but he did think if the Military felt so very strongly on the matter they might have put themselves in touch with him, and had they done so he would have used every effort to have met the request for any soldier who had given his life for his country to be buried in their cemetery, even to the extent of providing the fees had it been necessary.

Mr. Linnell said it had always been usual to charge double fees for strangers, but he thought that, to stop the chance of similar occurrences, they should allow any soldier dying in the neighbourhood to be buried at Rugby if his friends wished it. He hoped there would be so few that it would make little or no difference to the number of interments.

Mr. Stevenson suggested that this should be referred back to the Cemetery Committee.—Mr. Robbins supported.

Mr. Yates thought it very regrettable that such a controversy had arisen. They had acted entirely within the regulations, but this was one of the unexpected emergencies arising for which there was no provision made. He supported the suggestion to refer the matter to the Cemetery Committee to see if they could frame a rule or amend the regulations to cover contingencies such as this. They wanted to scrap as much red tape as possible, and if they had officials and there were regulations they could only expect them to carry them out. They could pass no strictures on Mr. Morson although they might blame themselves for not making their regulations elastic enough to cope with such cases.

Mr. Barnsdale agreed that all soldiers whose friends desired it should be allowed a free burial in the Cemetery, but he regretted that this question had cropped up. Much had been said about it which should not have been said.

The Chairman (Mr. McKinnell) also thought it was a great pity that the matter had arisen. The gist of the matter seemed to be that while the Military felt very strongly that this young officer should be buried in Rugby Cemetery they did not get into touch with the Clerk to inquire whether the charge could be reduced or waived altogether. Had the Clerk not felt able to take the responsibility upon himself or to find the chairman of the Cemetery Committee he certainly would have authorised him to give permission for the burial, and he felt quite certain that the Council would have been only too glad to have confirmed his action.

Mr. Hands suggested that a copy of the paper containing the discussion should be forwarded to the Coroner.

RUGBY PETTY SESSIONS.

DESERTER.—Wallace Harper, no fixed abode, was charged with being a deserter from the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C.—He pleaded guilty.—P.S Hawkes deposed that he met prisoner on Saturday morning in Railway Terrace, and as ha was of military age he asked to see his Army discharge papers or rejection certificate. Prisoner replied that he had neither, and that he had not been registered, examined, or called up. He gave his name as James Davis, no fixed abode ; but while he was taking his description at the Police Station witness noticed that he had been recently vaccinated ; and on being questioned about this, prisoner admitted that his name was Wallace Harper, and that he had been a deserter from Norwich since April 27th.—Remanded to await an escort.

A PATRIOTIC OFFER.—Mr Harold Cole, a retired Metropolitan policeman, was sworn in as a reserve constable, and complimented by the Bench upon his patriotism in coming forward.

DISCHARGED SOLDIERS.—The number of discharged soldiers in the different districts is as follows:—Rugby 443, Alcester 138, Atherstone 287, Brailes 30, Coleshill 85, Coventry 406, Henley 57, Kenilworth 104, Kineton 39, Leamington 429, Solihull 135, Southam 91, Stratford 157, Sutton Coldfield 241, Warwick 236.

RUGBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL.

LOW FLYING OVER THE TOWN.
In reply to a letter to the Military Authorities asking that low flying in aeroplanes over the town should be stopped, Capt King, the officer commanding, wrote :— “ It is impossible to eliminate all low flying, as present War conditions make a certain amount of low flying essential. Flying has to be carried out when the clouds are very low, and, consequently, the machines have to fly underneath the clouds. I will, however, try as far as possible to keep the machines from flying low over Rugby.

FIRST LADY DRIVER.
A hackney carriage driver’s license was granted to Miss Ida Cooper, of 83 Winfield Street. This is the first license that has been granted to a lady locally.

THE RECENT EXPLOSION.
In presenting the Electric Committee’s report, Mr H Yates expressed the gratitude of the Committee to the B.T.H. staff & workmen for the very speedy manner in which they effected the repairs after the recent accident at the Power House. When he visited the scene of the accident with Mr Shenton, and saw the extent of the damage done, he was surprised that they should attempt to get the supply renewed for the evening. He thought the achievement reflected great credit on the staff and workmen who worked so hard to get the supply assured by eight o’clock. He therefore moved that a letter of appreciation be sent to the B.T.H.

Mr T A Wise seconded, and said the speed of the repairs was really wonderful. He did not see the damage, but those who had seen it told him that they never believed it possible that the work could be done so quickly. Praise was due also for the extraordinary presence of mind of two workmen—Messrs Smart and Newitt—who took steps immediately the accident occurred to eliminate all chance of a further explosion. Had it not been for them, he understood much more serious damage would have been done.—This was carried.

ROLL OF HONOUR.
In reply to a question, the Clerk said he had received a long list of names of Rugby men who had fallen in the War, but they were not nearly complete yet, and he hoped that friends and relatives of fallen men would communicate with him at once.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

The following Rugby soldiers, all belonging to the Oxford and Bucks LI., have been reported missing:—Ptes W Chamberlain, F Lenton, H Slatcher, and Corpl W F C White. Rifleman Pitham, 10 Earl Street ; Pte W H Mitchell, Worcester Regt, son of Mr and Mrs David Mitchell, Lodge Road, and Pte H Facet, Leicester Regt, have also been reported as missing.

Pte A G Shilbock, Gloucester Regt, 41 Abbey Street, Rugby, who has been reported as missing, is believed to have fallen into the hands of the Germans as he was last seen in a small group which was cut off by the enemy on March 24th. He was a fine swimmer and won three certificates at the Rugby Baths. He had been in France 12 months.

Mr. and Mrs. Bland have received news from the War Office that their eldest son, Private W Bland, of the Somerset Light Infantry, has been missing since March 21. This is their second son who has been reported missing. A third son is now in France.

Mrs. Freeman, Bennett Cottage, Bennett St., has received news from her husband. Sergt. J. Freeman, R.W.R, an old member of E Company that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He was officially posted as missing on March 22nd.

D.C.M. FOR RUGBY SOLDIER.
Sergt J Webb, 1st Warwicks, Dunchurch Rd, Rugby, who, as we announced last week, was congratulated on his fine behaviour by the General commanding the 4th Division, has been awarded the D.C.M. for gallantry in the field.

RUGBY PRISONER OF WAR’S STORY.
Transferred to Holland after more than three years in Germany as a prisoner of war, Sergeant H Collins, of New Bilton, Rugby, writes: “ I must tell you about my last three days in Germany, just to give you an idea of the starvation out here. Three days before leaving Germany for Holland we were sent to an exchange station on the German frontier, a town called Aaken. When we arrived at the station there and marched through the streets, hundreds of children followed us begging us to give them bread and among them also were many women. Of course we had food with us from our parcels, and at our billets we threw the empty meat and jam tins away. My God, it was painful to see crowds of these women and children dash for the empty tins.

DESERTER.—On Monday, before Mr. A. E. Donkin, Driver William Henry Jones, 24 Kimberley Road, pleaded guilty to being a deserter from the Mechanical Transport, A.S.C., since April 7.—P.S. Hawkes deposed that prisoner was in plain clothes when he arrested him at his residence. He was unable to produce any Army discharge papers, and he admitted that he was a deserter.—Remanded to await an escort.

DUNCHURCH.
DR POWELL has heard that his son, who was reported missing, is wounded and a prisoner in Germany.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
LATEST NEWS OF OUR SOLDIER BOYS.—News is now to hand that Pte Sidney Linnett, Army Cyclist Corps, previously reported missing, is a prisoner of war at Limberg. He was captured on April 9th last.—Pte Frank Lane, Grenadiers, is now reported missing. He is son of Mr & Mrs Joseph Lane, and his brother Arthur, also of the Grenadiers, was killed on March 29, 1916.

NEWBOLD-ON-AVON.
RIFLEMAN W BUTTON, 7th Batt. Rifle Brigade, has sent word to Mrs Day, of Newbold-on-Avon, that he was taken prisoner about two months ago, and is now at Langensalza, Germany. Rifleman Button resided in the village for several years, and before joining the Army in September, 1914, was employed at the Cement Works.

SILVER COINAGE MUST NOT BE HOARDED.

The prohibition of the hoarding of silver coinage and the sale or purchase at more than its face value, in Ireland, announced on Tuesday morning, is now extended to the whole of the United Kingdom. The Regulation provides that after next Monday “ no person shall retain current silver coins of a value exceeding that of the amount of silver coinage reasonably required by him at that time for the purposes of the personal expenditure of himself and his family and of his trade or business (if any).” Contravention of the Regulation constitutes an offence against the Regulations, and the burden of showing what amount of silver it is “ reasonable ” for a person to have it placed on the person charged. The Regulation also provides that any person who sells or purchases, or offers to sell or purchase, any current coin for an amount exceeding the face value of the coin, or accepts or offers to accept any such coin in payment of a debt or otherwise for an amount exceeding its face value, shall be guilty of an offence.

FARMERS WANT PROTECTION AGAINST POLITICIANS.

At a meeting of the Executive Committee of the National Farmers’ Union on Tuesday, in London, progress was reported in respect of the proposed Council of Agriculture, which is to represent owners, occupiers, and labourers to watch the interests of agriculture generally against urban interests, which one member said cared only for votes and how to get the cheapest food. It was hoped the Council would protect farmers against politicians, who set party against party, and class against class. It was agreed to send a resolution to Mr Prothero and Lord Rhondda, asking for a revision of food prices, in view of the greatly increased cost of production.

“ It is curious one can buy a live rabbit without a coupon, but not a dead one. You ought to have bought a live one and wrung its neck,” said Mr. H. Jackson, the clerk at West Ham Police Court.

WHITSUNTIDE BOOKINGS.—Although the number of persons travelling during the holidays was not so large as in pre-war days, the bookings at the G.C.R. Station on Saturday showed an advance on last year’s figures. On Whit-Monday, too, the numbers were high, but in most cases tickets were taken to Willoughby or stations within easy reach of the town. On the L & N.W. Rly. the traffic was quite normal, and although no extra trains were run passengers were not unduly crowded except in a few cases. The countryside was looking at its best last week-end and presented great attraction to those who could by any means of locomotion get out a few miles to enjoy the vernal surroundings. Most of them adopted the wise precaution of taking their lunch and tea rations with them.

SCHOOLBOY LABOUR ON THE LAND.
APPEAL TO PARENTS, HEADMASTERS & BOYS.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

DEAR SIR,—The military situation has necessitated calling-up of a large number of agricultural labourers, which will seriously deplete the available labour during the coming hay, corn, and potato harvests. It is of vital importance that the harvest of these crops should be successfully secured this year. This success will depend largely upon boys at public and secondary schools who have reached an age that will enable them to do useful work on the land.

The extent to which farmers are counting on their help is shown by the fact that demands for over 17,000 boys have already been received at the Ministry ; and there is no doubt that these numbers will be largely increased when the full effect of the calling-up for military service has been appreciated by the farmers. Of these numbers not less than 3,000 will be required during June and July, and a further 3,500 are needed for October for potato lifting if suitable accommodation can be arranged.

In view of the above facts, I am reluctantly compelled to appeal to schools to release during term-time such groups of boys as may be necessary for getting in the harvest. This is a time of national crisis, and the ordinary considerations of education have not the same force as in normal times. As I have pointed out, it is necessary to provide men for the Army, and it is necessary to provide labour to take their places on the farms and I must urgently appeal to parents, headmasters and boys to give all the help they can.

In view of my representations as to the urgency of the national need, the President of the Board of Education concurs in this appeal, and is issuing a circular on the subject to secondary schools in England and Wales.

All offers of service must be made through the headmasters of the schools. Headmaster who have not already received the regulations, and who can offer boys of 16 and over, should communicate with this Ministry.—I am. your, faithfully.

(Signed) A C GEDDES.
Ministry of National Service, Westminster, S.W.1.

DEATHS

DODSON.—In loving memory of Trooper GEOFFREY H. DODSON, 10th Australian Light Horse, son of Armourer-Staff-Sergt & Mrs. Dodson, 4 St. Matthew’s Street, who was killed in action in Palestine on May 2nd, 1918 ; aged 25.

IN MEMORIAM.

HUDSON.—In ever-loving memory of my dear husband, HENRY JOHN HUDSON, who died at Chatham Naval Hospital, May 20, 1917.
With patience he suffered, his troubles were sore.
But now it is ended, he suffers no more ;
He sleeps, we will leave him in silence to rest,
The parting was painful, but God knoweth best.
—Sadly missed by his loving Wife and Children.

Covington, Reginald Frederick. Died 22nd May 1918

Reginald Frederick COVINGTON was born in Northampton in about 1894, and his birth was registered in Q1, 1894He was the son of George Frederick Covington, born in about 1861 in Northampton, and Kate, née Westley, Covington, who was born in about 1867 in Sherrington, Buckinghamshire.  They had married on 25 December 1890 at St Michael and All Angels church, Northampton.

It seems that the family moved from Northampton to Wellingborough between 1897 and 1901, when the family was living at 9 Oxford Street, Wellingborough.  Reginald’s father was a ‘fruitier’.  The family then moved to Rugby

Before 1911 they moved again, to Rugby, and Reginald attended school at St. Matthew’s. He had been a holder of the Robertson Cup for the best all-round athlete in the school.[1] When Reginald was 17, the family were living in a six room house at 28 North Street, Rugby.  He had two younger sisters.  His father was a ‘Fruitierer & Confectioner’, and he was working as a ‘Compositor’ – later he would work for the family business and managed his father’s branch shop in Lawford Road.

It is uncertain when he joined up, although an obituary stated that he ‘… joined the army … in the early days of the War.’[2]  He joined up as a Gunner, No.1160, in the Royal Field Artillery – Territorial Force, and at a later date, but prior to September/October 1917, he was renumbered as No:840787.

It seems that he did not go to France until at least late 1915, as he did not receive the 1914-1915 Star, but he was certainly in France prior to September/October 1917, as he was wounded and/or gassed as mentioned in two local papers.

In September 1917, the ‘Local War Notes’ reported
Bombardier Reg Covington, R.F.A, son of Mr Richard[3] Covington, has been gassed during the recent fighting.[4]

It was probably the same occurrence that was reported in October 1917, in the Coventry Evening Telegraph,
Roll of Honour, Coventry and District Casualties.
Wounded … Covington, 840787, Gnr. R., Rugby, R.F.A.[5]

An official Casualty List in October also listed him a ‘Wounded’ under the Royal Field Artillery listing.[6]

It seems that he was sent back to England for treatment, but returned to France in about early 1918.  The CWGC record states that he was latterly in the ‘D’ Battery of the 275th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery.

The 275th (1/1st West Lancashire) Brigade RFA Territorial Force was based at Windsor Barracks, Spekeland Street, Liverpool.  The Brigade came under the orders of the West Lancashire Division.  The divisional artillery crossed to France, landing at Le Havre on 1 October 1915.

The West Lancashire Division, now titled the 55th (West Lancashire) Division, was ordered to re-form in France and the artillery rejoined it at Hallencourt between 2 and 4 January 1916.  A new “D” Battery was formed for the Brigade on 7 May 1916.  There were later various reorganisations as the batteries were switched around.

In 1918, the 55th Division relieved the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division in the front line at Givenchy and Festubert on 15 February.  Here, it faced numerous strong enemy attacks in March 1918.

Whilst the front had been comparatively quiet, an attack was anticipated and on 21 March 1918, the Germans launched a major offensive, Operation Michael, against the British Fifth Army and the right wing of the British Third Army.  The German artillery targeted command and communications; then, the destruction of artillery; and then the front-line infantry.  The artillery bombardment began at 4.40am on 21 March 1918, and hit targets over an area of 150 square miles, the biggest barrage of the entire war.  Over 1,100,000 shells were fired in five hours.

Early April was comparatively quieter, but it was a lull before a storm, with the Division involved in the Battle of Estaires (9-11 April) including the Defence of Givenchy (9-17 April) and the Battle of Hazebrouck (12-15 April), the latter two being phases of the Battles of the Lys.

The Defence of Givenchy was to become the single most famous action fought by the Division.  ‘It was afterwards publicly stated by an officer of the German General Staff that the stand made by the Division on April 9th and the days which followed marked the final ruination of the supreme German effort of 1918’, says the Divisional history.

The 275th RFA Brigade Diary gives information on their various actions in April and May, but there do not seem to be any specific large scale actions at and just before Reginald died of his wounds.

The 275th Artillery Group was in the line in early April and on 9 April, the ‘B’, ‘C’ and ‘D’ Batteries of the 275th were moved back section by section.  On 10 April there was considerable hostile bombardment which included about 10% of gas shells of various types.  In spite of attacks, it seems the German advances on Givenchy and Festubert were driven back and indeed some 700 prisoners were taken.  On 25/26 April, the 164th Infantry Brigade attacked Givenchy to re-establish the old line.  The 275th put down smoke and shrapnel to cover one of the flanks.  The 55th Division were congratulated on their fine work during this battle.

There is less information recorded for May, and Reg was probably wounded, possibly by German counter-battery shelling, sometime in April or May.  If earlier, he might have been expected to have been evacuated further to a base hospital, so it was probably about mid-May.

Reginald’s Medal Card states that he ‘Died of Wounds’ on 22 May 1918 and the Army Register of Soldiers’ Effects stated that he died at the ‘2/1 Wessex Field Ambulance’,[7] France.  Their movements may provide some further information on Reginald’s location.

The 2/1st Wessex Field Ambulance, was largely a Devonshire unit but was attached to the 55th West Lancashire Division from January 1916 to November 1918.  In April 1918 they were in the area La Basse/Givenchy and near Bethune on 9 April 1918, and had an Advanced Dressing Station just behind Givenchy during the German attacks of April 1918.

The RAMC War Diary for the 55th Division provides details of the movement orders for the 2/1st Wessex Field ambulance, and during the month they were moved to some ten different locations in response to the German assaults.

During May the 2/1st Wessex Field Ambulance quartered around Drouvin, and it seems likely that Reginald died of his wounds at the Field Ambulance there on 22 May 1918 and was buried in the nearby Houchin British CemeteryHis body was buried in grave ref: I. B. 18.   Later, when a permanent gravestone replaced the temporary cross, his family’s message, ‘Though Far Away to Memory Ever Dear’ would be inscribed upon it.

Houchin is a village situated between Barlin and Bethune, about 5 kilometres south of Bethune. Houchin British Cemetery was opened in March 1918 when the 6th Casualty Clearing Station came to Houchin.  From April to September the German advance made Houchin unsafe for hospitals, and the cemetery was used by the 55th (West Lancashire) Division.

In June 1918, the Rugby Advertiser reported,
Gunner Reginald Covington.  Mr G F Covington, of North Street, has received news that his only son, Gunner Reg Covington, R.F.A. died of wounds received in action on May 22nd.  He was 23 years of age, and joined the army – prior to which he managed his father’s branch shop in Lawford Road – in the early days of the War.  Towards the end of last year he was badly gassed, but he returned to France a few months ago.  An old St. Matthew’s boy, he was at one time the holder of the Robertson Cup for the best all-round athlete in the school.[8]

The Coventry Evening Telegraph also reported his death in June 1918,
Roll of Honour, Coventry and District Casualties Died of Wounds
… Covington, 840787, Gnr. R., Rugby, R.F.A [9]

An official Casualty List in July also confirmed that he ‘Died of Wounds’ under the Royal Field Artillery listing.[10]

Reginald Frederick COVINGTON is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates.  His Medal Card showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

His mother, Kate, as sole Legatee, received his back-pay of £6-7-1d on 28 August 1918, and his War Gratuity of £13-10s on 9 December 1919.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Reginald Frederick COVINGTON was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, February 2018.

[1]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 1 June 1918.

[2]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 1 June 1918.

[3]      This would seem to be in error, there are no other Reg Covingtons with a father Richard.

[4]      https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2017/09/29/29th-sep-1917-blackberry-picking/, and Rugby Advertiser, 29 September 1917.

[5]      Coventry Evening Telegraph, Friday, 19 October 1917.

[6]      Weekly Casualty List (War Office & Air Ministry), Tuesday, 23 October 1917.

[7]      2/1 Wessex Field Ambulance, a file is available at TNA ref: WO 95/2919/1, 1916 Jan. – 1919 Apr., and various information can be found on Google.

[8]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 1 June 1918.

[9]      Coventry Evening Telegraph, Thursday, 27 June 1918.

[10]     Weekly Casualty List (War Office & Air Ministry), Tuesday, 2 July 1918.

Eyden, Clarence Alfred. Died 18th May 1918

Alfred Eyden and Sarah Eleanor Mewis, the parents of Clarence were married on New Year’s Eve 1889. The Reverend John Murray Rector of St Andrews parish church Rugby, conducted the ceremony, and unusually eight witnesses appear to have witnessed and signed the Register.

Clarence was born on the 4th November 1890. He was baptized at St Andrews parish church Rugby on the 31st December 1890. December was an unusually warm month that year, with the average temperature being four and a half degrees Celsius or forty degrees Fahrenheit. If the day was indeed fairly mild the whole family must have been in good spirits as they walked to church from their home in Clifton Road.

Having qualified for the Lawrence Sheriff Grammar School for boys Clarence was obviously a boy of above average intelligence. The Census for 1911, on which he can be found, reveals that he was twenty years of age and lived at 165, Clifton Road, Rugby. This was most likely a house provided by the London North Western Railway. The other people also in residence were his Grandfather Richard Mewis aged sixty eight, who worked as a Railway engine driver and his wife Sarah, aged seventy, his father Alfred Eyden aged forty nine, Chief Rates Clerk LNWR Rugby, and his wife Sarah, aged forty four. Clarence was next, and worked as an apprentice for the LNWR at Leamington Spa. Maurice, the younger brother of Clarence was aged fourteen and a scholar at Lawrence Sheriff School. Edith Hughes, age eighteen, a general domestic servant, was also living in the house.

Clarence commenced his apprenticeship on May 29th 1905 at Rugby his salary being £20 per annum. From Rugby he moved on to Brandon, Long Buckby and Leamington Spa. His salary in March 1911 was £50 per annum. His employment at Leamington Spa ceased at the end of March, and on April 3rd 1911 he was transferred to the General Manager’s office Euston where he was employed as the private Clerk to the LNWR General Manager.

The family appears to have been musical: on 23 January 1915, at a ‘Concert for soldiers in the Church House’, arranged by the Entertainment Committee of the Conservative Club, songs were given by Mr. Clarence Eyden.  On the next Sunday, 31 January 1915, his mother sang, and was the soloist at a meeting of the Rugby Brotherhood at the Cooperative Hall with the notice, ‘Soldiers heartily welcomed’.[3]

His parents would later move to Northampton, meanwhile, presumably after his concert appearance in early 1915, Clarence joined up in London, as a Sapper, No.88204 in the Royal Engineers.  It was not long before he was sent to France and his Medal Card gives that date as 8 June 1915.  He was later promoted to be an Acting 2nd Corporal, and it was possibly then that he was renumbered, WR/252025 [possibly standing for War Reserve], and with his ten year’s railway experience, it is perhaps not surprising that he became a member of the ‘Railway Traffic [or Transportation] Establishment RE’.

The Establishment for the Railway Traffic Section, R.E. was 25 Officers and 174 Other Ranks.  3 Officers were Deputy Assistant Directors of Railway Traffic and the other 22 Railway Traffic Officers.  The Other Ranks were made up of 1 CSM, 30 Clerks & 56 Checkers (1 Staff Sgt, 4 Sgts & 81 Rank and File), 74 to act as Porters, Goods Guards, Loaders and Train Conductors (1 Sgt with 73 Rank and File).  The remainder of the unit comprised 13 batmen, 4 cooks and 4 men for general duties.[4]

So crucial was transportation that in the last months of the war, despite a shortage of front line soldiers, men with railway experience were being transferred from infantry units to railway operating companies.

Clarence died of wounds, but it is not known when or where he was working when he was wounded.  Because of his burial in St. Omer, he was possibly working in the St. Omer area, dealing with some aspect of railway organisation.

St. Omer had suffered a severe air raid on the night of 18/19 May 1918 when among other damage, a German air raid caused an explosion at an ammunition dump at Arque – some five miles south-east of St. Omer.  Indeed, recovering the wounded took five hours and 18 Military Medals were subsequently awarded to the female medical and transport staff.  On that occasion a number of men from the Chinese Labour Corps were also killed.  ‘A certain number of houses had been hit and some ammunition dumps and petrol stores and part of the railway line, so it was considered the Germans would think they had had a good night.’[5]

Various records state that Clarence both ‘Died in Action’ and ‘Died of Wounds’, however, his Medal Card notes that he ‘Died’ rather than stating ‘KinA’ or ‘DofW’.  This may imply that …

… some time had passed between … being wounded and dying – the next-of-kin were informed that he had ‘died’, rather than ‘died of wounds’.  Exactly how much time had to pass before this distinction was made is not clear.’[6]

From the dates, it is possible that Clarence was one of the casualties of the bombing of St. Omer, possibly when the ‘part of the railway line’ was hit and had reached hospital in St. Omer where he died that night, 18 May 1918, or possibly the following day.[7]  He was 27 year old.

He was buried in Plot: V. B. 9., at the Longuenesse (St. Omer) Souvenir Cemetery.  On his gravestone his family had arranged to be inscribed: ‘In Proudest Memory of One “Who Greatly Loved, Who Greatly Lived and Died Right Mightily”

St. Omer is 45 kilometres south-east of Calais and the cemetery at Longuenesse is on the southern outskirts of St. Omer.  St. Omer was the General Headquarters of the British Expeditionary Force from October 1914 to March 1916.  The town was a considerable hospital centre with the 4th, 10th, 7th Canadian, 9th Canadian and New Zealand Stationary Hospitals, the 7th, 58th (Scottish) and 59th (Northern) General Hospitals, and the 17th, 18th and 1st and 2nd Australian Casualty Clearing Stations all stationed there at some time during the war.  St. Omer suffered air raids in November 1917 and May 1918, with serious loss of life.  The cemetery takes its names from the triangular cemetery of the St. Omer garrison, properly called the Souvenir Cemetery (Cimetiere du Souvenir Francais) which is located next to the War Cemetery.

Clarence Alfred EYDEN is also remembered on the Rugby Memorial Gates; and on the WWI Lawrence Sheriff School Plaque,[8] which reads,

‘In Commemoration of our Brother Laurentians who Fell in The Great War, 1914-1918, Orando Laborando.

His Medal Card and the Medal Roll showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal, and also the 1914-1915 Star.

His father received his back-pay of £5-11-2d on 16 October 1918 and later his War Gratuity of £15 on 2 December 1919.  Clarences’s parents appear to have left Rugby before 1918, and later in the CWGC record, Clarence is noted as the son of Mr A. Eyden, of 1 St. Pauls Terrace Northampton.

In the year 1921 the following memorial notice appeared in the Rugby Advertiser:
EYDEN. —- To the ever precious memory of Clarence, the dearly beloved and elder son of Alfred and Eleanor Eyden, who fell in the Great War on Whit Sunday, May 18th 1918. —- And the World passeth away, but he that doeth the will of God abideth forever.                                                                                                                                            

Clarence’s younger brother Maurice Eyden also joined up.  Reports in the Rugby Advertiser noted.

October 1916 – Maurice Victor Eyden (O.R), younger son of Mr Alfred Eyden, of Northampton, formerly residing in the Clifton Road, Rugby, has been gazetted 2nd Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment (Steelbacks), after a course of training in the Inns of Court O.T.C.[9]

July 1917 – Second Lieutenant Maurice V Eyden (son of Mr Alfred Eyden), 2nd Northants Regiment, has been promoted to the rank of First-Lieutenant.[10]

July 1918 – Mr. & Mrs. Alfred Eyden, ‘Denaby’, St. Matthew’s Parade, Northampton, have been advised that their younger son, Lieut Maurice V Eyden, 2nd Northants Regiment, reported missing on May 27th, is a prisoner of war in Germany and quite well.  His only brother (Royal Engineers) was killed in France on May 19, 1918’.[11]

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Clarence Alfred EYDEN was researched and written for a Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, February 2018. Other information by Charles Partington-Tierney

[1]      London and North Western Railway, Salaried staff register [No 2, pages 1613-2092] – Goods Department.

[2]      London and North Western Railway, Salaried staff register [No 2, pages 1613-2092] – Goods Department.

[3]      Rugby Advertiser, Saturday, 30 January 1915.

[4]      Ivor Lee, 8 August 2003, http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/topic/4011-railway-transport-establishment/.

[5]      Diary of the Matron in Chief in France and Flanders, TNA, WO95/3990, http://www.scarletfinders.co.uk/91.html.

[6]      http://www.epitaphsofthegreatwar.com/killed-in-action/.

[7]      The item on his brother in the Rugby Advertiser, 6 July 1918, gave the date of Clarence’s death as 19 May 1918 – the day following the bombing of St. Omer.

[8]      Information from https://www.rugbyfhg.co.uk/lawrence-sheriff-school-plaques.

[9]      Rugby Remembers, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2016/10/28/28th-oct-1916-the-boy-scouts-a-record-of-useful-work/, and Rugby Advertiser, 28 October 1916.

[10]     Rugby Advertiser, 14 July 1917, and Rugby Remembers, https://rugbyremembers.wordpress.com/2017/07/14/14th-jul-1917-the-rugby-baking-trade-no-more-men-can-be-spared/.

[11]     Rugby Advertiser, 6 July 1918.

18th May 1918. Fatal Flying Accidents near Rugby

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENTS NEAR RUGBY.
TWO YOUNG PILOTS KILLED.

On Monday two inquests were held by Mr E F Hadow at Rugby on the bodies of Second-Lieut James Donald McRae Reid (21) and Second-Lieut Roderick Oliver Sherar, who were killed in aeroplane accident during the latter end of last week.

With regard to Lieut Reid, of Vancouver, a member of the Canadian R.F.C, it was stated that on Thursday morning last week he started on a flight in a machine, the rigging and engine of which were in good order. An eye-witness, Second-Lieut Gerald Gold, stated that when he was about 2,000ft up Lieut Reid started a vertical dive, and while he was trying to straighten out again the aeroplane collapsed. Deceased dived from 1,200ft to 1,500ft, and he believed that the accident was due to deceased trying to straighten out too quickly. He was apparently diving without the engine going.

Capt Henry Pick Dean thought that the aeroplane fell about 800ft out of control. Deceased was diving at a rate of 180 or 200 miles an hour, and tried to straighten out too quickly, and witness believed this caused the aeroplane to crock up. It was not common for ‘planes to break in the middle as this did unless subjected to very great strain.

Surgeon-Major Chester Collins deposed that death was instantaneous, deceased’s head being smashed in and a large number of bones broken.

In the case of Second-Lieut Sherar, it was stated that he was an Australian, and had served in France with the Infantry. He was gazetted from a cadetship a fortnight ago. On Saturday, at 12 o’clock, deceased was ordered by Capt Pick Dean to take up the machine, the engine and rigging of which had been certified previously as in good order. Deceased was a very fine flyer, and Capt Dean watched him looping and ” rolling ” —a corkscrew evolution which all pilots were taught—for about ten minutes. He then flew out of sight, and the accident occurred shortly afterwards. Capt Dean’s opinion was that Lieut Sherar, who was 2,000ft up when he began his evolutions, was losing height without realising it. Probably when at a height of 1,500ft, but thinking it was higher up, the officer began a spin without sufficient depth to save himself. Had there been another 50ft below him he could have got out all right. It was clearly a case of misjudging the altitude.—This was confirmed by Second-Lieut Charles T Robinson, who witnessed the accident, and who said the machine struck the ground after coming out of a voluntary spin.—The injuries were described by Surgeon-Major Chester Collins, who said death must have been instantaneous, as deceased’s neck was broken.

A verdict of “ Accidental death ” was returned in each case.

RUGBY’S PATRIOTISM IMPUGNED.
Capt King, the officer commanding, mentioned that he had wished to give one of the officers a military funeral at Rugby ; but as he was not a Rugby man, the local authorities wished to charge £11 for the ground alone. He did not consider it very patriotic of Rugby people when a young man gave his life for his country, to refuse him a decent burial in their town.

The jury endorsed Capt King’s remarks and expressed the hope that the question would be brought to the notice of the Council.—The Foreman : They would not treat you like that at Clifton.—Capt King: No we are going to have him buried there.—The jury asked the Coroner to write to the Clerk to the Council on the matter, and the Foreman also promised to approach a member of the Council.

The attention of Mr Arthur Morson, the clerk to the Urban District Council, having been drawn to this question, he informs us that the regulations governing internments in the cemetery were very explicit on this point, and the Council have no power to allow a stranger to Rugby to be interred in the cemetery without the payment of double fees. This rule is necessary for the preservation of the burial ground for Rugbeians, and if it was not strictly observed there is a possibility that the cemetery would soon be filled with people from outside.

FUNERALS OF THE VICTIMS.
It was hoped to have given both of the deceased an imposing military funeral at Rugby ; but as the price of the ground space in Rugby Cemetery was too prohibitive, the funerals took place at Clifton with full military honours, whilst the villagers showed their respect by attending in large numbers.

Lieut Reid was buried on Monday, and in attendance were six officers, who acted as bearers,and 30 men, the whole being under the charge of Capt King. A sister of the deceased, who is serving with the Canadian Red Cross, attended. A firing party fired volleys, and the ” Last Post” was sounded. The school children, it might be added, lined the churchyard path, and a hymn was sung, accompanied on the organ. The Rev Cyril Morton (Vicar) officiated, and was assisted by Captain McGuinness (Presbyterian Chaplain).

The funeral of Second-Lieut Sherar took place at Clifton on Tuesday. Thirty officers (six of whom acted as bearers), thirty N.C.O’s and men, and a firing party attended, under Major Forbes. In church the hymn, ” On the Resurrection Morning,” was sung, and appropriate organ music was rendered. Cousins of the deceased were present as chief mourners. A representative was present from the Strand headquarters. Lieut Wood was in charge of the arrangements.

In both cases wreaths were sent by brother officers.

To the Editor of the Advertiser.

SIR,—I can hardly believe that the loyalty of Rugby— which is proverbial—should have failed on such an occasion in the provision of some 6ft. of ground (except at the cost of £11) to be the last resting-place of one of our youngest and bravest Allies.

Lieut Reid was a magnificent flyer, and his machine— OUR manufacture—literally broke in two with him when in mid-air, and if any man gave his life for our country he did.

I can only say we here at Clifton were proud to have him, as well as a young Australian, at rest in our little village burial ground.

T S TOWNSEND. May 16, 1918.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Pte F Rouse, A.S.C, of 8 Stephen Street, Rugby, has been wounded. He had an operation in France, and is now in Newcastle-on-Tyne.

Mrs Webb, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, has received from her husband. Sergt J Webb, 1st Warwicks, a letter from the Major-General of the 4th Division,stating that Sergt Webb’s gallant conduct had been reported to him, and congratulating him on his fine behaviour. Sergt Webb enlisted in September, 1914.

New has been received by Mrs McKie, 33 Albert Street, Rugby, that her son, Pte Horace Horsley, of the Manchesters, has been missing since March 21st. He was formerly employed at the B.T.H, and is 21 years of age. He joined up in May last year, and went out in November and took part in the big battle.

Lieut A J Dukes, 15th Battalion the Welsh Regiment, son of Mr A J Dukes, Rugby, has been wounded in action, and is now in hospital in Birmingham.

Lance-Corpl A Blundy, 2nd Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, was killed in action on April 28, 1918. Prior to joining up he was employed in the B.T.H Generator Department. He was an old St Matthew’s boy.

Information has been received that R.S.M W J Barford, 4th Lincolnshire Regiment, died on April 30, 1918, from wounds received in action. Prior to joining his Majesty’s Forces, Pte Barford was a member of the Supply Department staff of the BTH.

Mrs F C Worrall has received news that her husband, Sergt F C Worrall, has been wounded. He is the eldest son of Mr C Worrall, Farm Cottage, Albert Street, and has been in France two years.

Lieut Evan Harries Jones, M.C, 87th Brigade, R.F.A, second son of Mr & Mrs J Jones, of Cosford, who was killed in action on April 25, 1918, was 22 years of age, and educated at the Rugby Lower School. In a letter received by his parents from the Commanding Officer of the Brigade, the latter states that he had known the late Lieut Jones for many months, and that they had had many hard and trying times together. His example was always a keen stimulant to those under his command, For gallantry and conduct he received the M.C some time ago. The writer adds:—“ On the date on which he lost his life we were together in a very hot and extremely difficult position ; his conduct then, as it had been at all times, was cool and beyond praise. He was killed by a German bullet, and his death was instantaneous. In the great loss to you, so it is to us, his brother officers and his battery. He will always be remembered as one of the finest officers who have laid down their lives for their King and country. I have the pleasure to state that he has again been mentioned for gallantry and splendid conduct to the proper quarter, and I feel sure that a bar to his M.C will be awarded. I wish you to know how much his brother officers sympathise with you in your great loss.”

STRETTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
SOLDIER MISSING.—News has been received by Mrs Hancox that her son, Pte J F Hancox, has been missing since April 14th. The War Office states that he may not be killed ; he may have been taken prisoner or temporarily separated from his regiment.

BRANDON.
PTE HORACE WATTS.—Mr & Mrs G Watts, who had not received news of their son, Pte Horace Watts, since March 21st, have just heard from him that he is a prisoner of war in Germany. He was wounded in two places in the leg in 1916 and invalided home. He joined up in August, 1914, and has been on the Western front for upwards of three years, during which time he has seen much fighting with his regiment, the West Kents. He was one of the number who, in Trones Wood, was surrounded by the Germans, and successfully held them at bay for two days, eventually being successful in withdrawing from the difficult situation. He is again wounded. Before answering his country’s call he was a footman to the Earl of Amherst, and previous to that he held a similar position to Col R J Beech at Brandon Hall. His father, Mr G Watts, has been head gamekeeper for Col Beech for 26 years.

DUNCHURCH.
MRS P GRANT, Mill Street, Dunchurch, received the news from her husband on Tuesday morning that he has been wounded in the right leg, and has undergone an operation, which was successful.

LONG ITCHINGTON.
CASUALTIES.—Mrs Edwd Ayres has now received through the Red Cross evidence that her eldest son, Pte Edwd Ayres, R.W.R, previously reported missing, was seen lying dead in a disused trench on October 9th last. Much sympathy is felt with Mrs Ayres, whose only other son has just been called up. She is a widow, and works hard for her living at Messrs Kaye’s Lime and Cement Works.—News is also to hand that Pte Sidney Linnett, Army Cyclist Corps, is missing. The chaplain writes that he went into action on April 18th last, and has not since been heard of. He was one of our early enlistments into the Royal Warwicks. Pte Linnett is the adopted son of Mr and the late Mrs W Gaskins, of the Model Village.—Pte George Hart, R.W.R, has been wounded in the face and thigh, and though at first blinded, has now recovered his sight. He writes that he expects soon to be convalescent and again in the fighting line. He has three other brothers in the Army, all of whom have seen considerable service. They are the gallant sons of Mr & Mrs Wm Hart.—Gunner Arthur J Worrall, R.F.A, who for the past six months has been an inmate of the Middlesex War Hospital at Maksbury, is now convalescent.—Sapper J Gamage, R.E, eldest son of Mr & Mrs W Gamage, has met with a serious injury to his hand while on duty in France.

NAPTON.
ROLL OF HONOUR.—The parishioners regret to hear of the loss of two Napton lads—Pte Clement Fell Batchelor and Pte Sidney Lines. Mr & Mrs James Hands have also had official notification that their second son, Pte Frank Hands, was missing from April 1st. Mr & Mrs Hands’ eldest son was killed in action in June, 1916.

AN APPEAL TO RUGBY YOUNG MEN.

From one of the propaganda vans war pictures were exhibited on Thursday evening to a large crowd gathered near the Clock Tower. Speeches were delivered by Mr McKinnell, two representatives with the van, and Colonel Johnstone. In a stirring appeal, Col Johnstone said : “ Young men of Rugby, I have appealed to you before, and I appeal to you again with greater force, because the necessity for men is very much greater. Do you want to see your country devastated and your homes ruined ? If not, follow the example of those noble and brave men whom you see walking about the town in blue. Those fellows have done their duty. They had fought for their country and for you and me. Come forward and follow their example. I know some of you are working in munitions, and I also know that you have only to hand in your certificate, and then you can voluntarily enlist. Do not make a mistake about that. Other men will be found to do your work. I think it is a shame, and to me it is very degrading, that older men of 45 or so should be called out to the Colours when there are so many young men quite able to join the Colours who ought to do so, instead of letting their fathers do so. Col Johnstone concluded by an appeal to the men who could not join the Army to join the Volunteers. That would be helping their country. The Rugby Company had got a very good name. Col Johnstone referred to the test mobilisation at Warwick Park, when 886 men were on parade. These men could render a very good account of themselves in the case of emergency, and they did not know how soon this emergency would arise. At present there was a need for boys of 17 years to 17 years 9 months to come forward as carpenters.”

MEDICAL EXAMINATION OF EXEMPTED MEN.
APPEAL TRIBUNAL CHAIRMAN’S WARNING.

A warning as to the probable fate of applicants for exemption, or exempted men called up for review, who postpone their application for medical examination until they appear before the Tribunal, was given by the Chairman (Mr H W Wale) at the Coventry Appeal Tribunal on Friday in last week.—The question arose, on the application of George Evelyn Clarke, sub-postmaster and carrier, Newbold-on-Avon, for a fresh examination.—In support of the application, Mr H W Worthington said the man had been down to the Drill Hall to try to get re-examined, but had been told that it could not be got through in time. He had a medical certificate showing the state of the man’s health, and he did not think he would now be placed in the same category as before, viz, B1.—The Chairman pointed out that the Tribunal had sat three times that week ; they were busy men, and did not want repetition. One day one of these appeals would be dismissed as a warning to other people of what would happen if they did not take advantage of their rights. Every man now had the right to a re-examination, and every man should exercise that right, and not put people who were doing a tremendous amount of public work to unnecessary trouble.— Applicant: I tried to get re-graded as soon as I received my papers.—Mr Meredith (National Service representative): You were passed Grade 2 in August last.—The Chairman : We might say that you are satisfied with your grading by the mere fact that you have let things go on so long, but we will grant the application in this case, and adjourn the matter till next Wednesday.

AGRICULTURE AND RECRUITING : IMPORTANT DECISION.

The Board of Agriculture announce that an arrangement has been made with the Ministry of National Service and the War Office for a definite number of 30,000 Grade 1 men to be made available from agriculture for military service not later than June 30th.

It is hoped that the large majority of these men will be recruited under the Proclamation of April 19, 1918, calling up men born in the years 1895-99, but if the full number of men born is not obtained under this Proclamation it will be necessary to obtain the remainder from men up to 31 years of age.

It is expected that additional labour, including a large number of prisoners of war, will be made available for agriculture to take the place of the men urgently required for immediate military service.

ENCOURAGING PIG-KEEPING.

A new regulation under the Defence of the Realm Act permits the keeping of pigs in any locality, premises, or place where they do not cause nuisance or injury to health. The restriction limiting pig-keeping within a specified distance of any street or public place is removed, providing permission is given by the local authority. Local authorities are also permitted to erect or provide and maintain piggeries and to purchase, keep, or sell pigs. This regulation is extended to Scotland and Ireland.

MEAT COUPONS TO HAVE NEW VALUES.

The Food Ministry has issued an order amending coupon values and dealing with the exemption of certain classes of offal from the necessity for the surrender of coupons.

The following kinds of edible offal, whether cooked or uncooked, may be purchased without coupons:—Tripe, chitterlings, lights, sheeps’ heads, calves’ heads and feet, ox heels, cow heels, and pigs’ and sheep’s trotters, as well as the following articles if containing no meat except edible offal of the kinds mentioned:—Cooked or prepared sausages, polonies, brawn, canned or potted goods, horseflesh (thin flank and forequarters except foreribs), meat of goats and kids, white pudding and meat pastes, containing not more than 33% per cent. of meat.

Food Control Committees are empowered under the Order to authorise the sale without coupons of meat pies not exceeding 6ozs in weight, cooked, of a kind usually sold in their districts, provided the total weight of cooked meat in the pie does not exceed 20 per cent. of the whole. Such authority will only be given to retailers who have customarily sold meat pies of this class.

Any coupon attached to an ordinary or supplementary ration card will be available during the period of its validity for the purchase of suet, edible offal, bones, and sausages. While a general butcher may sell suet, tongue, kidneys, and skirt to his registered customers only, he may sell other edible offal, hones, and sausages to any purchaser, detaching coupons in all cases where this is required.

PRESERVING BUTTER.

With the object of encouraging conservation for winter use, the Food Controller has issued an authorisation permitting the acquisition of farmers’ butter for home preservation under the following conditions:—The amount obtained by any person must not exceed the quantity authorised by the Food Control Committee of his district. The conditions mentioned in the authority must be complied with. A certificate in a form prescribed by the Food Controller must be given by the purchaser to the supplier. The butter must be properly salted or preserved, and it must be consumed only at such time and subject to such conditions as may be authorised by the Food Controller. Farmers’ butter may be supplied up to the amount permitted on the production of the necessary authority and of the certificate mentioned when required by a Food Committee.

STATE ROAD TRANSPORT.
POWER TO SEIZE HORSES AND VEHICLES.

New powers for “ maintaining an efficient system for the transport of goods by road ” are conferred on the Board of Trade by a Defence of the Realm Regulation which is published in the “ London Gazette ” of Tuesday night.

The Board may regulate the use of horses and vehicles, and may place restrictions on the sale of them. It may take possession of any horse or vehicle “ either absolutely or by way of hire,” but compensation will be paid. If the amount of compensation is not agreed upon between the Board and the owner, then it is to be determined by a single arbitrator, who “ shall not be bound to have regard to the market price . . . .or to the rate of hire prevailing in the district.”

An order may be made by the Board requiring owners to give notice to it before they dispose of their horses and vehicles. The carriage of “ goods of any class ” by road may be prohibited, and the Board may prescribe the radius or distance within which goods may be carried.

It may also “ regulate the priority in which goods are to be carried by road,” and may lay down the rates at which horses and vehicles may be hired and goods carried.

The powers conferred by the regulation are not to be exercised in the case of horses and vehicles which are used wholly or mainly in agriculture, “ except in connection with a preconcerted scheme to be put in operation in case of invasion or special military emergency.

 

DRASTIC TRAIN CHANGES.— Sir Albert Stanley, president of the Board of Trade, announced in the House of Commons that it had been decided to reduce steam train passenger traffic by 40 per cent. This will entail drastic changes.

SUGAR AT WHITSUNTIDE.—Persons who intend spending Whitsuntide in holiday resorts are advised by the Ministry of Food to take their sugar supplies with them. All visitors should take their butter and meat cards with them when on a holiday. The Ministry of Food cannot, however, guarantee that extra supplies will be available to provide for visitors to any particular district.

DEATHS.

JONES.—In loving memory of my dear husband, Pte. F. J. JONES, 1/9th London Regiment, who was killed in action on April 25, 1918, “ somewhere in France ” ; aged 40 years.
“ He sleeps besides his comrades,
In a hallowed grave unknown ;
But his name is written in letters of love
On the hearts he left at home.”
—From his sorrowing Wife and Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

PERRY.—In ever-loving memory of Pte. ALFRED JOHN PERRY, Royal Marine L.I., who died of wounds in France on May 22, 1917.
“ Sleep on, dear son, in thy foreign grave ;
Your life for your country you so nobly grave.
No friends stood near to say ‘ Good-bye,’
Safe in God’s keeping now you lie.”
— From Mother, Brother and Sister (Kilsby).

MASON.—In loving remembrance of ARTHUR ALEC MASON, of Long Buckby and Braunston, who was lost in the Dardanelles on H.M.S. Goliath, May 13, 1915.
— “ Until the day breaks.”

11th May 1918. New Bilton Man Wins Military Medal

NEW BILTON MAN WINS MILITARY MEDAL.
TWICE REPORTED MISSING.

Pte G Starkey, Border Regiment, has had exceptional experiences. He joined up from the Cement Works on January 1st, 1915, and was already the possessor of two South African medals and seven bars. In 1915 he was, in error, reported to be missing. After nearly three years’ fighting, in which he was unscathed, he was invalided home suffering from shell shock. He returned to the front in February, and was reported missing, and believed killed, as from March 21st. On April 26th he wrote home that on the previous day he received the Military Medal.

DEATH OF SERGT. J. SOMERS, V.C.

Sergt James Somers, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who won the V.C in Gallipoli, died on Tuesday at the home of his parents, Cloughjordan, Ireland, of lung trouble, after being badly gassed in France some months ago. Sergt Somers joined the Inniskillings in 1913, crossed the Channel with his Battalion with the original Expeditionary Force on August 21, 1914, and was wounded three times in Flanders. In the following spring he was billeted with the 2nd Battalion in Rugby, and proceeded with them to the Dardanelles, where he won the V.C for gallantry on the night of July 1st and 2nd, “when owing to hostile bombing some of our troops had retired from a sap, remaining alone on the spot until a party brought up bombs.” He then climbed over into the enemy’s trench, and bombed the Turks with great effect. Later on he advanced into the open under very heavy fire, and held back the enemy by throwing bombs into their flank until a barricade had been established. During this period he frequently ran to and from our trenches to obtain fresh supplies of bombs. “ by his great gallantry and coolness,” the official account concluded, “ Sergt Somers was largely instrumental in effecting the re-capture of a portion of our trench which had been lost.” During his stay in Rugby, Sergt Somers was billeted with Mr & Mrs W D Burn, 16 Corbett Street. Immediately after his investiture at Buckingham Palace he visited the town, and was awarded a civic and enthusiastic welcome. After meeting several of his friends and receiving their congratulations at Mrs Burn’s residence, he attended a large recruiting rally at the Clock tower, and made a short and inspiring appeal for recruits.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

We regret to learn that there is still no news of Capt T A Townsend, M.C., who was reported missing a few weeks ago.

Lieut G P Rathbone, youngest son of Mr Rathbone, Hillmorton, who was recently posted as missing, has written home to say he was taken prisoner on March 21st, after severe fighting, and is unwounded.

Pte W H Mitchell, Worcestershire Regt, second son of Mr and Mrs David Mitchell, of Lodge Road, Rugby, has been reported missing since the 23rd March, 1918. He joined up 13 months ago, at the age of 18 years, and he was in France three months. He formerly worked for Mr Varney, builder.

Pte Charles James Fretter, R.W.R, was killed in action on March 22nd. He was the eldest son of the late Mr & Mrs Samuel Fretter, and was an old St Matthew’s boy. Before joining up he worked for Willans & Robinson. His age was 42 years, single, and he had been in France two years.

News has been received by Mrs W Middleton, Sandown Road, Rugby, that her husband, Lance-Corpl W Middleton, 79th Field Company, Royal Engineers has been missing since March 21st. At that he time was working on the front line near Moy during the German advance. Lance-Corpl Middleton, son of Mr J Middleton, 101 Claremont Road, is 26 years of age. He has been in France three years and was formerly employed in Willans & Robinson’s pattern shop.

Sergt T F Gambrall, Oxon and Bucks L.I, of 174 Cambridge Street, has been reported missing since March 23rd. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, employed at the B.T.H. and he enlisted in September, 1914. A brother of Mrs Gambrall was also killed March 24th; another brother has been reported missing, and two others wounded.

Pte John Reynolds. R.W.R, of 9 Little Elborow Street, died in hospital at Liverpool on Wednesday from wounds received in action. He was an old St Matthew’s boy, 32 years of age, and when joined up was employed the Rugby Co-operative Society.

Lieut Henry Boughton-Leigh, of Brownsover Hall, has been wounded in the knee during the recent fighting, and is now in the Officers’ Military Hospital at Plymouth, where he is making satisfactory progress.

Pte Fred Wright, Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr John Wright, 32 Lawford Road, New Bilton, is reported as missing since March 21st. He was formerly a sailor and visited the Dardanelles a number of times. He was afterwards employed at the B.T.H, subsequently joining the Army. He is 20 years of age.

RUGBY MEN MISSING.

The following local men have been reported as missing :—Sergt E Watts, Oxford and Bucks L. I, of 10 Benn Street, Rugby : Lance-Corpl R G Salmon, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs G H Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road ; and Pte F Shears, M.G.C, son of Mr & Mrs J Shears, 66 Murray Road.

LIEUT I D MOORE, R.F.A, Reported KILLED.

Information has been received that Lieut I D Moore, Royal Field Artillery, has been reported as “killed in action” on March 22nd. Prior to joining his Majesty’s Army, Lieut Moore was a member of the B.T.H. Testing Department.

A RUGBY MILITARY MEDALLIST.

Honours are falling fast to Rugbeians, and one of the latest to receive the Military Medal for gallantry in the field is Signaller E Manners, R.F.A, son of Mr Frank Manners, of Windmill Lane. He joined in January, 1917, and has been in France since September. He writes optimistically of our prospects, and refers to the enormous losses the Germans have sustained.

MAGISTERIAL.—At the Rugby Police Court on Wednesday—Before Mr A E Donkin—Pioneer Thomas Henry Cox, Royal Engineers, 3 Addison Row, Bilton, was charged with being an absentee.—Defendant stated that he had served in France two years, and had been wounded. As he had been ill he had delayed his return to his unit, but had he not been arrested he would have returned that morning.—He was discharged on promising to return by the next train.

BILTON.
MILITARY MEDAL.—Lance-Corpl G T Stibbard, K.R.R, son of Mr James Stibbard, of this village, has been awarded the Military Medal for gallant conduct “ in carrying important messages under heavy fire at all times of the day and night during the period between March 21st and April 7th.” He has been warmly congratulated by the General commanding his Division. Corpl Stibbard is the first Biltonian, we believe, to gain distinction of this kind. He formerly worked at Willans & Robinson’s, and joined up in September, 1914, so that he has seen a lot of service, and has been twice wounded. He was also a popular member of the Working Men’s Club and of the football team.

DUNCHURCH.

ON Monday afternoon several little children were walking along the bottom of the Mill Street allotments, when one of them, named Frost, fell in the ditch. The other ran away frightened; But Postman T Brain, who happened to be at work close at hand, ran to the spot, and found the little one at the bottom of the ditch covered with water, and had he not been there the child would have been drowned.

DR POWELL has received news that his eldest son Corpl R Prince Powell, who was serving with the Australian Forces, is reported missing as from April 14th. Dr Powells second son is also serving with the Australian Forces.

MR & MRS JAMES BORTON, Daventry Road, Dunchurch, have received the news from their son, R Borton, who went to Germany with some polo ponies before the War broke out, that he has been a prisoner of war, and is now in Holland. Mr & Mrs James Borton’s family were agreeably surprised to receive the news.

BOURTON-ON-DUNSMORE.
A MEMORIAL SERVICE was held in the Church on Sunday, for Bombardier Frederick Ward, who was killed in action in France on March 30th. He joined the Army at the beginning of the War, and was recently promoted bombardier in recognition of his bravery in action. He was universally liked and respected, and much sympathy is felt for his family.

STOCKTON.
MR REGINALD TARRANT, the junior master in the Council Schools, has left to become a wireless operator in the Navy. The children assembled to wish Mr Tarrant “Good-bye,” and gave him three rousing cheers as a send off. The Rev A C Easu expressed the good wishes of the managers.

BRANDON.
WOUNDED AND PRISONER OF WAR.—Mr & Mr. T Ward have received news, that their son, Lance-Corpl J Ward, has been wounded and is now a prisoner of war. He had been in France for 18 months, and was previously wounded in April, 1917. Before joining he was learning dentistry with Mr Daniels at Coventry. His father is a well-known Oddfellow, having occupied most of the principal offices. Much sympathy is felt for Mr & Mrs Ward, who have already lost one son, Pte C Ward, K R.R ; had another badly wounded, Pte J Ward ; and another discharged for ill-health, Pte W Ward. Lance-Corpl J Ward is wounded in the shoulder.

STRETTON-UNDER-FOSSE.
MR CONOPO has received news to the effect that his eldest son, Gunner L S Conopo, of the 132nd Oxford Heavy Battery, R.G.A, is a prisoner of war in Germany. Gunner Conopo had been in France two years, and was taken prisoner on the 21st March. He is believed to be in Cassel Internment Camp.

FATAL FLYING ACCIDENT NEAR RUGBY.
While flying near Rugby on Thursday, Lieut James Donald McRae Reid (21), Royal Air Force, a Canadian, fell from an altitude of about 1,000ft, and was killed instantly. The incident is believed to have been caused by something going wrong with the engine.

THE B.T.H. EXPLOSION.

The inquest on George Alsop, the man who died as the result of injuries received at the B.T.H on Monday in last week, was opened by Mr E F Hadow on Friday, May 3rd.—Mr H Lupton Reddish represented the B.T.H Company and the Insurance Company. Mr G Ralph and Mr S London also attended.

Lucy Alsop, the widow, said her husband was 58 years of age, and had been employed as a stoker by the B.T.H Company for the past three years. When she saw her husband at the hospital he was unconscious and unable to tell her how the accident occurred. He died without recovering consciousness. He was previously employed as a stoker by the Oxford Canal Company.

Dr C R Hoskyn said death was due to a fracture of the base of the skull. He also suffered from a secondary scald, extending down the whole of the left leg, but this alone would not have been sufficient to cause death.

Mr Reddish said he was instructed by the directors of the Company to say how much they deplored the accident, and wished him to express their great sympathy with the relatives of Alsop and the other men who had been injured. He assured the jury that the Company were prepared to do everything humanly possible to assist them to ascertain the cause of the explosion.—The Coroner and the Jury associated themselves with these remarks.

The inquest was then adjourned till Wednesday, June 5th, for a full investigation of the cause of the accident.

THE FUNERAL took place at Napton on Monday in the presence of a large number of friends and sympathisers. The service was conducted by the Rev J Armstrong (vicar), and, in addition to the members of the family, fifteen employees of the B.T.H, representing the Power House staff, Wiring Department, and the Workers’ Union, attended. There was a large collection of  floral emblems, including tributes from neighbours in Rowland Street, Rugby ; his fellow-workmen in the Power House ; Wiring Department, B.T.H ; Workers’ Union, Branch No. 2 ; and the staff and his fellow-workers.

RUGBY’S MEAT SUPPLY.
LITTLE HOPE OF IMPROVEMENT IN QUALITY.

In view of a letter read at a meeting of the Rugby Food Control Committee on Thursday afternoon there appears to be very little prospect of any immediate improvement in the quality of the foreign meat consigned to the town. It will be remembered that at the last meeting the committee a letter was read from Messrs Clayson[?], Wait, and Woolley, asking to be relieved of their undertaking to be responsible for the payment for foreign meat consigned by the Area Meat Agent to make up for the deficiency of meat obtained from Rugby Market. This step, they said, was forced upon them by the fact that the meat was of such an inferior quality that they doubted whether the other butchers would continue to purchase it from them, in which case they would be faced with a serious financial loss. At Thursday’s meeting the Executive Officer (Mr F M Burton) reported that he had written to the district Commissioner on the subject, and he had replied to the effect that he would be pleased to grant an interview to the Chairman of the Committee and the Executive Officer, but did not think any useful purpose would be served by a discussion, because neither he nor the Area Meat Agent were able to alter the conditions under which foreign meat was supplied. The Area Meat Agent was not responsible for the quality of the meat, which was liberated by the Government from their own cold storage, and it was impossible to guarantee any uniform standard of quality. The time had now arrived when it was no longer practicable for people to be too fastidious with regard to their meat. Any district which objected to frozen meat was not obliged to accept it, if they preferred to go short; but any deficit could only be made up with frozen meat. All meat sent from cold storage had to be paid for, and any dispute as to payment might result in no further supplies being sent without cash.—To this the Executive Officer replied that the objection was not to frozen meat, but to the quality of the supplies which had been sent, and he asked what would be his financial position in the event of meat being sent of such quality that the butchers would not accept it ? Would the Food Committee be held responsible? It was rather serious from their point of view, considering the large quantity of frozen meat sent into the district.

The Chairman (Mr T A Wise) said the Commissioner took up the line that they received the meat from the Government cold storage, and distributed it equitably. The committee could not go beyond that, because they could not prove that they were getting worse meat than anyone else.—Mr Mellor asked if it was a fact that the meat sent to the foreign shops from the Central Depot was of a better quality than that sent to the order of the Executive Officer.—The Chairman : If it is this the committee can do nothing, nor can the Government. The old-established firms naturally get the pick of the market.—Mr Ewart pointed out that under present system the Government stood to lose nothing, because if the meat was sent they had keep it ; whereas if a butcher bought bad meat he would have to stand by the loss.—The Chairman : But if everyone refused to buy it the Government would lose a great deal.—The Executive Officer said some of the beef in the foreign shops was no better than that sent to the other butchers.—Mr Griffin : Anyone in the trade knows that the foreign shops better beef than we get.—With reference to the late arrival of meat, the Executive Officer said that neither the Butchers’ Association nor he was responsible  for that. They were expected to send the account of their deficit early on Monday morning, but they did not know what it would be until mid-day, when he immediately ‘phoned or wired the shortage. This week the butchers had been advised to attend Eardsley Market, Herefordshire, but they were unable to do so, and on telegraphing their requirements to the auctioneer there they received a reply to the effect that this was not the week in which the market was held. He then had to inform the Area Meat Agent, who had promised to forward the meat on Friday, which would make things very awkward for the butchers.—The Chairman pointed out that the cheque for imported meat this week amounted to £750, and they could not run the risk of having £100 or £200 of this left on their hands. It was only by the kindness of the master butchers that they had been able to go on.—It was stated that the master butchers had decided to carry on as usual for a short time, and the matter was, therefore, referred to the Finance Committee, the Executive Officer in the meantime to get into communication with other centre to ascertain their mode of procedure.

INCREASED BACON SUPPLIES.

From Monday last only two of the four ration coupons can be used for butchers’ meat weekly, but the bacon allowance will be practically doubled. The new scale of coupon weights will be :—
Bacon, uncooked, with bone. . . . .8oz.
without bone. . 7oz.

Ham, uncooked, with bone . . . . .12oz.
without bone . . 10oz.

Bacon, cooked, with bone . . . . . 7oz.
without bone . . .5oz.

Ham, cooked, with bone . . . . . .10oz.
without bone . . . .8oz.

Two coupons only will be required for picnic hams weighing up to 5lb, with one coupon for each additional pound.

These weights may not be permanent; but they will be in force for least a month, so large are the supplies of American bacon in the country. It is hoped that before it is necessary to reduce the bacon ration again it may be possible to increase the fat ration, probably by an addition of lard.

The previous scale was 5oz of ham or bacon with bone, or 4oz without bone. The reduction in the meat rations means that each consumer may only spend 10d weekly with the butcher.

NUNEATON.
WAR MEMORIAL.—Lord Denbigh visited Nuneaton on Monday afternoon to unveil a temporary war memorial, containing the roll of honour of Nuneaton’s brave soldiers who have made the supreme sacrifice. The inscription on the memorial, which has been erected the Mayor, is : “ They wrought to save us, and to save us died. H C Jones, Mayor, 1918.” Canon Deed and the Rev J C Masterton took part the unveiling ceremony, which was witnessed by thousands of people. In the course of an oration, Lord Denbigh paid solemn tribute to the sacrifices which our brave soldiers had made and the great debt of gratitude the country owed them in fighting that we might still exist as a great nation.

DEATHS.

FRETTER.—Pte CHARLES JAMES FRETTER, 10th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who was killed in action on March 22, 1918.
“ At duty’s call, with soul inspired,
 To fight for honour, truth and right ;
 His task well done, yet still untired,
 He marches now in realms of light.”
—Deeply mourned by his loving Sisters and Brothers.

HARRIS.—In loving memory of Pte. THOMAS HARRIS, who died of wounds in Egypt.—“ Our loss was his gain.”—From his loving Wife and Children.

IN MEMORIAM.

BATCHELOR.—In loving memory of Pte. THOMAS BATCHELOR, of the 5th Royal Berks., who died of wounds in Germany on December 25, 1917.
“ May the winds of heaven blow gently
On that sweet and sacred spot,
Though sleeping in a far-off grave,
Dearest one, you are not forgot,”
—Sadly missed by his loving Children, Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

FROST.—In loving remembrance of Pte. JAMES FROST,  youngest son of the late Mr. John Frost, butcher, Daventry, who died of wounds in France on May 9, 1917.
“ We miss you from our home, dear Jim ;
It’s sweet to breath your name.
In life we loved you very dear,
In death we do the same.”
—From his loving sister Nellie, 47 Alfred Rd., Coventry.

KEEN.—In loving memory of ARTHUR WILLIAM KEEN, killed in action on May 9, 1915, in France.—From his Father, Mother, Sister and Brothers.

LIXENFIELD.—In fondest memory of JACK LIXENFIELD, Lance-Corpl., Royal Engineers, who died of wounds on May 13, 1917, at Manchester.
“ O happy hours we once enjoyed,
How sweet thy memory still.”
—Always in the thoughts of Lil.

PORTER.—In affectionate remembrance of our dear son and brother, GEORGE RUPERT PORTER, who fell in action on May 8, 1915.
“ The hardest part it yet to come
When other lads return,
And we miss among the cheering crowd
The face of him we love.”
—From his loving Father, Mother, Brothers & Sisters.

Reynolds, John Henry. Died 8th May 1918

John Henry Reynolds was born in Rugby in 1882 and baptised at St Matthews Church on 1st August the same year. His parents were William Albion Reynolds and Sarah Jane (nee French).

In 1891 John Henry was age 8 and living with parents and 3 siblings, at 3 Orton Court off Dunchurch Road Rugby. His father William age 35 was a labourer with the Board of Health. By 1901 the family was living at 26 West Leys, but John Henry was not with them. We have not been able to find his location.

On 8th February 1903 John Henry Reynolds, labourer, age 20 married Ann Norman, age 22 at St. Matthews Church, Rugby, and in 1911 he was a labourer with a coal merchants, living at 9 Little Elborow Street, Rugby with his wife Ann and son John, aged 3. A second son was born in 1912 but died the following year.

On 8th December 1915 enlisted in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment Reserve (number 19747). He was mobilised on 10th June 1916 and landed in France on 10th Oct 1916 with the 1st Bn R.W.R. A week later he joined the 2nd/7th Bn and was given the number 20309. He was 5ft 5½in tall, and aged 33yrs 4mths.

On 1st Mar 1917 he was allocated a new (and final) number 268059.

During 1917 he would have taken part in the Operations on the Ancre, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck and The German counter attacks.

The anticipated attack by the Germans, Operation Michael was launched on 21 March 1918, against the British Fifth Army and the right wing of the British Third Army.  The German artillery targeted command and communications; then, the destruction of artillery; and then the front-line infantry.  The artillery bombardment began at 4.40am on 21 March 1918, and hit targets over an area of 150 square miles, the biggest barrage of the entire war.  Over 1,100,000 shells were fired in five hours.

Thus commenced the Battle of St Quentin and the Actions at the Somme Crossings.  The 61st (2nd South Midland) Division was holding the forward zone of defences in the area northwest of Saint Quentin in the area of Ham and lost many men as it fought a chaotic, but ultimately successful, withdrawal back over the Somme crossings over the next ten days.

In the initial clash, the South Midland Division faced three enemy Divisions and only began to retire on the afternoon of 22 March, when ordered to do so, in consequence of the enemy’s progress in other parts of the line.

On marching out on 21 March, the Battalion had comprised 21 Officers and 556 Other Ranks.  In the period to the end of March, there were 30 Officer casualties (some additional officers had joined in the period) and 488 Other Ranks casualties.

The remnants of the exhausted Battalion – and the 61st Division – were transferred from the XVIII Corps on 10 April 1918.  Lt. General Ivor Maxey wrote a message of congratulations to the 61st Division, which had ‘… established for itself a high reputation for its fighting qualities and its gallant spirit …’.

The Battalion was moved north to a quieter part of the line near Bethune.  On 10 March 1918 the Battalion went to St Roche via Amiens, and then entrained for Berguette which was further north and where they arrived at 10.30pm.  They became involved in the Battle of Estaires, and then on 11 March, they took up positions to the rear of the Robecq-Calonne Road, and were involved in the Battle of Hazebrouck (12–15 April), when their positions south of Merville were captured.

On 12 March the enemy were active and by 10.30am all that remained of the 2nd/6th RWR were withdrawn though the line to a support line.  On 13 April, the British artillery was more effective and the line was being held, with troops back in the old line and reoccupying houses.  That night they were relieved by the 2nd/6th RWR and returned to Hamet Billet for breakfast.

Several other Rugby men in the 2nd/6th and 2nd/7th Battalion RWR were killed in the period from 11 to 14 April, during this second major German attack, on this ‘quieter part of the line’

On 14 April 1918, during this second major German attack, on the ‘quieter part of the line’, John Henry Reynolds was ‘wounded in action’ with GSW (gunshot wound) to Knee.  [For more information see the biography of George Edgar White who died on the same day]

He was evacuated from the front line and by 30th April he had returned to England. He was sent to Mill Road Hospital, Liverpool, by which time he was also suffering from Gastritis. He died there at 12.45 am on 8th May 1918.

He is buried in Clifton Road Cemetery, Rugby. The inscription provided by his family reads
“JESU LOVER OF MY SOUL, LET ME TO THY BOSOM FLY”

John Henry Reynolds was awarded the British Way and Victory medals and his widow was awarded a pension of 20/5 per week.

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM