Hayes, George Hinde. Died 10th Oct 1917

George Hinde was born in Brinklow in 1884 and baptised there on 3rd August 1884. He was the second son of Charles and Elizabeth (nee Hinde) Hayes who married in 1881. Charles was an Agricultural labourer and in 1891 the family was living with Elizabeth’s father John W Hinde, a carpenter in Brinklow.

In 1901, the family was living at 51 Pinfold Street, New Bilton and George, his age wrongly given as 18, was a labourer at the cement works. By 1911 Charles was a gardener, living at 80 York Street Rugby and George (26) was still living at home. He worked as a railway carter.

By 1914 George Hinde Hayes was a shunter and driver at B.T.H. and joined the Territorials on 27th April. He arrived in France in April 1917 as Company Sergeant Major in the 7th Bn., Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He was wounded on 4th October 1917 at Paaschendaele and died on 10th of that month at no 11 General Hospital, Wimereux.

His Captain wrote:
“I am grieved to think that George has lost his life doing his duty to his country. As an officer of E Coy, I knew him well, and what an excellent N.C.O. he was, as well as a popular and cheerful comrade to all the other boys. I was not at all surprised to hear of his promotion to Coy. Sergt.-Major, as I know of his excellent qualifications for the appointment, and he is just the stamp of man I would have chosen for such a responsible duty myself.”

and his Coy. Quartermaster-Sergt.:
“We are sorry to lose your son, for he was always ready for duty, and the officers all join me in sympathy; we have lost both a good soldier and an ever-cheerful comrade.”

Coy.Sergt.-Major Hayes was awarded the military Cross, because when the advance was held up by a strong enemy machine-gun position, and all the officers became casualties, he took command, and crawled to a flank under direct fire from the post to a position from which he killed several of the enemy. He then led his men in an attack on the post, which he captured with ten prisoners and a machine gun; he showed splendid courage and initiative.

He was buried at Wimereux communal Cemetery. The inscription on his grave reads:

WAITING FOR THE DAWN
TO BE REUNITED
HIS DUTY DONE
R. I. P.

He is also listed on the BTH War Memorial, together with his brother Frank Hinde Hayes, who died on 19th July 1916.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

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Jones, Charles Bradlaugh. Died 9th Oct 1917

Charles Bradlaugh JONES’s place of birth was recorded variously as being in Leyton, Poplar or Stratford, London. He was born some while after the April 1881 census. His father Frederick was a cooper.

In 1891 he was enumerated as aged eight and was living with his widowed father and four siblings at 285 High Street, Stratford, London.

By 1901 his father had also died and Charles and his younger siblings were living at 11 Durham Row, Ratcliffe, London, the home of their married elder brother Henry and his wife Elizabeth and baby daughter Lillian. Two of Elizabeth’s younger siblings were there also.   Charles and his elder brother were both working as hairdressers.

By 1911, Charles was now ‘30’ and boarding with the Hessian family at 65 Grosvenor Road, Rugby, and that was no doubt where he met his wife to be, Ellen Daisy Hessian, one of the daughters of the house. Her father was an engine driver.   Charles was then still working as a hairdresser.

Some time before the war Charles seems to have had a change of occupation, going to work at British Thompson Houston (BTH) in their Lamp Factory. Then in 1914, when he was about 33, he married Ellen, now 29; the marriage was registered in Rugby [Rugby, Q3, 1914, 6d, 1551].

It is uncertain exactly when Charles ‘joined up’.   There are no surviving Service Records, but as he did not win the 1915 Star, it was probably after late 1915.   Various men from BTH with the name Jones joined up and served in 1914,[1] however an item in the Rugby Advertiser[2] stated, ‘Jones, Charles, 36 Sandown Road, Rugby’ ‘… enlisted at the Rugby Drill Hall under the Group system’, in late 1915, and this confirms the approximate date when he joined up.

As noted, Charles was living in Rugby, but records also suggest that he enlisted initially in Warwick, as Private, No.32852, in the 1st Battalion (Bn.) of the Gloucestershire Regiment. The 1st Bn. had been at Bordon in August 1914, as part of the 3rd Brigade in the 1st Division, and landed in France at Le Havre on 13 August 1914, well before Charles joined up. The 1st Battalion probably continued to act as a recruiting, training and reinforcement centre in UK.

Charles would later be posted to the 1st/6th Bn. of the Gloucestershire Regiment. The 1st/6th Bn. had been at St Michael’s Hill, Bristol, in August 1914 as part of the Gloucester and Worcester Brigade of the South Midland Division. On mobilisation they moved to Swindon and very soon after to Maldon in Essex. On 30 March 1915 the Battalion landed at Boulogne, and on 15 May 1915 became part of the 144th Brigade in the 48th (South Midland) Division.

It seems likely that Charles was posted to the Battalion as part of the reinforcements at some date in 1916 and may soon have been involved on Western Front, possibly in the Somme offensive of July 1916, and then may have taken part in the pursuit of the German Army in their retreat [or ‘tactical withdrawal’] to the Hindenburg Line in March 1917.

Later in 1917, the 1st/6th Battalion was involved several of the actions making up the Third Battle of Ypres from 31 July to mid-November including: the Battle of Langemarck; the Battle of Polygon Wood; the Battle of Broodseinde and the Battle of Poelcapelle (9 October 1917).

The Battalion War Diary[3] gives details of their later movements and actions. From the beginning of September 1917, they had been at School Camp, in St Jan Ter Bizen, to the west of Poperinge, Belgium, not far west of Ypres. Then on 18 September the Battalion travelled west to Zutkerque, France – suffering various delayed trains – to take part in Divisional and Brigade training until the end of the month. At the end of September 1917, the Battalion’s ration strength was 802 men.   The diary continued:

1 October – ‘Battn. … moved by Rail to Brake Camp.   Entraining Staion Audricq.   Detraining Station Vlamertinghe … ‘C’ Company working party buried cable …’.
‘C’ Company continued burying cable for the next two days.

4 October – ‘Battn. Moved to Canal Bank …’

5 October – ‘ Battn. moved to Dambre Camp in the morning.’

6 October – ‘In Camp.’

7 October – ‘Battn. Moved to Irish Farm 8.30am.   Heavy rain afternoon and evening.   Battn. Moved back to Dambre Camp 4.30pm.’

8 October – ‘Battn. Moved to Front Line and relieved 1/1 Bucks …’

This was in all in preparation for the Battle of Poelcapelle (9 October 1917) one of the actions of the Third Battle of Ypres.

9 October – ‘Battn. Attacked 5.20am. See Appendix ….’

The Appendix gives copies of both the Orders and a Report on the attack on the morning of 9 October 1917. Brief extracts from the Report are given below:

First Wave – ‘A’ Company on the Right, ‘B’ Company on the Left. Second Wave – ‘C’ Company on the Right, ‘D’ Company on the Left. … two platoons of each Company being in each line.

Objectives – First Wave … gun pit … special parties to capture 2 Mebus … and redoubt, … special parties to capture Vacher House and gun pit … Second Wave … Berks Houses … assist 7th Worcesters in capture of Mebus … assist 4th Gloucesters in capture of Berks Houses.

Three hours before Zero, the whole Battalion was in position … about half an hour before Zero, enemy shelled Winchester line fairly heavily but this fell just behind second wave and only four casualties occurred.

Zero – 5.20am First wave got away well with the barrage, followed at about 300 yards by second wave. Enemy at once opened M.G. fire all along the line, …

Considerable detail followed, and the assault appears to have been comparatively successful with considerable numbers of the enemy and their equipment captured, however the Report also noted:

Estimated casualties of ‘B’ Company … 1 officer … 45 other ranks … Estimated loss of ‘A’ Company … 2 Officers … 50 other ranks … Estimated losses of ‘C’ Company … 2 Officers … 55 other ranks …

The War Diary noted on the next day:

10 October – ‘Battn. Relieved by 26 Brigade … Returned to Siege Camp via temporary shelter at Irish Farm.’

Overall during October the Battalion had lost 56 men killed or died of wounds and 153 were wounded and 42 missing. Despite the Battalion receiving a ‘draft’ of 79 new men during the month, by the end of the month the Battalion ration strength had dropped from 802 to 633.

Charles Bradlaugh Jones was one of 141 men from the Gloucestershire Regiment who died on 9 October 1917, most of them from 1st/6th Bn. during the attack, and the fighting of the Battle of Poelcapelle. Like so many others, his body was either never found, or was not identified.

He is remembered with his comrades on one of the Panels 72 to 75 of the Tyne Cot Memorial. The Tyne Cot Memorial is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Whereas those who died before 16 August 1917 are remembered on the Menin Gate, the United Kingdom servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot. Charles is also commemorated on the Rugby Memorial Gates in Hillmorton Road, Rugby, on the BTH List of ‘Employees Who Served’ and on the BTH War Memorial.[4]

On 7 February 1918, Charles’s Widow, Ellen, received £1-7-9d owing to her husband, and then a War Gratuity of £3-0-0d on 9 December 1919.

Charles’s Medal Card showed that he was awarded the British War Medal and the Victory Medal.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

– – – – – –

 

This article on Charles Bradlaugh JONES was researched and written for the Rugby Family History Group [RFHG] project, by John P H Frearson and is © John P H Frearson and the RFHG, June 2017.

[1]       Men named ‘Jones’ were listed in Rugby Advertiser, 5 and 26 September 1914 – probably others of the same name.

[2]       This was under the Lord Derby’s Recruiting Scheme, he is listed in Rugby Advertiser, 27 November 1915.

[3]       The National Archives, WWI War Diaries (France, Belgium and Germany), 1914-1920, Gloucestershire Regiment 48th Division, Piece 2758/2: 1/6 Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment (1915 Apr – 1917 Oct).

[4]       The List is that published in the Rugby Advertiser, 4 November 1921.

Amos, Harry Thomas Ernest. Died 9th Oct 1917

Harry Thomas Ernest Amos was born in the second quarter of 1880 and baptised on June 13 1880 in St Andrews Parish Church, he was the fourth child of George and Mary. George was originally from Elmstead and Mary was born in France a British citizen. In 1881 they lived in 13 Little Pennington Street the rest of the family consisted of Nancy 8, Bertha 5, George W 3 and baby Harry under 11 months, George came to Rugby area to be a groom at the rectory in Birdingbury and married Mary Ann Collier in June quarter 1872 ,

Harry married Clare Kate Coleman in the third quarter of 1902 in Market Harborough. In the 1911 census they were living at 13 Lodge Road with three children Edna 7, Francis 3 and Phyllis 5 months old. Harry was employed at the post office as a letter carrier.

He enlisted at Budbrooke barracks and was placed in the Gloucester regiment service number 32829 he was in the 1st battalion and also the 1st /6th battalions according to the regimental medal rolls and was awarded the Victory and British medals.

Harry Thomas Ernest Amos was killed in action on the 9″‘ October 1917 whilst his battalion was in action in the third battle of Ypres. The battalion’s orders according to the war diary for that date was to capture 3 MEBUS Vacher House and Berks House this was all on the Poelcappelle map. (For more details about this battle see the biography of Private C B Jones, who died the same day.)

He is listed on the Tyne Cot Memorial and CWGC information is “Son of George William Amos, of 25, Old Station Square, Rugby; husband of Clara Kate Amos, of 41, Lodge Rd., Rugby. Postman, 26 years’ service.”

His widow Clara lived in Rugby until her death in 1950.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

 

 

Allen, Isaiah Humphries. Died 9th Oct 1917

Isaiah Humphries Allen was born in Farthingstone, Northamptonshire and baptised there in October 1886. His parents were Harry Allen, a labourer and Sarah, nee Humphries (spelt Humphriss on the marriage certificate), a school mistress. They married on 14th April (Easter Day) 1884 at Nether Heyford.

By 1901 the family had moved from Farthingstone to Nether Heyford, where Harry was a brick burner and Isaiah was also working in the brickyard at the age of 14. The family was still there in 1911, but by then Isaiah was in India, a Lance Corporal in the 13th Hussars.

It is not known how long he served in India but on 6th December 1913 he married Elizabeth Clarke, a widow (maiden name Hill). They lived at 7 New Station, Rugby. They had two daughters, Annie in 1914 and Kathleen in early 1915.

As a reservist, Isaiah was called up in August 1914 and in 1915 went to France. he took part  in the Battles of Ypres and the Somme. He moved from the Hussars (no 5375) to the 16th Bn., Royal Warwickshire Regiment ( private, no 32885). He was reported missing and is believed to have been killed in action near Ypres on the 9th October 1917.

He is listed on the Tyne Cot Memorial.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

6th Oct 1917. Successful Effort for Rugby Prisoners of War Fund

SUCCESSFUL EFFORT FOR RUGBY PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.
SHOW & SALE ON BENN FIELD.

Glorious weather and the prospect of performing a pleasing duty under pleasant conditions attracted a large crowd to Benn Field on Saturday afternoon, when a show and sale, arranged by the “ G.H.S ” Philanthropic Society on behalf of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund was held. The decision to hold the show was only reached about ten days previously, but so enthusiastically did all connected with the effort work, and so generously were they supported by the public, that the success of the undertaking was never in doubt, and this feeling of confidence was justified by the results.

The opening ceremony was performed by Mr J J McKinnell, who explained that the object of the effort was to raise as much money as possible to send parcels, of food to those “ poor chaps ” who had been taken prisoners by the unspeakable Hun, and who, as they knew well, were treated very badly indeed and were not properly fed. It was, therefore, up to the people of Rugby to see that enough money was raised, so that parcels of food could go to these men week by week, and so that they, when they were liberated after the end of the War, would be restored to their friends hale and hearty and able to take their place again in the life of the community. If they did not find the money, and if they left those poor fellows to the tender mercies of the Germans, some would never come back at all, and others would come back with their constitution devitalised by continual semi-starvation, and many, perhaps, would only come back to linger and to die. The Rugby Prisoners of War Committee was started two years ago by an energetic committee, of whom Mr J R Barker was the equally energetic secretary, and he had worked like a Trojan for it. The fund now supported 77 prisoners, all of whom were boys from Rugby or villages in the immediate neighbourhood. There was no doubt therefore, that there was a special call for them to look after these men. It cost £170 per month to send the requisite number of parcels, and of this £70 had already been guaranteed by certain kind and patriotic individuals, but the balance of £100 per month still had to be raised, and they were going to see that day if they could not realise at least several hundreds (a voice : “ Thousands ”). Thank God, Rugby, during this War had always come up to the scratch, and he had never known her let them down ; and he earnestly appealed to them to support the effort that day to the best of their ability. . .

A large number of attractions had been arranged by the committee, the principal of which was the vegetable show, where some exceptionally fine exhibits were staged and were much admired. Prizes were offered for the best exhibits, and these were divided into 27 classes, the winners being as follows :–

The judges were Messrs W Harmon (Newnham Paddox) and A Chandler (Coton House).

The Fire Brigade competitions were keenly contested. The prizes were given by the B.T.H Foremen’s and the Assistant Foremen’s Association. Mr W Spencer and Engineer Reece were the judges ; Messrs J Taylor and Cooke, timekeepers ; and Third Officer Fletcher (B.T.H) starter. . . .

A short concert was also given, the programme being arranged by Mr Charles T Mewis, and those who took part were Messrs H Phillips, W Jackson, J Farley and J Heap (Rugby Glee Party), Mr Geo Pratt, Coventry (humorist), Mr W C Sutton (ventriloquist), Mr Gough (conjuror). Mr J Littler was at the piano. A Punch and Judy show was also provided for the entertainment of the children. There was a musical chairs competition on bicycles, which was arranged for Boy Scouts, a number of whom from the Murray School Troop rendered valuable assistance during the afternoon. The competition was won by P Leader, G Day being second.

Various side-shows, skittles, “ Kaiser Bill and Little Willie,” guessing competitions, &c, were provided, and each of these did a good business.

A quantity of poultry and several sheep and lambs were sent by sympathisers for the benefit of the funds, and early in the evening the poultry were sold by Mr W Wiggins. Some very choice birds were offered, and in a number of cases they were sold over and over again. The prices, on the whole, were very satisfactory, the buyers sympathising with the genial auctioneer’s exhortation to “ Never mind the value of the things, but remember it is for a good cause.” A pet lamb was sold and re-sold ten times, realising £2 2s 6d.

The live stock having been disposed of the scene of interest shifted to the exhibition tents, where the produce was sold by Messrs W Wiggins, W Howkins, and F Frost. The visitors were in a generous mood, and, on the whole, very satisfactory prices were given. A small tan of petrol, containing about a gill of spirit, was sold and re-sold many times, the total realised being over £5 ; and by a similar method a toy motor-car realised about £7 10s. A potato, shaped like a bulldog’s head, also found many purchasers.

The sheep, lambs, and goat were sold in Rugby Market on Monday, and realised between £30 and £40.

Other diversions arranged for had to be omitted, as permission for extension and lighting could not be obtained. The proceeds will amount to well over £150.

The committee was assisted during the day by Messrs A Lord, G Vickery, G W Lawson, G Hansbury, G O Watson, W Henson, W Martin, H Clark, A C Bennett, A Allcutt, A Padbury, Mrs Barker, Misses R Palmer, Johnson, Ward, Kitchen, Twyford, Renshaw, Bromwick, Franklin, Prince, Owen, Spencer, Holyoake, Houghton, Fairfield, Walker, Cooke, and Gibbs.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Capt R O Squarey, R.E, who has won the Military Cross, was captain of football at Rugby School.

Mrs Wakelin, of 15 Adam Street, New Bilton, has received news that her husband Pte L A Wakelin, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, has been wounded by shrapnel.

Lieut Stanley Hidden, who has been serving for some considerable time with the Headquarters of a Mounted Division, has recently been promoted captain.

Lance-Corpl F E Boyes, Oxford and Bucks, son of Mr & Mr J Boyes, 84 Railway Terrace, has been reported wounded and missing on August 16th, after being twice previously wounded. He was 20 years of age, and had been in France two years. He had ten days’ leave at home in July. An elder brother, Pte F W Boyes, Berkshire Regiment, who was reported missing on July 1st, was subsequently reported killed.

ANOTHER HONOUR FOR LANCE-CORPL J H ENTICOTT.

Lance-Corpl J H Enticott, Oxon and Bucks Light Infantry, son of Mr J Enticott, of 60 Union Street, who has already won the Military Medal and bar, has now been awarded the D.C.M for gallantry. Before the War Lance-Corpl Enticott, who is an Old St Matthew’s boy, was employed at the B.T.H. He is the third “ old boy ” to win the D.C.M, three others have received the Military Cross, about half-a-dozen the Military Medal, and numerous others have been mentioned in despatches.

LIEUT BASIL PARKER MISSING.

News has been received that Lieut W Basil Parker, of the Machine Gun Corps, son of Mr E Parker, 85 Avenue Road, New Bilton, has been missing since September 29th. He was a pupil, and afterwards a student teacher, at St Matthew’s School, from where he gained a candidate teachers’ scholarship to the Lower School. He completed his education at Saltley College, and when he enlisted he held a teaching appointment in Derbyshire. He was formerly a member of the 1st Rugby Company Boys’ Brigade, and had also played forward for Rugby Football Club.

PERSONAL.

Capt T A Townsend, M.C, medical officer of the London (Queen’s) Regiment, has received the Order of St Sava of Serbia in recognition of his services in that country in 1914-15.

WAR HOSPITALS SUPPLY DEPOT.

Many workers have been obliged to give up coming to the depot in order to take up other war work. More workers are urgently needed and invited to come to 8 Market Place, which is open on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays each week from 10 to 1 in the mornings, and from 2.30 to 4.30 on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons. M MICHELL.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.

HIRE TRADERS AND THE WAR.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–I notice that more people are required for the National Service, and I think it is a scandalous shame that hire traders are allowed to keep groups of able-bodied men and women going from door to door pestering people to buy their goods on weekly payments. Some of the men look fit to be in khaki, while the others might also be doing useful work at a time like this. They seem to make a special business of calling on soldiers’ wives and trying to induce them to buy goods and pay for them out of the separation allowances which the Government pays to maintain the women and children, and not for any other purpose. I don’t think it right that these agents should be allowed to go about persuading soldiers’ wives to incur this liability without the knowledge or consent of the husband, and it will be a great shame if anything happens to prevent the women keeping up their payments if the trader seizes the goods without the consent of the Court when there has been a considerable sum paid. I think the Government would be justified in passing legislation to protect these people, as it would put the hire trader on a level with other tradesmen and not leave the customer at their mercy.–I remain, yours truly.
FAIR PLAT.

FOOD PRICES.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
SIR,–Can anyone explain why food prices are rising simultaneously with the multiplication of Control Committees ? Take the case of butter. Why is it put up 4d a pound as soon as Rugby has a Food Control Committee ? I have had to pay an extra 2d twice lately, and I suppose I shall have to help pay the expenses of the Food Controllers. Surely we consumers are being forced to pay all round. As for the bread, we shall have to pay for it in the taxes, even if we get it for 9d a 4lb loaf. And we shall be made to fork out the money for the salaries of the hundreds and thousands of officials of the Government from top to bottom.

It was said in the old time of some professing Christians, “ Ye do wrong and defraud, and that your brethren.” What would St Paul or Thomas Carlyle say now about the greed of gain ? And what are the ministers of religion saying and doing in the face of all the avarice prevalent among traders and workmen of almost every sort ? Are honesty and religion standing a tiptoe in our land, ready to pass–I know not where !–Yours sincerely, INQUIRER.
Rugby, September 26, 1917.

SEATS FOR WOUNDED SOLDIERS.
To the Editor of the Advertiser.
DEAR SIR,–If your correspondent, “ Visitor,” resided here he would know that Rugby does possess public seats, but for some pre-war abuse they were banished by the “ City Fathers ” to the “ Rec,” and the Park, and thither Tommy must go if he wants a rest. It is not want of thought on the part of townspeople, because the seats have been pleaded for in previous summers, but the said Fathers said, “ No,” and it is so. What little bit of life is in this small town Tommy wants to see it, but he must stand or hang on railings to do it now the Parks are too cool.–Yours, sir, very truly,
CITIZEN.

DEATHS.

PEARCE.–On September 11, 1917, HAROLD, the dearly beloved son of H. & C. Pearce, who was killed in action in France.
“ He marched away so bravely,
His young head bravely held ;
His footsteps never faltered,
His courage never failed ;
There on the battlefield
He calmly took his place ;
He fought and died for Britain :
An honour to his race.”

RUSSELL.–Gunner Walter Russell, R.F.A., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Russell, Toft Farm, Dunchurch, died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917; aged 27.

RUSSELL.–In loving memory of my dear husband, Gunner WALTER RUSSELL, R.F.A., who died of wounds received in action in France in September, 1917.–NELLIE RUSSELL, Whitehall Farm, Dunchurch, Rugby.

VEARS.–Killed in action in France September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest son of Harry and Nellie Vears, of Bedworth, late of Rugby ; aged 21 years.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave
Of a dear son and soldier brave :
How dear, how brave, we shall understand
When we meet again in the Better Land.”

VEARS.–Killed in action in France on September 11th, 1917, FREDERICK, dearly beloved eldest grandson of Mrs. F. Draper, Long Buckby ; aged 21 years.
“ Bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.”
–From Grandma, Aunts and Uncles.

IN MEMORIAM.

SALMON.–In loving memory of Rifleman J. R. SALMON, R.B., youngest son of Mr. & Mrs. G. H. Salmon, 17 Lower Hillmorton Road, Rugby ; killed in action on the Somme Front, October 7, 1916.

TANSER.–In ever-loving memory of Lance-Corpl. T. TANSER, of South Kilworth, killed in action October 3rd, 1916.
“ Ever in our thoughts, but the hardest part still yet to come.
When the heroes all return and we miss among the cheering crowd the face of our dear boy.”
–Mother, Wife, Sister and Brothers.

 

Lindley, Joseph. Died 5th Oct 1917

Joseph Lindley was born in Hampstead, London in 1875. His father, Henry Lindley, who was born in Holmfirth, Yorkshire, was a miner/subcontractor on the railway. In 1863 he had married Sarah Hibbert in Heaton Norris, near Stockport. Sarah was born in Chapel-en-le-Frith, as were their two older children, George (1865) and John (1867). Mary Ann (1869) and Arthur (1870) were born Marsden, Yorks and William (1872) in Watford, Herts.

Henry Lindley died in 1879 near Northampton and buried at Hardingstone. He was aged 42. It is not known what happened to Sarah, but in 1881 five year old Joseph was in the Wootton Union Workhouse, in Northampton, together with his sister Mary Ann (12) and William (9). Mary Ann died there a year later.

By 1891, William was a shop boy in West Ham, London and Joseph (16) was boarding at 94 Dunston Street, Northampton. He was a shoe finisher.

On 21st June 1897, Joseph Lindley, now working as a labourer, married Elizabeth Walton in Roade, Northants. By 1901 they were settled at 13 Little Pennington Street, Rugby, with two year old Joseph Thomas.

They were still at the same address in 1911, with Thomas and Mary Ann (8) who had been born in Roade. Joseph was working as a general labourer for Co-op Stores.

Joseph was 40 years of age and a van driver for Rugby Co-operative Society, when he signed up in June 1916. He joined the 1st Bn., Royal Warwickshire Regiment (private 20368) and proceeded shortly afterwards to the front. In Spring 1917 he was invalided home through illness and later returned to France. He moved via the 11th Bn., to the 16th and at the time of his death, 15th Bn. RWR.

This battalion took part in Battle of Polygon Wood (26 Sep – 3 Oct 1917). Perhaps this was where he was injured.

Joseph Lindley died of wounds on 5th October 1917, and was buried at Outtersteene Communal Cemetery Extension, Bailleul, Nord, France.

Outtersteene is a village about 5 kilometres south-west of Bailleul. In August 1917, during the Third Battle of Ypres, the 2nd, 53rd and 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Stations came to Outtersteene.

Joseph was aged 42, the same age his father had died.

Elizabeth Lindley died in Rugby in 1958. In 1939 she was living at 88 Rowland Street, Rugby with her unmarried son Joseph Thomas and her daughter Mary Ann Mace, who was also a widow.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

29th Sep 1917. Blackberry Picking

BLACKBERRY PICKING.-During the past fortnight the scholars of various schools in Rugby and the neighbouring villages have picked 2 tons of blackberries, to be used to make jam for the Army and Navy.

UTILITY POULTRY KEEPERS’ MEETING.-There was a satisfactory attendance at a meeting held at the Eagle Hotel on Saturday to consider the formation of a branch of the National Utility Poultry Society, which, in conjunction with the Agricultural Organisation Society, is seeking to put the poultry industry on a business footing. Mr Walter Barnett (Bilton) presided, supported by Mrs Barnett, Mr E B Covington, Mr W T Fischer, &c. Mr H Tarbox read letters from a number of interested poultry keepers ; from the Secretary of the N.U.P.S, and from Capt Peirson Webber, the County Council expert, regretting inability to be present that day. After discussion, it was resolved to form a society for Rugby and district, and to convene a further meeting when the experts can tend to give details of the working of similar existing branches.

THE FOOD ECONOMY CANTEENS.

It has been decided to close – at any rate, temporarily – the Food Economy Canteen opened at New Bilton in July last, and meals will not be obtainable there after today (Saturday). Although there is no doubt that if workers had been brought to realise that meals can be obtained there far cheaper than they could be prepared at home, the canteen has not been well patronised, and there has been a weekly loss since it opened. It is gratifying to note, on the other hand, that the Chester Street canteen continues to be a great success, and there are hopes of an extension in the accommodation. Not only is bread conserved, but, thanks to the willing aid of enthusiastic honorary helpers and to the hearty co-operation of an efficient paid staff, the prices as at New Bilton, rule low for very satisfying meals. The place is always full at meal times, and many people purchase cooked food to take home. Working expenses are being met, and a weekly profit, which will go to the liquidation of the debt incurred in setting up the canteen, is being made.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Bombardier Reg Covington, R.F.A, son of Mr Richard Covington, has been gassed during the recent fighting.

The latest list of war honours contains the name of Pte J French (Rugby), Royal Warwickshire Regiment, who has been awarded the Military Medal.

Pte George Ruddle, of James Street, Rugby, is reported missing, believed killed. From his comrades it was gathered that he was almost certainly killed. He was in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Sergt L C Cox, elder son of Mr A G Cox, Kenilworth House, Popular Grove, Rugby, after much active service in France with the King’s Royal Rifles, during which time he was wounded four times has passed first class in a special course of instruction and sails for Africa this weekend to join the King’s African Rifles. His younger Brother Albert, also with experience of the fighting in France, being twice mentioned and awarded the Military Medal, has been presented as a second-lieutenant in the King’s Liverpool Regiment.

Official intimation has been received from the War Office, that Bombardier S G Smith, son of Mrs Smith, 28 Pinfold Street, New Bilton, was killed in action in France on August 18th. He was formerly a member of the of the Rugby Howitzer Battery, and was employed by the Rover Company, Coventry when called up. A letter from the officer commanding the battalion speaks in high terms of Bombardier Smith’s performance of his duties.

ASHBY ST. LEDGERS.

CAPT E G PASSMORE, of the Northamptonshire Regiment, son of Mr S A Passmore, is in hospital at Dieppe suffering from trench fever.

News has reached the village that Pte Stowe, who was reported missing, is now a prisoner of war. This is the second prisoner of war from this village, Pte Roberts having been wounded in the leg and taken prisoner a few months ago.

BRETFORD.

KILLED IN ACTION.-Mrs Archer College, Hill Farm, Bretford, has been notified that her husband, Pte Archer Colledge, Royal Warwicks, was killed in France on September 3rd. Pte College, who went to the front in June last, lost his life in his first engagement. He was educated at Pailton Church School and was employed at Coventry Ordnance Works until called up in March last. Pte College’s Company Officer, in a letter to Mrs College, writes :- “ Although he had recently joined us, by his cheeriness and courage he soon made himself liked, and his platoon feel his loss keenly, as I do myself.” A comrade of Pte College’s, who has been in continuous action for the last 16 months, writes that the present fighting is the bitterest he has yet experienced. Pte College was 29 years of age, and leaves a widow and one child.

TO HELP THE PRISONERS OF WAR FUND.

AN IMPORTANT EVENT.

To-day (Saturday) an attractive event will take place in Benn’s Field, North Street, Rugby, in aid of the Rugby Prisoners of War Fund, for which a continuous and increasing flow of money is needed. The effort will consist of a great show and sale of agricultural and horticultural produce, which is being freely given by generous donors in the town and district.

Mr J J McKinnell, C.C, chairman of the Urban District Council, is the chairman of the committee, and, supported by leading residents, will open the affair at 2.30 p.m.

In the horticultural section 26 prizes are offered for competition ; and, of course, contributions of produce merely for sale will be gladly received. Already a large number of sheep, lambs, pig, rabbits, and poultry have been promised for the agricultural department ; and the auctioneers of the town, who will sell the goods, are giving their services gratuitously, as well as all others who are working so energetically to ensure success, and it only remains for the public to give their attendance-and their money-for which there will be plenty of bargains.

A large marquee. which will be lighted by electricity in the evening, will be provided ; and apart from the exhibition and sale, there will be various competitions and side-shows of an attractive nature. These will include a fire brigade competition-always an interesting item-and four brigades from Coventry will be represented in this. There will be dancing also for the young people.

For a small admission fee of 6d the visitor will, therefore, get plenty of money.

The Committee consists of Messrs. A Bell, chairman ; J Cash, hon treasurer ; G Allford, J Reginald Barker, C Cockerel, F Dunkerley, J Harker, G Harrowing, G Henton, J P Lennon, C Mewis, J J   Scrivener, F Starmore, with J R Blyth and H Lovell, joint hon secretaries.

DEATHS.

COLLEDGE.—In ever-loving memory of Private ARCHER COLLEDGE, 20249 Royal Warwickshire Regt., killed in action on 3rd September, 1917, somewhere in France, aged 29 years.
A loving husband, true and kind,
A better father you’d never find ;
But He who orders all things best,
Has given to him eternal rest.
The end was bitter, the shock severe,
To part with one we loved most dear.
We did not see him die or hear him say goodbye ;
We miss him and mourn for him in silence unseen,
And dwell on the days is his young life has seen.
—Deeply mourned by his Wife and Child.

IN MEMORIAM.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxon and Bucks, killed at the battle of Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915, son of the late James Barnett and Mrs. Sansome, 5 Gas Street. Never forgotten by his sorrowing Mother, Step-father, Brothers, Winnie and May.
He bravely answered his country’s call,
He gave his life for one and all ;
But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow,
None but aching hearts can know.

BARNETT.—In loving memory of my pal, Lance-Corpl. GEORGE BARNETT, 5th Oxford and Bucks, killed in action September 25th, 1915.
Two years had passed, my heart’s still sore,
As time rolls by I miss him more ;
His loving smile and cheerful face
No pal on earth can fill his place.
BILLIE WEBB, somewhere in France.

BROWN.—In loving memory of our dear Son & Brother, PERCY EDWIN BROWN, who was killed in action on September 25th, 1915.
Sleep on dear son and brother in your far off grave,
A grave we may never see ;
But as long as life and memory lasts,
We will remember thee.
—From Father, Mother, Sisters and Brothers.

CASHMORE.—In loving memory of PRIVATE C. CASHMORE, Oxon & Bucks L.I., who was killed in action September 25, 1915.
Our hero gone, but not forgotten,
Never shall his memory fade ;
Our sad thoughts so often wonder
To that far-off land where he is laid.
Yes, we think of him in silence,
And his name we oft recall,
But there’s nothing left to answer,
But his photo on the wall.
—From his loving Wife and Children.

EMERY.—In loving memory of ERNEST HARRY EMERY, Bdr. R.F.A., accidentally killed whilst on active service with the Salonica Forces, Oct. 1st, 1916. Interred in Mekes Cemetery.

FRANKTON.—In loving memory of our dear brother, FRED, who was killed in France on Sept. 25th, 1915.
From POLLIE AND SARAH.

HINKS.—In loving memory of my dear son, JOHN HINKS, of 33 Essex Street, of the 5th Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, who fell asleep in action in France on September 25th, 1915.
“ The midnight star shines o’er the grave,
Of a dear son and soldier brave ;
How dear, how brave, we shall understand,
When we meet again in the better land.”
—Not for granted by his Mother, Father, Sisters and Brothers.

STENT.—In loving memory of my dear son, Corpl. P. V. STENT, who was killed in action at Loos, on September 25th, 1915.
“ Two years have passed and friends around us
Think, perhaps, the wound has healed ;
But they little know the sorrow,
Deep within our hearts concealed.”
—Silently mourned by his loving Mother, Father, Sisters, and Brother.

STENT.—In loving memory of PERCY VICTOR STENT, who was killed at Loos, Sept. 25th, 1915. “ Death divides, but memory lingers.”—From Mr. and Mrs. HARBAN and family.

STONE.—In loving memory of my dear husband, PTE. C. G. STONE, who was wounded 28th Sept., and died the 1st October, 1915.
“ They miss him most who loved him best.”
—From his loving wife Amy.

WHITBREAD.—2nd Lieut. BASIL, 14th Royal Warwickshire Regiment. Reported missing 22 July, 1916 ; now presumed to have been killed in action on that date.

WEST.—In proud and loving memory of FRANK WEST, Lieutenant-Colonel R.F.A. (T.), who was killed near Pozieres on September 28, 1916 ; aged 33.—“ We have found safety with all things undying.”