Wise, Arnold Vincent Denys. Died 15th May 1917

Arnold Vincent Denys Wise was born in Rugby according to various census. His birth was registered in Rugby registration district in September quarter 1893 and he was baptised at St Matthews church on 23rd July 1893.

He was the son of Thomas Arnold Wise and Fanny Estelle Shortland, she was born in India and the marriage took place in the Isle of Wight in September quarter 1891. AVD Wise was at home in the school “Oakfield” at 21 Bilton Road, Rugby, where his father was a schoolmaster. According to the 1901 census he is aged 7, born Rugby.

In the 1911 census he was at Leconfield school, Cheltenham, now Cheltenham College aged 17 born Rugby, Warwickshire.

On the outbreak of war he joined the Royal Engineers with the rank of 2nd Lieutenant and was posted to the 2nd Field Squadron. He was later promoted to the rank of Lieut on 25 June 1915. He was awarded the Military Cross.

The CWGC states that Capt AVD Wise was killed in action on 15 May 1917 aged 23 of Royal Engineers( 2nd Field Squadron)and is commemorated at XA9 in Tincourt New British Cemetery , on the Memorial Gates in Rugby and on the Oakfield memorial in St Matthew’s Church, Rugby. Awarded MC and is son of Thomas Arnold and Estelle Wise of Oakfield, Rugby

Medal Roll has ranks 2nd Lieut and Captain Arnold Vincent Denys Wise , awarded Victory Medal, British War Medal, 15 star. Theatre of war: France. Father TA Wise, Oakfield, Rugby

Army service record not found at Kew, though Long number 20807 found.

Using Army Lists, the following found:

Date of birth: 6 June 1893, Appointed 2nd Lt 17 July 1914 in Royal Engineers

Appointed Lieutenant Royal Engineers 9 June 1915, Appointed Acting Captain 20 August 1916

Rugby Advertiser of 26th May 1917 records the death of Captain Arnold Vincent Denys Wise of the Royal Engineers on 15th May 1917. He was killed by a fluke shot from the burst of an automatic at some 800 to 1000 yard, living for about half an hour afterwards. He was mentioned in despatches in January 1916 and awarded a Military Cross in February 1916. The Advertiser has more detailed information about his career.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

Advertisements

Chater, William Thomas. Died 23rd Jan 1917

CHATER Thomas William
14788, 9th Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Thomas William Chater (known as Thomas) was born on 15th April 1896 and baptised at St Matthews Church, Rugby, on 24th February 1901.

His parents were Charles Chater and Sarah Jane (nee Batchelor) who were married 18th June 1893 at St.Matthews.

By 1901 the family had moved from Victoria Street, Bilton to 45 Pennington Street, Rugby and around 1913 the family moved to 7 Plowman Street Rugby. Charles Chater worked at the Gas Works.

Thomas was the second of six children and in 1911, at the age of 14 was working as an errand boy for a bookseller.

He enlisted early in the war in the 9th Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He missed most of the Gallipoli campaign arriving on 17th December 1915, shortly before the Division was evacuated to Mudros and then Egypt.

They embarked for Basra from Suez arriving 28th February 1916 to defend British interests against the Turks. In late April 1916, British commander Sir Thomas Townsend surrended the garrison of approx 10,000 men at Kut-al- Amara, considered by many to be the greatest humiliation ever to befall the British Army.

After reorganisation a new offensive against Kut was attempted. An attack was launched on the night of 13/14 December on both banks of the River Tigris. Around 50,000 men were involved in the advance.

Progress was slow and it was not until 17th February 1917 that the Turks retreated from Kut.

It would have been in this action that William Thomas was wounded. He died on 23rd January 1917 and was buried at Amara War Cemetery

On February 10th 1917 the Rugby Advertiser published, in the Local War Notes the following:

ANOTHER ST.MATTHEWS OLD BOY KILLED.
Information has come to hand that Pte T.Chater, 9th Royal Warwickshire Reg. was killed in action on January 24th. Pte Chater, whose home was at 7 Plowman St. was an old scholar of St.Matthews School, and enlisted early in the war.

Thomas is also listed on the family grave in Clifton Road Cemetery:

In Loving Memory Of
Pte WILLIAM T CHATER R W Regt killed in Mesopotamia Jan 23rd 1917 aged 21 years.
Also of Pte ARTHUR E CHATER M G C killed in France Oct 8th 1918 aged 20 years.
Also of JOSEPH G CHATER who died Nov 5th 1918 aged 17 years sons of CHARLES & SARAH CHATER.
Also of CHARLES husband of SARAH CHATER who died Oct 26th 1926 aged 56 years.

footstone: ILMO SARAH JANE beloved wife of CHARLES CHATER who died July 9th 1951 aged 78 years.

 RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

4th Nov 1916. St Matthews Old Boy’s Story of High Wood

ST MATTHEW’S OLD BOY’S STORY OF HIGH WOOD.

Rifleman R Coles, of the London Regiment (Post Office Rifles), in a letter to Mr R H Myers, headmaster of his old school, writes of his personal experiences of the fighting at High Wood :—

“ It was the first time the ‘ Tanks ‘ were used. I was never more surprised in my life than when I saw them coming down shell holes and over trenches, and rattling out their rations for the Huns. It was great and made one feel proud of England to think we had got something which the enemy had not. On this eventful morning we were all ‘ standing to,’ waiting for 6.00[?] to come, and on the minute the order was given, ‘0ver you go, lads,’ and we were soon over. We got through the wood all right, but at the edge the enemy gave up a very heavy curtain fire. It was awful, but we lost comparatively few, and on we went into the open. It was a grand sight to see all our boys advancing, just like one straight line, as far as you could see. Unfortunately, about 150 yards from the wood, I was shot right through the right foot and right wrist. For a few minutes I lay down, and then I got up to get my rifle and in doing so received another wound in my right thigh, so I had to get to a shell hole. After about four hours some of the boys carried me to one of the German trenches we had taken. I was all right there for a time till we had heavy shelling, and I got buried up to the ears—a sensation I never want again. When they dug me out I was a wreck, but some of my companions were dead when they got them out. It seemed impossible to get stretcher bearers, so I decided to try and crawl back, succeeded after over seven hours crawling. When I got to the dressing station it was 25 hours after being wounded ; but what a relief it was to get there and have my wounds attended to ! Then followed a weary journey on stretchers and motors and jolting on French hospital trains. I was glad to find myself at last at Bristol, and it does seem a treat to be back in dear Old England. Everyone in this hospital is so kind that it is just like being at home.”

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Lieut O H Buckingham, of the Leicestershire Regt. who was, before the war, on the staff of the B T.H. has been mentioned in despatches by Sir Percy Lake. Lieut Buckingham served in France before leaving for Egypt and the Persian Gulf, and he served under Gen. Sir Percy Lake’s Tigris Force in the Kut Relief Expedition. On January 7th at the battle of Sheikh Sa’ad he was severely wounded and sent to India, whence he was invalided home in September.

RUGBY POLICE OFFICER OBTAINS A COMMISSION.

P.C Victor Rollason, who at the outbreak of the war was a member of the local force, and was called up as belonging to the reserve of the East Lancashire Regt. has just been granted a commission in the 17th Manchester Regt.

PRISONERS OF WAR.

The names of fourteen men of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment who, after being notified as missing, are now reported as being prisoners of war, are included in the latest casualty lists. The following Rugby men are included : W F College, H McDonald, A Walker, F Nicholls (King’s Own Lancs) ; previously reported killed.

LOCAL CASUALTIES.

SERGT M O’BRIEN KILLED.

News has been received at the B.T.H Works that Sergt M O’Brien, of the Oxford and Bucks L.I, was killed in action about the 15th October, Sergt M O’Brien, who enlisted at the commencement of the war, was formerly employed in the Foundry Department.

 

BRETFORD.

SERGT C DASHWOOD.—The friends of Charlie Dashwood will be pleased to hear that he has now been promoted to Sergeant. He enlisted in the R.F.A at the outbreak of war, but has since volunteered for one of the Trench Mortar Batteries, in which he has obtained rapid promotion. His father volunteered when the South African War was on, and lost his life there.

VOLUNTEERS TO BE INSPECTED BY LORD FRENCH.

Field-Marshal Lord French is inspecting the five Warwickshire Battalions of Volunteers in Calthorp Park, Birmingham, on Sunday next. This is undoubtedly a historic event in the present Volunteer movement, and is in continuation of the numerous inspections which Lord French has been making for several weeks past. We understand the Rugby Corps, which forms the larger part of B Company of the 2nd Battalion is turning out in strength.

DISTRICT APPEALS TRIBUNAL.

Military appeals chiefly occupied the attention of this Tribunal at the sitting at St Mary’s Hall, Coventry, on Wednesday evening, when there were present : Messrs M K Pridmore (chairman), W Johnson, jun, P G Loveitt, and K Rotherham ; Military representative, Mr M E T Wratislaw.

The Coventry Military representative mentioned the case of a farm servant named Buckingham, of Combe Fields, it having been suggested that he should be used as a substitute.—Mr Wratislaw thought the man might go into the employ of Mr Corbishly, of Brandon, and an order was made that the man might be so used, it being left with the Military to decide whether the place was suitable or not.

On behalf of Thos Arthur Stephenson, woollen and cotton rag merchant, Newbold Road, Rugby, whose case had been postponed for him to find work of national importance, Mr Harold Baden said the man was to present himself on the following day at the Daimler Works, Coventry—Adjourned for 14 days.

An appeal was made on behalf of Alfred William Elsley (35, married), 70 King Edward Road, Rugby, a manager of grocery stores in Sheep Street.—Mr Wratislaw said the man was in charge of a branch shop, and simply ordered his goods through the head office.—Given to December 31st, to carry him over Christmas time, with the intimation that he would have to be ready then.

Percy John Allen (30, married), boot maker, 131 Cambridge Street, who had been given to October 31, again appealed, mainly on the grounds of domestic hardship.—Mr Wratislaw did not think there was any hardship worse than in many other cases.—Appeal dismissed, the Military to allow 28 days.

Pleading that the man would be responsible to the landlord for the rent of the farm next March, and had a large amount of capital invested in stock, Mr Harold Eaden asked for conditional exemption for Fred Green (26, married), Castle Farm, Woolscott.—As he would not be called up till January 1st, the Tribunal unanimously agreed to dismiss the appeal.

Temporary exemptions granted to two members of Messrs Foster & Dicksee’s staff were appealed against by the Military. They concerned Herbert Watson, 20 Arnold Street, and James Henry Pennington, 54 Lawford Road, both of whom were married men and had been passed for service abroad. Mr Watson, who is acting secretary to the Company, put in a written appeal from the firm, stating that the business would be greatly dislocated by his loss as a cost clerk.—Mr Harold Baden represented Mr Pennington, who, he said had been with the firm 22 years, had two children, and heavy financial liabilities. He had also an appointment to present himself this week at H.M Factory at Queen’s Ferry, with respect to taking a post there.—The Chairman pointed out that Mr Watson was an attested man, and the Tribunal thought, therefore, that they must leave him. The Military appeal in this case was dismissed.—In the other case it was allowed.

In regard to Fredk Foster (26), coal carter, Barby, in the employ of the Rugby Coal and Coke Co, the amount of wages paid (25s weekly) evidently weighed with the Tribunal in their decision to uphold the Military appeal against a temporary exemption till November 15th.—Mr Wratislaw said another employee had left and gone to the Co-operative Society, where he received 30s weekly, and 2s war bonus.—Mr Brereton, who represented the Company, produced a copy of a futile advertisement for another man.—The Chairman : We are unanimous that a man earning 25s a week cannot be indispensable, and we allow the appeal. We give you 28 days.

Exception was also taken by the Military to the temporary exemption granted to Percy Leeson (25, single), 48 Chapel Street, Rugby, engaged chiefly in the delivery of parcels for Messrs Sutton & Co.—Mr Wratislaw said they sent as a substitute a reliable man on October 6th, and he was told they did not require him.—Mrs Lesson, mother of appellant, said she fully explained to the man who came the nature of the business, and he said he would not think of taking such a responsible post.—Mr Wratislaw : He came back to the recruiting officer and said you told him you didn’t require anyone.—The Military appeal was allowed, but 28 days was given, and Mr Wratislaw promised that the same substitute should be sent again, or they would try and find another.

Exemption to January 1st had been granted to Thos Wm Durham, carter and horsekeeper (30, married), 13 Campbell Street, New Bilton, on the ground that his occupation was principally that of carting flour from Rugby Station to bakers, and also the carting of hay, oats, etc, to the remount departments.-The Military had appealed, and Mr Wratislaw said almost next door was a carter named Lowe who had been sent into the army, and it was not fair that one should be taken and anotherbleft.—Mr Worthington said lest month Mr Durham carted 293 tons of flour, and the carting for the remounts was 24 tons a month.—On Mr Wratislaw offering to find a substitute, the case was adjourned for 14 days.

Thos Mm Alfred Arnold, firewood and hardware dealer, 54 Avenue Road, New Bilton, appealed, through Mr Harold Eaden, for the temporary exemption granted by the Local Tribunal to be confirmed, but that it might be varied so as not to be made final.—In this case a munition order, subject to the approval of the substitution officer at Rugby, was granted.

S Mackaness, Cestersover, appealed on behalf of his son, Chas Henry Mackaness (19, single), described as a shepherd, on a farm of 940 acres, of which 130 were arable. In reply to Mr Wratislaw, appellant said he had four sons, neither of whom was in the army.—The Chairman : You will get to the 1st of January. We shall dismiss the appeal.

ABSENTEE.—At the Rugby Police Court on Monday, before J. E. Cox, Esq, Ellis John Hewitt, of Dunchurch Road, Rugby, pleaded guilty to being an absentee from the R.W.R, and was remanded to await an escort.

THE GLOVE WAISTCOAT SOCIETY.

DEAR SIR,-This Society is a company of ladies who make wind-proof waistcoat linings for our soldiers and sailors out of old gloves. Some friends in it have asked me to find out if Rugby will help them with old gloves of any kind of skin or fur ; woollen gloves are not used. Any such gloves, so long as there is a square inch of sound skin in them, will be gratefully received at 10 Moultrie Rood, or at Mr S Overs, 19 High Street, and will be sent to the Society and promptly used.—Yours faithfully, W H PAYNE-SMITH.

DEATHS.

DYKE.—Killed in action in France, on October 12th, 1916, CORPL. OTHELLO DYKE, Royal Warwickshire Regiment, the dearly beloved brother of Mona Barrett, of Bilton Grange, aged 34.

HOWES.—The beloved wife of Pte. J. C. Howes, died suddenly, October 20th, 1916, aged 26 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

PARKER.—In loving memory of EDWARD JOSEPH, the beloved son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Parker, of Dunchurch, died of wounds received in action on November 3rd, 1914.
— Not forgotten by Father, Mother, Brothers, and Sisters.-“ At Rest.”

Batchelor, Ernest Andrew. Died 24th Oct 1916

Ernest Andrew Batchelor was born in 1887 and baptised in October 1887 at St Andrews Church in Rugby.

At the time he lived at 13 Chapel Street Rugby. He was the son of Andrew Batchelor who was born in 1855 in Rugby and died in 1931 in Rugby, and Elizabeth Batchelor (nee Quinney) born 1856 and died 1938 in Rugby. Andrew Batchelor was a labourer.

In 1891 the family still lived at 13 Chapel Street, and Ernest lived there with his parents and his sisters Lucy and Frances and brothers William, Albert and Arthur.

In 1901 the family had moved to 2 Little Elborow Street and he now had two more brothers Walter and Frank and two more sisters Ethel and Fanny. Later his parents moved to 35 Worcester Street. He attended St Matthews School in Rugby and later worked at a firm in Birmingham.

Ernest enlisted in the First World War at Birmingham and served as Private No 18519 in the 10th Battalion of the Worcestershire Regiment. The 10th Battalion was formed in Worcester in September 1914 as K2 and came under the orders of the 57th Brigade in the 19th `Western Division. They landed in France on 18th July 1915

He enlisted originally on 26th August 1907 but discharged due to sickness on 30th December 1914. He later rejoined the Regiment and served in France & Flanders. During 1916 the Regiment fought in various battles, the Battle of Albert, the attacks of High Wood, the Battle of Pozieres Ridge and the Battle of Ancre Heights. Ernest died on 24tlr October 1916 in the Battle of Morval during the Battle of the Somme, and his body was not recovered. He is commemorated on Pier & Face 5A and 6C of Thiepval Memorial.

An officer of the Regiment wrote to Ernest’s parents that – “He was one of our best bombers, and always cheerful and good-hearted”.

At least three of his brothers enlisted to fight in the First World War. Frank Batchelor, born 1893, enlisted in 1911 in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment and served in the war from 4th October 1914 and discharged 6th February 1920. During 1911 two other brothers, Arthur Batchelor and Walter Batchelor enlisted in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HM

Bale, James William. Died 22nd Jun 1916

James William Bale was born in Rugby in 1891 to James and Emily (nee Payne). He was baptised at St Matthews Church on 22nd Feb. He was the 3rd of at least 5 children. The family lived at 1 Lagoe Place, but later moved to no. 9. He attended St Matthews school and when he left in 1904 he held a prominent place in the school sports

James joined the 2nd Bn., Royal Welsh Fusiliers (service no. 9339) in about 1907 and at the time of the 1911 census was based at Quetta, India. The regiment was transferred to France when war broke out. By the time of his death he had been “mentioned in despatches” and promoted to the rank of sergeant for bravery in the field.

In March 1916 he was awarded a DCM with the following citation:
“For conspicuous gallantry. When on patrol his officer was wounded. Corporal Bale at once sent his patrol in, went back, and brought his officer under fire which was directed at him. This is the second time he has rescued his officer on patrol.”

It was publicly presented to him in Rugby, when he was home on leave a few weeks before his death.

On 22nd June 1916, 2nd Bn, RWF were serving in the trenches near Givenchy, Pas de Calais, when the Germans exploded a large mine destroying 80 yards of the line. This was followed by an hour long bombardment. There were about 100 casualties. James William Bale was one of them.

He is buried in the Gorre British and Indian Cemetery in France.

 

RUGBY REMEMBERS HIM

17th Jun 1916. The Postponed Bank Holiday

THE POSTPONED BANK HOLIDAY.

The suspension, by Royal Proclamation Whit-Monday as a Bank Holiday to avoid any interruption in the supply of munitions of war was patriotically observed by the public. The sacrifice of outdoor pleasure could not be regarded as serious, as the weather was cold and wet. In conformity with the wishes of the Government there were no holiday facilities on the railways. The weather on Sunday and Monday was characterised by cold winds and rain, which made fires in the house necessary and acceptable. The temperature was about 18 or 20 degrees below the proper level for the date. Such a Whit-Monday has not been experienced since 1891, when snow fell and the thermometer stood at 42 degrees at noon. But that was in May, nearly a month earlier in the season, so that allowing for the difference in time Monday was relatively colder, and it is not surprising that recourse was had to overcoats, furs, and fires—ten days from midsummer ! The bitter conditions affected all the eastern counties, the coast in particular being exceedingly cold, while the west and north were a little better.

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

News has been received by Mrs Watts, Benn Street, Rugby, that her husband, Sergt E Watts, of the 6th Oxon and Bucks L.I, has been wounded in France, and is now in hospital at Bradford.

Lieutenant the Hon Henry S Feilding has been transferred from K.E Horse Special Reserve to the Machine Gun Corps.

Lieut J A Maddocks, son of Mr Henry Maddocks, barrister-at-law, has been killed in action. He was in his twentieth year, and the oldest of six sons. He was educated at Oakfield, Rugby, and also at University College, London.

Miss Dora McLelland, who was trained at the Hospital of St Cross, Rugby—and is still on the staff—has been mentioned in the Birthday Honours for Nurses, first-class Royal Red Cross decoration. Miss McLelland is at present working in the Territorial Force Nursing Service.

R V Wilson (Old Laurentian), son of Mr J G Wilson, York Street, Rugby, has joined the H.A.C Infantry Division. The Old Laurentians have supplied a great many members to this distinguished Company.

The relatives of W H Brain have now received official news from the Admiralty, stating that he was drowned when his ship—the “ Indefatigable ” — was lost in the North Sea Battle.

ST MATTHEW’S BOY IN THE SEA FIGHT.

Mr R H Myers, headmaster of St Matthew’s Boys’ School, has received the following interesting letter from an “ old boy,” P.O Telegraphist E W Penney:—

“ I thought you would like to know that I managed to come safely through our recent battle without a scratch, being luckier than I was at the ‘ Dogger Bank,’ though that was only a picnic compared with the Jutland Battle. As usual, we were in the thick of the fight, which is only natural, seeing that we fly the flag of Vice-Admiral Sir David Beatty and are flagship of the Battle Cruiser Fleet. It is a great pity we did not meet the enemy earlier in the day. Had we done so, I am certain there would have been annihilation for the High Seas Fleet ; but, of course, it is only a pleasure deferred. I can state with confidence that, although our losses were rather heavy, the German losses were much heavier in both material and men, but, unlike us, do not publish the whole of their losses, though we know them just the same. They were very brave at first, when they thought that our Battle Cruiser Squadron was alone, but immediately the Grand Fleet hove in sight they made of at full speed. It was a wretched day, the average visibility being only about 5,000 to 6,000 yards, so, aided by the darkness and mist, they escaped—but they had a good hammering first. All we ask now is to meet them a little further out, as this time they were on top of their own shores. I lost many friends in the ‘ Queen Mary ’ and other ships, but I have the satisfaction to know that they upheld the glorious traditions handed down to us by our ancestors.

“ I have had some rather unique experiences during the War. Some time ago I was fortunate to have a trip to Flanders with a party from the Grand Fleet. I spent four days in the first line trenches at ——,and afterwards we had a tour of the batteries, and spent some hours looking round Ypres, which is a sight never to be forgotten. Our trenches were pretty close to the Germans, so I was able to throw over a few souvenirs in the shape of bombs ; and, of course, the compliment was returned. I did not see any Rugby men out there, but I must say all the troops were very cheerful, and they wondered who we were, as we dressed in khaki, but kept our cap ribbons on.

“ All good wishes to the boys of the old school, past and present.”

ANOTHER EMPLOYEE OF MESSRS FROSTS KILLED.

News has been received that Rifleman A Pullen, of the Machine Gun Section, Rifle Brigade, has been killed in Francs during the taking of a German mine crater. Rifleman Pullen, who enlisted in September, 1914, and was drafted to the Front in July, 1915, was employed by Messrs Frost as a compositor before the War, and lodged at 117 Oxford Street. He is the eight employee of the firm to be killed in the War. A fellow-employee, Rifleman Negus, was killed at the same gun some time ago. Rifleman J Pyne (R.B), an employee of Messrs Frost & Son, is now in the London General Hospital suffering from a wound in the shoulder. He is making good progress.

THURLASTON.

PROMOTION.—Corpl C Hedgcock, son of Mrs Hedgcock, of Thurlaston, has been promoted to the rank of sergeant.

SOUTH KILWORTH.

Mr J Pickering has received the sad news that his son, W J Pickering, had perished on H.M.S. Defence at the naval battle on May 31st. A memorial service was held in the Parish Church on Sunday afternoon and a very large congregation assembled. Special Psalms and hymns were sung by the choir, of which he was a member. The Rector (the Rev R M Bryant) delivered a most impressive and touching address.

STOCKTON.

ROLL OF HONOUR.—Mr and Mrs W Maskell have this week been notified that their son George was killed when in action in France on May 30.

WOMEN’S WORK ON THE LAND.

A meeting to consider the question of the employment of women on the land was held at the Benn Buildings on Wednesday afternoon. There was a good attendance of ladies, over whom Dr A A David presided, supported by Miss Craig and Miss Day.

The Chairman said there were three difficulties before them in this matter of work upon farms. In the first place, he had found that a rather absurd difficulty had been encountered in the objection on the part of certain ladies to the work as degrading and beneath their dignity. He did not suppose there was anyone present who would sympathise with that opinion, but still there was the difficulty to be faced, although they could rise above it, and they must strive by precept, and more particularly by example, to oppose this absurd notion. The second difficulty was the farmer. The farmer had been abused a good deal lately, and they most not be offended with them if they did not display the enthusiasm some of them might be expected to show at the idea of having women to work for them. The third difficulty was that of organisation. It was obvious that if a number of people continued to get some big thing done, there must be a certain amount of machinery to give them the opportunity for combined effort. This had been solved by the network of organisations all over the country, and which in their county was represented by the Warwickshire War Agricultural Committee. Rugby was represented on that committee by a lady to whom the town owed a great debt of gratitude for the work she had already done, and to whom they would owe a greater debt before this task was over—Miss Whitelaw. A few weeks ago, when they decided at the School to allow boys to go out in squads to help the farmers as they did last year, he wrote to Miss Whitelaw, and pointed out that he was anxious not to get in the way of any organisation for similar employment of women, and the boys were quite willing to stand aside if necessary. Up to the present they had had more applications than they could possibly meet. They would try to arrange with some of the farmers to employ women, even if it came to the point of refusing to let the boys go to a village until the women were fully employed. Whatever they might do, he promised not to stand in the way of the employment of women labour. This call upon women was very clear and urgent, and he was very much impressed by hearing from the farmers of the fearful progress which the weeds were making. He hoped that as the result of that meeting some organisation would be brought nearer, if it was not finally decided upon. There was a considerable danger of a thing like that being taken up warmly at first, and then the people getting tired of it, but, he pointed out, that in this case the work must be kept up until the end of the harvest.

Miss Craig then addressed the gathering on the vital importance of the food supply to the nation. They had been depending too largely upon other countries for their food supply, and the farmers were now being asked to produce more, and not less, food. This was very difficult, owing to the large number of men who were being called to the colours. The land was the nation’s source of wealth, and if it failed to produce to its utmost capacity, it would mean a tremendous increase in the price of food to the well-to-do, and to the poor it would mean poverty and privation such as they had never experienced, and such as they could hardly comprehend. This was the opportunity for women to show their value to the nation. There was only one way for England to be beaten by the Germans. It was not the loss of men, because they had been told that they would fight to the last man ; it was not the loss of money, because they would fight to the last shilling ; but if their ships failed to bring in the supplies, and if the work of the farmers did not go on, if the food fell off, then indeed would their men at the front feel that they had done their bit in vain, and that alone would make them feel they could lay down their arms, having been unsuccessful.

Miss Day alluded to the fact that Lord Selborne, President of the Board of Agriculture, had asked for   400,000 women to help in the food production of the country, and there were several classes whom she thought might assist. First, there were the women who were receiving separation allowances ; they were costing the country about £30,000,000 a year ; she did not begrudge them their money, and she would be the last to suggest that the men should go away and leave their wives in want ; but if they were getting that from the nation it was their duty to do something for the nation, and she thought they could rightly demand their services (applause). They also wanted women from the towns to go out and live in the country and work on the farms regularly, not only at harvest time, but all through the year. If she could get 100 whole-time workers from Rugby she would be able to get them placed with farmers within about a week. They also desired women to undergo a course of training, either on the farms or in colleges for agricultural work, and also to obtain gangs of cyclist workers who could go out one day in each week and work for a farmer under the care of a skilled forewoman. To make this a success, they would desire six ladies to make themselves responsible for a gang one day in each week. Referring to the difficulty mentioned by the Chairman, the fact that some women thought the work was degrading, Miss Day said this could be overcome by women of education coming forward and giving a lead. This would show that whatever work was to be undertaken, provided that it was done to the best their power, was work worth doing.

Several interesting questions were asked and answered and farmers requiring workers, and women desirous of helping, were referred to Miss Whitelaw.

PRISONERS OF WAR HELP COMMITTEE.

A meeting of the Executive of the Rugby Prisoner of War Help Committee was held at the Rectory on Saturday. Mr Wm Flint, C.C, presided.

The Hon Secretary (Mr J Reginald Barker) reported that the receipts to date amounted to £472 10s 4d, the expenditure was £314 17s 1d, leaving a balance in hand of £158 2s 3d.

Mr Barker also stated that he had completed arrangements for despatching a 4lb loaf of “ Dujon ” bread to each prisoner every week. The prisoners of war spoke very highly of this broad, and letters received showed that it arrived in excellent condition. The cost of each loaf, including packing, was 1s.

In view of the fact that the committee were now looking after the welfare of 51 men from Rugby and the surrounding villages, and that the cost of the weekly parcels of food and the special parcels of bread was about £13 per week, the Executive Committee discussed various suggestions for raising funds to ensure a continuance of the weekly parcels.

Mrs Blagden, who is in charge of the parcels sub-committee, said the parcels contained food in accordance with the instructions received from London. The supplies included butter or margarine, sugar, tea, condensed milk, cafe au lait, jam or syrup, bacon or corned beef, shredded wheat or force, soup squares, sardines or herrings, and occasionally cigarettes or tobacco.

Other items were included from time to time, such as tooth-powder and brushes, shirts, socks and under-clothing, and at the special request of a prisoner of war boots were sent.

DEATHS.

DEANE.—Killed in action on June 3rd Edmund Bonar (1st Canadian Division), eldest son of Rev. C. H. Deane, M. A., 46 Church Street, Rugby (formerly Vicar of Willoughby).

GOUGH.-James Clecton Gough, 11th Royal Warwickshire Regiment killed by a shell in France, June 2nd, aged 30 years.

IN MEMORIAM.

GREER.—In loving memory of Pte. Robert Greer, 1st Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, who was killed in action at Gallipoli, June 18, 1915.—Dearly loved and mourned by all at 12 Argyle Street, Rugby.

HANCOX.—In loving memory of our dear and only son and brother, Charles Hancox, Stretton-on-Dunsmore, who died of wounds received in action June 20, 1915.

“ One year has passed, our hearts still sore,
Day by day we miss him more ;
His welcome smile, his dear, sweet face,
Never on earth can we replace.
We often sit and think of him,
And think of how he died ;
To think he could not say “ Good-bye ”
Before he closed his eyes.”
Deeply mourned by his loving MOTHER, FATHER and SISTERS.

HUGHES.—In loving memory of our son Jack, killed in France, 18th June, 1915.

“ He sleeps not in his native land,
But neath some foreign skies ;
And far from those who loved him best,
In a hero’s grave he lies.”
—From his loving MOTHER and FATHER.

 

27th Nov 1915. Local War Notes

LOCAL WAR NOTES.

Earl Poulett is gazetted a temporal captain in the Warwickshire R.H.A (T.F).

Mr Harold Eaden, solicitor, Rugby, has enlisted in his group under Lord Derby’s scheme.

Armourer-Staff-Sergeant F H Dodson, 7th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, writing to Mr T A Wise from the front, says : “ The other day there were three of us together out here, and the sum total of our years’ service was 100 years.”

Lance-Corpl N H Priday and Pte F Foss, of the 1/7 Royal Warwickshire Regiment, have been nominated to commissions, the former in the West Yorks (the Prince of Wales’ Own) and the latter in the East Yorks Regiment.

Mr W J Penn, son of Mr W Penn, farmer, of Wootton, has been gazetted second-lieutenant in the 12th Battalion Welsh Regiment, Nov 3rd. He is an old Northampton and County School boy , and of St John’s College, London. He has been Headmaster and Scoutmaster of Norton, near Daventry.

Sergt W C D Miles, son of Mr and Mrs Miles, of Catthorpe, has received a commission in the Westminster Dragoons. He is son-in-law to Mr and Mrs T C Thompson, of Murray Road, Rugby, and was a draughtsman on the Willesdon staff of the B.T.H Company when he enlisted, soon after war broke out. Previous to this, Lieut Miles was in the Drawing Office at the B.T.H at Rugby.

“ BUCK THE SLACKERS UP!”

Bandsman B Wilkins, of the Rifle Brigade, writing to a friend in Rugby on November 17th, says : “ I have seen the Rugby papers this week and I see the recruiting is getting better. That is what I like to see. England will need all she has got, so just buck the slackers up, and tell them the more men we can get, the better and easier they are making it for their comrades who are doing their bit out here. Nobody knows what Tommy’s troubles are till he gets out here and tries a bit ; so you see, the sooner we can get the men, the sooner we shall try and bring these terrible times to an end. Now, buck up, Rugby, and try and win back the men you have lost.”

PTE H DYER, OF DUNSMORE, KILLED.

News has been received at Dunsmore that Pte Henry E Dyer, who left his employment in the gardens at Dunsmore House to enlist in the 10th R.W.R last December, has died in Reading Hospital from wounds received at the Front. Pte Dyer, who was a native of Gloucestershire, and was 24 years of age, was wounded in the head and groin by a bomb while in a trench in France on September 6th, and succumbed to his injuries ten days afterwards. He had been at the front about two months when he received his fatal injuries. Pte Dyer had worked at Dunsmore Gardens for nearly a year before enlisting.

MURRAY SCHOOL NOTES.

Pte A S Horswell, a former member of the Murray School Staff, writing to Mr W T Coles Hodges from a “ dug out ” in the Mediterranean theatre,says : “We landed on August 9th, just three weeks after leaving England, and proceeded straight to the firing line under shrapnel fire, We saw life for four days. Talk about snipers ! They were up in the trees, absolutely surrounding us ; they were the chief cause of the casualties. Fortunately they were more or less indifferent shots, otherwise we should have come off worse than we did. Since then we have had various trips to the firing line, interspersed with spasms of “ fatigue ” work, unloading lighters, filling water-cans for the firing line, and digging. We see some glorious sunsets out here at times ; also some very fine play of light on various islands. I myself never believed the deep blue sea theory till we came out hero. In the Mediterranean you get a lovely ultra-marine in the day, which gradually darkens to deep indigo in the evening.”

Pte H F Baker, R.A.M.C, has been invalided home from the Dardanelles, and is now in hospital at Brighton. Amongst other things in a very interesting letter to his old headmaster, Mr Hodges, he describes the passing of the Rock of Gibraltar on the way home, and says : “ The top of the rock was hid from view by great white clouds. The peaks on the mainland were gilded under the sun’s rays, making a fine contrast.” He mentions that he met Arthur Webb, Lower Hillmorton Road, at Mudros, and adds that he looked very well.

Two members of the Murray School Staff have enlisted-Mr J H Fazakerley in the R.A.M.C, under Lord Derby’s scheme, and Mr A L Westbury in the R.E at Chatham, to which place he proceeded on Tuesday last.

LETTER FROM OLD ST MATTHEW’S BOY.

WHY SO MANY MEN ARE MISSING.

Lance-Corpl Harold Thompson, 6th Oxford & Bucks L.I., well-known in Rugby for his swimming prowess, an “ Old Boy” of St Matthew’s, writes to Mr R H Myers, the headmaster :—

“ We had the heaviest shelling from the Germans last week, but luckily our casualty list was all right, although the parapets were badly knocked about in places. We were just over a hundred yards from the German lines, so you can imagine that we were not over-anxious to look over the top during the day, for their snipers are very hot shots. It is very quiet all along our front now, and one would hardly think that a big engagement had taken place so recently as Sept 25th. The only remaining indications of a fight are the dead bodies between the lines, and these have to stop there, as it is so dangerous to go out to find the names, and that is what makes the missing list so great. We have sent out patrols nearly every night to find out any details about the bodies, but it is very difficult work and not very pleasant. One fellow went out and, losing his way, nearly walked into the German lines. They opened fire on him, but he happened to drop into a shell hole, and there he had to stop until the early hours of the morning, when the firing dropped off.

We happened to be in the firing on September 25th, and quite expected to go over the top, but our luck was out, and we had to cool our heels and wait, in case the Huns counter-attacked, but we were also disappointed in that. The bombardment previous to the attack was terrible. We could only see the German lines for five minutes after the guns started, but in that short time we could gather some idea of the destruction our guns were causing. About an hour before the attack started, it began to rain, and when the first soldier went over the parapet the ground was like a bog, but that did not prevent our fellows from charging impetuously. Since then it has developed into an artillery duel again. The French are still bombarding very heavily, and at night the sky is lit up all the time by the clash of the guns.

It is awful to see all the towns and villages destroyed as we move about to different parts of the line. The Huns seem to make a special mark of churches, and these is hardly a church round here that has not been damaged. The trenches are in a pretty bad condition. In places the mud and water are waist-deep. . . Please remember all the St Matthew’s “ Old Boy ” here to the teachers and pupils of the School.”

DISTINGUISHED CONDUCT MEDAL.

Sergt Vernon S Robinson, of the 2nd Battalion Wiltshire Regiment, has been awarded the “ for conspicuous gallantry on the 25th September, 1915, near Vermelles. when he advanced by a communication trench leading from a trench just captured to one held by the enemy, with bombs, thus making certain that the trench was dear before is was blocked. On the 27th September he crossed several hundred yards of open country under heavy rifle fire and machine-gun fire to fetch bombs, which were urgently needed, and succeeded in bringing them to the point where they were required. In doing this Sergeant Robinson’s rifle, owing to the heavy fire, was smashed and rendered useless.”

Sergt Robinson, who is only 20 years of age, is a grandson of Mrs Robinson, 50 Manor Road, Rugby, and nephew of Mrs Lewis, 74 Manor Road. He came to Rugby six years ago, and was employed as an engine cleaner on the L & N.W.R. He was in the Special Reserve of the Royal Warwicks, and was undergoing his annual training in the Isle of Wight when the war broke out. He transferred to the Wiltshires, and went out to France in May last. He was promoted to the rank of Sergeant on the field, and has also received the French Military Medal.

THE ARMY’S WINTER KIT.

WARMER CLOTHES FOR THE KILTED TROOPS.

The coming of winter has found the War Office Department whose duty it is to clothe the Army fully prepared with supplies of warm clothing for the protection of the troops against the rigours of winter warfare. The following is a list of the apparel provided by the military authorities for each soldier at the front :-

Winter service cap.
Waterproof cover for cap.
Cap comforter.
Body belt.
Woollen vest and drawers.
Shirt.
Cardigan waistcoat.
Tunic and trousers.
Fur or leather (flannel lined) jacket.
Great-coat.
Waterproof cape.
Fingerless gloves.
Woollen gloves.
Socks, puttees, and boots.

In addition, gum boots reaching to the top of the thigh are provided for men actually in the trenches. The special needs of the kilted regiments have not been overlooked, and auxiliary warm clothing is provided for them.

The authorized scale of equipment, we are informed, allows two shirts and four pairs of socks for each man. From time to time complaints reach this country that men in this or that battalion are in want of socks and shirts ; and appeals for these articles or money for purchasing them are advertised. It is stated on good authority that there is no real necessity for such appeals, as ample Government supplies are available to meet all demands made through the proper channels. Mufflers and mittens, however, are not a “ Government supply,” and the making, purchase, and collection of them is a field in which the generosity and industry of the public will be warmly welcomed.

RUGBY TERRITORIALS COMFORTS’ COMMITTEE.

DEAR SIR,—May I make a final appeal before Christmas for donations, and gifts of socks, mufflers, mittens, groceries, plum puddings, etc, for our local Territorials, appealing especially to the subscribers and old members of the Rugby E Company, 7th Warwicks

We have received very generous contributions from supporters of the Howitzer Brigade, but very few from supporters of E Company.

The weather in France is now very bad and the cold intense, in addition to which men have to walk or stand about in 18 inches of mud and water ; this is confirmed by a commanding officer on leave this week.

We hope to send every man from Rugby a Christmas parcel of groceries, etc, and a warm Christmas present, but this cannot be done without better support from the friends of the units.

If every subscriber and old member of each unit would help, we could do much to help our gallant Territorials spend a happy Christmas.—Yours faithfully.

A. W. ADNITT.

2 Regent St, Rugby.

RECRUITING AT RUGBY.

Recruiting has not been quite so good at Rugby during the past week, either for immediate service or under Lord Derby’s Group Scheme [See next post]. The following have enlisted for immediate service with the Colours :—

KING’S ROYAL RIFLES.
H G King, 34 Campbell Street, New Bilton.
A Widdows, Heythorp, Oxon.
John Papworth, Clifton-on-Dunsmore.
A H Harwood, 24 Gas Street, Rugby.

ROYAL WARWICK REGIMENT.
T W Barrett, High Street, Hillmorton.
G Clarke, 42 Bath Street, Rugby.
W H Benjamin, Rowland Street, Rugby.
T Whiteman, 16 Winfield Street, Rugby.
Frank Boswell, Brook Street, Fenny Compton.
Geo Bradshaw, Hillmorton Wharf, Rugby.
W T Jeffs, Smith’s Lodging House, Gas St, Rugby.

3rd/7th WARWICKSHIRE REGT.
T Greasley, 108 Wood Street, Rugby.
H Moore, 47 Sandown Road, Rugby.

COLDSTREAM GUARDS.
A E Randall, 58 Manor Road, Rugby.

ROYAL ENGINEERS.
S Reader, Barrack Hill, Ravensthorpe, Northants.
S L Webb, Lawrence Sheriffe Cottages, Brownsover.

R.F.A.
Harry Hobley, Stretton-under-Fosse, Rugby.

NORTHANTS REGIMENT.
W T Cox, Ashby St Ledgers, Northants.

OXON & BUCK L.I.
G Spittle, Thurlaston, Rugby.

A. S. Corps.
John Robertson, 73 Heavy Tree Rd, Plumstead.
Geo Atkins, 70 Church End, Evers Holt, Woburn, Beds.

GRENADIER GUARDS.
P Gibbins, Willoughby, Rugby.

ARGYLE & SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS.
J Gurden, 22 Sandown Road, Rugby.

DRIVER, R.E.
E Brown, Melton Mowbray.

LIVERPOOL REGIMENT.
J Wilson, 68 Nelson Road, Paisley.